Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 221

GMU

STUDENT
HANDBOOK
A Y 2013 - 2014

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
INTEGRATED MBBS PROGRAM

www.gmu.ac.ae

C O N T E N TS
Introduction

GMU Vision & Mission Statement

From the Presidents Desk

10

Message from the Provost

11

Message from the Dean, College of Medicine

12

About the Student Handbook

13

1.0

Academic Calendar

15

2.0

University Divisions & Academic Programs

18

3.0

License & Recognition

20

4.0

The Campus

22

5.0

Location Map

24

6.0

Undergraduate Admission Policies & Procedures

26

6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7

Policy Statement
Undergraduate Admission Requirements
Admission Process
Documents Required for Admission
Transfer Admissions Policy and Procedures
Transfer within GMU
Re-admission

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

3|P a g e

7.0

Student Services
7.1

Office of Student Affairs

7.2

Counseling Services
7.2.1 Student Counseling Policy
7.2.2 Academic Counseling Policy
7.2.3 Personal Counseling
7.2.4 Student Activities Policy

7.3

GMU Undergraduate Student Council


7.3.1 Student Council Executive Board
7.3.2 Student Publications
7.3.3 Student Behavior

7.4

Student Academic Services


7.4.1 The Deans Office
7.4.2 Office of Student Affairs
7.4.3 Career Service Office
7.4.3.1 Career Service Policy
7.4.4 Financial Aid Office

7.5

Health Services
7.5.1 Health Services Policy

7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
7.11
7.12
7.13
7.14

Third Party Liability (TPL) Insurance


Student Records Policy
Information Release Policy
Plagiarism and Copyright Policy
Dress Code
Dining Services
Recreational Facilities
Student Support Services
GMU Physical Facilities
7.14.1 Lecture Halls
7.14.2 GMU Testing Center
7.14.3 Common Rooms & Lockers
7.14.4 Masjid
7.14.5 Mail Box
7.14.6 GMU Hostel

7.15
7.16
7.17
7.18
7.19
7.20
7.21

Transportation
Telephone
Classroom & Laboratory Protocol
Student Identification
University Entrance
Car Parking in the Campus
Information on Safety Issues

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

32

4|P a g e

8.0

9.0

Students Rights & Responsibilities

58

8.1

Student Rights
8.1.1 Rights in the Pursuit of Education
8.1.2 Right to access Records and Facilities
8.1.3 Right to Freedom of Association, Expression, Advocacy & Publication
8.1.4 Right to contribute to University Governance and Curriculum

8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6

Students Responsibilities
GMU Honor Code
Salient Features of the Honor Code
Breach of Honor Code
Effects of Committing an Honor Offence

University Resources and Services


9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4

Introduction
Vision
Mission
Library
9.4.1 Timings
9.4.2 Library Resources
9.4.3 Library Orientation
9.4.4 Audio Visuals
9.4.5 Scanning and Printing
9.4.6 Photocopy
9.4.7 Journal Article Request Service
9.4.8 Cataloguing
9.4.9 Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC)
9.4.10 Security Gates

9.5
9.6
9.7
9.8
9.9
9.10
9.11
9.12
9.13
9.14
9.15
9.16
9.17
9.18

Library Policy and Procedures


Library Rules & Regulations
Circulation Policy and Procedures
Multimedia Labs
Network Infrastructure
Wi-Fi Network
Online Resources
Servers & Supports
IT Training
Internet Services
Technology Support for Learning
IT Support Team
User accesses and Security
E-Learning at GMU

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

62

5|P a ge

10.0

GMC Hospital & Research Center (GMCH & RC)


10.1
10.2
10.3

11.0

75

Student Finance Policy


Tuition Fees
Hostel Fees
Utilities Service Fees
Registration Fees
Examination Fees
Visa Charges
Caution Deposit
Fees for Other Services
Transportation Fees
Payment of Fees
Late Fees and Fines
Financial Aid and Scholarships
Refund of Fees
Revision of Tuition and Other Fees

Academic Policies
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
12.5

13.0

Vision
Mission
Clinical Departments & Services
10.3.1 Dos
10.3.2 Donts
10.3.3 Violation Warning

Student Finance
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
11.7
11.8
11.9
11.10
11.11
11.12
11.13
11.14
11.15

12.0

71

80

Program Completion Policy


Academic Progress Policy
Grading, Assessment and Progression Policy
Online Examination (Exam Soft)
International Foundations of Medicine (IFOM) I & II Examinations

Misconduct & Disciplinary Procedures

85

13.1

Student Misconduct & Disciplinary Procedures


13.1.1 Academic Misconduct
13.1.2 Personal Misconduct
13.1.2.1 Personal Misconduct on University Premises
13.1.2.2 Personal Misconduct Outside University Premises

13.2

Students Rights and Responsibilities


13.2.1 Student Rights and Responsibilities Policy
13.2.2 Rights in the Pursuit of Education

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

6|P a ge

13.2.3
13.2.4
13.2.5
13.2.6

14.0

Right to Access Records and Facilities


Right to Freedom of Association, Expression, Advocacy & Publication
Right to Contribute to University Governance and Curriculum
Students Responsibilities

The Integrated MBBS Program


14.1
14.2
14.3
14.4
14.5
14.6
14.7
14.8
14.9

95

Goals
Intended Program Learning Outcomes
MBBS Program Structure
Plan of Study
Course Descriptions
Clinical Training Sites
Course Outline
Typical Week
PBL Week

15.0 List of Text Books, Reference Books, Recommended Readings

180

15.0

Grading, Assessment & Progression Policies

193

16.0

Deans List of Toppers

202

17.0

Administrators & Faculty

203

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

7|P a ge

Introduction
MBBS Student handbook is meant to provide information and guidelines on the various services
and MBBS program offered by College of Medicine (CoM) at GMU. It contains sections covering
admission procedure, general rules and regulations, student support services, curriculum
details, departments and examination policies. Each section has been listed in the contents so
that you can refer quickly to areas of particular interest to you. Please note that attendance in
various courses arranged by the college is mandatory and this has been repeatedly stressed in
the handbook. Every effort has been made to provide accurate and up to date information.
Additional information useful to students will be regularly displayed on the college notice
board. Students are also advised to get in touch with course coordinators for any academic
difficulties.
We hope that the handbook will help and guide you during the new academic year at CoM.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

8|P a ge

GMU Vision Statement


The Vision of Gulf Medical University is to be a leading contributor to the continuous
improvement of the nations health care delivery system through the pursuit of excellence
in medical education, biomedical research and health care services.
The University aspires to provide a unique learning experience of high quality to our
students and produce graduates whose competence will help them to make a significant
contribution to the health of the community through pursuit of academia, research and
health care.
The University aspires to attract the best of students by offering a variety of excellent
programs supported by quality administration and student support services.
The University aspires to be known for excellence and impact of its research on the
educational milieu of the nation and the outcomes of clinical care.
The University aspires to be an integral part of the community through transfer of
knowledge, continuous dialogue with the countrys health care planners and enhanced
community service.

GMU Mission Statement


It is the Mission of the Gulf Medical University to strengthen and promote excellence in
medical education, biomedical research and patient care.
GMU is committed to prepare a highly skilled health workforce made up of health care
professionals, health management and support workers and health science investigators in
order to meet the health care needs of the nation and the region.
GMU will strive to produce health care professionals who will integrate the advances in
research with the best clinical practices.
GMU will promote health services, which incorporate the latest advances in scientific
knowledge in a manner that supports education and research for the benefit of the
community.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

9|P a g e

From the Presidents Desk

Dear Students,
It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to the portals of Gulf Medical University where
we are entering into an exciting new era! You are beginning a new chapter in your life here
at Gulf Medical University. It will be a challenging yet exciting and illuminating journey for
you.
I am grateful to the Almighty Allah for the remarkable development the Gulf Medical
University has undergone in the last 15 years, where the University has been able to make its
mark in Medical Education, Healthcare and Research. We aspire to be among the best in the
region, and we're making it happen right now. We have embarked on a journey of making
GMU as a Research Based University in the coming years.
Our students coming in from 67 nations around the world thrive in our culture of dynamism
and innovation. We are proud of our traditions, our current standing and our vision for the
future. GMU students come from every corner of the world to invest in education that
inspires challenges and prepares them to be globally competitive. Eventually they discover a
world of opportunities to explore new possibilities, new ideas and new perspectives to
prepare them for life in their chosen career paths. Our students find in GMU a rich, vibrant,
innovative, and enriching academic experience.
The newly launched Center for Advanced Biomedical Research and Innovation (CABRI) has
been established to evolve, integrate, and develop multi-disciplinary research and enhance
the teaching activities of the university. It will also provide advanced diagnostic research and
testing services in the areas of Allergies, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease and Hereditary
diseases. Newer fields like Proteomics, Metabolomics and Genomics will be explored.
The Center for Quality Enhancement (CQE) has been established as a central facility to
enhance Quality within the University, the hospitals and laboratories of the group.
The GMC Hospitals one among the Clinical Training sites for the students of the Gulf Medical
University is now expanding rapidly with new hospitals in Dubai, Ajman, Sharjah and Ras Al
Khaimah being added to enhance the clinical training facilities to students of Gulf Medical
University. The latest expansions include the 25,000 sq.ft. modern simulation center to be
made available for clinical training in the forthcoming academic year.
I invite you to join us in this exciting journey into a bright future with a University that is
talented, dedicated, and caring. We wish you a happy and fruitful time during your study in
the Gulf Medical University.

Thumbay Moideen
Founder President - GMU Board of Governors
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

10 | P a g e

Welcome Note from the Provost

Dear Students,
On behalf of the President, the faculty, administration and the student body, I am delighted
to welcome you to the Gulf Medical University also known as GMU!
The university learning community will now be made up of students working to become
practicing physicians, pharmacists, dentists and physical therapists, a multi professional
group very much like the multi professional healthcare delivery teams of the 21stCentury.
We hope at GMU as you Study together today to work together tomorrow you will share
the large pool of knowledge and experience that is available in the different health related
disciplines with each other and grow to respect the contribution made by each health
profession to provide comprehensive health care to the community you will together serve
in the future.
Members of the faculty, as well as students and staff have helped building this institution
that is attracting regional, national and international attention. With a faculty committed to
maintaining strong academic standards for our students and ourselves and the commitment
of the administration and staff in every aspect of our mission and your contribution as a
member of the university community we will together realize the potential to deliver the
vision of GMU.
The leadership of the faculty and staff at GMU is engaged in efforts to strengthen teaching,
learning, research and creativity both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. GMUs
mission is focused on assuring the quality of its programs to the university student
population. With the establishment of the Center for Advanced Biomedical Research and
Innovation (CABRI), active research combined with public service shall further strengthen
opportunities for learning.
As you become familiar with the campus, your mentors and your peers you will surely be
impressed with the multifaceted and rich academic environment. We are confident that your
contributions to the lives of fellow students, your chosen career field and the university will
be marked by excellence. Welcome.

Prof. Gita Ashok Raj MD; MNAMS


Provost - Gulf Medical University
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

11 | P a g e

Message from the Dean, College of Medicine

Greetings from College of Medicine, GMU!


College of Medicine in its over 15 years of existence has remained undiminished in its
endeavor to impart quality education and clinical training to our undergraduate medical
students. We follow the organ-system based integrated curriculum incorporating elements
of innovative trends in medical education.
Students receive good clinical exposure to a large number and a wide variety of clinical cases
as they are posted in Hospitals under Ministry of Health and Al Mafraq Hospital, Abu Dhabi
under SEHA in addition to our own GMC Hospital at Ajman for their clerkship training in
order to become safe practitioners of the future. I take this opportunity to thank MoH, SEHA
& GMC Hospitals for offering their clinical training sites for our students.
Every student undertakes a research project by the end of third year that enables to imbibe
the quality of a scientist early in their training. Emphasis on evidence-based approach to
decision making, participation in community services, professionalism and ethics form
important elements of the curriculum. Students are trained to become self-learners and lifelong learners in order to adapt to the ever-changing advances in the medical field.
College of Medicine is offering a number of short and long-term courses including AHA
accredited Life Support Courses as part of continuing medical education. It is a reality for
majority of students graduating from College of Medicine and wanting to update their
knowledge and skills or pursue further studies, to look upon their alma mater to provide the
same. The multi-national and multi-cultural mix of student diaspora is encouraged to
participate in a wide variety of extra-curricular activities like cultural and ethnic day
celebrations, debate and sports competitions.
I thank our Founder President; Mr.Thumbay Moideen to provide us with constant guidance
and support and today under his leadership and vision, College of Medicine is the ultimate
destination for any student aspiring to be a successful doctor.
Dear students, welcome to the College of Medicine, GMU for a promising and glorious
future!

Prof. Manda Venkatramana, MS, FRCSEd, PGDHPE


Dean, College of Medicine, GMU
Professor of Surgery
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

12 | P a g e

About The Student Handbook


This handbook is a source of important information regarding Gulf Medical University
(GMU) policies, regulations, rules, procedures and facilities which will be very useful to
students during their studies. The material contained herein is a supplement to the Catalog
and other information distributed to the students by GMU.

Every effort has been made to provide students with complete and accurate information.
The University reserves the right to change program, requirements and to modify, amend
or revoke any rule/s, regulation/s and / or financial schedules. However, the information
published in this handbook shall be valid for the academic year for which it is published.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

13 | P a g e

ACADEMIC CALENDAR

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

14 | P a g e

1.0 Academic Calendar


2013

Day

Events

Jul 31

Tue

Last day for application for admission

Aug 31

All days

Aug 15

Thu

Registration period
Last day for payment of tuition and other fees for all returning
students**

FALL SEMESTER
Fall Semester begin
1st Year MBBS (Phase I) Students and Parents welcome session
Reopening for returning 4th Year (Phase III Year 1) students
Reopening for returning 5th Year (Phase III Year 2) students at
Mafraq Hospital, Abu Dhabi
Reopening for returning 2nd Year (Phase II Year 1) students
Reopening for returning 3rd Year (Phase II Year 2) students

Sep 4

Wed

Sep 8

Sun

Sep 26

Thu

Oct 13 - 17

Sun Thu

*Eid Al Adha Holiday

Nov 4

Mon

*Islamic New Year Holiday

Nov 5 - 6

Tue &
Wed

Dec 2

Mon

Dec 22
Jan 2

Sun Thu

Dec 28

Sat

White Coat Ceremony

GMU Annual Scientific Meeting


National Day Holiday
Fall Semester Break for the I, II, III & IV Year MBBS students
Phase III Year 2 Semester 9 Examination

2014
Jan 1

Wed

New Year Holiday

Jan 4

Sat

Phase III Year 1 Semester 7 Examination begins

Jan 5

Sun

Phase II Year 2 Semester 5 Examination begins

Jan 6

Mon

Phase II Year 1 Semester 3 Examination begins

Jan 9

Thu

V Year MBBS Sessional Examination begins


IV Year MBBS Sessional Examination begins

Jan 13

Mon

*Al Moulid Al Nabawi Holiday

Feb 2
Feb 9

Sun
Sun

Phase III Re-sit Examination begins


Final MBBS Part II Professional Supplementary Examination begins

Feb 10

Mon

Final MBBS Part I Professional Supplementary Examination begins

Feb 16

Sun

Phase I Semester 1 Examination begins

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

15 | P a g e

SPRING SEMESTER
Feb 23

Sun

Spring Semester begin

Mar 20

Thu

Annual Sports Day

Mar 21

Fri

GMU Global Day

Mar 22

Sat

GMU Literary Day

Mar 30 Apr 10

Sun Thu

Spring Semester Break for the I, II, III Year MBBS Students

May 26

Mon

*Israa Al Mihraj Holiday

Jun 16

Mon

V Year MBBS Sessional Examination begins

Jun 22

Sun

Phase III Year 2 Semester 10 (theory & OSCE) Examination


begins
Phase II Year 2 Semester 6 Examination begins

Jun 29

Sun

Phase I Semester 2 Examination begins

Jun 28

Sat

Jun 30

Mon

IV Year MBBS Sessional Examination begins

Jul 6

Sun

Final MBBS Part II Professional Examination begins

Jul 13

Sun

Jul 20

Sun

Jul 27 Aug 31

Sat

*Holy month of Ramadan Starts

Phase III Professional Examination begins


Phase II Professional Examination begins
Final MBBS Part I Professional Examination begins
Phase I Professional Examination begin
Phase III Year 1 Semester 8 Examination begins
Phase II Year 1 Semester 4 Examination begins
Eid Al Fitr Holidays & Summer vacation

* Islamic holidays are determined after sighting the moon. Thus actual dates of holidays may not
coincide with the dates in this calendar.
**All tuition and other fees are subject to revision by Gulf Medical Universitys Board of
Governors in accordance with University requirements. Every year, fees are reviewed and
subject to revision. As and when fees are revised, the new fees will be applicable to all enrolled
and new students. The amount shown in this document represent fees as currently approved.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

16 | P a g e

UNIVERSITY DIVISIONS &


ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

17 | P a g e

2.0 University Divisions and Academic Programs


The University has six academic divisions offering following degree and non-degree
programs.
College of Medicine (CoM)

Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) Program


Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences (BBMS) Program

College of Pharmacy (CoP)

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program

College of Dentistry (CoD)

Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD) Program

College of Allied Health Sciences (CoAHS)

Bachelor of Physiotherapy (BPT) Program

College of Graduate Studies (CoGS)

Master of Science in Clinical Pathology (MS CP)


Master in Public Health (MPH)
Master in Toxicology (MTox)
Diploma in Toxicology (DipTox)
Masters in Human Reproductive Biology (MHRB)
Master of Physical Therapy (MPT)

Center for Continuing Education and Community Outreach (CCE&CO)

Non degree programs

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

18 | P a g e

LICENSE & RECOGNITION

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

19 | P a g e

3.0 License & Recognition


The following programs have received Initial Accreditation from Commission for Academic
Accreditation, Ministry of Higher Education & Scientific Research (CAA MOHE&SR),
AbuDhabi UAE.
SI.No

Program

Month &Year of Initial


Accreditation

Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS)

September 2004

Bachelor of Physiotherapy (BPT)

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD)

Doctor of Dental Medicine (DMD)

Master of Science in Clinical Pathology (MS CP)

Master in Public Health (MPH)

July 2010

Master in Toxicology (MTox)

July 2010

Diploma in Toxicology (Dip Tox)

July 2010

Masters in Human Reproductive Biology (MHRB)

10

Master of Physical Therapy (MPT)

11

Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences (BBMS)

June 2005
August 2008
September 2008
January 2009

December 2012
May 2013
October 2013

Gulf Medical University is listed in the WHO World Directory of Medical Schools and in the
Eastern
Mediterranean
Regional
Office
(EMRO),
WHO
website.
http://www.emro.who.int/hped/
Gulf Medical College is listed as an accredited / recognized medical school in the
International Medical Education Directory (IMED) published by Foundation of Advancement
of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) at the website
http://imed.ecfmg.org/

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

20 | P a g e

THE CAMPUS

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

21 | P a g e

4.0 The Campus


The Gulf Medical University is located in the Al Jarf area in the northern emirate of Ajman
on a vast stretch of land extending up to a 100,000 sq.mtrs and a built area of 1,90,000
sq.ft. It has laboratories, classrooms and administration buildings, a standalone building
that houses the library and the modern multimedia centers, a cafeteria, multi-cuisine
restaurant and a sports complex with courts for lawn tennis, basketball, volley ball and lush
green grounds for cricket and football and the vacant grounds have been earmarked for
the future multispecialty hospital, the residence halls for students and living quarters for
the staff and faculty.

The Gulf Medical College Hospital and Research Center is located a few miles away on the
side of a main arterial road entering Ajman from the neighboring emirate of Sharjah and
currently serves as the teaching hospital for GMU. The affiliated hospitals are located in the
different emirates: Mafraq Hospital in Abu Dhabi (HAAD), Sheikh Khalifa Hospital in Ajman,
Umm Al Quwain Hospital in UAQ and Ajman Municipality Public Health Clinic.

The GMU Campus includes modern facilities with classrooms, laboratories and learning
center that are appropriately equipped with up-to-date instructional and educational aids.
GMU encourages social, cultural and other extra-curricular activities and sports to enhance
a comprehensive personality development. The spacious campus spotted with greenery
contains student rest rooms, prayer halls, indoor and outdoor sports facilities, first aid
clinic, and student car parking. The facilities are well connected with each other making it
easy for students to move from one area to another.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

22 | P a g e

LOCATION MAP

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

23 | P a g e

5.0 Location Map

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

24 | P a g e

UNDERGRADUATE
ADMISSION
POLICIES & PROCEDURES

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

25 | P a g e

6.0 Undergraduate Admission Policies & Procedures


6.1 Policy Statement
Gulf Medical University admits students irrespective of their national origin, color, gender or
religion to all the rights, privileges, activities and programs offered by the university.
The University stands for the highest moral and academic standards consistent with the
heritage and cultural background of the United Arab Emirates and shall aspire for national
and international recognition of its programs and degrees.
The University sets high standards for previous academic performance to attract student of
high caliber and to meet and exceed the standards of high retention, low attrition and
outstanding academic performance required to fulfill the accreditation standards for every
program offered by the University.
6.2 Undergraduate Admission Requirements

Applicants shall meet all criteria for admission into each programs offered by the
University as laid down in the Standards published by the Commission for Academic
Accreditation, Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, UAE.

The applicant must have completed a minimum of 12 years of education in school and
passed subjects in Physics, Chemistry and Biology in higher secondary school.

The applicant must have secured a minimum of 80% marks as per U.A.E. Secondary
School education standards or its equivalent in each of the three science subjects
(Physics, Chemistry, Biology)

Students who complete their secondary school education as per UK curriculum must
have completed at least two of the three science subjects (Physics, Chemistry,
Biology) in AS levels or A levels provided they have passed in all the three subjects
in their O levels. The minimum grade required is B/C in AS/A level in Chemistry,
Biology or Physics.

A score of at least 28 of IB (International Baccalaureate) and for holders of American


Diploma a minimum score of 80% is required in addition to a SAT II score of at least
550 in Biology.

An aggregate score of 75% for Pakistan Board, 80% for Indian State Board and 75% for
Indian Central Board while the minimum score of 70% in each subject of Biology,
Physics and Chemistry is required.

The applicant must have completed 17 years of age on or before the 31st of
December of the year of admission.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

26 | P a g e

The applicant must have proficiency in spoken and written English and Science
terminology.

The applicant must have passed the English language proficiency test such as TOEFL
or IELTS. A minimum score of 500 TOEFL (173 CBT, 61 iBT) or its equivalent in a
standardized English language test, such as 5.0 for IELTS or any other equivalent
internationally recognized test.

The applicant shall appear for a written MCQ test and a personal interview before the
GMU Admissions Committee.

The Admissions Committee shall evaluate all applicants for both cognitive and noncognitive traits demonstrating their aptitude for the chosen area of study.

Applicants shall submit all academic documents and official transcripts / credits /
grades / marks duly attested by the Ministry of Education, U.A.E. and Ministry of
Foreign Affairs, U.A.E. or U.A.E. Embassy in their country on admission into the
program.

Applicant shall submit a copy of the Equivalency Certificate issued by the Ministry of
Education U.A.E.

Applicant shall submit a copy of the Emirates ID.

Students of Indian nationality are required to obtain an Eligibility Certificate from


the Medical Council of India / Dental Council of India, New Delhi before they seek
admission into the MBBS / DMD program.

On admission, the student shall submit a copy of the individuals birth certificate or
proof of age, the applicants passport, and a copy of UAE nationality ID (Khulasat AlKayd), a Certificate of Good Conduct. A medical fitness certificate including blood
test results, fifteen recent colour photographs, a written pledge by the applicant
agreeing to comply with University rules and regulations, the application form duly
filled up with complete details, a receipt for payment of a non-refundable fee
towards admission.

All information regarding admissions shall appear in the Catalog, Institutional website and in
any other forms of advertisement circulated by the University.
6.3 Admission Process
This is carried out in several stages:
1) Advertisement in the media: Information in the media will include details of the
programs, colleges of the university, admissions criteria and online registration form.
2) Scrutiny of information: The Admissions Committee scrutinizes the credentials of the
applicant with reference to the high school education: courses, grades in the qualifying
examinations and the overall suitability of the applicant for admission into the program.
The committee would also inform the applicant regarding the need for any additional
documents that may be required.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

27 | P a g e

3) Short listing: Applicants whose credentials have been accepted as adequate by the
Admissions Committee are informed about the date and time for a personal interview
that would be conducted in Gulf Medical University, Ajman. GMU will provide necessary
help concerning visa arrangements for students from outside UAE.
4) Personal Interview: The Admissions Committee of GMU will conduct the personal
interview. The committee follows a protocol for the interview that will last
approximately 45 minutes. The conversation during the interview will be in English. This
will be in an informal atmosphere and the applicant will be given ample opportunity to
respond to the questions in a relaxed manner. After the personal interview, the
Admissions Committee will submit its recommendations to the Provost concerning the
suitability of the candidate for admission.
5) Provost Approval: The Provost of GMU will finalize admissions after studying the
recommendations of the Admissions Committee. The decision of the Provost on matters
concerning admissions shall be final.
6) Academic Advising: GMU is committed to provide academic advising in order to advise
students in the development and pursuit of academic objectives consistent with their life
goals and the available opportunities at the university.
7) Medical Fitness: Students admitted to GMU are required to submit a Medical Fitness
certificate soon after they have registered on the University rolls. The Medical
Examination in this connection will be carried out in GMC Hospital & Research Center,
Ajman.
8) Enrollment: Candidates who are finally selected for admission are required (within the
time announced on the notification of selection) to submit a letter of acceptance to the
Provost, along with the fee in cash or by demand draft in favor of Gulf Medical
University, Ajman payable at Ajman, U.A.E. Failure to comply with this requirement will
result in cancellation of the admission.
6.4Documents Required for Admission:

Application form with all entries completed


Attested copy of High School Mark Sheet
Certificate of English language proficiency test
True copy of applicant's passport
Fifteen recent passport-size photographs
Emirates ID copy
Equivalency certificate issued by the Ministry of Education, UAE

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

28 | P a g e

6.5 Transfer Admissions Policy and Procedures:


Students shall be considered for transfer only as per the following Transfer Admissions
Policy of the University:

Only students from a federal or licensed institution in the U.A.E. or a recognized


Foreign Institution of higher learning shall be eligible for admission by transfer.
All transfer students shall meet the English Language proficiency requirements of the
program to which they are transferred.
All transfer students shall submit official transcripts before admission to the Program in
which they are transferred.
All transfer students shall submit official transcripts of credit earned from all institutions
of higher education previously attended before admission to undergraduate programs.
Only students who are in good academic standing (a minimum cumulative grade point
average of 2.0 on a 4.0. scale, or equivalent) for transfer to an undergraduate program
of study similar to that from which the student is transferring shall be accepted for
admission.
Students who are not in good standing shall be transferred only to a program in a field
different from the one from which the student is transferring.
The University shall transfer undergraduate program credits only for courses relevant to
the degree that provide equivalent learning outcomes and in which the student earned a
grade of B (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better;
The University shall inform applicants for transfer admissions or re-admission of the
transfer credits earned for previous courses.
The University shall limit transferred credit hours to less than 50% of the total credit
hours required for the program.
The University shall not grant credit twice for substantially the same course taken at two
different institutions.
The University shall allow the transfer of credits for clinical training only when done in
the U.A.E.; in exceptional circumstances, in which case waiver of this condition shall be
sought from the CAA, MoHESR before admission.
On admission, the student shall submit a copy of the individuals birth certificate or proof
of age, the applicants passport and a copy of UAE nationality ID (Khulasat Al-Kayd), a
Certificate of Good Conduct, a medical fitness certificate including blood test results, six
recent color photographs, a written pledge by the applicant to comply with University
rules and regulations, the application form duly filled up with complete details and a
receipt for payment of a non-refundable fee towards admission.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

29 | P a g e

6.6 Transfer within GMU


The students' wishes are taken into consideration when applying to the programs of Gulf
Medical University. However, they will be allowed to transfer to other programs available in
the university according to established rules based on the recommendations of the
Admissions Committee.
6.7 Re-admission
Students who are on leave for a period of one year must apply for re-admission to the
program through the Admissions Office.

Students in Good Standing: Students who are absent on approved leaves must apply
for re-admission before they will be permitted to register for the semester.
Students Suspended for misconduct: Students who have been rusticated from the
university and under probation must apply for readmission and may be readmitted
after serving the suspension period.
Students on academic probation: Students who fail to meet the minimum GPA
requirement but have satisfied other requirements may be allowed to register as a
non-matriculate student for a probationary period. Non matriculated students who
achieve a minimum GPA of 2.0 can be readmitted, provided they meet all the other
requirements.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

30 | P a g e

STUDENT SERVICES

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

31 | P a g e

7.0. Student Services


7.1 Office of Student Affairs
The Office of Student Affairs supports and complements the mission of the University and
its academic programs by creating a comfortable, safe and secure environment that
contributes to the success of the students educational mission and personal growth. It
helps to involve students in the university community by providing appropriate student
organizations, activities, publications and opportunities for interaction with faculty, staff and
peers outside the classroom.
7.2 Counseling Services
7.2.1 Student Counseling Policy
All counseling sessions are conducted with the utmost regard to confidentiality and all
records kept by Counselor are treated as confidential.
Information shared with a counselor is not released to anyone outside the Counseling
Services office. Information may be released under the following exceptions, if,

the student gives written permission to disclose information (In that instance, the
student determines what information is to be released and to whom.) or
A student presents a danger to himself / herself or to another person.
Students meeting with a counselor shall be encouraged to discuss any concerns that they
have about confidentiality.
7.2.2 Academic Counseling Policy
Student advising is part of the academic duties of every faculty member. The Dean or Chair
of the Academic Unit assigns advisors so that the number of advisees per faculty member is
as small as possible.
Each student shall have an appointed full-time faculty advisor. This does not preclude
informal advising with a student regarding progress in the courses being taught.
Student advising is not limited to registering students, but encompasses all aspects of
academic advising, including selection of electives, counseling on any academic difficulty/ ies
or problem encountered, and monitoring the academic progress of advisees.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

32 | P a g e

An academic advising guide has been prepared by the Provosts office and is distributed to
all academic advisors.
Students receive notification of their faculty advisor and a listing of all students and advisors
is available in the Academic Advising Center (AAC). Prior to actual course registration,
faculty are available to advisees during their scheduled office hours to discuss academic
programs and issues related to vocational, career and educational goals. A record is kept of
the advisory meetings. Faculty advisors assigned to the Office of Advising, Assessment and
Counseling Center shall coordinate further referrals.
Adjunct faculty is not to be responsible for the academic advisement of their students.
7.2.3 Personal Counseling
Professional counseling is available for personal problems (i.e., financial, career, home,
health) especially if you have;

Physical complaints when no medical causes can be found.


Excessive anxiety for examinations / accommodation / or home sickness.
Lack of interest in daily activities.
An unusual amount of irritability or fear to mingle with friends.
Not been able to cope with studies.
Inability to concentrate.
Personality changes that cant be explained such as sudden shifts in mood / behavior.

Referrals are made to the office of Admission & Registers regarding regulations concerning
questions of transfer; to the Accounts Office regarding financial aid issues; to the Career
Counselors Office regarding career or job placement issues; by the Dean Student Affairs
who attends to all student activities, discipline issues, university policy etc.
7.2.4 Student Activities Policy
The Office of Student Affairs offer comprehensive programs and services that foster an
educational environment conducive to the overall development of students.
The Office of the Dean of Student Affairs oversees all departments catering to various
student services and serves as an advocate for students in the development of University
policy. The Office is also responsible for administering the University code of conduct
(judicial policies).
Information on specific programs and services particularly athletic, cultural and literary like
GMU Global day celebrations, intercollegiate Sports meet, debates, presentations at
scientific meetings, health exhibitions shall be published in the Student handbook,
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

33 | P a g e

University Catalog and displayed prominently on Student Notice Boards, the University
Website and MYGMU e-platform to encourage participation by all students in these events.
7.3 GMU Undergraduate Student Council
The GMU student council comprises of representatives elected from the various academic
programs.
GMU Student Council shall have representation in faculty committees such as Academic
Council, College Council, Student Affairs Committee, Curriculum Development Committee,
Library Council, Sports, Culture & Literary Committee, Campus Health, Campus Safety and
Security Committee.
The student council comprises of class representatives. Each class will elect student
representatives who would coordinate the curricular and extracurricular activities of the
class.
Each class will elect two representatives comprising one male and one female.
The class representatives will be elected following an approved election procedure and the
procedure consists of the following stages:
Nominations of the candidates are submitted to the Dean / Associate Dean of Student
Affairs.
The Dean / Associate Dean of Student Affairs will supervise the voting and declare the
results of the election.
The names of the elected class representatives will be announced to the University.
Elected student representatives will be invited to the Office of the Dean / Associate
Dean of Student Affairs where they will sign a formal document accepting their duties
and responsibilities as elected members of the student council.
The elected representatives from the student council will represent in different
committees.
The University reserves the right to remove student representatives from their office
on disciplinary grounds and/or inadequate performance.
Duties and Responsibilities of Student Representatives
1. To interact with other students in the class and collect data on matters pertaining
to the teaching program, examinations and student welfare measures.
2. To bring to the notice of the faculty, Associate Dean or the Dean any matter/s
relating to student activities, which require modification/s or corrective measures.
3. To attend meetings of Student Council with the Associate Deans and the Dean at
regular intervals. The members of the Student Council are expected to come
prepared with the agenda for such meetings so that all relevant points can be
discussed in an orderly manner.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

34 | P a g e

4. To identify any personal problem of the students which require immediate or


urgent intervention and brings it to the notice of the faculty, Associate Deans or the
Dean.
5. To recommend effective measures relating to student activities (academics,
discipline and welfare).
6. To act as a healthy and reliable link between the students on one hand and the
members of faculty and administration on the other.
7.3.1 Student Council Executive Board
Elected representatives from the Student Council form the Student Council Executive
Board comprising one student from each program who will attend the respective college
council meetings called for by the Deans of the respective colleges.
The university reserves the right to remove any student representative from their elected
office on disciplinary grounds and / or inadequate performance.
Students indulging in Academic or Personal misconduct will not be allowed to be elected
for Class Representative or Member of Student Council Executive Board; and those holding
these posts already stand to be disqualified.
7.3.2 Student Publications
Students write, edit and publish a newsletter (Previously GMU Pulse, under name change
at present), which is an essential feature that chronicles student life at GMU. The students
newsletter expresses their sense of commitment and degree of cooperation as well as their
awareness of the educational and social issues that affect life in the GMU. The newsletter
reflects the make-up of the GMU and it appears in two languages - Arabic and English.
7.3.3 Student Behavior

All students are expected to maintain decorum and decency in conducting themselves
in the Campus.
Men and women students should not be seen together anywhere in the campus
including the central hall, corridors, learning center or cafeteria. Members of faculty
have been requested to be on the vigil about this and have been authorized to censure
any student violating this regulation.

7.4 Student Academic Services


7.4.1 The Deans Office
The Office of the Dean oversees all departments catering to various student academic
services.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

35 | P a g e

7.4.2 Office of Student Affairs


Office of Student Affairs coordinates all matters concerning student council, student
welfare, career guidance, alumni affairs, student health, placement, student discipline,
residential halls, transportation, student publication, student activities and sports. Student
may approach the Associate Dean Student Affairs to resolve issues regarding student
affairs and student support services.
7.4.3 Career Service Office
The University has a full time Career Counselor.
7.4.3.1 Career Service Policy
The Career Counselor shall be available at all hours on all working days throughout the year;
Students are encouraged to meet the Career Counselor and discuss their career plans.
All students are encouraged to avail of clinical training at sites available in the country and
abroad during the summer break.
The students are encouraged to seek help in preparing their curriculum vitae.
Students shall also be helped in filling application forms for taking various licensing
examinations being held in the country and abroad.
The career counselor collects and disseminates information about the various hospitals,
institutions and universities offering internship and residency programs in the country and
abroad.
The career counselor shall encourage graduates to keep in touch with the alma mater
through the Universitys website, correspondence and telephone.
The Career Counselor maintains a register of GMU Alumni. The Career Office also keeps a
record of employment of all Alumni and seeks evaluation of the GMU graduate as an
employee.
The Career Counselor shall submit reports periodically to update the Alumni records in the
Center for Quality Enhancement (CQE).
7.4.4 Financial Aid Office
Information on financial aid may be obtained from the Chief Accounts Officer of the Gulf
Medical University.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

36 | P a g e

Refer to Section 11.13 under Financial Aid and Scholarships in this document for further
details.

7.5 Health Services


A First Aid Room is available in the GMU campus. All GMU students shall be eligible for
medical treatment in the GMCHRC.
7.5.1 Health Services Policy
In order to streamline the health care needs of GMU students, a Campus Medical Center
has been established. This will provide care in the following areas:
o First Aid Service at GMU
o Referral to GMC Hospital
o Coordination between GMU & GMC Hospital
The student Management System has been linked with that of the hospital for easy
identification of student for treatment.
As part of the registration procedures, every student must be covered for health services
under one of the two following plans. Plan I is compulsory for all GMU sponsored
students. This provides medical benefits under the GMCHRC Health Card. Plan II is
compulsory for others who are officially enrolled in health insurance plans with their
families.
Students shall be required to present the Student ID as identification document on
registering for medical treatment.
The Office of the Academic Affairs at GMCHRC shall make arrangements for access to
health care facilities at the hospital and to encourage students to undergo vaccination.
It is compulsory for all GMU students to have a valid Third Party Liability (TPL) Insurance.
Students shall be informed regarding the benefits of immunization and testing for
communicable diseases and encouraged to undertake appropriate immunizations and
tests.
7.6 Third Party Liability (TPL) Insurance
As per the Ministry of Health (MoH) guidelines, all students undergoing clinical training at
various hospitals are required to have a valid Clinical Training Third Party Liability
Insurance. This insurance cover is restricted to training hours only and / or whilst

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

37 | P a g e

participating in indoor and/or outdoor university activities under universitys expressed


authorization including transportation from and to training centre by university vehicles.

7.7 Student Records Policy

The University shall maintain confidentiality of student records. The student records
shall be stored in safe custody and only authorized personnel shall have access to
them.
Transcripts shall be issued only upon the signed request of the parent or the student.
Under no circumstances shall the student records be released to any third party
without the knowledge of the student or the students parent.
All official records shall be signed by the Provost of the University whose signatures
only shall be recognized outside the bounds of GMU.
A progress report shall be sent regularly to the contact address to inform the
guardians about the wards progress.
The records policy shall be published in the student handbook for information. The
Office of the Dean Admissions & Registers shall maintain the students permanent
academic record and requests to view the individuals record must be made to the
Office of the Dean Admissions & Registers.
The program office of academic program in which a student is enrolled also maintains
student files that are considered non-permanent. Students have the right to access
their program file except documents where access has been waived (e.g.
recommendation forms).
A student must submit an application to the Dean Admissions & Registers office to
obtain access to his/her program academic record.

The Dean Admissions & Registers Office shall ensure:

The continuous maintenance and back up of student records with one set stored in a
secure location, preferably off-site in a vault or fireproof cabinet.
Special security measures to protect and back up computer-generated and stored
records.
Confidentiality of records.
A definition of what constitutes the permanent record of each student; the right of
access to student records, including students access to their own records.
The authority to manage and update student records.
Appropriate retention and disposal of records.

7.8 Information Release Policy

The University shall neither deny nor effectively prevent current or former students
of the University the right to inspect and review their education records.
Students shall be granted access to their records within a reasonable period of time
after filing a request. Students have the right to request the amendment of their

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

38 | P a g e

education records to ensure that the records are not inaccurate, misleading or
otherwise in violation of their privacy or other rights.
The University shall not release or provide access to education records, except
directory information, without the written consent of the student to any individual,
agency or organization.
The University is, however, authorized to provide access to student records to
Campus officials and employees who have legitimate educational interests in such
access. These persons are those who have responsibilities in connection with the
academic, administrative, or service functions of the university and who have reason
for using student records connected with their academic or other university
responsibilities. Disclosure may also be made to other persons, Ministry and
Government officials or organizations under certain conditions (e.g. as part of an
accreditation or program evaluation; in response to a court order, audit in connection
with financial aid; or to institutions to which the student is transferring).
The University shall designate the following items as directory information:
student name, addresses, telephone numbers, major field of study, participation in
officially recognized activities and sports, dates of attendance, degrees and awards
received, most recent previous school attended and photograph. The University may
disclose any of those items without prior written consent, unless notified in writing
on the form available from the Dean Admissions & Registers.
Confidentiality of information shall be highly respected at GMU. If students wish that
any of their education record shall be available to anyone, a consent form shall be
available in the Office Admissions and Registers. If there is no consent form,
information will not be disclosed except to the appropriate person(s) in connection
with an emergency, if the knowledge of such information is necessary to protect the
health or safety of the student or other persons.
Under no circumstances shall the student records be released to any third party
without the prior knowledge of the student or the students parent.

7.9 Plagiarism and Copyright Policy:


Plagiarism is defined as a piece of writing that has been copied from someone else and is
presented as being your own work. The student should cite the sources if they use
someone elses ideas. If the student include copyrighted material in their thesis, they are
responsible for obtaining written permission from the copyright holder. The Gulf Medical
University takes no responsibility in this regard. To avoid plagiarism, student must mention
the sources properly using footnotes, endnotes or references, inclusion of illustrative
graphs, charts etc. which are copyrighted sources, permission letter should be included.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

39 | P a g e

Copyright is legal protection of intellectual property. As thesis is legally classified as


publication and an intellectual property of the student, during the preparation of thesis, the
student should consider the copyright laws regarding the protection of original work.
Copyright ownership means that the student has the exclusive right to print, reprint, copy,
sell, and prepare derivative works based on their work.
7.10 Dress Code
Professional Dress
Students should at all times maintain a neat and clean appearance, and dress in attire that is
appropriate. When students are functioning as medical / health professionals, either with
clinical patients or simulated patients, dress must be appropriate and professional. A
professional image increases credibility, patients trust, respect, and confidence. In addition,
because medical and health sciences students utilize facilities on campus where patients and
the public are present, professional dress and appearance are also expected even when
students are not engaged in patient care. In addition, most of the clinical facilities have
specific dress code policies that must also be followed. Furthermore, Photo I.D. badges are
to be worn at all times.
Violation of the dress code can have detrimental consequences for patient care and could
damage the reputation of the institution. Flagrant and repeated violations of the dress code
may be deemed to signify a lack of insight or maturity on the part of the individual student
and call for counseling and discipline. The immediate supervisor may choose to discuss initial
violations of the dress code directly with the student. Serious or repeated violations may be
subject to disciplinary action.

Students of GMU are expected to maintain decorum in their dress code in


accordance with the dignity of the medical profession and of the institution.
Traditional dresses are allowed for only U.A.E nationals.
Students must wear white coats with identity cards / badges on entering the campus
/ clinical sites and must wear the coats as long as they are inside the campus / clinical
sites. The white coat must be clean and well maintained and of acceptable quality.
The white coat must be worn fully buttoned.
The security and duty staff have the right to reject admission to any student into the
campus when not properly dressed or when not wearing the white coats.
White coats are to be worn only inside the college and hospital premises. Students
should not wear white coats in public places such as supermarkets.
Women students must take special care in avoiding skin tight and revealing dress.
They must have their hair properly tied up and must not keep the hair loose. All
women students must wear dress, which reaches down to the ankle level.
Students must wear dress that does not hinder practical or clinical work.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

40 | P a g e

7.11 Dining Services


GMU provides modern dining services in the campus where meals are served at a
reasonable price. The dining facilities are provided at 3 locations in the campus and 2 in the
GMC hospital. The Terrace a multi cuisine restaurant located in the campus serves all the
Arab, Continental & Asian cuisines.
7.12 Recreational Facilities
State of the art recreational facilities are provided in the Body & Soul Health Club, a
gymnastic unit of GMU. Membership is provided to the students at a concessional rate and
they can enjoy all facilities including swimming.
World class Basketball, Volleyball courts, Tennis courts, Cricket & Football fields have been
located in the campus. Separate indoor Table Tennis facility for male and female students
has been provided. The sports committee announces inter-collegiate sports events every
year wherein interested students can participate.
7.13 Student Support Services
Faculty in-charge/
Coordinators

Name

Tel.No: 06 7431333

Hostel :

Dr. Joshua Ashok


Mrs. Sherly Ajay

Ext. 317
Ext. 384

Sports & First Aid:

Prof. Ishtiyaq Ahmed Shaafie

Ext. 211

Cultural Activities:

Mr. Vignesh Unadkat

Ext. 240

Library:

Dr. Syed Shehnaz Ilyas

Ext. 316

Mr. Aslam Hameed


Mr. Diaz Idiculla
Mr. Ansal

Ext. 300
Ext. 221
Ext. 221

Mr. Subeesh
Mr. Supreeth / Mr. Bilal
Mr. Fayaz Mohammed

Ext. 219
Ext. 222
Ext. 238

Mr. Sakthi

Ext. 283

Administrative Assistance:
Accounts:
Library:

Common Rooms, Common utilities


and Transport:
Audio Visual Aids:
Visa and Health Card:
Photocopy Section, Mail Boxes
and Sub store
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

41 | P a g e

7.14 GMU Physical Facilities


7.14.1 Lecture Halls
The lectures are usually held in the four main lecture halls - Lecture Hall I, Lecture Hall II,
Lecture Hall III and Lecture Hall IV. In addition the demonstration rooms located close to
laboratories are used in teaching smaller classes for lectures, group discussions, seminars
and tutorials. The graduate students have their classrooms in the teaching / learning center.
7.14.2 GMU Testing Center
The state-of-the-art GMU testing center is the latest addition to the ever-growing facilities of
Gulf Medical University. This new unit is capable of accommodating placement tests,
examinations or any other form of testing through a sophisticated technical set-up.
With a capacity of holding up to 88 participants, the centre has all modern facilities. To meet
the standards required for international testing regulations, invigilators are supported with
adequate number of CCTV cameras in each testing halls. The testing center has a data
processing room where post-test analysis of scores could be done or the central valuation
room for the examiners to value paper based tests. Access to the center and examination
halls is user-friendly to people with special needs (wide elevator and doors).
7.14.3 Common Rooms & Lockers
Separate common rooms with locker facility are available for male and female students.
Locker keys may be obtained from the Administrative office. In the event of any damages to
the lockers or loss of keys, a fine of AED 100 is levied. Only materials pertaining to academic
and learning needs are to be kept in the lockers; strict disciplinary action is taken if any
objectionable material is found in the lockers.
7.14.4 Masjid
Separate entrance for men and women with ablution facilities are provided in the Masjid.
7.14.5 Mail Box
All incoming postal mail would be kept in the designated area close to the photocopying
section.
7.14.6 GMU Hostel
Separate hostel facilities for male and female students are provided on request. Resident
wardens in the hostels take care of student needs. Indoor games and Internet facilities are
available for recreation and study.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

42 | P a g e

A. Aim: The Office of Student Affairs support and complement the mission of the college
and its academic program by creating a comfortable and safe environment that contributes
to the success of resident students educational progress and personal growth.
The hostel offers a learning environment that fosters self-dependence, respect for social and
communal norms, and tolerance of cultural diversity. The residence halls provide
opportunities for residents to improve their leadership, communication and social skills,
which support their academic development.
B. Hostels
GMC Girls Hostel
GMC Boys Hostel

Ajman
Ajman

Single / Sharing rooms


Single / Sharing rooms

C. Hostel Fees details


Students who are sent out of the hostel on disciplinary action will not be eligible to get
refund of the rent.
Hostel
Ajman

Single
19000/- + 1000 security deposit

Sharing
13000/- + 1000 security deposit

D. Hostel Regulations
These rules have been formulated to help the students to study comfortably in the hostel, to
ensure their safety and maintain discipline. All the inmates of the hostels are to strictly
adhere to these rules.
1.

Right of Occupancy
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

2.

GMU students who have paid or arranged for the payment of their hostel
fees, tuition and other college fees have the right to reside.
Rent is charged for one academic year extending from the beginning of the
academic year to the end.
Request of renewal to be submitted and paid before the next academic
year. The room is confirmed only on payment.
Students leaving the hostel in the middle of an academic year are not
eligible for refund of the rent.
Student has the right to report to the Warden, Hostel In charge or Office of
Student Affairs in case of any difficulty faced during her / his stay in the
hostel.

Security
a.

To ensure the security of all students, all GMU hostels are protected by
security staff / warden for 24 hrs. throughout the year.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

43 | P a g e

3.

Facility
a.
b.
c.

4.

Air conditioned room with kitchen and bathroom, cot with mattress and
quilt, fridge, study table and chair, wooden cupboard, micro-oven.
Water cooler provided in each floor, common washing area, computer lab
and exercise room.
Cleaning, transportation and fulltime warden.

Curfew
a.

b.
c.
d.

e.

f.

During week days (Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday) all
resident female students are expected to be in their respective dorms by
9:00 p.m. and male students by 9:30 pm
During weekends (Friday & Saturday) female students must report back
before 10:00 p.m. and male students report back before 11:00 p.m.
Daily attendance of hostel students will be conducted and submitted to the
Hostel In-charge and Office of Student Affairs.
The hostel Warden monitors the attendance records regularly for tardiness
and absences. Repeated violation of attendance regulations will be
reported to the Office of Student Affairs.
Students require prior permission from the warden before leaving the
hostel for shopping. Details about their movement in such cases should be
entered in a movement register maintained for this purpose.
Hostel doors will be closed by 11:00 pm.

Violation of the curfew timings and hostel regulations may result in the
cancellation of the hostel facility.
5.

Weekend / Vacation out-pass policy


a. Female students who wish to go out to visit their parents or relatives must
obtain prior permission from their parents or nominated guardians on each
occasion.
b. A letter must be faxed /email to the Office of Hostel In-charge
(fax no: 06-7468989 or email: sherly@gmu.ac.ae or
Warden Daisy Thomas, email: daisythomas@gmu.ac.ae
Warden Subaida, email: subaidarakefa@gmu.acae) well in advance for prior
approval.
c. Student should fill out the out-pass form before leaving.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

44 | P a g e

6.

Inter-visitation
a.

GMU students who are not residents of the hostel and parents are not
permitted to stay in the hostel.
b.
On emergency purpose, oneday stay of non-residents (current GMU
student/ GMU students sister), concerned student requires to take prior
approval (at least 3 days before) from the Office of Student Affairs.
A visitor fee of AED 100/- per day will be charged. Student is requested to submit the
receipt of payment on entry to the hostel.
c.
Hostel students may be permitted to have visitors / friends in the visiting
area and will not be permitted to take them to their rooms.
d.
GMU students visiting hostel inmates are required to fill the form and take
the approval from the Warden.
e.
Outsiders other than parents or nominated guardians are not allowed
inside the hostels. Parents are allowed to visit their wards room only on
the first day of the University or on emergency situation upon approval.
7.

Smoking / Alcohol / Drugs


a.
b.

Smoking, seesha and using drugs / alcohol are strictly prohibited in GMU
hostels.
If a student is found using drug / alcohol / seesha etc., he / she will face
severe disciplinary consequences.

8.

Littering
a.
Since the hostels are the residents second home, all students are expected
to maintain cleanliness inside the halls.
b.
Rooms are inspected periodically for cleanliness.
c.
Students are also expected to regularly empty the garbage in their rooms.
d.
In the event a student room is found to be in a dirty state, the Student
Affairs office has the right to charge the student for getting it cleaned.

9.

Cable / TV / Internet / Computer Room


a. Students are allowed to have Television of their own.
b. Hostel has the Wi-Fi connections on all floors and an additional computer
room with internet connection is provided for learning purpose.
c. Computer /Internet usage will be viewed seriously and any misuse will entail
discontinuing the facility.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

45 | P a g e

10.

Exercise area (Girls Hostel Safeer area)


a. Students are provided with tread mills for exercise.
b. Students utilizing need to sign in the usage of time in the register.

11.

Meals and Cafeteria


a. Micro-oven and Fridge has been provided for warming and storing of food.
b. Procuring ordered food from outside restaurants should be delivered before
10:00 pm. Any late deliveries will not be permitted.
c. The facility of hostel delivery of food is arranged from the University Terrace
Restaurant (Contact no: 06-7430002)

12.

Transportation
Hostel students are provided transport facility to the University.
On regular class days, University bus has been arranged as per following
schedule:Time
Pick up to the University
Pick up from University

Main Girls Hostel


(Safeer area)
First trip : 8:00 am
Second trip : 8:10 am

Girls Hostel
(Jurf)
8:15 am

Boys Hostel

3:45 pm

3:45 pm

3:45 pm

8:15 am

Transport facility is also provided for hostel students during summer and
semester break holidays. Request for transport signed by the Warden has to
be filled and submitted to the Transport department for approval.
Transport is NOT provided for weekend travels.

13. Concerning Fire Codes


a. A fire alarm sound indicates that an emergency situation exists.
b. Students are required to switch OFF the electrical equipments after use. In
case any room is found to have the oven, A/c or any other electrical
equipment ON unnecessarily, the office reserves the right to ask the student
to pay the electricity charges.
c. Cooking indoors with charcoal or any open flame device, burning candles is
prohibited.
d. In case of complaint regarding malfunctioning switches or any other electrical
equipment needs to be reported to the Warden immediately or written in the
complaint book.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

46 | P a g e

14. Entering / Transfer of rooms


a. GMU officials including Hostel Supervisor and Warden may enter student
room in an emergency.
b. Students will be informed in case of maintenance work to be done or college
officials entering their rooms.
c. Male members are not allowed inside the girls hostel except male
maintenance staff on approval will be accompanied by the Warden.
d. Requests for a transfer to another room are to be forwarded through the
Wardens office.
15. Laundry
a. Washers and dryers are located in the hostel. The Laundry room will be closed
by 11:00 p.m.
16. Furniture
a. Students are strictly forbidden from removing any of their room furniture.
b. Hostel students are required to obtain special approval from the hostel incharge to bring own furniture.
17. Storage
a. Storage rooms are NOT available in hostels.
b. Students need to clear their belongings on leaving the hostel. The belongings
will be moved outside once the student leaves the hostel.
c. Institution will not be responsible for students belongings once the student
leaves the hostel.
18. Medical Facilities
a. Students should report any injury or illness immediately to the Warden
without delay so that necessary medical attention could be arranged.
b. All GMU students are eligible for medical treatment in GMC hospital. Students
are required to present the Student ID as identification document to register
for medical treatment.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

47 | P a g e

19. Student responsibilities


a. Students must take care of their personal belongings and the management
will not be responsible for any loss or damage. On leaving the hostel, student
is required to clear all her / his belongings.
b. Students must maintain cleanliness and discipline in the hostel. All property
and fittings should be handled with care. If a student is found to be
responsible for any damages, the cost of repair / replacement will be
recovered from the student.
c. Students are required to abide by the advice and decisions of the Warden on
all matters pertaining to life in the hostels.
d. Students are required to abide by any other rules or regulations, which the
Dean, the Supervisor or the Warden may feel necessary to introduce from
time to time.
e. Students are required to submit the No Objection letter from parent and fill
up the out-pass /clearance form when staying outside or when vacating the
hostel.
f. Students are required to submit the clearance form to the office of the
Warden before vacating the room and submit a copy to the accounts
department for refund of deposit.
20. Actions Prohibited
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

Student should NOT break the curfew timings.


Student should NOT write on walls, lifts, doors of the hostel.
Student should NOT bring in any pets (cat, puppy, bird etc.) into the hostel.
Student should NOT remove furniture, or install personal locks for rooms.
Student should NOT insert / fix holes or hooks in walls, floors or ceiling.
Student should NOT refuse to follow the instructions from the Warden or
security personnel who is only performing his/her duties.
g. Students are NOT allowed to decorate the exterior of rooms, corridors or
other common areas.
h. Student should NOT shout or create disturbances for any residential room.
i. Student should NOT drop or throw any solid object or liquid from windows.
j. Student should NOT harass or verbally abuse any resident or staff member
living in the hostel.
k. Student should NOT host overnight guest / parent without obtaining prior
approval from the Office of student affairs / Hostel In-charge.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

48 | P a g e

Following actions are taken for those who break the rules of the hostel
i.
ii.
iii.

First warning with letter issued to student.


Second and final warning with letter issued and copy to parents and the respective
College Dean
Third student penalized / expelled from the accommodation.

Any breach of the above rules by the inmates may result in their, being deprived of the
privilege of occupying the room besides rendering themselves liable to pay such damages,
as may be claimed by the authorities. Also there will be NO refund of fees in the event of
denial of hostel accommodation on grounds of misconduct (academic or personal).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------I have read and understood the above rules and regulations of the hostel and will follow
the same.

_________________
Students Signature

______________________
Parents Signature:

_________
Date:

21. Whom to Contact in an Emergency


Dr. Joshua Ashok

Associate Dean,
Student Affairs

Mrs. Sherly Ajay

Ladies Hostel In-charge

Mr. Subish
Mrs. Daisy
Thomas
Mrs. Zubaida

Manager, General
Services
Warden, GMU Ajman
Girls Hostel
Warden, GMU Ajman
New Girls Hostel

Tel : 06- 743


1333 Ext: 317
Tel : 06-7431333
Ext:384
Tel : 06-743
1333 Ext: 219

Mobile: 050-7276958

Tel: 06-7464881

Mobile: 050-5103981

Tel: 06-7496255

Mobile: 050 - 3649007

Mobile: 050-7447921

Mobile: 050-7467155

7.15 Transportation
Bus facilities, to commute from residences to GMU and other clinical locations, are available
to the hostel students free of cost. Day scholars are provided transport on request and on
payment of stipulated fees. Students requiring transport facilities should contact the
Transport Department for all transport needs.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

49 | P a g e

7.16 Telephone
Prepaid telephone booths are located in the central hall.
7.17 Class Room & Laboratory Protocol
Separate entrances are designated for men and women students in the Lecture Halls and
Laboratories. Students are strictly advised to follow these.
Attendance will not be granted to late comers to lectures and practical.
Students are not allowed to bring food and drinks into the lecture rooms and
laboratories.
Lab coats must be worn only during laboratory work, ambulatory and bedside teaching
activities.
Students should use equipment and property of the institution with care and should not
indulge in destruction or damage to any of the equipment & property. If a student is
found to be responsible for any such damage, the repair / replacement cost for the same
shall be recovered from the student.
Students who require audio visual equipment for presentations should organize this with
the help of the Administrative Assistant for Student Affairs. Students should fill in the
request form for this and hand over the same at least 3 days before their presentation.
Visitors are not permitted to attend lectures and laboratories except with the prior
written approval of the Dean.
Students should leave the lecture halls as soon as the lectures are over. Lingering on in
the hall alone or in groups is not permitted. Lecture halls will be locked soon after the
lectures are over and will be opened only 15 minutes before the commencement of
lectures.
7.18 Student Identification

All students are required to submit passport size photos to be fixed on their ID cards.
The Student ID must be worn at all times and must be presented on demand in the
campus, clinical sites and examinations.
Loss of ID cards must be reported to the Deans office and replacement card can be
obtained after payment of AED 25.

7.19 University Entrance


Separate entrances are designated for men and women students. These should be strictly
adhered to. Parents, relatives and friends who drop the students in the college and drive
them back are requested to respect this and drop or collect the students only from the
designated areas. Students are not allowed to walk through the main foyer doors or sit in
the entrance area. This area is meant for guests and visitors to the college.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

50 | P a g e

7.20 Car Parking in the Campus

Cars should be parked in the allocated positions for men and women students separately
in an orderly manner. Only cars belonging to the President, Trustees and other visiting
dignitaries are allowed to be parked in the main portico area. The College administration
reserves the right to tow away any vehicle, which has been parked in an unauthorized
manner or place.
Dangerous driving practices, creating inconvenience or risk to others and damage to
property within the college campus are punishable offences.

7.21 Information on Safety Issues


GMU adheres to and adopts the guidelines on safety issues, which covers safety aspects
under the categories- Laboratory and Chemical safety. Excerpt from the University
Laboratory Safety Manual is provided.
Laboratory Safety
1. General
1.1 Take care not to run around in the laboratories unless a situation [e.g. Emergency]
warrants the same.
1.2 Laboratory dress code:

Laboratory coat must be worn while pursuing laboratory work but be removed while
visiting a non-laboratory environment, e.g. office, canteen, toilet, and computer
room.
No smoking is permitted at any time in or near the laboratory.
Long-sleeved laboratory coats must be worn to protect against chemical spills and
prevent exposure to radiation and UV light.
Latex gloves must be worn when handling toxic chemicals and, bacteria. However,
do not use such gloves in the course of simple chores like opening doors, answering
telephones, at the keyboard, to cite some examples.
Safety goggles or spectacles must be worn while working with hazardous chemicals
or radioactive materials.
Use the face-mask when using the UV trans-illuminator.
Mandatory use of close footwear [E.g. No open-toed shoes, sandals and slippers]
when working in the laboratory and while handling also working hazardous chemicals
or radioactive materials.
Long hair or loose clothing must be secured before commencing work to avoid the
possibility of their entanglement in equipment, or contact with chemicals or
possibility of a fire accident.
Wearing a Walkman/radio head phone while working is prohibited.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

51 | P a g e

1.3 Waste disposal:


Appropriate bag must be used to dispose hazardous and non-hazardous waste. The
specially designed safety bag must only be used for disposal of hazardous waste and
not for non-hazardous waste disposal. Non-hazardous waste can be disposed in the
general household garbage bag.
Broken glass and needles must be disposed in a sharps bin or plastic container.
Acid, organic solvent, and radioactive waste must be disposed in the designated
bottles or containers (see Chemistry and Radiation Safety for detail).
2. Electrical outlet usage:

To avoid power overloading, ideally, one electrical outlet must be connected only
to one equipment
If the outlet is used for more than one connection, the adaptor with the Singapore
Productivity and Standard Board (PSB) logo (i.e. PSB approved adaptors) must be
used.

Chemical Safety
1. General
Working alone with hazardous chemicals (particularly after office hours) must be
discouraged in all laboratories involved in such experimental work.
2. Chemical Storage
The general properties and storage characteristics of each chemical must be
indicated by a colored sticker on the chemical containers. The suggested color
codes are:
a. RED: Flammable
b. WHITE: Corrosive
c. YELLOW: Reactive
d. BLUE: Health risk (carcinogen, mutagen, etc.)
e. GRAY: General chemical storage
f. RED 'S': To be stored separately from chemicals of similar code

Chemicals must not be stored on the floor or on top of shelves. The storage shelf
must have the rails to prevent the fall off.

Organic and inorganic chemicals must be stored in different cabinets.


Organic solvents must be stored in resistant containers, e.g. glass or teflon. The
cap must be resistant to the solvent and screwed on tight. Solvents are stored
primarily in a metal cupboard or sometimes in a fume hood.
There must be no open flame near organic solvents, nor must they be kept near
heat.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

52 | P a g e

Concentrated nitric acid must be stored in designated cabinet.


Poisons must be stored in designated and locked cabinet.
Corrosive chemicals must be placed in a location below eye level, e.g. in bottom
shelves of a cabinet or under the sink.
Cabinet shelves must not be overloaded.
Upper shelves must not be heavier than lower shelves.
All shelves must be protected with chemical-resistant, non-absorbent, easycleaning trays with anti-roll lips.
All chemicals must be placed on these trays and not directly onto the metal surface
of the shelves.
All cabinets must be kept closed at all times other than during depositing or
withdrawal of chemicals.
All cabinets must be placed on floor and must be stable.
Labels indicating the contents of each cabinet must be displayed on the outside of
the cabinet.
A fire extinguisher must be located near the exit and not near the chemical
cabinets. In the event of an explosion, a fire extinguisher near the explosion area
might be rendered inaccessible or damaged.
The appropriate type of fire extinguisher, i.e. Class B extinguisher such as carbon
dioxide or foam, to deal with chemical fire must be used. Everyone in the lab must
know to use the fire extinguisher.
Spill control kits to handle spillage of flammable chemicals, must be available.
First aid kits must be available and they must be equipped to deal with accidental
ingestion, spillage, etc.
Periodic checks must be made of the chemical stores in order to ensure that the
conditions of the containers are satisfactory. These include but are not restricted
to:
The physical state of the primary and secondary containers
The state of the seals of these containers
The cleanliness of the containers (salt deposits indicating leakage, etc.).
The presence of moisture in the bottle or any other form of precipitation and /
or caking.
Adequate ventilation must be available.
Bottles of toxic chemicals, once opened, must be tightly recapped, sealed and
placed in a fume hood.
Chemical bottles / containers in constant use must be placed in chemical-resistant,
non-absorbent, easy-cleaning trays.
Gas cylinders, hoses and regulators must occasionally be checked for wear and
tear, leaks and functionality. A simple soap-bubble test can be done to check for
leaks.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

53 | P a g e

All gas cylinders must be secured with chains.


Empty gas cylinders must not be stored with full cylinders. In the event of a
mistake, empty gas cylinders can cause serious-suck back effect when connected
to pressurized equipment.

3. Chemical Handling
All lab workers must be familiar with recommended procedures associated with
the chemicals they are dealing and the relevant hazards. When in doubt the MSDS
must be referred to, for information.
All work involving aqueous hazardous chemicals must be done in fume hoods.
All Appropriate protective apparel must be worn when working with hazardous
chemicals. These include but are not limited to gloves, masks, aprons, lab coats,
face shields and goggles.
Hand towel dispensers must be made available in all labs.
Appropriate gloves for handling corrosives, hot/cold objects, organic solvents and
other specific chemicals must be available.
When a process is known to result in chemical fumes, wearing appropriate masks
must be mandatory. Please note that normal surgical masks and dusk masks are
not suitable protection against chemical fumes.
Spilled mercury (e.g. from broken thermometers) must be picked up using a
pipette and stored in a small, tightly sealed and labeled plastic container in the
fume hood.
Standard Operational Procedures (SOPs) to deal with emergency situations arising
from radioactive, chemical and bio-hazardous accidents must be clearly
displayed in every lab.
Handling of Gases:

Make sure that you know how to operate the regulator on a gas cylinder before
using it.
Gas cylinders must be replaced before they are completely empty. Some positive
pressure must be allowed in the used cylinders.
Check the gas tubing from time to time.
Poisonous gases and chemicals that give rise to vapors must be experimented
with only in the fume hood.
Do not light any flame when you smell a gas leak. Beware of flammable gases,
e.g. oxygen and acetylene.
If you smell something dangerous, raise the alarm and evacuate the lab
immediately. The source must later be traced and action taken by the
appropriate safety personnel.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

54 | P a g e

While handling Liquid Nitrogen:


Your hands must be protected by thick pair of heavy duty gloves.
Lab coat must be worn and legs and feet protected.
Liquid nitrogen must be kept and transported in Dewar flasks.
Liquid nitrogen splatters easily when pouring, especially if the glassware or
plastic ware is not pre-chilled before use. Hence special caution ought to be
exercised.
Handling of Phenol:

Phenol must be handled with appropriate protection and in the fume hood.
Phenol must be stored in resistant containers made of glass or teflon.
If ones' skin comes in contact with phenol, it must be rinsed immediately with
lots of water, followed by wash with soap and water.
Spills must be attended to immediately and not left to dry unattended.
Stains left by chemical spills must be cleaned up immediately.
Hand towel dispensers must be made available in all labs.
Appropriate gloves for handling corrosives, hot / cold objects, organic solvents
and other specific chemicals must be available.
When a process is known to result in chemical fumes, wearing appropriate masks
must be mandatory. Please note that normal surgical masks and dusk masks are
not suitable protection against chemical fumes.
Spilled mercury (e.g. from broken thermometers) must be picked up using a
pipette and stored in a small, tightly sealed and labeled plastic container in the
fume hood.

4. General Chemical Disposal


Not all chemicals can be thrown into the drain. Ensure that the chemical is safe for
discharge into the sewer. If not, store in empty reagent bottles or carboys for
processing and disposal by a waste disposal company. As a general guideline, strong
flammable and acute toxic chemicals must not be discharged into the sewer.
Dilute all chemicals that will be thrown into the sewer.
Acids and bases must be neutralized properly before discharging into the
sewerage system.
All gels (excluding those stained with EthidiumBromide) must be disposed into
special plastic bags. These bags, when full, must be double wrapped, secured
properly and thrown with normal rubbish for disposal.
Commingling of chemical waste in waste storage containers must be kept to
confinement separately.
Where the above is not possible, aqueous waste must be segregated into the
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

55 | P a g e

following groups:
Halogenated
Flammable
Phenol-chloroform
Flammable chemical waste must be stored in well-ventilated areas to reduce
accumulation of flammable vapors.
Solid chemical waste must be securely packaged before disposal into normal
trash where they will eventually be incinerated. An exception to this is solids that
sublime at room temperature and produce toxic gases. In such cases, try to
convert the solids to a stable form and chemically inactivate it.

Organic Solvents:

Solvents are disposed of in specifically-labeled (name of solvent, your name and


your supervisors name) waste bottles in a fume hood. Do not pour them down
the sink. Only very small quantities (< 1 ml) may be flushed down the sink with
lots of water.
Chloroform and acetone must not be poured into the same bottle as they react
to form an explosive chemical.
Chemical containers must be tagged with information including chemical name,
description, generators name and date of disposal.
All chemical disposal exercises must be documented.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

56 | P a g e

STUDENTS RIGHTS
& RESPONSIBILITIES

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

57 | P a g e

8.0 Students Rights and Responsibilities


8.1 Students Rights
All students must become familiar with the academic policies, curriculum requirements, and
associated deadlines as outlined in the University Catalog. The academic advisor shall advise
the student on all matters related to their program of study and will aid the student in the
interpretation of policies whenever necessary.
However, it shall ultimately be the students responsibility to meet all stated requirements
for the degree and the policies related thereof. It is also the students responsibility to
actively utilize their campus email and the university web site, observe netiquette, observe
the policies on internet use as published and made available in the Student handbook as it
tends to be a major communication resource and is often the primary form of
communication between students.
Gulf Medical University shall maintain an academic environment in which the freedom to
teach, conduct research, learn, and administer the university is protected. Students will
enjoy maximum benefit from this environment by accepting responsibilities commensurate
with their role in the academic community. The principles found herein are designed to
facilitate communication, foster academic integrity, and defend freedoms of inquiry,
discussion, and expression among members of the university community.
8.1.1 Rights in the Pursuit of Education
Students will have the right:

To pursue an education free from illegal discrimination and to be judged on the basis
of relevant abilities, qualifications, and performance;
To fair and impartial academic evaluation and a means of recourse through orderly
procedures to challenge action contrary to such standard;
To an academic environment conducive to intellectual freedom; and
To a fair and orderly disciplinary process.

8.1.2 Right to Access Records and Facilities


Students will have the right:

To access their own personal and education records and to have the university
maintain and protect the confidential status of such records, as required by
appropriate legal authority;
To have access to accurate information regarding tuition, fees and charges, course
availability, general requirements for establishing and maintaining acceptable
academic standing, and graduation requirements;

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

58 | P a g e

8.1.3 Right to Freedom of Association, Expression, Advocacy & Publication


Students will have the right:
To free inquiry and expression;
To organize and join associations to promote their common and lawful interests; and
To be able to protest on university premises in a manner which does not obstruct or
disrupt teaching, research, administration, or other activities authorized by the
university.
8.1.4 Right to Contribute to University Governance and Curriculum
Students will have the right:

Through student representatives, to participate in formulating and evaluating


institutional policies.

8.2 Student Responsibilities


Students shall be expected to balance these rights with the responsibility to respect the
learning environment for others and for themselves and to make their best effort to meet
academic challenges undertaken. Students will be responsible for compliance with the
University Code of Conduct.
The standards of professional behavior in the educational setting are related to three
domains:
1. Individual Performance;
2. Relationships with students, faculty, staff, patients and community, others and
3. Support of the ethical principles of the medical profession
Individual performance:
Demonstrates educational experiences (i.e., exams, clinics, rounds, small group
sessions, appointments at the clinical skills center.
Adheres to dress code consistent with institutional standards.
Relationships with students, faculty, staff, patients and community.
Establishes effective rapport.
Establishes and maintains appropriate boundaries in all learning situations.
Respectful at all times to all parties involved.
Demonstrates humanism in all interactions.
Respects the diversity of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, disability and
socioeconomic status.
Resolves conflict in a manner that respects the dignity of every person involved.
Uses professional language being mindful of the environment.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

59 | P a g e

Maintains awareness and adapts to differences in individual patients including those


related to culture and medical literacy.
Supports ethical principles of the medical profession.
Maintains honesty.
Contributes to an atmosphere conducive to learning and is committed to advance
scientific knowledge.
Protects patients confidentiality.

8.3 GMU Honor Code


The students of Gulf Medical University Ajman, must recognize that they form an essential
part of the medical profession and society. The Honor Code lays emphasis on students
behavior to meet the expectation of their profession, family and general public. The Honor
Code is administered at the White Coat Ceremony. Students are required to read the pledge
and sign an undertaking to observe all the rules as specified in the code.
8.4 Salient Features of the Honor Code
The code strives to emphasize the importance of ethical behavior and compassion in patient
care. It helps a professional to understand the importance of the power of healing when all
health care professionals work together as a team. It guides students to interact among
their fellow colleagues and mentors. The honor code formally acknowledges a sense of
trust, responsibility and professional behavior among students, staff and faculty.
8.5 Breach of Honor Code
The following acts are considered as violation of the honor code:
1. Illegal, unethical and inappropriate academic conduct or professional behavior with
colleagues and mentors either in college, hospital campus or in any professional
gathering.
2. Failure to maintain confidentiality of a patient.
3. Failure to provide the highest level of patient care.
4. Failure to report any situation where the honor code has not been followed or
failure to take appropriate action when the honor code has been violated.
8.6 Effects of Committing an Honor Offence
When a student, member of the administrative staff or faculty commits an offense against
the rules of the honor code, it becomes violation of the code and is termed as an Honor
Offense. The matter must be reported to the Dean of GMU. The report would be taken to a
committee formed by student and faculty representatives. Once the person is proved guilty,
the Committee will initiate appropriate action depending on the degree of the offense.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

60 | P a g e

UNIVERSITY RESOURCES
AND SERVICES

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

61 | P a g e

9.0 University Resources & Services


9.1 Introduction
The GMU Information and Learning Centre provide year-round reference and information
services and assists students in the development of effective search strategies. Staff
members at the learning center assist students in identifying new and additional resources,
confirming citations and providing instructions on how to use online databases and search
engines.
9.2 Vision
In carrying out this vision, the library will acquire, manage and link information resources
both physical and virtual and will provide quality instruction to empower users to benefit
from the full potential of the universe of knowledge. The librarys information professionals
and staff will ensure that GMU library aims to meet complex information challenges of the
21st century for life-long learning and excellence in undergraduate, graduate and
professional studies.
9.3 Mission
The mission of the GMU Information & Learning Centre is to provide resources and
instructional material in support of the evolving curriculum. It also provides leadership in
accessing and using information consistent with the GMU. The GMU Learning Centre is
focusing on maintaining and providing access to the state-of-the-art information technology
to meet the current and changing information needs of the GMU community.
9.4 Library
The library at the GMU campus is located on the first floor of the Information and Learning
Center. Library materials are circulated to faculty members, staff and the students for
periods according to the circulation policy.
9.4.1 Timings:
The library remains open from Sunday through Thursday between 8.00 a.m. to 10.00
p.m. and on Saturday between 8.30 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. (Except on official holidays).
9.4.2 Library Resources
Books
E-Books (Access Medicine)
Journals (Online)
Journals (Hard copy)
CDs
Video Tapes
Online Databases:
Proquest, Access Medicine, Cochrane, UpToDate, USMLEasy, Micromedex
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

62 | P a g e

9.4.3 Library orientation


During the Library Orientation Program, the library staff will give orientation and
bibliographic instructions to the library users on the following topics:

Use of various electronic resources


Resources available in particular subjects of interest
Library rules and services.

9.4.4 Audio Visuals


The library has the facility for viewing medical video tapes and CD ROMs. A collection
of VHS tapes and CDs on latest medical topics are available.
9.4.5 Scanning and printing
Scanning and printing of learning materials without infringing on the copyright law
are provided in the library.
9.4.6 Photocopy
Photocopy services are provided at a nominal charge of one dirham for 10 pages. The
information and learning center abides by national and international copyright laws
in force.
9.4.7 Journal Article Request Service
The GMU users can get copies of Journal articles from the library on request. For
getting a copy of the article, users have to submit Journal Article request to the
library in the prescribed form. Request form is available in the GMU library website.
The applicant will get a copy of the article within three working days, if it is available
in GMU library.
9.4.8 Cataloguing
The GMU library is following Anglo-American Rules (AACR 2) for Cataloguing and the
National Library of Medicine USA coding for the classification system. The GMU
library using AutoLib System Software.
9.4.9 Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC)
The GMU Library provides Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC) through the library
website (www.gmu.ac.ae/library). The user can search the catalogue by author, title,
subject, ISBN or key word.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

63 | P a g e

9.4.10 Security Gates


GMU central library has two security gates (3M library security system) for the
protection of library resources. The machine details are shown below:
3M Library Security System: The 3M Library Security System consists of several
components including 3Mt Tattle-Tape, circulation accessories, and detection system.
The key to the effectiveness of the system is protecting the library resources with 3M
Tattle-Tape security strips. Only when all library resources have the 3M detection
system (3M Tattle-Tape security strips) , the illegal exit of the resources can be
monitored
Name & Model of the Security Gate: 3 M Library Security Systems - 2301BP Model.
9.5 Library Policy and Procedures

Adequate library and learning resources are essential to teaching and learning. The
purpose of the library is to support the academic, research, health service and
continuing education programs of the university by providing students, faculty, and
staff with the information resources and services they need to achieve their
educational objectives.
The library staff work closely with department chairs, faculty, student and community
patrons in determining needs and which resources to obtain and which services to
offer.
Gulf Medical University maintains an adequate level of professional librarians and
support staff at the Gulf Medical University Campus and Gulf Medical College Hospital
and Research Center.
The Gulf Medical University selects and purchases appropriate and sufficient print and
non-print materials, including the lease of information databases suitable for the
instructional needs of the university with the goal of providing access to the maximum
amount of relevant information available within the constraints of the libraries
budget.
Gulf Medical University provides automated systems in the following areas: online
public access catalog, circulation, cataloging and acquisitions.
Gulf Medical University provides bibliographic instruction to the university community
and interested groups, including orientations, personal assistance, computer-assisted
instruction and printed information.
Gulf Medical University provides hours of service to suit the needs of its learning
community.
Gulf Medical University maintains and continues to improve the facilities and
equipment for housing and using materials.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

64 | P a g e

Gulf Medical University evaluates resources and services annually via student surveys,
reviews of holdings by library staff and faculty, comparison with similar institutions,
and direct feedback from all users.

9.6 Library Rules and Regulations:


Students are required to abide by the following code of conduct while using library
resources.
It is mandatory for the graduate students to possess their own laptop for use in the
university.
Separate areas have been designated in the library for men and women students. The
reading rooms and computer facilities have been arranged accordingly.
Students are expected to use the designated reading rooms and computer areas
separately marked for men and women in the library.
Students who are seen in areas other than those specifically designated for their use
are liable to face disciplinary action. Video library facilities shall be arranged on
separate days for men and women students.
Students are not allowed to sit on the steps or passages near the library or in other
parts of the University.
Students are reminded that defacing or stealing library material is classified as
misconduct and is liable to invite censure.
Personal laptops are allowed into the library; however, other personal items and
handbags may be deposited in the area provided before entering the library. No foods
and drinks are allowed inside the library.
The students are requested to carry Identity Cards at all times. These are coded and are
required to issue books.
Books may be issued from the GMU campus only. Books may be reserved using online
services. Books may be issued for limited periods up to 2 weeks at a time. The library in
GMCHRC and other affiliated hospitals do not issue books. Instructions on how to
access subscribed online text books and databases are prominently displayed.
The library staff is available at all times for locating books, CDs, Videos, Journals and
any other library services (such as inter-library loan, accessing electronic resources,
other cooperative arrangements, orientation, training).
Photocopying class handouts is permitted. However, international laws regarding
image reproduction and copyright law shall be strictly followed.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

65 | P a g e

9.7 Circulation Policy and Procedures


GMU circulation policies are designed to permit prompt and equitable access to library
materials. The staff at circulation service desk is focused on meeting the needs of the library
users.
1) Circulation privileges are accorded to those holding valid GMU identification cards.
The ID must be presented on request in order to use the Library facilities and
services. Cards are not transferable.
2) Two books will be issued for a maximum period of two weeks. This can be renewed
once as long as there is no holding request for the same book.
3) Short loan for reference books will be allowed ranging from one hour to a maximum
of three days.
4) A fine of AED 1.00 per day will be levied for over-due books. If the fine is more than
the cost of latest edition of the book, the user has to pay the cost of the latest
edition of the book including procuring expenses equivalent to 10% of cost of book.
Users cannot borrow further books until due items are returned and penalties paid.
5) The users are not allowed to make any marking / underlining / highlighting in the
library books and journals. They should not indulge in any act that may damage the
books / journals. If any page is torn away or damage caused to any book or journal
the borrower will be asked to pay the penalty one and half times the cost of the book
/ journal and also be referred to the disciplinary committee for further action.
6) In case of loss, users have to replace the latest edition of the new book or pay the
cost of the latest edition of the book including procuring expenses equivalent to 10%
of cost of the book.
7) Reservation may be placed for loaned item.
8) The Library will not issue a No Due Certificate until all books are returned and fines
are paid.
9.8 Multimedia Labs
The Computer Center located on the ground floor of the Information and Learning Center of
Gulf Medical University shall provide a basic technological infrastructure for all academic
activities.
The Multimedia Lab includes the provision for networks, intra-GMU links and appropriate
hardware and software for administration and academic needs. The Multimedia Lab shall
ensure that the technological infrastructure is used effectively. For this purpose, among
others, the Center assumes a significant role in user support and training.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

66 | P a g e

9.9 Network Infrastructure


The Local Area Network (LAN) Infrastructure encompasses all academic offices, lecture
halls, laboratories, administrative & faculty offices. The network provides high bandwidth
servicing data, voice & video, and is connected to the Internet through two DSL lines, which
is protected behind a secured firewall & monitored 24 X 7.
The Multimedia Lab is a state-of-the-art data center, which houses the GMU servers, and the
backbone network switches and houses the data and software required for administrative
packages as well as fulfilling other faculty, staff and student uses.
All GMU students shall be provided individual accounts so that they can access the system to
obtain current information on all academic matters, access online learning materials and
tools, use discussion forums and interact with faculty. Users can also use the Web mail to
access their e-mail through the Internet. The video conferencing facilities enable video
meetings and distance learning.
9.10 Wi-Fi Network
All wireless access to university networks shall be authenticated by Information Technology
Security (ITS) approved methods. Staff, students, faculty and visitors at the university can
only access the wireless network using this encrypted network.
9.11 Online Resources
GMU has an online e-learning facility to enhance the learning process and help students
improve their knowledge by offering additional instructional material. It allows students to
access the facility from the campus as well as hostels and residences. The Center focuses on
the creation of an environment where all students will have easy access to information
resources by providing innovative technologies and learning resources.
9.12 Servers & Supports
All the computers within the campus are connected to high end rack servers which itself is
supported by power back up of 3 hours and monitored round the clock. The servers are
installed with antivirus, which is updated regularly, and entry is restricted to authorized
members only.
9.13 IT Training
Appropriate training sessions are being conducted for all students at regular intervals
around the year to update them with latest software and learning tools in the field of
Information Technology.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

67 | P a g e

9.14 Internet Services


The information and learning center provides Internet facilities for all students, faculties
and staff. Search can be carried out freely by individual users or with the help of librarian.
Users can print their search results or directly e-mail them to any registered accounts.
9.15 Technology support for learning
All the class rooms are equipped with adequate technology support comprising computers,
projectors as learning support needs of our institution with local access port for both faculty
and students. Protected Wi-Fi is available to facilitate usage of portable IT gadgets among
the students and staff within the campus.
9.16 IT Support Team
The Gulf Medical University IT Support Desk (Help Desk) is a technical support team that
provides prompt, knowledgeable, courteous computing support services through the
phone, in person and email. The Help Desk is available to everyone who uses the GMU
Computing Service and is the first point of contact for any technical queries.
One of the tasks of the Help Desk is to help members of the GMU to be more productive
through the use of provided IT facilities.
GMU IT Support Team constantly collects valuable feedback about the services and its
quality in a bid to improve what they offer. The GMU IT Support Team was set up to handle
users' initial calls for technical assistance.
9.17 User accesses and Security
Access to operating systems is controlled by a secure login process which ensures:

Not displaying any previous login information e.g. username.


Limiting the number of unsuccessful attempts and locking the account if exceeded.
The password characters being hidden by symbols.
Displaying a general warning notice that only authorized users are allowed.
All access to operating systems is via a unique login id that will be audited and can be
traced back to each individual user.
All University systems, vulnerable to attack by malware must be protected by
antivirus software wherever possible unless a specific exclusion has been granted
and alternative measures have been taken to provide the same degree of protection.
Centrally Managed Kaspersky Antivirus 8.0 using Kaspersky Security Center protects
client systems running under Microsoft Windows XP, Vista 7, Windows 7, windows 8
and server systems running under Windows Server 2003, 2008 R2 from all types of
malicious programs. The product was designed specifically for high-performance
corporate servers that experience heavy loads.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

68 | P a g e

9.18 E-Learning at GMU


The GMU e-learning shall have an effective system that caters to self-paced personal
learning through resources available over the Internet.
The Gulf Medical University shall use the Moodle as an open source e-learning platform.
Students shall access the e-learning system at any location of their choice, since the system
is completely online. The University has campus-wide Wi-Fi services to facilitate e-learning
practices. Computers with Internet access have been provided in addition at all clinical
training sites in the library and student common rooms and residence halls.
Students are provided instructions on the proper use of the e-learning medium. Accessing
protected computer accounts or other computer functions, knowingly transmitting
computer viruses and unethical use of GMU access is prohibited.
To be granted the use of a computer account, users have to agree to abide by universal
guidelines on use of the computing and Internet services.
Access to the use of computer facilities is through authorized computer accounts. A
computer account consists of a unique log-in ID and a password. Students are requested to
keep their password secret. To activate the GMU account, the user shall be instructed to go
to the GMU website and follow the instructions.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

69 | P a g e

GMC HOSPITAL & RESEARCH


CENTER (GMCH & RC)

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

70 | P a g e

10.0 GMC Hospital & Research Center (GMCH & RC)


Gulf Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, the first teaching hospital under the
private sector in UAE, became operational in October 2002 by the Thumbay Group. With its
unique approach to healthcare, bringing together the best professional expertise and
infrastructure at affordable prices, the hospital constantly strives to fulfill its motto of
"Healing through knowledge and wisdom.
10.1 Vision
The vision of the hospital is to be recognized as a leading Academic Healthcare Centre
providing high quality patient centric specialty healthcare services to the community
integrated with medical research and clinical training.
10.2 Mission
The mission of the hospital is to provide ethical patient care focused on patient safety, high
quality care and cost effective services. GMC Hospital and Research Centre is committed to
integrate latest trends in education to produce competent healthcare professionals who are
sensitive to the cultural values of the clients they serve.
GMC Hospital and Research Centre will strive to attain the highest quality and accreditation
standards.
GMC Hospital and Research Centre is committed to promote ethical clinical research that
will enhance outcomes of clinical care.
10.3 Clinical Departments and Services
Being a multi-specialty hospital, it houses the departments of Anesthesiology, Accident &
Emergency, Cardiology, Clinical Nutrition, Dermatology & Venereology, Dentistry, ENT,
Family Medicine, General Surgery, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Nephrology, Obstetrics &
Gynecology, Orthopedics, Ophthalmology, Pediatrics & Neonatology, Physical Therapy,
Psychiatry, Gastroenterology, Radiology and Urology and Critical care units (ICU, CCU and
NICU).
Specialized services include a medical imaging department with state of the art equipment
like spiral CT scan, mammography, ultrasound, color Doppler, ultrasound and radiography.
An advanced laboratory caters to the requirements of all the clinical departments and is
equipped for routine and advanced investigations in biochemistry, clinical pathology,
serology and hormone studies.
Student posted in GMC Hospitals for clinical training is required to:

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

71 | P a g e

10.3.1 Dos

Procure the GMCH Student Guide Book.*


Wear student ID badges at all times in the hospital.
Follow the dress code as stated in the handbook. (refer section: 9.1 - dress code)
Maintain punctuality, professionalism and ethical behavior at all times when posted
in the hospital.
Complete the Orientation program of the hospital which includes Infection control &
Fire safety program.
Submit the vaccination/screening record for Hepatitis B and C Virus.
Submit the BLS certification (preferable).
Submit Arabic certification. (for non-Arab students preferable)
Submit the completed the Patient safety self-assessment form at the end of each
organ system module.
Maintain 80% attendance in the clinical and theory subjects.
Attend the CME/CPD programs of the hospital.
Follow the hospital rules and regulations.
Be responsible for their personal belongings, and accountable when posted in the
clinics and wards.
Report to the Office of Academic Affairs for any clarifications / problems faced.

10.3.2 Donts

NOT to involve in activities that disturbs patient care and safety.


NOT to use mobile phones in the clinics and wards.
NOT to access the patient information without prior approval. No entries are to be
made in the patients file.
NOT to take history or examine a patient without consent and approval of both the
patient and the faculty.
NOT to prescribe medications.
NOT to favor any patients breaking the rules of the hospital.
NOT to discuss the patient information in public.
NOT to do any clinical rotation that was missed without approval of the Academic
Affairs office personnel.
NOT to loiter in the hospital during nights and other timings out of the training.
NOT to violate any rules of the hospital.

10.3.3 Violation Warning:

First violation will lead to an oral warning.


Second violation will lead to a written warning.
Third violation will be seen in the Students Welfare Committee for disciplinary actions
which may lead to suspension/discontinuation of the training.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

72 | P a g e

*Note: All students posted in GMCHRC are required to procure the GMCHRC Student Guide
Book which states the rules and regulations of the hospital in detail. Students are required to
submit the signed disclaimer form to the academic affairs office after reading the Guide book.
Office of Academic Affairs - Gulf Medical College Hospital and Research Center
Prof. Meenu Cherian
Director Academic Affairs
Contact: 06-746 3333 Ext: 107, Speed Dial : 8056
Mrs. Sherly Ajay
Academic Coordinator
Contact: 06-746 3333 Ext: 106, Speed Dial : 8074
Ms. Namitha
Academic Secretary
Contact: 06-746 3333 Ext: 377
Mr. Abdul Razak
Office assistant
Academic Affairs

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Dr. Ihsan Ullah Khan


Assistant Director Academic Affairs
Contact 06-746 3333 Ext: 107, Speed Dial : 8141
Mr. Celso Viernes
Academic Secretary
Contact: 06-746 3333 Ext: 377, Speed ial:8089
Ms. Manjusha Latheesh
Academic Secretary
Contact: 06-746 3333 Ext: 377

73 | P a g e

STUDENT FINANCE

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

74 | P a g e

11.0. Student Finance


11.1 Student Finance Policy
The University publishes in the catalog, the student handbook and other publications the
universitys financial policy towards tuition fees and other payments for student services
provided.
All tuition fees shall be deposited before completing the registration process either in cash
or by checks payable to GMU due on the date of registration for new admissions. Students
in University rolls must pay all fees before commencement of the academic year.
Students who are unable to pay the full tuition fees upon registration may pay the tuition
fee in two installments after obtaining approval from the management. The first
installment shall be payable on the date of completion of registration (dated current) and
the second installment shall be paid by a postdated check due four months after the first
payment. A penalty shall be levied on all returned checks. The hostel fees along with a
security deposit shall be paid in full before occupying the room in the hostel.
Payment for other student services shall be levied in addition to tuition fee towards
provision of visa, conduct of examinations, issue of ID and Library cards and reissue of a lost
ID or Library card, Lab coat, convocation, issue of certificates verifying bonafides of the
student, issue of duplicate academic transcripts / course certificate / duplicate hall ticket;
replacement of a lost hostel key and annual rent for lockers provided.
Two or more children of the same family shall be entitled each to a 5% reduction in the
tuition fees provided they are registered in the same academic year. The request shall be
supported by the following documents; an application in person, a copy of the schedules of
the course being attended and a copy of their student IDs. Other details shall be provided
by the Office of Accounts.
The University shall arrange scholarship for students who have secured more than 95%
marks in their final higher secondary examinations and if approved by the sponsoring
agencies.
11.2 Tuition Fees* (Academic Year 2013 2014)
Tuition Fee if Paid Yearly

Tuition Fee if Paid in Two


Installments

Phase I

100,000

51,500

Phase II Year 1

95,000

49,000

Phase II Year 2

95,000

49,000

Phase III Year 1

95,000

49,000

Phase III Year 2

95,000

49,000

MBBS

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

75 | P a g e

* All tuition and other fees are subject to revision by the Gulf Medical University's Board of
Governors in accordance with university requirements. Every year, fees are reviewed and subject to
revision. As and when fees are revised, the new fees will be applicable to all existing and new
students. The amounts shown in this document represent fees as currently approved.

11.3 Hostel Fees


Single

AED 19000

+ AED 1000 Security deposit

Sharing

AED 13000

+ AED 1000 Security deposit

11.4 Utilities Service Fees


A Compulsory fee of AED 75 per month will be charged to student account in addition to the
respective room rent.
11.5 Registration Fees
Program

Fees

MBBS

AED 2,000

11.6 Examination Fees


Program

Professional Examination

Supplementary Professional
Examination

Phase - I

AED 1,500

AED 1,500

Phase - II

AED 3,000*

AED 3,000*

Phase - III

AED 4,000*

AED 4,000*

*-includes IFOM examination fees

11.7 Visa Charges


New

AED 1,500*

Renewal

AED 1,000*

*- Subject to revision

11.8 Caution Deposit Money


Caution Deposit Money

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

AED 1,500 (Refundable)

76 | P a g e

11.9 Fees for Other Services


Type of Service

Fees (in AED)

Graduation Fee

1,000

Third Party Liability (TPL) Insurance

200 per year

Online Examination

200 per year

Compensatory Clinical Posting

100 per day

Application for joining the GMU

150

Bonafide Letter (To whom it may concern)

100

Duplicate Academic Transcript (Course Certificate)

100

Replacing a lost hostel key / locker key

100

Damage to locker

100

Locker annual rent

30

ID Card /Library Card

25

Replacing a lost ID /Library Card

25

Duplicate hall ticket in place of original

25

11.10 Transportation Fees


Destination

One Day

One Week

One Month

Six Month

One Year

Ajman

AED 30

AED 150

AED 400

AED 2,100

AED 3,300

Sharjah

AED 50

AED 200

AED 500

AED 2,700

AED 4,400

Dubai

AED 70

AED 250

AED 600

AED 3,300

AED 5,500

11.11 Payment of Fees


Fees must be paid in full before completing the registration process either in cash or by
cheque payable to GMU due on the date of registration for new admissions. Students on
GMU rolls must pay all fees before commencement of each semester. However, for those
unable to pay the tuition fees upon registration in full, fees may be paid in two installments
after approval from the management: the first half is paid on the date of completing the
registration (31 August) and the second half by postdated cheque due four months after
the first payment (31 December). Hostel fees must be paid in full prior to joining the hostel.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

77 | P a g e

11.12 Late Fees and Fines


Late payment fee shall invite a penalty of AED 75 per day and any further delay will attract
further charges. Please note that a penalty of AED 500 is imposed on returned checks and
the returned check will not be handed over to the student unless the penalty is paid in cash.
The department heads in the college and the clinical training sites will mark the student
who has failed to pay the fees in time as absent until dues are cleared.
11.13 Financial Aid and Scholarships
Two or more children of the same family are entitled each to a 5% reduction in the fees,
when they are registered for the same or different programs in GMU in the same academic
year. Students are requested to apply in person with the necessary documents. GMU will
assist in obtaining financial aid from charitable agencies or commercial banks for needy
students. Further details in this regard may be obtained from the Office of the Accounts
Department.
11.14 Refund of Fees
In the event a student formally withdraws from the university, a grade of W or WF will be
recorded depending on time of withdrawal. The following refund schedule will apply:
Withdrawal from the University
One week before the first day of classes
Before the end of the first week of classes
During the second week of classes
During the third week of classes
During / After the fourth week of classes

100% refund
100% refund
50% refund
25% refund
0% refund

Students withdrawing from the programs after being admitted to GMU on having
completed the registration process by paying the tuition fees will not be refunded the fees
amount paid by them under any circumstances during or after fourth week.
11.15 Revision of Tuition and other Fees
All tuition and other fees are subject to revision by Gulf Medical Universitys Board of
Governors in accordance with University requirements.
Every year, fees are reviewed and subject to revision. As and when fees are revised, the
new fees will be applicable to all enrolled and new students. The amounts shown in this
document represent fees as currently approved.
If a student discontinues the academic program for any reason and rejoins/readmits the
program at a later year shall be governed by the tuition and other fees applicable at the
time of his/her rejoining/readmitting the program.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

78 | P a g e

ACADEMIC POLICIES

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

79 | P a g e

12.0 Academic Policies


12.1 Program Completion Policy
All students are expected to study the program and course details provided in the student
handbook and undergraduate catalog. For any one degree all requirements under the terms
of any catalog in effect at or after their admission must be met. Candidates must satisfy all
university requirements and all requirements established by the program faculty. The
individual programs may have higher standards and / or more restrictive requirements as
compared to the university minimum requirements.
The university mandates the following general degree completion requirements in order for
students to receive their degrees. Each graduate student must:

Be continuously enrolled in the program from admission to graduation.


Have satisfied all conditions of his or her admission, such as provisional admission.
Successfully complete a comprehensive examination or equivalent as determined by
the individual degree program.
Submit a thesis or research project, if required by the academic program, to the
University that meets the format requirements set forth in the College Thesis
Manual.

The students shall fulfill the requirements of each course as prescribed and published and
made available to the students. The student shall be responsible for attending all the classes
and completing the requirements of the chosen program of study. The course completion
and degree requirements of each program are published in the respective sections of the
undergraduate Catalog.
12.2 Academic Progress Policy
Students are expected to attend all classes as per the schedule notified by each college.
Classroom activities are essential to learning and to the application of knowledge. The
student is responsible for knowing and meeting all course requirements, including tests,
assignments, and class participation as indicated by the course instructor. The schedules
shall be published and prominently displayed on the notice boards in the department and
the general notice board of the college and university. It shall also be uploaded and made
available on the e-platform MYGMU and the LAN available in the multimedia labs.
The responsibility for making up work missed during an absence rests with the student.
Students are encouraged to initiate negotiations with the instructor regarding missed work
as early as possible. If a student is unable to attend class on an exam day, the instructor is to
be notified in advance.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

80 | P a g e

Students must complete all clinical requirements. If a student is unable to attend a


scheduled rotation, the student must notify the instructor prior to the rotation time or at
the earliest possible time. Students are responsible for contacting with instructors for
make-up work. All leaves must be approved by the Dean for further consideration.
All leave applications must be approved by Dean for attendance consideration. The deans
office reserves the right to accept or reject medical certificates after scrutiny of its
authenticity.
It is the responsibility of the students to interact with the concerned department to verify
and ensure about their attendance particulars from time to time.
In the case of Clinical rotation, a minimum aggregate of 80% attendance is mandatory for
the student to be permitted to appear for the professional examination. Even when the
reason for absence constitutes approved leave, the minimum aggregate of 80% must be
satisfied by compensatory postings.
Attendance shall be entered daily by the department in the Student Management System.
The comprehensive attendance shall be downloaded and displayed prominently each
month and forwarded to the office of the Dean for information and necessary action.
Deficits in attendance shall be noted and brought to the notice of the students / guardians
to enable the student to improve the situation. Academic advising shall be offered by the
faculty and preceptors to delineate the cause of the learning deficit and help the students
to overcome the contributing problems, if any.
The performance at the departmental / semester examinations shall be closely monitored
to identify students with learning difficulties. Academic advising by the faculty and the
preceptors shall be available at all times to resolve the problem.
The attendance deficits and unsatisfactory performance in the continuous assessments
held by the departments and the college shall be used as parameters to identify students
who are not progressing in the courses.
Students shall be regular and punctual at lectures, demonstrations, seminars, practical,
fieldwork and other academic exercises. They shall be required to attend all the allotted
working periods in each of the prescribed courses.
Leave on medical grounds shall be considered only on the recommendation of the Medical
board constituted by the University for a maximum period of 15 days. The Leave application
must be supported by a Medical Certificate issued by a licensed physician preferably from
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

81 | P a g e

any of the GMU affiliated clinical teaching hospitals. A maximum of 15 days leave on medical
grounds may be approved for compensating attendance deficits at the end of a course.
In the credit bearing programs, a maximum of 7 to 8 days medical leave will be considered
in a semester and a maximum of 15 days for an Academic Year.
Students must provide appropriate documents to support leave of absence for purposes
like renewal of residence permit abroad within one week after return to the University. The
period of absence will not be approved if this regulation is not followed.
Students who miss classes in connection with completion of GMU Visa formalities shall be
required to submit supporting documents indicating the date and time of absence, within
three days of completing the procedure. Such leave shall be approved.
Prolonged Absence: Students are required to inform the Deans office in writing in
instances of absence from classes or clinical program exceeding 3 months by giving valid
reasons for the absence. The college reserves the right to remove the names of those
students from the rolls for periods exceeding three months and those who fail to inform in
writing giving valid reasons for the absence.
The admissions committee of the university will review absences with prior information in
writing for up to a period of 1 year, before the student is allowed to rejoin the program. The
admissions committee of the university will not consider the case of any student for
rejoining the program if the period of absence exceeds 18 months.
The prescribed courses shall be completed within the specified time periods.
The progress that a student makes in achieving the goals and objectives of the curriculum
are to be regularly evaluated.
Formative Assessment shall be a continuous process carried throughout the academic
period and consists of weekly or end of the topic quizzes, tutorials, computer based tests
and small group discussions.
12.3 Grading, Assessment and Progression Policy
Refer Section: 16.0

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

82 | P a g e

12.4 Online Examination (Exam Soft)


GMU has entered into a license agreement with the Exam Soft Worldwide Inc. USA for
usage of their software for item banking, exam delivery, result scoring and item analysis.
From the AY 2012-13 onwards the mid semester, end semester examinations for the
academic programs wherever applicable shall have online examination of MCQs using exam
soft application.
The students are hereby notified that the online examination will be conducted in the
Testing Center halls I, II & III and in the Multi Media labs. The schedule of the examination for
each program with the details of venue, date & time will be notified by the examination
department.

12.5 International Foundations of Medicine (IFOM) I & II Examination


As per the direction from Commission for Academic Accreditation (CAA), Ministry of Higher
Education & Scientific Research (MOHE&SR), GMU has decided to implement the IFOM
examination (I & II) from the academic year 2013 2014 onwards. IFOM examination is used
for the purpose of external benchmarking of students performance in the MBBS program at
the end of Phase II and Phase III. The scores obtained in this examination will be
incorporated into the summative assessments.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

83 | P a g e

MISCONDUCT & DISCIPLINARY


PROCEDURES

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

84 | P a g e

13.0 Misconduct and Disciplinary Procedures


13.1 Student Misconduct & Disciplinary Procedures
13.1.1 Academic Misconduct
The college may discipline a student for academic misconduct, which is defined as any
activity that tends to undermine the academic integrity of the institution and undermine the
educational process. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to the following:
a. Cheating
A student must not use or attempt to use unauthorized assistance, materials, information,
or study aids in any academic exercise, including, but not limited to:
External assistance in professional or any in class examination. This prohibition
includes use of books, notes, mobiles, students cross talk, etc.
Use of another person as a substitute in the examination.
Stealing examination or other source material.
Use of any unauthorized assistance in a laboratory, or on fieldwork.
Altering the marks in any way.
Claiming as his / her own work done by others or the work completed in collaboration
with others.
b. Fabrication
A student must not falsify or invent any information or data in an academic work, including
records or reports, laboratory results, etc.
c. Plagiarism and Copyright Violation
Gulf Medical University takes strong exception to plagiarism and copyright violation by
students, faculty or support staff.
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is using the ideas created and words written by others as ones own, and without
indicating the source.
Plagiarism encompasses ideas, opinions or theories, facts, statistics, graphs, drawings,
images, photographs, videos, movies, music and other similar intellectual property, with the
exception of information that is categorized under common knowledge.
Plagiarism includes:
Turning in someone elses work as your own
Copying ideas from someone else without giving credit
Failing to put a quotation in quotation marks
Giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation
Changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit
Copying so many words or ideas from a source to make up the majority of your work.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

85 | P a g e

Students are reminded that ideas written by researchers or other authorities or the content
appearing in text books, recommended readings or journals need to be paraphrased before
they could be included in your project work, assignment reports, posters or manuscripts.
Paraphrasing involves reading the original text, understanding the meaning and then
presenting the information in your own words: maintaining the original sentence structure
with a few words changed in places is not acceptable paraphrasing.
Copyright Violation
Intellectual property such as, graphs, essays, poems, drawings, images, photographs,
videos, movies, music, statistics and other similar creations automatically become copyright
the day they are made public by the author. Unless the copyright owner has specifically
mentioned that the items are copyright free, using any of these in students own
compositions is a copyright violation. The exception to this stipulation is when the user is
covered under fair use, which is the limited use of copyright material for research,
scholarship and teaching. In such case the need for obtaining permission from the copyright
owner does not arise.
Preventing Plagiarism
Gulf Medical University requires the students to submit their projects, reports, assignments
and manuscripts prepared as electronic files through the portal that is made available
through the IT Department. While allowing the student to submit the document
instantaneously, the software also checks the document for plagiarism. When detected, the
percentage of similarity and the site where the original document had appeared will be
indicated. As headings of sections and references in the document may be similar to those
that appear in other texts, a 15-20% of similarity is taken as falling within the acceptable limit,
and is not considered as plagiarism.
Deciding on the percentage of plagiarism allowable is empirical, contingent solely upon
evaluators discretion. The distinction between what is fair use and what is infringement in a
particular case will not always be clear or easily defined. There is no specific number of
words, lines, or notes that may safely be taken without permission. Acknowledging the
source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining permission.
The extent of plagiarism is only relevant in determining the form and level of sanction.
Consequences of Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is considered an act of academic misconduct. Plagiarism of any sort or any degree
is not condoned under any circumstances, and students convicted of plagiarism after due
procedures are liable to punitive action by the university authorities.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

86 | P a g e

Academic Misconduct Procedures


(A) Initiation of Proceedings
When a student in a course commits an act of academic misconduct like plagiarism, the
faculty member who has detected the misconduct has the authority to initiate academic
misconduct proceedings against the student. Before this, the faculty is required to hold an
informal meeting with the student concerning the matter. If the faculty member affirms that
the student did commit the act of misconduct as alleged, then at the conclusion of the
informal meeting, the faculty member is required to report the matter to the Student
Welfare Committee in writing.
Upon reviewing the complaint and after enquiry & verification, the committee will forward
the report to the College Council presided over by the Dean. On the consensus reached by
the Council, the Dean has the discretion to decide whether disciplinary proceedings should
be instituted.
A disciplinary proceeding is initiated by the Dean sending a notice to the student who is the
subject of the complaint. The notice sent is to inform the student that charges are pending
and that a hearing has been scheduled. It shall inform the student of the reported
circumstances of the allegedly wrongful conduct.
It also specifies that if the student fails to appear for the meeting, the Dean may re-schedule
the meeting.
The notice shall inform the student that the college council may impose straight -away any
of the below mentioned disciplinary penalties, if it is reasonably believed the failure of nonappearance is to be without good cause or weigh this as a negative factor in future appeals.
(B) Disposition
When the student appears as required, the Dean shall inform the student as fully as possible
of the facts alleged.
If, after discussion and such further investigation as may be necessary, the Dean determines
that the violation occurred, as alleged, the Dean shall so notify the student and may impose
any one or a combination of the below mentioned sanctions for facts of academic
misconduct. If the student fails to adhere to the sanctions imposed, the student may be
subjected to additional sanctions, including suspension or expulsion. The sanctions include
lowered or failing grade on the particular assignment or the possibility of an additional
administrative sanction, (like the under mentioned) in case the academic misconduct
extends to other deeds
a. A failing grade on the examination, paper, research or creative project;
b. A specified reduction in the course grade;
c. Non-inclusion of scores earned in continuous assessment; and
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

87 | P a g e

d. Multiple Sanctions: More than one of the sanctions listed above may be imposed for
any single violation;
Reprimand and warning - An undertaking is signed by the student not to repeat the offence.
The student may face suspension if she / he engages in the same misconduct again or
commits any other violation.
Suspension - A student may be prohibited from participating in all aspects of college life for
a specified period of time.
The student may appeal against the decision of the Dean to the Provost. The appeal for the
latter decision rests with the discretion of the Provost.
Appeal to and Action by the Provost
The Provost shall inquire into the facts of the appeal and shall discuss the matter individually
with the student, the faculty member, the Dean and make a decision concerning the merits
of the appeal. The Provost may affirm the original decision concerning the disciplinary
sanction to be imposed, reverse the original decision and direct that the complaint be
dismissed; impose a different sanction, amounting to commutation.
The student may appeal against the decision of the Provost to the President. The appeal for
the latter decision rests with the discretion of the President.
Appeal to and Action by the President
The President shall inquire into the facts of the appeal and shall discuss the matter
individually with the student, the faculty member, the Dean, the Provost and make a
decision concerning the merits of the appeal. He may affirm the original decision concerning
the disciplinary sanction to be imposed, reverse the original decision and direct that the
complaint be dismissed; impose a different sanction, amounting to commutation.
13.1.2 Personal Misconduct
13.1.2.1 Personal Misconduct on University Premises
The college may discipline a student for the following acts of personal misconduct, which
occur on college property and its allied teaching sites:
False accusation of misconduct, forgery, alteration of college document (record,
identification).
Making a false report on emergency / catastrophe.
Lewd, indecent or obscene conduct, gesture/s and /or remark/s.
Disorderly conduct, which interferes with teaching or any other college activity.
Failure to comply with the directions of authorized college officials.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

88 | P a g e

Unauthorized possession of college and others' property.


Physical damage to university related or others' property.
The Committee will place the facts of the case before the College Council, presided over by
the Dean and a decision on the nature of act, and sanction to be imposed is taken. The
nature of the act and the sanction to be imposed is reviewed by the college council,
presided over by the Dean, taking into consideration the following:
(i) Previous act/s of misconduct.
(ii) Record of repeated act/s of misconduct.
13.1.2.2 Personal Misconduct Outside University Premises
The college may discipline a student for acts of personal misconduct that are not committed
on college property, if the acts arise from activities that are being conducted off the campus,
or if the misconduct undermines the security of the GMU community or the integrity of the
educational process.
PERSONAL MISCONDUCT PROCEDURES
(A) Initiation of Proceedings
A report that a student has committed an act of personal misconduct may be filed by any
person; it must be submitted in writing to the Student Welfare Committee.
After reviewing a complaint, after enquiry & verification, the committee will forward the
report to the College Council, presided over by the Dean. On the consensus reached by the
Council, the Dean has the discretion to decide whether disciplinary proceedings should be
instituted.
A disciplinary proceeding is initiated by the Dean sending a notice to the student who is the
subject of the complaint. The notice sent is to inform the student that charges are pending
and that a hearing has been scheduled. It shall inform the student of the reported
circumstances of the allegedly wrongful conduct.
It also specifies that if the student fails to appear for the conference, the Dean may reschedule the meeting.
The notice shall inform the student that the college council may impose straight -away any
of the below mentioned disciplinary penalties, if it is reasonably believed the failure of nonappearance is to be without good cause or weigh this as a negative factor in future appeals.
(B) Disposition
When the student appears as required, the Dean shall inform the student as fully as
possible of the facts alleged.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

89 | P a g e

The student is given a fair opportunity to explain her / his position / views regarding the
allegations leveled against her / him.
If, after discussion and such further investigation as may be necessary, the Dean
determines that the violation occurred, as alleged, the Dean shall so notify the student and
may impose any one or a combination of the below mentioned sanctions for facts of
personal misconduct. If the student fails to adhere to the sanctions imposed, the student
may be subjected to additional sanctions, including suspension or expulsion. The student
may appeal against the decision of the Dean of the college to the Provost of the university.
The sanctions include:
Reprimand and warning - That the student may receive additional sanction/s if the student
engages in the same misconduct again or commits any other violation/s.
Disciplinary probation is for a specified period of time under conditions specified by the
Dean. As a condition of probation, the student may be required to participate in a specific
program, such as a counseling program, a program designed, to stimulate good citizenship
within the college community, or any other activity which would foster civic participation.
Restitution - A student may be required to pay the cost for the replacement or repair of any
property damaged by the student.
Expulsion from University Hostel - A student may be expelled from university hostel and
the student's contract for university hostel may be rescinded.
Suspension - A student may be suspended / debarred from participating in all aspects of
college life for a specified period of time.
Expulsion - A student may be expelled from the university permanently. Furthermore, the
student may not thereafter petition for readmission to the university.
(C) Appeal to and Action by the Provost
The student may appeal against the decision of the Dean of the college to the Provost of the
university, who may take any of the following actions:

Affirm the original decision that the student did commit the alleged act of
misconduct.
Affirm the original decision concerning the disciplinary sanction to be imposed.
Reverse the original decision that the student did commit the alleged act of
misconduct and direct that the complaint be dismissed.
Set aside the original decision concerning the disciplinary sanction to be imposed
and impose a different sanction, amounting to commutation.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

90 | P a g e

(D) Appeal to and action by the President


The student may appeal against the decision of the Provost to the President of the
university, who may take any of the following actions:

Affirm the original decision that the student did commit the alleged act of
misconduct.
Affirm the original decision concerning the disciplinary sanction to be imposed.
Reverse the original decision that the student did commit the alleged act of
misconduct and direct that the complaint be dismissed.
Set aside the original decision concerning the disciplinary sanction to be imposed
and impose a different sanction, amounting to commutation.

Repeated Misconduct Procedure (Personal)


In cases of repeated personal misconduct by a student, the student welfare committee will
study the advice, recommendation/s and instruction/s imparted by the committee against
the student on previous occasions. Serious warnings or disciplinary proceedings against the
student by the student welfare committee on earlier occasions constitute enough grounds
for the committee to recommend dismissal of the student with immediate effect if the
present episode of misconduct warrants such action.
Procedures for Handling Misconduct by Student Organizations
Academic misconduct proceedings and disciplinary proceedings against individual members
of a student organization are governed by the procedures otherwise applicable to students
alleged to have committed acts of academic misconduct.
GMU procedures for imposing academic and disciplinary sanctions are designed to provide
students with the guarantees of due process and procedural fairness, to ensure equal
protection for all students, and to provide for the imposition of similar sanctions for similar
acts of misconduct.
13.2 Students Rights and Responsibilities
13.2.1 Students Rights and Responsibilities Policy
The student must become familiar with the academic policies, curriculum requirements, and
associated deadlines as outlined in the undergraduate catalog. The academic advisor shall
advise the student on all matters related to their program of study and will aid the student in
the interpretation of policies whenever necessary.
However, it shall ultimately be the student's responsibility to meet all stated requirements
for the degree and the policies related thereof. It is also the student's responsibility to
actively utilize their campus email and the university web site, observe netiquette, observe
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

91 | P a g e

the policies on internet use as published and made available in the Student handbook as it
tends to be a major communication resource and is often the primary form of
communication between students.
Gulf Medical University shall maintain an academic environment in which the freedom to
teach, conduct research, learn, and administer the university is protected. Students will
enjoy maximum benefit from this environment by accepting responsibilities commensurate
with their role in the academic community. The principles found herein are designed to
facilitate communication, foster academic integrity, and defend freedoms of inquiry,
discussion, and expression among members of the university community.
13.2.2 Rights in the Pursuit of Education
Students will have the right:

To pursue an education free from illegal discrimination and to be judged on the basis of
relevant abilities, qualifications, and performance;
To fair and impartial academic evaluation and a means of recourse through orderly
procedures to challenge action contrary to such standard;
To an academic environment conducive to intellectual freedom; and
To a fair and orderly disciplinary process.

13.2.3 Right to Access Records and Facilities


Students will have the right:
To access their own personnel and education records and to have the university
maintain and protect the confidential status of such records, as required by
appropriate legal authority;
To have access to accurate information regarding tuition, fees and charges, course
availability, general requirements for establishing and maintaining acceptable
academic standing, and graduation requirements.
13.2.4 Right to Freedom of Association, Expression, Advocacy, and Publication
Students will have the right:

To free inquiry and expression;


To organize and join associations to promote their common and lawful interests;
To be able to protest on university premises in a manner which does not obstruct or
disrupt teaching, research, administration, or other activities authorized by the
university;

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

92 | P a g e

13.2.5 Right to Contribute to University Governance and Curriculum


Students will have the right through student representatives, to participate in formulating
and evaluating institutional policies.
13.2.6 Student Responsibilities
Students shall be expected to balance these rights with the responsibility to respect the
learning environment for others and for themselves and to make their best effort to meet
academic challenges undertaken. Students will be responsible for compliance with the
University Code of Conduct.
The standards of professional behavior in the educational setting are related to three
domains:
1) Individual Performance;
2) Relationships with students, faculty, staff, patients and community, others; and
3) Support of the ethical principles of the medical profession, as expanded below:
Individual performance:

Demonstrates educational experiences (i.e., exams, clinics, rounds, small group


sessions, appointments at the clinical skills center).
Adheres to dress code consistent with institutional standards.
Relationships with students, faculty, staff, patients and community.
Establishes effective rapport.
Establishes and maintains appropriate boundaries in all learning situations.
Respectful at all times of all parties involved.
Demonstrates humanism in all interactions.
Respects the diversity of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, disability
and socioeconomic status.
Resolves conflict in a manner that respects the dignity of every person involved.
Uses professional language being mindful of the environment.
Maintains awareness and adapts to differences in individual patients.
Including those related to culture and medical literacy.
Supports ethical principles of the medical profession.
Maintains honesty.
Contributes to an atmosphere conducive to learning and is committed to advance
scientific knowledge.
Protects patients confidentiality.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

93 | P a g e

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
(CoM)

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

94 | P a g e

14.0 The Integrated MBBS Program


14.1 Goals
1. The graduate will acquire and understand scientific principles of medical knowledge
at the molecular, cellular, organ, whole body and environmental levels of health and
disease. He should be able to apply the current understanding and recent advances
in contemporary basic sciences to promote health, prevent, diagnose and manage
the common health problems of individuals (at different stages of life), families and
communities.
2. The graduate will develop basic clinical skills (interpretive, manipulative, and
procedural) such as the ability to obtain a patient's history, to undertake a
comprehensive physical and mental state examination and interpret the findings, and
to demonstrate competence in the performance of a limited number of basic
technical procedures.
3. The graduates will develop an attitude and practice personal and professional values
necessary for the achievement of high standards of medical practice. This should
enable him to carry out independently the responsibilities of a physician and to
develop further knowledge and skills in order to adapt to the changes in the practice
of medicine throughout his professional career.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

95 | P a g e

14.2 Intended Program Learning Outcomes


Learning
Outcome

Domain

Upon successful completion of the program, the graduate


will be able to:
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key
concepts and principles of biomedical, clinical and
psychosocial sciences and their application in the clinical
context to promote health, and prevent and treat diseases
commonly encountered in the region within the legal and
regulatory framework

LO1

Medical
Knowledge

LO2

Communicate effectively with patients and their families,


Communication
colleagues, superiors and members of the public through
Skills
written, verbal and electronic means

LO3

Research and
Analytical Skills

LO4

LO5

LO6

LO7

Use appropriate statistical tools and research methods to


practice evidence-based medicine, maintain appropriate
documentation and carry out basic research studies

Arrive at decisions, take actions and perform assigned duties


paying due attention to cultural diversity, patient
Professionalism
confidentiality and ethical issues; be worthy of trust and
and Values
exhibit honesty, fairness, compassion, respect and integrity in
all interactions with patients and their families
Provide optimum patient care at the level of a basic doctor
through clerking, diagnosing and managing patients,
including performing common emergency and life-saving
Patient Care
procedures, adhering to recommended guidelines and
standard precautions with an awareness of both one's own
limitations and the need to seek the help of an expert when
required in the interests of patient safety
Function as an effective leader and contribute to the
professional development of peers; be an effective team
Leadership and member when dealing with peers and superiors in the
Teamwork
discharge of duties and during the process of learning and
appreciate the roles and contributions of colleagues and
other healthcare professionals of the multidisciplinary team
Possess qualities of self-evaluation, reflection, self-learning
and time-management skills so that life-long learning could
Personal
be undertaken for personal and professional development;
Development
develop critical thinking and problem-solving abilities along
with sufficient personal strengths to cope with the physical
and psychological demands of a career in medicine

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

96 | P a g e

14.3 MBBS Program Structure

Modular System-based Integrated MBBS Curriculum

Phase I

Phase II

Language &
Communication Skills
Psychosocial Sciences
Cells, Molecules & Genes

Phase - III
Endocrine
System
(including
Mammary
Glands)

P
Blood &
B
Immune System
L
P
Cardiovascular
B
System
L

P
B
L

P
Reproductive
B
System
L

Alimentary
System

P
B
L

Musculo
Skeletal
System

P
B
L

Metabolism & Nutrition


Internal & External
Environment
Year 1

P
Urinary System B
L
Year 2

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

P
Integumentary
B
System
L
Year 3

Blood &
Immune System

Cardiovascular
System

Cardiovascular
System
Respiratory
System
Alimentary
System

Respiratory
System
Alimentary
System

Urinary System

Endocrine
System
(including
Mammary
Glands)
Reproductive
System

Urinary System
Endocrine
System
(including
Mammary
Glands)
Reproductive
System

Nervous System

Musculo
Skeletal System

Musculo
Skeletal System
Integumentary
System

Year 4

Year 5

Nervous System

CRRI

Embryogenesis &
Life Cycle

P
Nervous System B
L

BASIC CLINICAL SKILLS

P
B
L

BASIC CLINICAL SKILLS

Respiratory
System

Blood &
Immune System

MULTI SYSTEM MODULES

Tissues and Organs

Integumentary
System

97 | P a g e

Year
6

14.4 Plan of Study


Phase I (2013 Batch)

FALL SEMESTER

Semester

Course

Duration

ORIENTATION

Sep 4 , 2013

ORIENTATION MED 101 & MED 102


(Language & Communication Skills)
and (Psychosocial Sciences)
MED 101
MED 102
(Language &
(Psychosocial
Communication
Sciences)
Skills)
MED 103
(Cells, Molecules & Genes)
EID HOLIDAYS
MED 103
(Cells, Molecules & Genes)
MED 104
(Tissues and Organs)
FALL SEMESTER BREAK
MED 104
(Tissues and Organs)
MED 105
(Embryogenesis and Life Cycle)
STUDY LEAVE
SEMESTER I EXAMINATION
MED 106
(Metabolism and Nutrition)

SPRING SEMESTER

SPRING SEMESTER BREAK


MED 106
(Metabolism and Nutrition)
MED 107
(Internal and External Environment)
STUDY LEAVE
SEMESTER II EXAMINATION
STUDY LEAVE
PHASE-I PROFESSIONAL
EXAMINATION
EID & SUMMER HOLIDAYS
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Weeks

Sep 5 , 2013

Sep 8 26, 2013


(3 Weeks)

1-3

Sep 29 Oct 10, 2013


(2 Weeks)
Oct 13 17, 2013
(1 Week)
Oct 20 Nov 14, 2013
(4 Weeks)
Nov 17 Dec 19, 2013
(5 Weeks)
Dec 22, 2013 - Jan 2, 2014
(2 Weeks)
Jan 5 - 9, 2014
(1 Week)
Jan 12 Feb 6, 2014
(4 Weeks)
Feb 9 13, 2014
(1 Week)
Feb 16 20, 2014
(1 Week)
Feb 23 March 27, 2014
(5 Weeks)
March 30 - Apr 10, 2014
(2 Weeks)
Apr 13 - 17, 2014
(1 Week)
Apr 20 - June 19, 2014
(9 Weeks)
June 22 - 26, 2014
(1 Week)
Jun 29 - July 3, 2014
(1 Week)
July 6 - July 17, 2014
(2 Weeks)
July 20 - 24, 2014
(1 Week)

4-5
6
7 - 10
11 - 15
16 - 17
18
19 - 22
23
24
25 - 29
30 - 31
32
33 - 41
42
43
44 - 45

July 27 - Aug 31, 2014


98 | P a g e

46

Phase II Year 1 (2012 Batch)


Semester

Course

Duration

ORIENTATION

Sep 8, 2013

MED 202
(Blood and Immune System)

Sep 9 Oct 10, 2013


(5 Weeks)
Oct 13 17, 2013
(1 Week)
Oct 20 24, 2013
(1 Week)
Oct 27 Dec 19, 2013
(8 Weeks)
Dec 22, 2013 - Jan 2, 2014
(2 Weeks)
Jan 5 - 9, 2014
(1 Week)

FALL SEMESTER

EID HOLIDAYS
MED 202
(Blood and Immune System)
MED 203
(Cardiovascular System)
FALL SEMESTER BREAK

SPRING SEMESTER

SEMESTER III EXAMINATION

Weeks

1-5
6
7
8 - 15
16 - 17
18

MED 211 & MED 212


(Clinical Block & Research
Methodology)

Jan 12 Feb 6, 2014


(4 Weeks)

19 - 22

MED 204
(Respiratory System)

Feb 9 March 20, 2014


(6 Weeks)

23 - 28

MED 212
(Research Methodology)

March 23 - 27, 2014


(1 Week)
March 30 - Apr 10, 2014
(2 Weeks)
Apr 13 - 17, 2014
(1 Week)
Apr 20 - June 12, 2014
(8 Weeks)
June 15 - July 10, 2014
(4 Weeks)
July 13 - 17, 2014
(1 week)
July 20 - 24, 2014
(1 Week)

SPRING SEMESTER BREAK


MED 212
(Research Methodology)
MED 205
(Alimentary System)
MED 206
(Urinary System)
STUDY LEAVE
SEMESTER IV EXAMINATION
EID & SUMMER HOLIDAYS

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

29
30 - 31
32
33 - 40
41 - 44

July 27 - Aug 31, 2014

99 | P a g e

45
46

Phase II Year 2 (2011 Batch)


Semester

Course

Duration

Weeks

MED 210
(Endocrine System and Mammary
Gland)

Sep 8 Oct 10, 2013


(5 Weeks)

1-5

FALL SEMESTER

EID HOLIDAYS
(MED 207)
(Reproductive System)
MED 211 & 212
(Clinical Block III & Research
Methodology)
FALL SEMESTER BREAK
SEMESTER V EXAMINATION

Dec 8 - 19, 2013


( 2 Weeks)

6
7 - 13
14 - 15

Dec 22, 2013 Jan 2, 2014


(2 Weeks)
Jan 5 9, 2014
(1 Week)

16 - 17
18

MED 208
(Nervous System)

Jan 12 - March 13, 2014


(9 Weeks)

19 - 27

MED 211 & 212


(Clinical Block IV & Research
Methodology)

March 16 - 27, 2014


(2 Weeks)

28 - 29

SPRING SEMESTER BREAK


SPRING SEMESTER

Oct 13 17, 2013


(1 Week)
Oct 20 Dec 5, 2013
(7 Weeks)

MED 209
(Musculoskeletal System)
MED 201
(Integumentary System)
STUDY LEAVE
SEMESTER VI EXAMINATION
STUDY LEAVE
PHASE II PROFESSIONAL EXAM
ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS
EID & SUMMER HOLIDAYS

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

March 30, - Apr 10, 2014


(2 Weeks)
Apr 13 - May 29, 2014
(7 Weeks)
June 1 - 12, 2014
(2 Weeks)
June 15 - 19, 2014
(1 Week)
June 22 - 26, 2014
(1 Week)
June 29 - July 10, 2014
(2 Weeks)
July 13 - 17, 2014
(1 Week)
July 20 24, 2014
(1 Week)

30 - 31
32 - 38
39 - 40
41
42
43 - 44

July 27 - Aug 31, 2014

100 | P a g e

45
46

Phase III Year 1 (2010 Batch)

FALL SEMESTER

Semester

Course

Duration

ORIENTATION

Sep 4 - 5, 2013

MED 301
(Integumentary System)
MED 302
(Blood and Immune System)

Sep 8 Oct 3, 2013


(4 Weeks)
Oct 6 - 10, 2013
(1 Week)
Oct 13 - 17, 2013
(1 Week)
Oct 20 31, 2013
(2 Weeks)
Nov 3 - 21, 2013
(3 Weeks)
Nov 24 - Dec 19, 2013
( 4 Weeks)
Dec 22, 2013 - Jan 2, 2014
(2 Weeks)

EID HOLIDAYS
MED 302
(Blood and Immune System)
MED 304
(Respiratory System)
MED 303
(Cardiovascular System)

SPRING SEMESTER

FALL SEMESTER BREAK

Week

SEMESTER VII EXAMINATION

Jan 4, 2014

MED 305
(Alimentary System)

Jan 5 - 30, 2014


(4 Weeks)

MED 306
(Urinary System)
MED 310
(Endocrine System)
(MED 307)
(Reproductive System)

Feb 2 - 20, 2014


(3 Weeks)
Feb 23 - March 6, 2014
(2 Weeks)
March 9 - 27, 2014
(3 Weeks)
March 30- Apr 3, 2014
(1 Week)
Apr 6 - 24, 2014
(3 Weeks)
Apr 27 - May 29, 2014
(5 Weeks)
June 1 -July 10, 2014
(6 Weeks)
July 13 - 17, 2014
(1 Week)
July 20 - 24, 2014
(1 Week)

SPRING SEMESTER BREAK


(MED 307)
(Reproductive System)
MED 308
(Nervous System)
MED 309
(Musculoskeletal System)
STUDY LEAVE
SEMESTER VIII EXAMINATION
EID & SUMMER HOLIDAYS

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

1-4
5
6
7-8
9 - 11
12 - 15
16 - 17

18 - 21
22 - 24
25 - 26
27 - 29
30
31 - 33
34 - 38
39 - 44

July 27 - Aug 31, 2014

101 | P a g e

45
46

Phase III Year 2(2009 Batch)

SPRING SEMESTER

FALL SEMESTER

Semester

Course

Duration

ORIENTATION

Sep 4 - 5, 2013

Clinical Posting 1

Sep 8 Oct 31, 2013


(8 Weeks)

1-8

Clinical Posting 2

Nov 3 Dec 26, 2013


(8 Weeks)

9 - 16

SEMESTER IX EXAMINATION

Dec 28, 2013

Clinical Posting 3

Dec 29, 2013 Feb 20, 2014


(8 Weeks)

17- 24

Clinical Posting 4

Feb 23 Apr 17, 2014


(8 Weeks)

25 - 32

Clinical Posting 5

Apr 20 - June 12, 2014


(8 Weeks)

33 - 40

STUDY LEAVE

June 15 - 19, 2014


(1 Week)

41

SEMESTER X EXAMINATION

June 22 - 26, 2014


(1 Week)

42

STUDY LEAVE

June 29 July 10, 2014


(2 Weeks)

43 - 44

PHASE III PROFESSIONAL EXAM

July 13 - 17, 2014


(1 Week)

45

ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS

July 20 24, 2014


(1 Week)

46

EID & SUMMER HOLIDAYS

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Week

July 27 - Aug 31, 2014

102 | P a g e

14.5 Course Descriptions


Phase - I
MED 101: Language & Communication Skills
The course is designed to provide a variety of simulated patient encounter settings to
introduce the basic interpersonal communication processes that help to gain sensitivity to
patient perspectives and to develop a sense of personal awareness, which will help the
student to deal with patients of all ages and both genders in routine and difficult situations
and in the process work effectively as a member of the health care team in real life
encounters. Students will be encouraged to learn medical terminology in common usage
both in English and Arabic to reduce language barriers in an effort to improve their
communication skills.
MED 102: Psychosocial Sciences
This course covers two major themes. Introduction to Behavioral Sciences covers such
topics as psychosocial basis of health, approaches to study of human behavior, methods of
behavioral sciences research, organic basis of behavior and the process of human
development through the life span. Dynamics of Human Behavior helps students to gain
knowledge of the working of the human memory system, consciousnesses and human
behavior, and the principles of learning and reinforcements and its applications. It also
provides students an opportunity to learn the elements of culture and process of
socialization, and their impact on health and illness.
MED 103: Cells, Molecules & Genes
This course introduces the fundamentals of molecular, cellular and genetic processes; the
structure-function relationships of biomolecules with an emphasis on their clinical relevance;
the functions of the biomembranes; and the basic mechanisms of signal transduction. Use of
computer and web-based learning resources in this course serve to promote interactive and
self- directed learning.
MED 104: Tissues & Organs
In this course, the structure and function of the various types of tissues, their organization
to form organs of the different systems in the body are dealt with in an integrated manner
to help in understanding the correlation of structure with function. This will enable the
learner to better correlate the alterations in function due to structural changes in a disease.
Seminars in relevant areas will give the learner an opportunity to develop presentation skills.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

103 | P a g e

MED 105: Embryogenesis & Life Cycle


This course is designed to introduce the normal human development at the various life
stages from conception to old age including embryology, childhood, adolescence, adulthood
and aging in the elderly. The course covers the first few weeks of early human development
from fertilization to formation of the embryo. Students will also learn to appreciate health
as a component of life cycle development.
MED 106: Metabolism & Nutrition
This course deals with the key concepts and principles of nutrition and metabolism that are
necessary for understanding the development of metabolic diseases and the rationale of the
methods employed in their investigations. Opportunities will be provided to work
cooperatively as a member of a group in the preparation and submission of a project when
students will gather and analyze health information in an attempt to identify unhealthy
eating behaviors which increases risk of developing nutritional disorders.
MED 107: Internal & External Environment
This course is the last course in Phase-I of the Integrated Curriculum. This course will help
the students to gain an insight into the challenges human beings face each day of their lives
indoors, at home or at work or outdoors as their bodies are challenged by agents in its
internal and external environments. The student will be introduced to the basic physiological
and pathological responses to the noxious agents at the level of cells, tissues and organs
that in turn is related to the toxicity of the agents which make the difference between
health and disease. The students will realize the magnitude of the preventive measures
made at the level of the individual, the community and globally to achieve the vision of
health for all in the future.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

104 | P a g e

Phase - II
MED 201: Integumentary System
This course has been integrated around the Integumentary System to provide the learner
with a sound knowledge and understanding of the structure, functions and development of
the integumentary system in health and its major deviations in common skin diseases. In
addition, the learner is introduced to the causes, pathogenesis, and pathological basis of
clinical manifestations, methods of diagnosis, principles governing management and
methods of prevention of these disorders.
MED 202: Blood And Immune System
The course presents an overview of the normal structure and functions of the blood and the
immune system and their derangement in disorders of the red cells, leucocytes, platelets
and the lymphoid tissues/organs. The pathophysiology, molecular basis, laboratory findings
and clinical manifestations of anemias, leukemias, and hemorrhagic, thrombotic and
immune disorders will be emphasized through didactics, laboratory exercises and seminars.
Case based discussions through CBL, PBL and settings will encourage development of
problem solving skills.
MED 203: Cardiovascular System
This course has been structured as an integrated study of the human cardiovascular system
and provides instruction into the mechanisms of operation of the human cardiovascular
system. Emphasis is placed on the integration of relevant principles with respect to the
behavior of the normal circulation and its responses to the stress of injury and disease. This
course deals with common cardiovascular disorders, including a study of atherosclerosis,
coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction, hypertension, valvular and congenital
heart disease, infectious heart disease, and heart muscle disorders. Also included is a series
of case presentations dealing with common complications of a variety of cardiac diseases:
cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure and shock. PBL sessions deal with prototype diseases and
provide opportunities to develop problem solving and interpersonal communication skills.
MED 204: Respiratory System
The course is designed to provide an integrated approach to the learning of the normal
structure, function and development of human respiratory system using different strategies
and applying the knowledge and skills acquired in understanding the pathophysiology of
various respiratory disorders. The basic principles of management of these disorders with a
focus on disease prevention will be described. The medico legal aspects of specific
respiratory disorders will be studied. PBL week will deal with the pathophysiology and
management of the lower respiratory tract infections.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

105 | P a g e

MED 205: Alimentary System


The course adopts an integrated organ system- based approach to provide the learner with
a sound knowledge and understanding of the structure, functions and development of the
digestive system and its accessory organs, in health and their major deviations in disease.
Furthermore, the learner is introduced to the aetiopathogenesis, basis of clinical
manifestations, methods of diagnosis, principles governing the pharmacological
management and methods of prevention of common disorders of the digestive system. The
course employs problem based learning (PBL) and a variety of teaching /learning methods to
facilitate interdisciplinary integration, student centered learning and development of
generic competences. Simultaneous introduction of basic clinical skills aims to vertically
integrate learning and prepare the students for clinical clerkship in the next phase.
MED 206: Urinary System
This course has been designed as an integrated study of the urinary system and provides
instruction into the mechanisms of operation of the urinary system. Emphasis is placed on
the integration of relevant principles with respect to the mechanisms of normal excretion
and its responses to health and disease. This course deals with common urinary disorders,
including study of renal failure, glomerular diseases, infections, obstruction and neoplasms
of the urinary tract. Also included is a series of case presentations dealing with common
complications of a variety of urinary tract diseases. PBL courses deal with prototype diseases
and provide opportunities to develop problem-solving skills.
MED 207: Reproductive System
The course is designed to provide an integrated approach to the learning of the normal
structure, function and development of the human reproductive system using different
learning strategies to acquire the knowledge and skills required for understanding the
pathophysiology of various reproductive disorders; the rationale for their management
focused on disease prevention. The medico legal aspects of specific disorders will be
studied. The PBL course will deal with the pathophysiology and management of menstrual
disorders.
MED 208: Nervous System
The course is designed to provide an integrated approach to the learning of the normal
structure, function and development of the nervous system and the organs of hearing,
vision, taste, smell and touch. The course also serves to introduce the medical students to
individual factors affecting human behavior particularly the micro level psychological
processes such as perception, personality, attitudes, values and motivation. The students
will also have a chance to understand the impact of these factors on the health and wellbeing of people in general and on the patient-doctor relationship in specific. The medico
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

106 | P a g e

legal aspects of death will be studied. PBL week will deal with the pathophysiology, and
management of meningeal infections.
MED 209: Musculoskeletal System
In this course the knowledge of the contribution of the normal structure, function and
development of the bones, joints and muscles in the maintenance of the kinetics of normal
posture and locomotion will help to understand how the physiological and pathological
changes associated with congenital, traumatic, infectious, degenerative, metabolic and
neoplastic musculoskeletal disorders lead to physical disabilities that have a major impact on
the biomechanical function of this organ system particularly following traumatic bone
injuries and degenerative joint disease.
MED 210: Endocrine System & Mammary Gland
This course has been structured to provide an integrated study of the homeostatic
mechanisms regulated by the circulating hormones secreted by the different endocrine
glands. Emphasis has been placed on the normal responses to stress that alter the endocrine
balance and the physiological changes that help to restore homeostasis. This course deals
with common disorders of the hypothalamus and pituitary, thyroid and parathyroid, adrenal,
pancreas that lead to either hyper functioning or hypo functioning metabolic disease states.
The mammary glands have been included as an example of a typical target organ of
hormone action. The PBL course introduces breast diseases, both neoplastic and nonneoplastic as a prototype of diseases that arises as a complication of .persistent hormonal
imbalance.
MED 211 Clinical Skills Competency Levels I & II
(Introductory Clerkship)

This course is designed to be introduced gradually and progressively and reinforced as


appropriate in each course in the pre-clerkship years in an attempt to vertically integrate the
knowledge of the basic sciences with the practice of the clinical sciences. Communication
skills will be learnt as a prerequisite of general history taking and physical examination to
help elicit the signs and symptoms and is introduced in year one (PHASE I). This will be
followed by a more focused history taking and physical examination as relevant to the
different organ systems in the second and third years (PHASE II). In addition during this
phase, the students will be introduced to the performance of routine technical procedures
related to physical examination to elicit specific diagnostic physical signs. Procedural and
manipulative skills relevant to the organ system under study will be learnt in the safe
environment of the Simulation Lab. Interpretation of results of ECG, laboratory and
radiologic investigations and deviations from the normal will be identified and their
significance will be discussed by a team made up of both clinicians and basic scientists.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

107 | P a g e

These skills will help to develop adequate communication and basic clinical skills in order to
prepare the student to integrate rapidly into the clinical hospital and respond professionally
during real doctor-patient encounters during the clerkship in the fourth and fifth years
(PHASE III) and the final internship year (CRRI)
MED 212 Research - I, II, III
This course is designed to afford the student the opportunity to develop a research proposal
under faculty guidance. The proposal development may involve a literature search,
preliminary experimentation, or a pilot field study. The research would be preliminary but
relevant to the project. The course will be conducted in three parts. In the second year,
Research Methodology is designed to introduce the student to basic concepts and problems
encountered in scientific investigation, including types of data and measurement,
descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, validity, reliability, sampling, hypotheses and
hypothesis testing, literature review and research design. In the third year Research
Protocol Design introduces the student to the scientific development of research protocols
and their key elements. Topics include the differentiation between research design types,
rules for writing protocols, ethical considerations relative to research protocols and the
correct preparation of data collection forms. Upon completion, the student will be able to
identify the primary components of protocols and effectively develop a protocol draft. In
the third year opportunity will be provided for a Research Practicum designed to provide the
student an opportunity to gain practical experience in the design and/or implementation of
research. A student may choose to do a practicum as part of an ongoing faculty research
project or as an independent experience in a community or institutional setting. Selection of
the research topic will depend on individual needs of a student and must be approved by the
students academic advisory committee. A faculty member will agree to supervise the
practicum.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

108 | P a g e

Phase - III
MED 301 & 401: Ophthalmology
This course is designed as an introduction to ophthalmology. In addition to attending
didactic sessions, the student will learn to take a good ophthalmic history and perform a
good general eye exam in order to detect common abnormalities of the eye and visual
system. Students will learn to interpret the clinical findings and reach a diagnosis and discuss
their management during case based discussions in the classroom, the outpatient and the
bedside. Students will develop and refine skills in the use of the penlight, ophthalmoscope
and slit lamp and will also have ample opportunity to observe a variety of ophthalmic
surgical procedures, such as sub-conjunctival injection, foreign body removal and
nasolacrimal duct syringing performed in the management of common eye disorders.
MED 302 & 402: Otorhinolaryngology
The didactic lectures provide essential factual information, and the clinical rotations provide
a practical experience. Students will learn to take a relevant history and perform a basic
head and neck exam with equipments available to a primary care practitioner (flashlight,
tongue blade, otoscope) and perform an ear exam by tympanometry and otoscope. The
students will gain increasing experience discussing the clinical findings to reach a diagnosis
of common problems like allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, otitis media, epistaxis, facial fractures,
hearing loss, dizziness, and swallowing disorders and discuss a treatment plan with the
faculty. Students will be able to observe surgical procedures like ear syringing, nasal packing,
tracheostomy, endoscopy and removal of foreign bodies. The student will be able to
perform laryngoscopy and use of tracheostomy tubes on a manikin in the simulation lab.
MED 303 & 403: Medicine and Allied Disciplines
The Medicine clerkship is divided into two rotations one in clerkship year 4 and the other in
year 5. The student will have adequate clinical encounters in both ambulatory and bedside
settings in the outpatient and inpatient departments of the hospital. The student will gain
wide exposure to the medical and conservative management of common acute and chronic
medical disorders. Rotations in allied medical specialties like dermatology and psychiatry will
increase the breadth of the experience to include the management of common skin
disorders and a broad understanding of the human mind and behavior, its normality in
health, abnormality in stress, methods of classifying psychological and psychiatric disorders
and different forms of therapy. It also helps students in gaining an understanding of the
ethical concepts in the field of medicine, the right of patients and the responsibility of health
professionals.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

109 | P a g e

MED 304 & 404: Surgery and Allied Disciplines


The clerkship in Surgery is designed to give the student a broad exposure to the principles of
diagnosis and management of common surgical problems, including surgical emergencies;
the indications and methods for fluid and electrolyte replacement therapy including blood
transfusion, the importance of asepsis, disinfection and sterilization and use of antibiotics,
and lastly, common malignancies and their management and prevention. During the course
of the rotation, the student will be expected to focus on several areas of study, which will
include basic principles of peri-operative management of the patient with a surgical
problem. An awareness of the nature and management of surgical disease is developed by
case oriented small group sessions, rounds and weekly conferences. The surgical experience
will be further widened to include surgical aspects of orthopedics, anesthesia and radiology
Orthopedics includes the principles of recognition and management of common bone and
joint injuries and infections; recognition of congenital and skeletal anomalies for correction
or rehabilitation; importance of metabolic bone diseases, diagnosis of neoplasms affecting
bones; recognition and management of degenerative and rheumatologic diseases of
musculoskeletal system; principles of reconstructive surgery of musculoskeletal system.
Anesthesiology includes principles of the pre-, intra- and post-operative anesthetic
management of the surgical patient with particular emphasis on relief of preoperative
anxiety, intraoperative maintenance of normal oxygenation when normal respiration is
depressed under anesthesia and postoperative pain relief Radiology will include the
identification of normal findings on routine X-rays of chest, abdomen, head and limbs, the
recognition of deviations of normal and their significance in the management of the
underlying disorders.
MED 305 & 405: Obstetrics and Gynecology
In the Obstetrics and Gynecology, the student will gain the skills of gynecologic and
obstetric history taking and physical examination in the outpatient and wards and practical
experience in the delivery room under the close supervision of the staff. The student will
avail these opportunities to reach a diagnosis and discuss the management of gynecologic
and obstetric disorders with the faculty while dealing with patients in the outpatient, the
delivery room, the operation theater and the wards. The performance of procedural skills
like delivering a baby, taking a PAP smear, suturing an episiotomy will be learnt and
practiced in the safe environment of the Simulation Lab. Formal and informal daily teaching
sessions and rounds with the faculty are a part of this clerkship experience.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

110 | P a g e

MED 306 & 406: Pediatrics


The student will learn to obtain clinical history in an age-appropriate and sensitive manner
from a child and or the accompanying adult and conduct a pediatric physical examination
appropriate to the condition and the age of the patient. During presentation of the clinical
findings to the faculty, the student will interpret the clinical findings and available lab results
to suggest a diagnosis and discuss the management of the disease. The student will assess
growth and development and advocate safety measures to prevent injury and disease. Many
case based sessions have been planned to provide alternative clinical experiences. The
simulation lab will allow the learner to practice in a safe environment.
MED 307 & 407: Multisystem Course
This course will deal with themes and topics that cut across all disciplines and involve
multiple organs in a broader perspective. This will enable the learner to see the patient as
whole and appreciate the generalized nature of diseases. Common examples are AIDS,
tuberculosis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, congestive cardiac failure,
sarcoidosis, shock, cirrhosis, trisomies and inborn errors of metabolism. In this course
seminar presentations will be used as the main learning strategy.
INTERNSHIP:
MED 595: Internship
This consists of an on-the-job training for a period of one year wherein the graduate rotates
in different clinical departments on completion of the MBBS program. The graduate gains on
the job experience under the close supervision of his teachers. It also serves to provide
opportunities to attain appropriate higher skill levels as the student has completed the
didactic requirements of the course and is now given opportunities to further improve his
skills and master it before he enters independent practice. The internship experience also
gives an insight into the practice of the chosen profession and is in itself a strong motivating
factor for the learner to continue and pursue higher education and specialize further in the
chosen field of study.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

111 | P a g e

14.6 Clinical Training Sites


Clinical training for the MBBS Program has been arranged at multiple sites:
GMC Hospital and Research Center - This is a 100 bed teaching hospital in Ajman. Students
will receive clinical training here during the first four years including early patient contact
during the first year.
Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Hospital, Ajman - This is a 200 bed MoH Hospital located at Al Jurf
next to GMU. Students will receive clinical training here in the 4th year MBBS and during
internship.
UAQ Hospital, Umm Al Quwain - This is a 180 bed MoH Hospital located in Umm Al Quwain.
Students will receive clinical training here in the 4th year MBBS and during internship.
Mafraq Hospital, Abu Dhabi - This is a 550 bed teaching hospital under the Health Authority,
Abu Dhabi. Students will receive clinical training here in the 5th year MBBS and during
internship.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

112 | P a g e

14.7 Course Outline

Phase - I Courses
Title

Language and Communication Skills

Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating
departments
Pre-requisite
Co-requisite / s

MED 101
Phase I / Year I / Semester I
3 weeks
Prof. Manda Venkatramana
Dr. Mehzabin Ahmed, Dr. Erum Khan & Dr. Pankaj Lamba
Basic and Clinical Science Departments
None
Psychosocial Sciences

Course Description:
The course is designed to provide a variety of simulated patient encounter settings to
introduce the basic interpersonal communication processes that help to gain sensitivity to
patient perspectives and to develop a sense of personal awareness, which will help the
student to deal with patients of all ages and both genders in routine and difficult situations
and in the process work effectively as a member of the health care team in real life
encounters. Students will be encouraged to learn medical terminology in common usage
both in English and Arabic to reduce language barriers in an effort to improve their
communication skills.
Aims:

Become oriented to the communication tasks of a physician by developing an


appreciation of the interpersonal nature of medical encounters in different clinical
situations.

Develop basic communication skills and strategies to deal with both routine and
difficult topics and situations encountered in clinical practice.

Develop basic communication skills and strategies for working with family members,
physician colleagues and other members of the health-care team.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

113 | P a g e

Intended Learning Outcomes


Knowledge
Students should be able to:
Describe basic interpersonal communication concepts and processes
Explain the meaning of, and rationale for, patient-centered medicine.
Define communication tasks that are integral to effective and efficient medical
encounters.
Explain the place and purpose of basic communication skills and strategies
Select communication skills and strategies that can be utilized to accomplish
particular communication tasks.
Generate a list of skills and strategies that might be appropriate for a given difficult
situation
Describe how family members can influence health outcomes through instrumental
support, social support and patient advocacy, or the lack thereof.
Outline the roles and goals of health-care team member and strategies for conflict
management and resolution.
Skills
Students should be able to:

Identify skills and strategies to accomplish the communication tasks.


Identify methods to deal with difficult situations
Identify ways to involve family members in patient care.
Handle appropriately enquiries from family members who act as caregivers.

Attitude
Students should be able to demonstrate:

Sensitivity to a patients perception of his/her illness


Sensitivity to cultural factors that might influence interactions with patients.
Sensitivity to personal factors that might influence interactions with patients.
Awareness of the fact that communication skills can be learned and improved.
Commitment to learning about difficult topics and situations
Sensitivity to the uncertainty and anxiety that members of patients families
experience.
Awareness of the fact that they are an important part of the health-care team and
thus bear responsibility for quality patient care.
Awareness of the fact that each member of the health care team is valuable,
regardless of degree or occupation.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

114 | P a g e

Study plan
Duration (Week)

Theme/s

Fundamental of
discourse
Week 1
Small -Group
Communication

Week 2

Week 3

Interpersonal
Communication

Large - Group
Communication

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Topics
Introduction to Language and Communication
skills
Types of communication
Introduction to E- Learning Tools and
Intellectual Properties
Computers for Health Care Professionals
Effective and ineffective communication
Receiving the patient
The presenting complaint
Small group Learning
Past and family history
Social history and telephone consultations
Medical Terminology
Examining a patient
Reflection: Use of Reflective Diary
Giving results
Communicating with challenging patients
Planning treatment and closing the interview
CARE
Communicating with children and adolescents
Breaking bad news

Introduction to CBL
Communicating with the elderly
Large group communication with emphasis on
education & health
Presentation skills
History chart

115 | P a g e

Course Title
Course Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s

Psychosocial Sciences
MED 102
Phase I / Year I BHS I & II / Semester I
3 weeks
Dr. Radhika Taroor
Prof. Elsheba Mathew & Ms. Avula Kameswari
Psychiatry & Sociology
None

Course Description
This course runs concurrently with MED 101 and covers two major themes. Introduction to
Behavioral Sciences covers such topics as psychosocial basis of health, approaches to study
of human behavior, methods of behavioral sciences research, organic basis of behavior and
the process of human development through the life span. Dynamics of Human Behavior
helps students to gain knowledge of the working of the human memory system,
consciousness and human behavior, and the principles of learning and reinforcements and
its applications. It enables students to acquire skills and knowledge for adaptive behavior. It
also provides students an opportunity to learn the elements of culture and process of
socialization, and their impact on health and illness.
BHS I
Introduction to Behavioral Sciences and Bio-psycho-social model of health
BHS II
Psychological basis of Human Behavior
BHS III
Mental processes and Individual Differences in Behavior
BHS IV
Psychopathology and Medical Ethics
BHS I and II will be taken in Phase I Year 1 and will run parallel with courses 1.
Developmental aspects will be incorporated in Embryogenesis and Life Cycle. BHS III will be
incorporated in course XV Nervous System in Phase II Year 3. BHS IV will become part of
the Psychiatry Clerkship in Phase III Year 4 and 5.
Aims:
Become aware of the basic concepts, principles and theories in behavioral sciences
related to human behavior and their application in the health behavior of individuals
and communities.
Familiarize with the dynamics of human behavior and individual factors affecting
human behavior especially in health care situations
Gain knowledge about psychological disorders and different forms of therapy.
Gain understanding of ethical concepts in the field of medicine, and critical thinking
skills for conducting research.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

116 | P a g e

Intended Learning Outcomes:


A. Knowledge
BHSI: Introduction to Behavioral Sciences and Bio-psycho-social model of health
On successful completion of this part of the Course, a student should be able to:

Outline the contributions of Behavioral Sciences in understanding human behavior


esp. related to health behavior
Outline contributions of modern Psychology in understanding human behavior,
especially related to health and disease
Explain the methods of studying behavior
Describe the Bio-psycho-social model of health
Outline the biological basis of human behavior
Explain the sociological basis of human behavior, impact of culture and socialization
on health and illness

BHSII: Psychological basis of Human Behavior:


On successful completion of this part of the Course, a student should be able to:

Explain the psychological basis of behavior esp. in the Bio-psycho-social model of


health
Outline the psychosocial aspect of human development through the life span and its
importance in health
Explain thinking, creativity, conflicts, frustration, emotion, motivation and personality
and their impact on human behavior.
Explain the coping strategies and common stress reduction methods.
Describe the psychology of person perception with special reference to doctorpatient relationship
Describe the different methods of learning and their importance in behavior
modification.
List the techniques to improve memory and their uses

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

117 | P a g e

B. Skills
BHSI: Introduction to Behavioral Sciences
On successful completion of this part of the Course, a student should be able to:

Apply psycho-social theories to explain human behavior and its adaptation


Identify appropriate methods to gather information on human behavior and
interpret the information.
Relate to the interplay of biological, psychological and social determinants of human
behavior, health and disease
Recognize the role of socialization in health and illness

BHSII: Psychological basis of Human Behavior:


On successful completion of this part of the Course a student will be able to:

Apply the process of human development through the life span, in the health
behavior
Apply the use of learning methods and memory techniques appropriate to individual
situations
Analyze the contribution of thinking, creativity, conflicts, frustration, emotion,
motivation and personality in human behavior and its impact on health and disease.
Apply the use of common stress reduction methods

C. Attitude
BHSI: Introduction to Behavioral Sciences
Students on completion of this part of the Course will be able to:

Appreciate the Bio-psycho-social model in health and disease


Show consideration for socially disadvantaged groups
Appreciate the importance of scientific studies in understanding human behavior.

BHSII: Psychological basis of Human Behavior


Students on completion of this part of the Course will be able to:

Appreciate that the process of physical, intellectual and social development of


human beings, impact behavior
Reflect on the importance of psychological processes in human behavior and health
Acknowledge the relevance of person perception and attribution processes in health,
illness and doctor-patient relationship

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

118 | P a g e

Study plan
Duration
(Week)

Theme

Week 1

Introduction to Behavioral
Sciences

Week 2

Dynamics of Human Behavior

Week 3

Dynamics of Human Behavior

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Topics
1. Introduction
1.1 Behavioral sciences
1.2 Psychology in health
2. Approaches in studying behavior:
2.1Studying human behavior
3. Biopsychosocial model of health
(BPSM):
3.1 Biological basis:
3.2 Sociological basis:
3.2.1 Socialization: Implications (groups
and leadership)
3.2.2 Culture in health and disease
3.2.3 Social determinants of health
behavior
4. Learning:
4.1 Influenced by nature of learner,
nature of learning material
4.2 Types of learning
4.3 Learning styles
4.4 Learning methods
4.5 Effective learning
5. Psychological basis of behavior:
5.1 Thinking-creativity
5.2 Motivation- Personality
5.3 Conflicts-frustration
5.4 Emotion-stress reduction
5.5 Psychology of:
Patient , Doctor, D-P relationship
Perceptual errors in D-P relationship
6. Memory:
6.1 Types of memory
6.2 Memory techniques, Mind maps
7. Life span development- illness behavior
7.1 Children and adolescents
7.2 Adults
7.3 Death and dying - loss/ grieving
8. Time Management
9. Assertiveness

119 | P a g e

Title

Cells, Molecules and Genes

Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisites

MED 103
Phase I / Year I / Semester I
6 weeks
Dr. Nelofor Sami Khan
Prof. Ishtiyaq Ahmed Shaafie, Dr. Anuj Mathur,
Mrs. Suni Ebby, Prof. Edwin DSouza
Anatomy, Biochemistry, Psysiology, Pharmacology,
Pathology, Community Medicine & Forensic Medicine
A good high school background in Chemistry & Biology

Course Description:
This course introduces the fundamentals of molecular, cellular and genetic processes; the
structure-function relationships of biomolecules with an emphasis on their clinical relevance;
the functions of the biomembranes; and the basic mechanisms of signal transduction. Use of
computer and web-based learning resources in this course serve to promote interactive and
self- directed learning.
Aim:
The aim of the course is to provide opportunity to first year medical students in
understanding the basic concepts & principles of the cellular, molecular and genetic
processes operating in healthy humans and prepare them to master key principles and
concepts taught in subsequent medical courses. Students will develop the necessary skills
and attitudes in understanding the scientific basis of medicine.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge
On successful completion of the course a student should be able to demonstrate knowledge
and understanding of the major concepts in cell and molecular biology and the basic
principles of medical genetics under the following themes:
1. Cells:

Differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure & organization;


Cell diversity in multicellular organisms;
Structure and functions of cell organelles;
Cell interactions;
Structure-function relationships of biomolecules;

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

120 | P a g e

Mechanisms of membrane transport;


Structure-function relationships of cell receptors;
Mechanisms of cell signaling;
Phases of cell cycle, their regulation and biological significance;
Mechanisms of cell division (mitosis and meiosis);
Principles of the techniques used for cell fractionation and their identification;

2. Molecules:

Classification, structure, functions and structure-function relationships of


macromolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleotides) ;
Mechanism of action, kinetics and regulation of enzymes;
Principles of the techniques used for the isolation, purification and identification of
biomolecules;

3. Genes:

Structure, function and regulation of genes;


Organization of human genome;
Nature and types of genetic variation, mutations and polymorphisms;
Mechanisms of replication damage and repair of genetic information;
RNA synthesis, processing and modification;
Features of genetic code and mechanism of protein biosynthesis;
Post-transcriptional and post translational modification;
Regulation of gene expression;
Structure and function of chromosomes and their roles in meiosis and mitosis;
Basis for genotype-phenotype correlations;
Structural chromosomal abnormalities;
Modes of single gene inheritance;
Multifactorial inheritance and role of genetic factors in complex diseases;
Molecular basis of unexpected phenotypes in Mendelian disorders;
Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes

Skills
On successful completion of the course, a student should be able to:

Demonstrate competence in using microscope and other basic laboratory equipment


for biochemical analysis;
Identify and draw the structures of eukaryotic cells;
Identify the skeletal structures of all major biomolecules;
Identify amino acids and sugars in biological fluids using chromatographic
techniques;

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

121 | P a g e

Identify the various fractions of plasma proteins, lipoproteins and hemoglobin using
electrophoresis techniques;
Analyze and interpret the results of biochemical experiments performed or
demonstrated in the laboratory;
Determine the type of Mendelian inheritance from a pedigree (autosomal, X-linked,
dominant, recessive);
Apply the Hardy Weinberg Equation to calculate frequency of a mutant gene in a
population from the occurrence of a specific tract;
Calculate an individuals risk using pedigree analysis and population gene frequency;
Identify those features of a pedigree for cancer which suggests a high genetic risk.

Attitudes
By the end of the course, a student is expected to demonstrate:

Awareness of the importance of active learning in acquiring knowledge;


Awareness of his/ her own limitations in knowledge and a willingness to seek help
from peers, faculty and staff for learning;
Ability to work as a team leader in various learning activities;
Awareness of the need to continue learning and contribute to the advancement of
knowledge by participating in seminars and projects;
Awareness about the rapid advances in the field of molecular biology and genetics;
Awareness about the ethical issues and emotional dilemmas related to genetic
disorders;

Study Plan:
Duration
(week)

Theme (s)

Cells
1
Molecules
Cells
2
Molecules

Topics
Eukaryotic cell, Intracellular organelles- Structure &
functions, Cell diversity, Cell cycle and mitosis, Meiosis
Introduction to Biomolecules; Amino acids, Peptide bond
and Peptides
Structure of cell membranes, Transport mechanisms
across cell membranes, Membrane potentials and action
potentials, Intercellular junctions
Proteins classification& structures, Levels of Protein
structure, Structure - function relationships of fibrous
proteins- Collagen, Protein folding and Denaturation

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

122 | P a g e

Molecules

Identification and characterization of protein structure,


Plasma proteins and their functions, Structure-Function
relationships
of
hemoglobin,
myoglobin
and
Immunoglobulins, sickle cell anemia

Genes

Morphology of chromosomes and karyotyping,


Cytogenetic Disorders & Numerical Abnormalities,
Structural abnormalities of chromosomes, Mendelian
Inheritance

Molecules

Genes

Molecules
5
Genes

Structure, function and biological significance of simple


and complex carbohydrates, Extracellular matrixcomposition and functions, Enzymes General
Properties, classification, active site, coenzymes, kinetics
and mechanism of catalysis, regulation of enzyme
activity
Variations in dominant and recessive phenotypes,
Cytogenetic abnormalities, techniques of cytogenetics,
Pedigree analysis, complex diseases and multifactorial
inheritance, Complex
diseasesPolygenic
and
multifactorial inheritance
Sturcutre and functions of simple and complex lipids,,
Eicosanoids & steroids structure and functions, second
messengers and cell signaling
Organization of the genome, DNA- structure and
function, DNA damage and repair mechanisms,
RNA: structure and function, RNA synthesis, processing
and
modifications,
Protein
biosynthesis
and
modifications, DNA based techniques, Regulation of
gene expression

Genes

False paternity, Complex diseases: congenital and adult


onset complex diseases, Hardy Weinberg equilibrium,
Complex Diseases: Tools and risk assessment (linkage
and association studies), Genetic Services: Genetic
screening- and counseling

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

123 | P a g e

Title

Tissues and Organs

Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisites

MED 104
Phase I / Year I / Semester I
6 weeks
Prof. Mandar Vilas Ambike
Dr. Mehzabin Ahmed, Ms. Soofia Ahmed & Dr. Sona Chaturvedi
Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology
MED 101 - 103

Course Description:
In this course, the structure and function of the various types of tissues, their organization
to form organs of the different systems in the body are dealt with in an integrated manner
to help understand the correlation of structure with function. This will enable the learner to
better correlate the alterations in function due to structural changes in a disease. Seminars
in relevant areas will give the learner an opportunity to develop presentation skills.
Aims:

To provide comprehensive and integrated knowledge of the normal structural and


functional organization of the human body tissues and organs as well as their
interactions for a well-coordinated body function.

To provide the basis for understanding the clinical correlation of organs or tissues
involved and the structural basis of the disease process.

Intended Learning Outcomes:


Knowledge
By the end of the course students will be able to:

Describe and identify the four basic tissues of the body.


Describe the functions of the basic body tissues and body fluids.
Explain the anatomical terms and demonstrate the planes of the body in anatomical
position.
Define body cavities & list their contents
List the components of each organ system.
Identify the location of various organs.
List the main functions of the principal organs of the body.
Describe how the functions are coordinated.
Explain the abnormal terms (e.g., atrophy, hypertrophy, hyperplasia etc)
Relate structure to function of the tissues and organs.
Relate deviation from normal structure to functional abnormality.
Outline the major postmortem changes of the human tissues.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

124 | P a g e

Skills
By the end of the course students will be able to:
Demonstrate the use of a light microscope.
Identify the characteristic features of the basic tissues under the microscope.
Preparation and staining of a peripheral blood smear.
Conduct experiments designed to study the functions of body organs.
Draw labeled diagrams of the basic tissues.
Demonstrate the planes of the body.
Locate and identify all body organs and tissues.
Attitudes
By the end of the course students will:
Demonstrate an awareness of ethical values when dealing with cadavers & cadaveric
material.
Adopt a meticulous approach to staining and experiments.
Appreciate the role of normal structure of tissues and organs in exerting normal
function and vice versa.
Observe universal safety precautions.
Study Plan:
Duration
(Week)

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Themes

Tissues I

Tissues II

Tissues - III

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Sub themes / Topics


Basic tissues -Introduction to the basic four tissues
Epithelium Types, structure and function correlation
of epithelial cells and Tissues
Connective tissue- Types, structure and function
correlation of C.T. Proper; Interaction of C.T.
components,
Pathological
changes
and
Microstructure of abnormalities of epithelial & C.T.
Fasciae- Structure and function of superficial and deep
fascia
Skeletal Connective Tissue - Microstructure,
Development and Growth, and Pathological changes
in Cartilage and Bones
Bones and joints- Orientation, Gross structure and
Structure function correlation of human skeleton and
classification of bones and joints, Joint movements,
Clinical applications of ossification centers
Muscle- Contractile function, Gross and Microscopic
and structure. Structure and function correlation of
muscular tissue, Pathological changes of muscle
tissue, Microstructure of the abnormalities
Nervous tissue- Conductive mechanism, Microscopic
structure,
Structure and function correlation ,
Abnormalities of nervous tissue,
Reactions of
125 | P a g e

Weeks 4

Organs I

degeneration and regeneration of neurons,


Definitions related to abnormalities in body tissues
General
Anatomical planes and body cavities Anatomical
terms, planes and terms of movements of human
body in anatomical position, Body Cavities, Thoracic
Cavity/ Walls of the thorax, Mediastinum
Postmortem Changes in Tissues
Endocrine system- Orientation, Structure-function
correlation and Co-ordination among the endocrine
glands, General function & regulation of hormones
Hemopoietic & Lymphoid tissues- Structure &
function of Hemal tissues, Preparation and staining of
Blood smear , Microstructure of Blood Cells ,
Hemopoiesis , Microstructure of Lymphoid tissues
and organs, Reticulo-endothelial system, Coordination
among lymphoid organs
Microstructure of the abnormalities of blood and
lymphoid tissues
Structure and function correlation of hemolymphoid
tissue
Cardiovascular System- Orientation, gross and
Microscopic structure of Heart and blood vessels and
Structure and function correlation of C.V.S. and types
of circulations, cardiovascular adaptation to function
Respiratory System- Orientation and function of
respiratory system organs Gross and Microscopic
structure of respiratory system organs, Function of
respiratory system organs and Respiration

Week 5

Organs - II

Gastrointestinal Tract- Orientation and function,


Gross structure, Structure-function correlation of GIT
organs, Adaptation of GIT lining to function,
Coordination among GIT organs
Hepatobiliary system- Orientation and function of
Liver, GB and Pancreas
Urogenital System
- Orientation and function of urinary tract
organs

Week 6

Orientation and function of male genital


organs Contents and relationships of pelvic
organs

Orientation and function of female genital


organs, Female reproductive cycles

Anomalies of reproductive cycles

Organs - III

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

126 | P a g e

Title

Embryogenesis and Life Cycle

Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members

Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s

MED 105
Phase I / Year I / Semester I
4 weeks
Dr. Anu Vinod Ranade
Dr. Nisha Shantha Kumari, Dr. Shiny Prabha Mohan
& Dr. Wajiha Ajmal
Anatomy, Psysiology, Pharmacology,Pathology, Forensic
Medicine, Community Medicine, Psychology, Pediatrics and
Gynecology & Obstetrics
MED 101 - 104

Course Description
This course is designed to introduce the normal human development at the various life
stages from conception to old age including embryology, childhood, adolescence, adulthood
and aging in the elderly. The course covers the first few weeks of early human development
from fertilization to formation of the embryo. Students will also learn to appreciate health
as a component of life cycle development.
Aims:

Master the terminology based upon embryonic structures and congenital


malformations.
Understand the process of early human embryogenesis from the stages of
fertilization, cleavage and implantation to embryo body formation
Understand the phenomena of normal growth and development and the process
through the different phases of the life cycle of a normal human being from infancy,
childhood, adolescence, adulthood, old age and death.

Intended Learning Outcomes


Knowledge
At the end of this course, the student should be able to understand the concepts and
explain the basic principles involved in:

The early stages of early human embryogenesis and the development of extra fetal
tissues (placenta and membranes) including its normal features & abnormalities.
Normal and abnormal (ectopic) implantation and twinning.
The role of ultrasound in identifying early intragestational sac anatomy.
Dysmorphology and teratology, defining terms for congenital anomalies.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

127 | P a g e

The medico legal aspects of pregnancy.


The prenatal diagnostic procedures used in identifying abnormal development.
The growth and development of a human being through a normal life cycle
The concomitance of physiological and psychological growth cycle

Skills
At the end of this course, the student should be able to:

Identify the major events occurring in the germinal and fetal period on models,
charts, animations and real time ultrasound or video projections
Identify the major events occurring in the fetal period on models charts, animations
or video projections
Identify fetal growth and development on models, charts and real time ultrasound or
video projections
Recognize major congenital anomalies on charts and video projections
Record and interpret the measurements from commonly used growth charts and
calculate the Body Mass Index with reference to different phases of growth in a
normal life cycle

Attitudes
At the end of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate:

Awareness of and sensitivity to issues related to congenital abnormalities and its


impact on the individual and his/her family
Awareness of and sensitivity to the changing physiological and psychological changes
occurring during the various phases of the life cycle of a human being

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

128 | P a g e

Study Plan
Duration
(Weeks)

Themes/Subthemes
EMBRYOGENESIS;
Gametogenesis;
Germinal period;
Development in Week 1 & 2;
Abnormal implantation;
Early Embryo & Placenta;

Week 1

Embryonic period;

Development of early
middle & late childhood
Physiological & psychosocial
changes in adolescence

Important milestones in a child from birth till the


age of 5 years.

Formation of Diaphragm;
Placenta and membranes;
Prenatal testing;
Amniotic fluid and umbilical
cord

Overview of fetal period &


fetal circulation;
Multiple gestations;
Common Birth Defects;
Medico legal aspects of
pregnancy;
Week 3

Migration of primordial germ cells & Formation of


Primordial gonads;
Review of Meiosis;
Spermatogenesis & Oogenesis;
Events in Week 1:Fertilization to Implantation
(Pre-implantation phase);
Abnormalities
in
fertilization-Ectopic
pregnancy;
Events in Week 2 : Early embryogenesis &
trophoblast formation;
Events in Week 3 : Gastrulation primitive streak
formation ; notochord
Events in Week 3 : mesoderm formationsomites;
Cephalo-caudal
and
Lateral
folding
Intraembryonic coelomic cavities; formation of
diaphragm;
Neural tube formation;
Trophoblast and derivatives;
Formation of diaphragm and its anomalies;
Placenta and its formation;
Prenatal testing for congenital anomalies-CVS,
Amniocentesis, Ultrasound screening;
Infertility, Assisted reproduction;
Amniotic fluid and its functions
Umbilical cord and its contents
Overview of fetal period Organogenesis
Fetal circulation - Dynamics, Prenatal &
Postnatal;
Twin
formation;
choriogenecity
and
amniogenecity;
Twin-twin
Transfusion
syndrome; Acardiac twin;
Common Birth defects- chromosomal defects,
teratogens, multifactorial inheritance;
Fetal viability; Fetal death; Infant death
syndrome;
In-vitro
fertilization;
Superfecundation and superfetalis;

Embryonic period;

Week 2

Topics

LIFE CYCLE;

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Normal growth in a child from birth till the age


129 | P a g e

of 12 years and recognize any deviations of


growth from normal Plot the weight and height
of a child on a growth chart and comment on
the growth parameters.
Recognition of the developmental delay and
reference to a specialist.
Psychosocial aspects
Attachment and bonding (Infancy).
object permanence; stranger anxiety; cognitive
development; social development
Phsical growth
Physical and endocrinal changes during
puberty in both sexes.
Regulation of the reproductive, nervous &
vascular system.
Psychosocial aspects
Challenges and issues of adolescence
social, emotional and sexual development
Physical growth
Stages of adulthood.
Teratogenic effects of drugs in
pregnancy

Teratogenecity;
common
congenital
malformations from drugs; high risk periods in
pregnancy

Week 4
Pathological aspects in
ageing

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Age related pathologies- old age on the basis of


cellular ageing (senescence) impact of ageing.

130 | P a g e

Title

Metabolism & Nutrition

Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s

MED 106
Phase I / Year I / Semester 2
6 weeks
Prof. K.G Gomathi
Prof. Shatha Al Sharbatti,
Dr. Kannan Narsimhan & Ms. Fahmida Jafri
Biochemistry, Physiology, Pharmacology, Pathology,
Community Medicine, Medicine and Dietetics
MED 101 MED 105

Course description
In this course first year medical students learn the principles and key concepts of nutrition
and metabolism that underlie health and disease states. Role of nutrition and its association
with malnutrition, obesity, and diseases such as anemia and cancer will be stressed upon.
The rationale underlying investigations performed to study various nutritional and metabolic
disorders will also be learnt. The student will, in addition, develop an appreciation of the
importance of proper diet and nutrition and its close association with health and disease.
Aims:
To provide opportunity to first year medical students to:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Understand the principles of nutrition and metabolism.


Understand the biochemical mechanisms underlying metabolic disorders.
Understand the role of investigations in the management of metabolic diseases.
Appreciate the importance of diet and nutrition in health and disease.

Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge
By the end of the course, students should be able to:
1. Discuss the general principles & concepts of nutrition and metabolism.
2. Discuss the key concepts with regards to:
Nutrition, dietary components and energy balance
Nutrition in the context of health and disease
Nutritional disorders of public health importance.
Micronutrient metabolism
Bioenergetics
Carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation
Lipid metabolism and its regulation.
Nitrogen metabolism.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

131 | P a g e

Integration of metabolism.
Heme metabolism
Purine and Pyrimidine metabolism.
Skills
By the end of the course students should be able to:

Calculate the calorie intake of a person based on the diet.


Calculate energy requirement for a person.
Calculate BMI and classify for obesity.
Assess nutritional status using anthropometrical measurements.
Estimate blood glucose levels and test for reducing sugar in urine.

Attitudes
By the end of the course students should be able to:

Recognize the relationships between diet, metabolism and disease states.


Develop awareness of issues concerning nutrition in different populations.
Appreciate the inter-relationship between the different health professions i.e.
Physicians, Nutritionists, Dieticians

Study Plan
Duration
(Week)

Theme (s)

General principles &


concepts of nutrition and
metabolism
1
Nutritional disorders of
public health importance and
nutritional programs

Micronutrient metabolism

Topics
Introduction to dietary components and metabolic
fuels, caloric values, daily energy expenditure and
dietary assessment. Nutritional intake and
recommendations-Dietary reference values and
WHO recommended dietary goals, Body Mass
Index and obesity
Malnutrition, principles of management of Protein
Energy Malnutrition in the community, nutritional
disorders
of
public
health
importance,
fortification, nutritional programs. Psychosocial
factors affecting food intake and food security.
Functions of the vitamins and minerals, metabolic
role of the essential trace elements, metabolic
basis of the vitamin and trace element deficiency
states.

2
Nutrition in health and
disease

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Nutritional
requirements
in
childhood,
adolescence, pregnancy, lactation, occupational
groups, athletes and in old age. Nutritional
anemias, nutrition and cancer.
132 | P a g e

Bioenergetics, Carbohydrate
and Intermediary metabolism

Lipid metabolism and


associated disorders

Intermediary metabolism and its importance in


energy generation Glucose metabolism,
regulation, homeostasis and associated disorders
Fatty
acid
and
cholesterol
metabolism,
relationship between diet and cardiovascular
disease.

Nitrogen metabolism and


metabolic integration;

Nutritionally essential amino acids, amino acid


metabolism, metabolism of ammonia, catabolism
of carbon skeletons of amino acids and associated
inborn errors of metabolism. Hormones and
metabolism, metabolic changes in conditions such
as hypoglycemia, starvation, Diabetes mellitus;

Metabolism of Heme,
Purines, Pyrimidines and
associated disorders

Heme metabolism and associated disorders


Nucleotide metabolism, disorders, uses
nucleotide analogs

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

133 | P a g e

of

Internal & External Environment

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members

Participating Departments

MED 107
Phase I / Year I / Semester 2
9 weeks
Dr. Ramesh Ranganathan
Dr. Mohammad Mesbahuzzaman, Dr. Kannan Narsimhan
Dr. Priya Sajith, Prof. Hemant Kumar Garg &
Dr. Jenny Cheriathu John
Physiology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology,
Pathology, Community Medicine and Forensic Medicine

Pre-requisite / s

Courses MED 101 MED 106

Course Description:
This course is the last course in Phase-I of the Integrated Curriculum. This course will help
the students to gain an insight into the challenges human beings face each day of their lives
indoors, at home or at work or outdoors as their bodies are challenged by agents in its
internal and external environments. The student will be introduced to the basic physiological
and pathological responses to the noxious agents at the level of cells, tissues and organs
that in turn is related to the toxicity of the agents which make the difference between
health and disease. The students will realize the magnitude of the preventive measures
made at the level of the individual, the community and globally to achieve the vision of
health for all in the future.
Aims:
The aim of this course is to help the students to:

Gain understanding of the influence of internal and external environment &


environmental agents on human health based on knowledge of relevant
Epidemiological, Toxicological and Exposure factors.

Recognize the scientific basis of signs, symptoms, diseases and sources of


exposure relating to common environmental agents and conditions

Recognize and the role of investigation and epidemiological approaches in the


prevention and control of these diseases.

Intended Learning Outcomes


MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

134 | P a g e

Knowledge
By the end of the course students will be able to:

Understand the magnitude of the impact of environment on the health of the


individual and the community

Understand the control systems of the body that help to meet the demands of
physiologic stress in the environment

Understand the innate and adaptive immune responses to environmental agents

Understand the cellular and tissue responses to noxious agents in the


environment

Recognize the type and magnitude of infectious diseases that arise as a


consequence of exposure to pathogenic organisms present in the environment
and the basis of antimicrobial therapy in the control of these infectious diseases.

Skills
By the end of the course students will be able to:

Identify major groups of microorganisms on the basis of morphological, cultural


and biochemical characteristics

Interpret tonicity, pH and changes in the composition of body fluids

Identify the prototypical morphologic changes at the gross and microscopic level
in tissues injured due to environmental insults

Calculate and interpret epidemiological data with relevance to mortality and


morbidity rates and risk

Retrieve information using library and Internet.

Attitudes
By the end of the course students will be aware of:

The importance of observing sterile precautions while handling infectious agents

The importance of teamwork and sensitivity to cultural and personal factors


while collecting epidemiological data

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

135 | P a g e

Study Plan
Duration
(Week)

Theme

Subthemes

Topics

1.1 Environmental
determinants of health

Concept of environment &


health

2-3

1.2 Biologic agents in the


environment

Microbes

Classification,
Definitions & Nomenclatures,
Growth & Cultural Methods,
Sterilization & Disinfection

4-5

Concept
of
homeostasis,
Control systems in body,
2.1 Physiologic responses to
Acclimatization, Adaptation &
environmental stimuli
Biological Rhythms, Normal
Bacterial Flora, ADME of Drugs

1
1. Environment and
Health

2. Control of internal
environment

Cellular adaptation, Neoplasia,


3.1 Cellular response to Cell injury and cell death,
stress and noxious stimuli
Intracellular & Extracellular
Accumulations
6-7

8-9

3. Host response to
environmental stimuli

4. Environment and
disease

3.2 Immune responses to


environmental agents

Innate & adaptive immunity

3.3 Tissue response to injury

Acute & chronic inflammation,


Tissue Renewal & Repair

4.1 Effects of adverse


chemical environment:

Drugs, Heavy Metals, Poisons

4.2 Effects of adverse


physical environment:

Radiations,
Extremes
of
Temperature,
Atmospheric
Pressure Changes, Mechanic
Forces/Troma

4.3 Consequences of
exposure to pathogenic
organisms on the host:

Principles
of
Disease
&
Epidemiology,
Microbial
Mechanisms of Pathogenicity

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

136 | P a g e

Phase - II Courses
Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s

Blood and Immune System


MED 202
Phase II / Year 2 / Semester 3
6 weeks
Dr. Biswadip Hazarike
Dr. Sajith Khan, Ms. Soofia Ahmed & Prof. Edwin DSouza
Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Pathology,
Microbiology, Pharmacology, Community Medicine,
Forensic Medicine & Pediatrics
Phase I Courses

Course Description
The course presents an overview of the normal structure and functions of the blood and the
immune system and their derangement in disorders of the red cells, leucocytes, platelets
and the lymphoid tissues/organs. The pathophysiology, molecular basis, laboratory findings
and clinical manifestations of anemia, leukemia, hemorrhagic, thrombotic and immune
disorders will be emphasized through didactics, laboratory exercises and seminars. Case
based discussions through CBL, PBL settings will encourage development of problem
solving skills.
Aims:
To acquire knowledge and understanding of common diseases of the blood, bone marrow
and lymphoid organs emphasize the etiology, structural-functional alterations underlying
laboratory findings, clinical features of the disorders and approach to their management and
prevention.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge: By the end of the course students should be able to:

Describe the cellular and molecular changes occurring in hematological diseases.


Describe the causes, types, principles of diagnosis and management of the common
hematological disorders.
Describe epidemiology, prevention and rehabilitation of hereditary hematological
disorders.
Explain immune mechanism and disorders of immune system.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

137 | P a g e

Skills: By the end of the course students should be able to:

Perform peripheral blood smear and identify normal and abnormal blood cells.
Perform complete blood count and recognize abnormal blood counts.
Identify abnormal blood cells in bone marrow smear.
Interpret screening tests, lab results of hematological disorders.
Interpret immunological tests.
Interpret lab results, blood picture and bone marrow picture of blood cell abnormalities.

Attitudes: By the end of the course students should be able to:

Follow safety guidelines in sample collection, cleanliness and meticulousness in


performing investigations.
Recognize erroneous or unexpected test values and take appropriate measures.
Demonstrate awareness of the psychosocial aspects of hereditary anemia.
Be aware of medico legal implications in traumatic blood loss.
Be aware of limitations in the management of hematological malignancies.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

138 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating
Departments
Pre-requisite / s

Cardiovascular System
MED 203
Phase II / Year 2 / Semester 3
8 weeks
Dr. Syed Shehnaz Ilyas
Dr. Nisha Shantha Kumari, Dr. Priya Sajith, Dr. Liju Susan Mathew,
Dr. Mohammad Mesbahuzzaman & Dr. Ehab Mohey Eldin Farag
Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Pathology, Microbiology,
Pharmacology, Community Medicine, Forensic Medicine, Internal
Medicine, Cardiology & Radiology
Phase I Courses

Course Description
This course has been structured as an integrated study of the human cardiovascular system
and provides instruction into the mechanisms of operation of the human cardiovascular
system. Emphasis is placed on the integration of relevant principles with respect to the
behavior of the normal circulation and its responses to the stress of injury and disease. This
course deals with common cardiovascular disorders, including a study of atherosclerosis,
coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction, hypertension, valvular and congenital
heart disease, infectious heart disease, and heart muscle disorders. Also included is a series
of case presentations dealing with common complications of a variety of cardiac diseases:
cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure and shock. PBL sessions deal with prototype diseases and
provide opportunities to develop problem solving and interpersonal communication skills.
Aims:
To provide a course of integrated learning of normal structure and function of the
organs of the cardiovascular system at a molecular, cellular and organ level, including
the way different components of the cardiovascular system are coordinated to
maintain perfusion of tissues under a wide range of physiological states.
To provide an introduction to abnormal structure and function (Pathology &
Pathophysiology) of the cardiovascular system in selected cardiovascular diseases.
To provide a scientific basis for the management of selected cardiovascular disorders
as a foundation for future clinical training.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

139 | P a g e

Intended Learning Outcomes


Knowledge: By the end of the course students will be able to:

Describe the normal structure and function of the different parts of the heart, the aorta
and large elastic arteries, arterioles and capillaries, venules and veins
Recognize and identify the changes in structure and/or functioning of the cardiovascular
system in the following disease states: valvular heart disease, disarrhythmias,
atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease, congenital heart disease, hypertension and
common syndromes like heart failure, stroke and shock that arise as complications
Explain the principles underlying some of the therapeutic interventions that may be
used to modify the course of the disease states listed above, including preventive
measures

Skills: By the end of the course students will be able to:

Identify normal and abnormal findings in the heart and blood vessels on gross,
microscopic and radiologic examination
Interpret circulation physics
Interpret normal and distinguish abnormal ECGs
Record a blood pressure reading
Elicit a clinical history in a patient suspected of cardiovascular disease
Recognize normal and abnormal heart sounds on physical examination

Attitudes: By the end of the course students will be aware of the:

Importance of lifestyle modification in the prevention and control of heart diseases


Marked morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disorders and its psycho
social impact on the individual and family

Broad Outline of Course Content (Themes)


The Heart

Cardiac Muscle- normal structure, function and dysfunction


The heart as a pump: valve function and valve disease
Regulation of cardiac function and heart failure
Blood supply to the heart and ischemic heart disease
Cardiac electric activity and arrhythmias

The Blood Vessels

Large blood vessels and atherosclerosis


Resistance blood vessels and hypertension
Pulmonary circulation and pulmonary hypertension
Capillary function lymphatic system and edema

Circulation

Fetal cardiovascular system and congenital heart disease


Exercise and cardiovascular fitness
Hemorrhage and circulatory shock

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

140 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members

Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s

Respiratory System
MED 204
Phase II / Year 2 / Semester 4
6 weeks
Dr. Rizwana Burhanuddin Sheikh
Dr. Nisha Shantha Kumari, Dr. Sajith Khan,
Dr. Anu Vinod Ranade & Dr. Raji Sharma
Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Pathology,
Microbiology, Pharmacology, Community Medicine,
Forensic Medicine & Anesthesiology
Phase I Courses

Course Description
The course is designed to provide an integrated approach to the learning of the normal
structure, function and development of human respiratory system using different strategies
and applying the knowledge and skills acquired in understanding the pathophysiology of
various respiratory disorders. The basic principles of management of these disorders with a
focus on disease prevention will be described. The medico legal aspects of specific
respiratory disorders will be studied. PBL week will deal with the pathophysiology and
management of the lower respiratory tract infections.
Aims:
The aim of the course is to have an integrated approach to the learning of human respiratory
system focusing on its normal structure-function relationships and their deviations and to
understand the etiopathogenesis, basis for clinical presentations and the principles of
treatment and management of various disorders.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge: By the end of the course, students should be able to:

Explain the normal structure and function and to correlate it with deviations in common
disease conditions.
Explain the normal development of the respiratory system and list the common
developmental anomalies.
Describe the etiopathogenesis, structural and functional change, basis of clinical
manifestations, approach to diagnosis, principles of prevention and management of
common disorders of respiratory system.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

141 | P a g e

Describe the epidemiology of various respiratory disorders.


Describe the medico legal aspects of asphyxias and respiratory failure.

Skills: By the end of the course, students should be able to:

Identify the gross and microscopic structure of the respiratory system.


Identify the anatomical relationships of the various components of the respiratory
system using dissected parts, laboratory models and images.
Identify deviations in gross and microscopic structure of respiratory system using slides
and images.
Interpret lung function tests and blood gas reports.
Demonstrate the use of basic cytological techniques in the diagnosis of respiratory
infections and interpret the results.
Demonstrate the effect of various drugs on respiratory system using interactive CDs.
Interpret the results of the biochemical and cytological examination of pleural fluid.
Identify the bacterial flora in sputum smears in various respiratory infections.
Perform basic clinical examination, record the normal and abnormal findings and report
the results.

Attitudes: By the end of the module students should be able to demonstrate:

Awareness and concern about the environmental issues related to respiratory system
affecting the community health.
Awareness about the medico legal and ethical issues concerning the disorders of the
respiratory system.

Study Plan
Theme 1: Chest wall, Pleura and Diaphragm
Structure, function and development of Chest wall, Pleura and Diaphragm; Respiratory cycle
and lung compliance; Pleural infections and tumors; Medico legal aspects of chest injury and
pulmonary embolism
Theme 2: Upper respiratory tract
Structure, function and development of Upper respiratory tract; Etiopathogenesis of upper
respiratory tract infections; Upper respiratory tract infections of public health importance;
Principles of drug therapy; Cough reflex
Theme 3: Lower respiratory tract
Structure and function of lower respiratory tract including broncho pulmonary
Segments; Lung defense mechanisms; Laboratory diagnosis of lower respiratory tract
infections; Morphology, clinical features and drug therapy of pneumonias

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

142 | P a g e

Theme 4: Airflow in the respiratory system


Functions of airways; Lung function tests; Bronchial asthma
4.4 Chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD); Bronchiectasis; Neoplastic disorders
Theme 5: Ventilation
Ventilation- perfusion matching; Diffusion; Pulmonary edema; Flail chest
Theme 6: Neural and chemical control of breathing
Neural mechanisms; Chemical regulation of breathing; High altitude sickness; Sleep
disordered breathing
Theme 7: Transport of gases and acid base- balance
Transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide; Hypo- and hyper-ventilation; Acid-base balance;
Occupational pulmonary disorders; Respiratory failure; Respiratory distress syndrome;
Ventilator associated infections; Asphyxia and asphyxial deaths.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

143 | P a g e

Title

Alimentary System

Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members

Participating Departments
Pre-requisites

MED 205
Phase II / Year 2 / Semester 4
8 weeks
Prof. Shatha Al Sharbatti
Dr. Ramesh Ranganathan, Dr. Nilofer Sami Khan,
Dr. Miral Nagy Fahmy Salama, Dr. Kannan Narsimhan
& Dr. Pradeep Kumar Sharma
Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Pathology,
Microbiology, Pharmacology, Community Medicine,
Forensic Medicine, Radiology& Surgery
Phase I Courses

Course Description
The course adopts an integrated organ system- based approach to provide the learner with
a sound knowledge and understanding of the structure, functions and development of the
digestive system and its accessory organs, in health and their major deviations in disease.
Furthermore, the learner is introduced to the etiopathogenesis, basis of clinical
manifestations, methods of diagnosis, principles governing the pharmacological
management and methods of prevention of common disorders of the digestive system. The
course employs problem based learning (PBL) and a variety of teaching /learning methods to
facilitate interdisciplinary integration, student centered learning and development of
generic competences. Simultaneous introduction of basic clinical skills aims to vertically
integrate learning and prepare the students for clinical clerkship in the next phase.
Aims:
At the end of this course the student should be able to:

Understand the normal structure and functions of the alimentary system.


Know the structural and functional changes in the alimentary system due to disease
result in clinical manifestations commonly seen in gastrointestinal disorders.
Perform and explain some common procedures used to diagnose and manage
diseases of the alimentary system.
Interpret results of laboratory radiologic investigations commonly performed to
diagnose and manage patients with diseases of the alimentary system.
Demonstrate awareness of the role of psychosocial aspects in the etiology of
alimentary diseases and their management.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

144 | P a g e

Intended Learning Outcomes:


Knowledge: By the end of this course students will be able to:

Understand and explain the structure of the component organs of the GIT and the
associated organs (salivary glands, exocrine pancreas, liver) that are essential for the
functioning of the digestive system and relate these to their key functions.
Explain the coordinated and integrated functioning of the digestive system.
Describe the causes, pathogenesis, morphological and functional alterations and
epidemiology of common disorders of digestive system.
Explain the clinical and laboratory features of these disorders in terms of disruption of
the normal structure and function.
Outline the principles of management and methods of prevention and medico-legal
aspects of poisoning.
Recognize the major risk factors, common symptoms and signs of disorders of
gastrointestinal system.

Skills: By the end of the course students should be able to:

Identify the structures and associated organs of the digestive system, on macroscopic
examination in cadavers, gross specimens as well as on imaging studies.
Identify the salient light microscopic features of these organs on slides /projected
images.
Recognize major alterations in morphology (macroscopic) of the foregoing structures in
common disorders.
Identify common gastrointestinal pathogens on appropriate specimens.
Obtain the clinical history from a patient with a gastrointestinal disorder.
Perform complete abdominal examination.
Interpret the results of a ascetic fluid analysis.
Interpret the results of liver function tests.
Explain the steps of procedures like nasogastric intubation, paracentesis, to a patient.
Perform nasogastric intubation of a manikin.
Identify normal radiological findings on an X-ray of the abdomen and explain the causes
of deviations from the normal.

Attitudes: By the end of the course, students should be aware of:

The cultural beliefs of different ethnic groups while performing a per-rectal examination.
The importance of proper nutrition, hygiene and sanitation in promoting health and
preventing illnesses.
The role of interactions of the body and mind in manifestations of gastro-intestinal
disorders.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

145 | P a g e

Study plan
Theme 1: Upper GIT - Mouth, Salivary glands, Esophagus, Stomach
Structures in the oral cavity and pharynx, process of mastication and deglutition, Saliva:
composition, functions, control of secretion, Infections of oral cavity and lips, Pathological
conditions of the mouth, Embryology and developmental anomalies of face and upper G.I.T ,
Structural arrangements of esophagus, swallowing (deglutition), control of motility in the
esophagus, dysphagia (mechanisms), , Esophageal reflux, oesophagitis, Barretts
esophagus, varicose veins Gross anatomy and functions of the stomach, Gastro esophageal
reflux, gastritis, peptic ulcer, Pre-neoplastic lesions and neoplasms of upper GIT, Main
determinants and risk factors of upper GIT cancers, Imaging of the upper GIT.
Theme 2: Liver, biliary tract and pancreas
Gross anatomy of liver, gall bladder , biliary system and pancreas, Liver function tests,
interpretation, Patterns of hepatic injury Histology of biliary system, Bile production,
secretion and storage, Jaundice and cholestasis, Gallstones &Cholecystitis, Portal circulation,
portal hypertension, Infectious disorders of liver including parasitic infestations , Alcoholic
liver disease, cirrhosis, Hepatomegaly, Neoplasms of Hepatobiliary system, Hepatotoxic
poisons, (Hepatotoxic drugs and chemicals), Antiviral drugs, Pancreas: Development and
functions, Pancreatic juice, Pancreatitis , Neoplasms of pancreas.
Theme 3: Peritoneum and Abdominal wall
Gross and clinical anatomy of peritoneum and peritoneal cavity, Torsion of mesentery
(volvulus) mesenteric cysts, Peritonitis, Subphrenic abscess, trauma, Ascites, Peritoneal fluid
analysis, Abdominal wall:rectus sheath and inguinal canal anatomy and clinical applications,
Emetics and antiemetics.
Theme 4: The Small Intestine
Gross and clinical anatomy of small intestine, Histology of small intestine, Development of
midgut, anomalies, Structure of the intestinal wall: the villous cell types, intestinal
secretions, control of secretions, Intestinal phase of digestion and absorption,
malabsorption syndromes, Infections( viral, bacterial, parasitic), Laxatives and antidiarrhoeal drugs, Principles of GIT chemotherapy, Abdominal injuries, Motility in the small
intestine, types of motility, segmentation, control of motility.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

146 | P a g e

Theme 5: Colon, Rectum and Anal Canal


Structure of large intestine (Gross and microscopic )including vermiform appendix,
Histology of large intestine, Secretion, absorption, motility of large intestine and its control,
diverticular disease (definition, mechanisms), fecal incontinence, Hemorrhoids, Prolapse
rectum, anal fissures, Corrosives and irritants, Food Poisoning, Constipation, principles of
therapy ,Appendicitis, Ischiorectal fossa, fistula- in-ano, perianal abscesses, inflammatory
bowel diseases (IBD): ulcerative colitis and Crohns disease; pathogenesis, morphological
changes, clinical features, complication and management, Intestinal obstruction, ischemic
bowel disease, Differentiation and growth of intestinal epithelium, Polyps, neoplasms of
intestine, anal canal, Endocrine cells of the GIT and tumors arising from them.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

147 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating
Departments
Pre-requisite / s

Urinary System
MED 206
Phase II / Year 2 / Semester 4
4 weeks
Dr. Shiny Prabha Mohan
Prof. Hemant Kumar Garg, Dr. May Khalil, Dr. Syed Morteza
Mahmoudi, Ms. Soofia Ahmed & Dr. Ihsan Ullah Khan
Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Pathology, Microbiology,
Pharmacology, Community Medicine, Forensic Medicine,
Medicine, Surgery, Urology & Pediatrics
Phase I Courses

Course Description
This course has been designed as an integrated study of the urinary system and provides
instruction into the mechanisms of operation of the urinary system. Emphasis is placed on
the integration of relevant principles with respect to the mechanisms of normal excretion
and its responses to health and disease. This course deals with common urinary disorders,
including study of renal failure, glomerular diseases, infections, obstruction and neoplasms
of the urinary tract. Also included is a series of case presentations dealing with common
complications of a variety of urinary tract diseases. PBL courses deal with prototype diseases
and provide opportunities to develop problem-solving skills.
Aims:
To acquire an integrated knowledge on the urinary system and its common disorders. The
knowledge acquired in understanding the normal and abnormal structures and functions of
the urinary system will be applied rationally as a Medical Practitioner, in the diagnosis and
management of common diseases of the urinary system in providing better health care.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge: By the end of the course, students should be able to understand:

Normal development of the urinary system and how congenital defects arise if it is
disturbed.
Normal structure and function of the urinary system and how these are altered in disease
of the urinary tract.
Various normal functions of the urinary system.
Familiarize with common disorders of the urinary system infectious, non-infectious and
congenital defects.
Principles of the management of recovery of normal functions of the urinary tract.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

148 | P a g e

Immune responses to external & internal agents may cause glomerular injury and
produce disease.
Microorganisms producing urinary tract infections.
Alterations in systemic vascular and metabolic states that secondarily produce urinary
tract disease.
Role of laboratory investigations and imaging techniques in the diagnosis and
management of diseases of the urinary tract.
Principles of pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment in the management of
urinary tract disease.

Skills: By the end of the course, students should be able to:

Identify the morphologic changes in common disorders of the urinary system.


Perform urethral catheterization in a manikin.
Interpret the results of the urinary colony count of microbiologic investigations done for
urinary tract infections.
Interpret results of common radiological and laboratory investigations done to diagnose
urinary tract diseases.
Distinguish the abnormal values from the normal values of kidney function tests.
Prepare and examine wet smear of the urine samples and interpret the cytological
findings.
Observe aseptic techniques in the collection of urinary samples.

Attitudes: By the end of the course, students should be able to:

Understand the progressive nature of most renal diseases, which contribute to the
morbidity, and mortality of urinary tract diseases.
Respect the regional, religious and emotional beliefs & needs of the patients.
Understand the patients problem and pay attention with compassion.
Understand how end-stage renal disease affects the quality of a patients life and its
effect on the individual and the family.

Study Plan
Theme 1

Kidney as an organ of excretion

Theme 2

Kidney as organ of homeostasis

Theme 3

Nephritc / Nephrotic syndrome & UTI

Theme 4

PBL week Chronic renal failure / Diabetic nephropathy

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

149 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating
Departments
Pre-requisite / s

Endocrine System & Mammary Gland


MED 210
Phase II / Year 3 / Semester V
5 weeks
Prof. Ishtiyaq Ahmed Shaafie
Dr. Mohammad Mesbahuzzaman,
Ms. Soofia Ahmed & Dr. Mahir Khali Ibrahim Jallo
Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Pathology, Microbiology,
Pharmacology, Community Medicine, Medicine & Surgery
Phase I Courses

Course Description
This course is designed to provide an integrated approach to the learning of normal
structure, function and development of endocrine system including the mammary glands
using different strategies and applying the knowledge and skills acquired in understanding
the pathophysiology of various endocrine disorders .Each endocrine organ is taken as a
theme and common presentations due to its hypofunction and hyperfunction are studied.
The clinical and laboratory features of the disorders are discussed. PBL week deals with the
structure and function and prototype diseases of mammary gland and provide opportunities
to develop problem solving skills and communication skills.
Aims:
At the completion of the course, the student should have sufficient knowledge about the
structure, function and regulation of major endocrine organs of the body, the endocrine
regulation of different organ systems and common disorders associated with the endocrine
system. The student should understand the role of mammary gland as the target organ for
hormones and its importance in cancer screening programs.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge: By the end of the course the student will be able to describe the:

Normal structure, function and development of endocrine organs and mammary gland;
Structural and functional relationships among the various endocrine organs;
Mechanisms for the synthesis, secretion and actions of hormones and their regulation;
Transport and metabolism of hormones;
Cellular and clinical effects of over-production and underproduction of hormones;

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

150 | P a g e

The etiopathogenesis, morphology and clinical features and principles of management of


neoplasms of endocrine glands;
Abnormal test findings of hypo function and hyper function of endocrine organs &
correlate with clinical features.
The biological basis of Dynamic Function Tests (Provocative and Suppression) in
endocrine disorders
Principles of drug therapy of endocrine disorders;
Epidemiology and prevention of endocrine disorders;

Skills: By the end of the course the student will be able to:

Eliciting relevant clinical history for endocrine disorders;


Perform physical examination for endocrine disorders.
Identify abnormal findings in laboratory reports and correlate the results with hypo-and
hyper-function of endocrine organs;
Identify different types of insulin preparations, insulin delivery devices & their usage;
Use glucometer for estimation of blood glucose in diagnosis of Diabetes mellitus;
Perform Breast examination using simulators;
Perform FNAC on breast using simulators;
Identify locations and normal shape and size of endocrine organs using images and
models.

Attitudes: By the end of the course the student will show:

Concern about the social problems associated with endocrine disorders;


Awareness about the importance of patient education in the management of diabetes
mellitus.
Awareness about the psychosocial aspects of (male) gynecomastia;
Awareness about the importance and promotion of breast feeding;
Awareness and importance of breast cancer screening programs.

Study Plan
Theme 1
Theme 2
Theme 3
Theme 4
Theme 5
Theme 6
Theme 7

Hypothalamus & Pituitary


Thyroid
Parathyroid
Adrenals
Endocrine Pancreas
Miscellaneous Hormones
Mammary gland

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

151 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating
Departments
Pre-requisite / s

Reproductive system
MED 207
Phase II / Year 3 / Semester V
7 weeks
Dr. Nisha Shantha Kumari
Dr. Joshua Ashok, Dr. Lisha Jenny John & Dr. Shanti Fernandez
Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Pathology, Microbiology,
Community Medicine, Forensic Medicine, Gynecology,
Urology, Surgery & Dermatology
Phase I Courses

Course Description
The course is designed to provide an integrated approach to the learning of the normal
structure, function and development of the human reproductive system using different
learning strategies to acquire the knowledge and skills required for understanding the
pathophysiology of various reproductive disorders; the rationale for their management
focused on disease prevention. The medico legal aspects of specific disorders will be
studied. The PBL course will deal with the pathophysiology and management of menstrual
disorders.
Aims:
To understand the normal structure & function of the male and female reproductive
systems and their common disorders.
To enable the learner to be cognizant of the principles of diagnosis, management and
prevention of these disorders.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge: At the end of the course the students will be able to

Explain the relationship between embryological origin, structure and function of the
male and female reproductive systems.
Describe the disorders of development of male and female genital systems
Describe the etiopathogenesis, structural and functional alterations, pathological basis
of salient clinical features, approach to diagnosis, principles of management, and
methods of prevention of :

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

152 | P a g e

Inflammatory disorders of male and female genital tract


Tumors and tumor like conditions of male and female genital tract
Disorders of Tunica vaginalis and spermatic cord
Vascular disorders of male genital tract
Menstrual disorders
Gestational and placental disorders
Disorders of displacement of uterus
Explain significance of abnormal findings in an Endometrial Biopsy in common
endometrial disorder
Be cognizant of microbiological examination and culture sensitivity reports of
specimens from genital tract.
Recognize normal pregnancy and define terms related to abnormal pregnancy
List methods of diagnosis of pregnancy
Explain the rationale for urine and blood tests in Pregnancy
Describe the stages of Labor
List the causes for Infertility in both genders, and the methods employed in assessing
the Infertile couple
Describe the types of Sexual offences and the Medico legal aspects of Impotency
Recognize normal and abnormal findings of Semen analysis
Describe the methods of Assisted Reproduction
List several birth control methods and describe their effectiveness.
Describe health programs directed to women and children
Identify causes for maternal and child mortality and morbidity

Skills: At the end of the course the student will be able to:

Elicit history on Male Infertility and Sexual dysfunction


Conduct physical examination of Male Genital system on a simulator
Conduct Pelvic examination of Nullipara and Gravida on a simulator
Elicit Gynecology history
Demonstrate techniques of obtaining high vaginal swab
Demonstrate methods of obtaining PAP smear
Collect, store & transport urethral and vaginal specimens for microbiological and
cytological examination.
Conduct Obstetric examination

Attitudes: At the end of the course the student will be able to demonstrate awareness of:

Demonstrate awareness and sensitivity while performing intimate examination e.g.


male and female genital examination.
The impact of Sexually Transmitted Diseases on the patient, his/her family, and the
community

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

153 | P a g e

The need to advise the patient to prevent transmission of STD


The feelings of the Infertile couple
The ethical issues of Assisted Reproduction and Abortion

Study Plan
Theme 1

Disorders of Development

Theme 2

Inflammatory Disorders

Theme 3

Male Infertility

Theme 4

Vascular Disorders

Theme 5

Disorders of Tunica Vaginalis and Spermatic Cord

Theme 6

Tumors and Tumor like Disorders

Theme 7

Disorders of Development

Theme 8

Menstrual Disorders

Theme 9

Infection of Female Genital Tract

Theme 10

Displacement of Supporting Structures

Theme 11

Tumors and Tumor like Conditions of Female Genital Tract

Theme 12

Pregnancy

Theme 13

Gestational & Placental Disorders

Theme 14

Contraception, Maternal and Child Health

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

154 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members

Participating
Departments
Pre-requisite / s

Nervous System
MED 208
Phase II / Year 3 / Semester VI
9 weeks
Dr. Nisha Shantha Kumari
Prof. Mandar Vilas Ambike, Dr. Kannan Narsimhan, Dr. Radhika
Taroor, Dr. Mehzabin Ahmed, Dr. Mohamed Hamdy Ibrahim
Abdalla & Dr. Pankaj Lamba
Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Pathology, Pharmacology,
Microbiology, Community Medicine, Forensic Medicine, Neurology,
Medicine, Ophthalmology &ENT.
Phase I Courses

Course Description
The course is designed to provide an integrated approach to the learning of the normal
structure, function and development of the nervous system and the organs of hearing,
vision, taste, smell and touch. The course also serves to introduce the medical students to
individual factors affecting human behavior particularly the micro level psychological
processes such as perception, personality, attitudes, values and motivation. The students
will also have a chance to understand the impact of these factors on the health and wellbeing of people in general and on the patient-doctor relationship in specific. The medico
legal aspects of death will be studied. PBL week will deal with the pathophysiology, and
management of meningeal infections.
Aims:
This required system-based block integrates the basic sciences into a study of neuroscience
and behavior in both health and disease. Each of the basic science topics is incorporated in
an integrated body of knowledge covering neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurological
correlates, neuropharmacology, neuropathology, human behavior and psychiatry, utilizing
both didactic & self-directed learning methods and clinical models.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge: At the end of this course the student will be able to:

Describe the gross features of the human nervous system including brain and spinal
cord, the meninges and ventricular system, and its blood supply.
Describe the cell biology of neurons including the structure of neurons, the basis of
synaptic transmission, and the pharmacological control of these processes.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

155 | P a g e

Define the structural basis and physiological and pharmacological properties of the
pathways that transmit sensory and motor information in the nervous system.
Describe the etiopathogenesis, structural & functional alterations, pathological basis of
salient clinical features, approach to diagnosis, principles of management & methods of
prevention of common disorders of the nervous system.
Develop an understanding of the mental processes and individual characteristics of a
person that form the basis of behavior, mental disorders and their treatment, the basis
of psychiatry.
Develop an understanding of the characteristics of behavioral disorders and the
principles of their treatment that form the basis of psychiatry.
Describe methods of relieving pain by pharmacologic and non - pharmacologic measures.
Describe the structure and function of the eye and visual disorders
Describe the structure and function of the ear and disorders of hearing
Describe the structure and function of gustatory and olfactory receptors and their
disorders

Skills: At the end of this course the student will be able to:

Elicit history related to nervous system and behavior disorders


Perform examination of the nervous system
Localize lesion to specific levels of the CNS based on application of basic principles to
neurological symptoms.
Perform Lumbar puncture on a simulator
Recognize normal and abnormal CSF analysis findings.
Recognize normal and abnormal radiological and neuroimaging findings
Identify neurotoxin
Recognize the individual characteristics and psychological processes in behavior related
to health and sickness
Perform examination of the eye (torch light, pupillary reactions, visual field, eye
movements, visual acuity, color vision and ophthalmoscopy)
Perform examination of hearing by tuning fork and audiometer

Attitudes: At the end of this course the student will be able to:

Appreciate the importance of psychological processes and individual characteristics in


understanding health behavior
Demonstrate consideration for motivation based disorders.
Demonstrate awareness of the social & psychological consequences of stigma
(disability/diseases) especially as they relate to the nervous system.
Appreciate the ethical issues in performing an invasive procedure (LP).
Demonstrate awareness of cases to be reported for medico legal investigation

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

156 | P a g e

Study Plan
Theme 1

Synaptic transmissions and neurotransmitters

Theme 2

Sensory system and its disorders

Theme 3

Motor system and its disorders

Theme 4

Spinal cord and polyneuropathies

Theme 5-6

The Brain and its disorders

Theme 7

PBL Meningitis

Theme 8

Behavioral disorders

Theme 9

The Eye and its disorders

Theme 10

The Ear, Olfaction and Gustation

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

157 | P a g e

Title

Musculoskeletal System

Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s

MED 209
Phase II / Year 3 / Semester VI
7 weeks
Prof. Mandar Vilas Ambike
Dr. Lisha Jenny John , Dr. Mehzabin Ahmed & Dr. Nishida
Anatomy, Physiology, Pathology, Pharmacology,
Orthopedics, Community Medicine, Forensic Medicine,
Orthopedics & Physical Therapy
Phase I Courses

Course Description
In this course the knowledge of the contribution of the normal structure, function and
development of the bones, joints and muscles in the maintenance of the kinetics of normal
posture and locomotion will help to understand how the physiological and pathological
changes associated with congenital, traumatic, infectious, degenerative, metabolic and
neoplastic musculoskeletal disorders lead to physical disabilities that have a major impact on
the biomechanical function of this organ system particularly following traumatic bone
injuries and degenerative joint disease.
Aims:

To provide a course of integrated learning of structure and function of the organs


that makes the musculoskeletal system to maintain posture and movements.
To provide an introduction to abnormal kinetics of the musculoskeletal system in
common musculoskeletal related disorders.
To provide an understanding of the mechanisms underlying clinical manifestations,
principles in management including rehabilitation in the disorders of the
musculoskeletal system.

Intended Learning Outcomes:


Knowledge: At the end of this course the student will be able to:

Describe the structure and functions of the musculoskeletal system.


Explain the basic mechanisms of the structural and functional alterations that occur in
common musculoskeletal disorders and their effects on health.
Relate the structural functional alteration to clinical manifestations of common
musculoskeletal disorders.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

158 | P a g e

Explain the role of relevant biochemical, clinical and radiological investigations of the
musculoskeletal system in common disorders.
Describe the conservative, surgical and rehabilitation measures to alleviate pain, improve
function and to modify the natural history of common musculoskeletal disorders.

Skills: At the end of this course the student will be able to:

Elicit relevant history related to the musculoskeletal disorders.


Identify by examination - visual inspection, palpation, and the evaluation of joint motion
(LOOK, FEEL and MOVE) the normality and abnormality of the musculoskeletal system.
Recognize normal and abnormal findings in biochemical, electrophysiology, imaging
modalities appropriate to the level of training.

Attitudes: At the end of this course the student will be able to:

Demonstrate polite and considerate interaction with patients and their family members.
Show respect for patients views, privacy and dignity.
Demonstrate awareness of the psychosocial implications with respect to deformities and
grievous injuries.
Communicate with patients about their condition, treatment and prognosis in a way they
understand.
Appreciate the multi-system presentation and multi-disciplinary management of
disorders and recognize the importance of teamwork.

Study Plan
Theme 1

Common Injuries of the Musculoskeletal System

Theme 2

Defects of Metabolism

Theme 3

Inflammatory, Infective and Degenerative Disorders of Synovial Joints.

Theme 4

Primary Muscular Disorders

Theme 5

Tumor &Tumor like Lesions of Bone and Soft Tissue

Theme 6

Congenital Disorders of Muscle, Bone and Joint

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

159 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Members

Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s

Integumentary System
MED 201
Phase II / Year 3 / Semester VI
2 weeks
Dr. Anuj Mathur
Dr. May Khalil, Dr. Mohammad Mesbahuzzaman,
Dr. Liju Susan Mathew & Prof. Irene Nirmala Thomas
Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Pathology,
Microbiology, Pharmacology, Community Medicine,
Forensic Medicine, Dermatology & Surgery
Phase I Courses

Course Description
This course has been integrated around the Integumentary System to provide the learner
with a sound knowledge and understanding of the structure, functions and development of
the integumentary system in health and its major deviations in common skin diseases. In
addition, the learner is introduced to the causes, pathogenesis, and pathological basis of
clinical manifestations, methods of diagnosis, principles governing management and
methods of prevention of these disorders.
Aims:
To develop an integrated, foundational knowledge and understanding of the Integumentary
system and its common disorders. This understanding will be essential to the development
of learners ability to recognize, diagnose, manage and prevent these disorders, which they
may encounter later in their clinical training as well as medical practice. Besides, as the first
course of organ system courses, it is expected to provide structured learning opportunities
that help students apply and consolidate their learning of introductory medical sciences.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge: By the end of the course students should be able to:
Understand and explain the relationship between the embryological origin, structure and
function of skin and its appendages
Understand the incidence, prevalence and classification of skin disease
Relate alterations in structure and functions of skin to clinical manifestations and
complications of cutaneous wounds (burns, erosion, ulceration, etc.); explain the
principles of wound healing

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

160 | P a g e

Describe etio-pathogenesis, structural and functional alterations, common signs and


symptoms, appropriate Laboratory work ups, principles of management and methods of
prevention of common disorders in the following categories:

Disorders of pigmentation
Disorders of appendages
Cutaneous infections
Inflammatory disorders of skin (including acute and chronic inflammatory
dermatoses, hypersensitivity, reactions, blistering and autoimmune disorders),
Premalignant lesions and neoplasms of skin
Skills: By the end of the course students will be able to:

Identify the structural constituents and organization of skin


Recognize alterations in gross and microscopic structure of skin in each of the disorders
(listed) as appropriate.
Prepare a gram stain and identify common cutaneous infectious agents by light
microscopy.
Identify common dermatophytes in a KOH preparation
Clinical skills:
Demonstrate the ability to take clinical history in patients with common skin disorders
Perform a focused physical examination in skin disorders, as appropriate to the level:
Identify primary and secondary lesions of the skin
Perform tests to detect skin sensations of touch, pain and temperature
Differentiate between skin cysts, tumors and ulcers by palpation
Perform injection techniques (I/D, S/C), tuberculin and allergy testing on simulators

Attitudes: By the end of the course students should be able to:


Demonstrate awareness of the social and psychological consequences of stigma
(disfigurement/ diseases) especially as they relate to skin conditions.
Study Plan
Theme 1
Theme 2
Theme 3
Theme 4
Theme 5
Theme 6

Skin Trauma (Cutaneous wounds)


Skin pigmentation and Disorders of Pigmentation
Skin Appendages, Acne, hair problems and other disorders of skin
Inflammations of the skin (including acute and chronic dermatoses,
hypersensitivity reactions, blistering disorders and autoimmune disorders)
Skin Infections
Premalignant Lesions and Neoplasms

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

161 | P a g e

Phase III Courses

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Clerkship Coordinator
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s
Co-requisite / s
Post-requisite / s

Ophthalmology
MED 401
Phase III / Year 4 & Year 5 / Semester VII - X
6 weeks
Prof. Salwa Abd El Razak El Said Attia
Dr. Pankaj Lamba
Dr. Pradeep Kumar Sharma, Dr. Mohammed Khalid &
Dr. Kannan Narsimhan
Ophthalmology, Internal Medicine, Physiology &
General Surgery
Phase II & Basic clinical skills
Surgery, Medicine, Pediatrics, Gynecology and Obstetrics &
Otorhinolaryngology
CRRI

Course Description
This course is designed as an introduction to ophthalmology. In addition to attending
didactic sessions, the student will learn to take a good ophthalmic history and perform a
good general eye exam in order to detect common abnormalities of the eye and visual
system. Students will learn to interpret the clinical findings and reach a diagnosis and discuss
their management during case based discussions in the classroom, the outpatient and the
bedside. Students will develop and refine skills in the use of the penlight, ophthalmoscope
and slit lamp and will also have ample opportunity to observe a variety of ophthalmic
surgical procedures, such as sub-conjunctival injection, foreign body removal and
nasolacrimal duct syringing performed in the management of common eye disorders.
Aims:
The broad goal the teaching students in ophthalmology is to provide such knowledge and
skills to the students that shall enable him to practice as an internist and as a primary eye
care physician, and also to function effectively as a community health leader to assist in the
prevention of blindness and rehabilitation of the visually impaired.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge Outcome: At the end of the course, the student will have knowledge of
1. Common problems affecting eye
2. Principles of management of major ophthalmic emergencies
3. Main systemic diseases affecting the eye
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

162 | P a g e

4. Effects of local and systemic diseases on patients vision and the necessary action
required to minimize the sequelae of such diseases.
5. Adverse drug reactions with special references to ophthalmic manifestations.
6. Eye care education for prevention of eye problems
7. Role of primary health center in organization of eye camps
8. Organization of primary health care and the functioning of the ophthalmic
assistant , eye bank organization
Skill Outcomes: At the end of the course, the student will be able to
1. Elicit a history pertinent to general health and ocular status
2. Perform diagnostic procedures such as visual acuity testing, examination of eye,
schiotz tonometry, staining for corneal pathology, confrontation perimetry,
subjective refraction including correction of presbyopia and aphakia, direct
ophthalmoscopy, and conjunctival smear examination and cover test.
3. Diagnose and treat common problems affecting the eye
4. Interpret ophthalmic signs in relation to common systemic disorders
5. Perform
therapeutic
procedures
such
as
subconjunctival
injection,
Corneal/Conjunctival foreign body removal, Carbolic cautery for corneal ulcers,
Nasolacrimal duct syringing, and tarsorraphy.
6. Provide first aid in major ophthalmic emergencies
7. Organize community surveys for visual checkup
8. Organize primary eye care service through primary health care centers.
Attitudinal Outcomes
1. Use effective means of communication with the public and individual to motivate for
surgery in cataract, and for eye donation.
2. Establish rapport with his seniors, colleagues, and paramedical workers, so as to
effectively function as a member of the eye care team.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

163 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Clerkship Coordinator
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s
Co-requisite / s
Post-requisite / s

Otorhinolaryngology
MED 402
Phase III / Year 4 & Year 5 / Semester VII -X
6 weeks
Prof. Tambi Abraham Cherian
Prof. Meenu Cherian
Dr. Jenny Cheriathu,
Dr. Muhanned Sultan & Dr. Rizwana B Sheikh
Otorhinolaryngology, General Surgery, Pediatrics &
Community Medicine
Phase II & Basic clinical skills
Surgery, Medicine, Pediatrics, Ophthalmology, OBG
CRRI

Course Description
The didactic lectures provide essential factual information, and the clinical rotations provide
a practical experience. Students will learn to take a relevant history and perform a basic
head and neck exam with equipments available to a primary care practitioner (flashlight,
tongue blade, otoscope) and perform an ear exam by tympanometry and otoscope. The
students will gain increasing experience discussing the clinical findings to reach a diagnosis
of common problems like allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, otitis media, epistaxis, facial fractures,
hearing loss, dizziness, and swallowing disorders and discuss a treatment plan with the
faculty. Students will be able to observe surgical procedures like ear syringing, nasal packing,
tracheostomy, endoscopy and removal of foreign bodies. The student will be able to
perform laryngoscopy and use of tracheostomy tubes on a manikin in the simulation lab.
Aims:
The broad goal of the teaching of undergraduate students in Otorhinolaryngology is that the
undergraduate student should have acquired adequate knowledge and skills for optimally
dealing with common disorders and emergencies of the upper aerodiigestive tract and the
principles of rehabilitation of the hearing impaired.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge: At the end of the course, the students will be able to:

Describe the basic pathophysiology of common ENT diseases and emergencies


Adopt the rational use of commonly used drugs, keeping in mind their adverse reactions.
Suggest common investigative procedures and their interpretations

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

164 | P a g e

Skills: At the end of the course, the students will be able to:

Examine and diagnose common ENT problems including the pre-malignant and
malignant disorders of the head and neck
Manage ENT problems at the first level of care and be able to refer whenever necessary
Carry out minor surgical procedures like ear syringing, ear dressings, nasal packing etc.
Assist in certain procedures such as tracheostomy, endoscopies and removal of foreign
bodies

Attitudes: At the end of the course, the students will be able to:
Show awareness of the need to act immediately in emergencies obstruction to air passages
by foreign bodies

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

165 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year / Semester
Duration
Chairperson
Clerkship Coordinator
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s
Co-requisite / s
Post-requisite / s

Medicine & Allied Disciplines


MED 403
Phase III / Year 4 & Year 5 / Semester VII - X
28 weeks
Prof. Sheikh Altaf Basha
Prof. Salwa Abd ElZaher Mabrouk
Dr. Ehab M. Esheiba, Dr. Muhanned A Abdul Wahid,
& Dr. Syed Shehnaz Ilyas
Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Psychiatry, PHC &
Pharmacology
Phase II, Basic clinical skills
Surgery, Pediatrics, Ophthalmology, Gynecology &
Obstetrics, Otorhinolaryngology
CRRI

Course Description
The Medicine clerkship is divided into two rotations one in clerkship year 4 and the other in
year 5. The student will have adequate clinical encounters in both ambulatory and bedside
settings in the outpatient and inpatient departments of the hospital. The student will gain
wide exposure to the medical and conservative management of common acute and chronic
medical disorders. Rotations in allied medical specialties like dermatology and psychiatry will
increase the breadth of the experience to include the management of common skin
disorders and a broad understanding of the human mind and behavior, its normality in
health, abnormality in stress, methods of classifying psychological and psychiatric disorders
and different forms of therapy. It also helps students in gaining an understanding of the
ethical concepts in the field of medicine, the right of patients and the responsibility of health
professionals.
Aims:
The broad goal of the teaching of undergraduate students in Medicine is to ensure that the
graduate will have acquired adequate knowledge, skills and behavioral attributes to practice
as a competent entry-level physician.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge: At the end of the Clerkship the student will have achieved cognitive proficiency
in:
Symptomatology, clinical presentation of common disorders affecting the various organ
systems of the body.
Various diagnostic modalities for the identification and differentiation of the conditions;
the interpretation of the results
Treatment strategies, which include drug therapy as well as other forms of therapy.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

166 | P a g e

Skills:
At the end of 5th year internal medicine ambulatory clerkship, the student will have
achieved the following professional skills:

Eliciting a comprehensive history from the patient and analysis of the various aspects of
the patients history.
Performing a general physical examination followed by detailed Systemic Examination.
Recording the history and findings of physical examination in a proper format and
presenting the case to the clinical tutor / consultant.
Discussing the cases, identification of the most likely problem (provisional diagnosis),
listing the differential diagnoses, describing the investigative approach, and discussing
the line of management.
Interpretation of the laboratory data, investigations such as radiographs, imaging
procedures, ECG, microbiology slides etc.
The student should have observed common diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (at
least each on two occasions) such as Pleural peritoneal aspirations, Lumbar Puncture,
Bone marrow aspiration, Liver Biopsy, 2 Echocardiography, TMT, Spirometry, Gastric
lavage, blood gas sampling etc. (As measured by acceptable scores in the periodically
conducted OSCE at the end of each clinical rotations and the final professional clinical
examination)

Attitudes: The student will have acquired the attitudinal skills to:

Accept the patients welfare as the first priority


Respect, protect and value patients right to privacy
Demonstrate the ability to participate in team work. (eg. project work)
Willingness to participate in group learning activities such as seminars and symposia

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

167 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year / Semester
Duration
Chairperson
Clerkship Coordinator
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s
Co-requisite / s
Post-requisite/ s

Surgery and Allied Disciplines


MED 404
Phase III / Year 4 & 5 / Semester VII -X
20 weeks
Prof. Yasien Malallah Taher
Dr. Mohammed Sohby
Dr. Amit Chaturvedi, Dr. Sona Chaturvedi
& Prof. Mandar Vilas Ambike
General Surgery, Orthopedics, Anesthesiology & Anatomy
Phase II & Basic clinical Skills
Medicine, Pediatrics, Gynecology & Obstetrics,
Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology
CRRI

Course Description
The clerkship in Surgery is designed to give the student a broad exposure to the principles of
diagnosis and management of common surgical problems, including surgical emergencies;
the indications and methods for fluid and electrolyte replacement therapy including blood
transfusion, the importance of asepsis, disinfection and sterilization and use of antibiotics,
and lastly, common malignancies and their management and prevention. During the course
of the rotation, the student will be expected to focus on several areas of study, which will
include basic principles of peri-operative management of the patient with a surgical
problem. An awareness of the nature and management of surgical disease is developed by
case oriented small group sessions, rounds and weekly conferences. The surgical experience
will be further widened to include surgical aspects of orthopedics, anesthesia and radiology
Orthopedics includes the principles of recognition and management of common bone and
joint injuries and infections; recognition of congenital and skeletal anomalies for correction
or rehabilitation; importance of metabolic bone diseases, diagnosis of neoplasms affecting
bones; recognition and management of degenerative and rheumatological diseases of
musculoskeletal system; principles of reconstructive surgery of musculoskeletal system.
Anesthesiology includes principles of the pre-, intra- and post-operative anesthetic
management of the surgical patient with particular emphasis on relief of preoperative
anxiety, intraoperative maintenance of normal oxygenation when normal respiration is
depressed under anesthesia and postoperative pain relief Radiology will include the
identification of normal findings on routine X-rays of chest, abdomen, head and limbs, the
recognition of deviations of normal and their significance in the management of the
underlying disorders.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

168 | P a g e

Aim:
The broad goal of teaching undergraduate students in Surgery is to produce graduates
capable of delivering efficient first contact surgical care.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
Knowledge: At the end of the course, the student will be able to:

Describe etiology, pathophysiology, principles of diagnosis and management of common


surgical problems including emergencies.
Define indications and methods for fluid and electrolyte replacement therapy including
blood transfusion.
Define asepsis, disinfection and sterilization and recommend judicious use of antibiotics.
Describe common malignancies in the country and their management including
prevention.
Enumerate different types of anesthetic agents, their indications, mode of
administration, contraindications and side effects.

Skills:

Elicit a comprehensive history on all surgical patients.


Identify and diagnose simple conditions like an abscess, thyroid swellings, superficial
tumors, breast lumps and abdominal masses.
List a differential diagnosis for each of the above conditions in the order of priority.
Evaluate patients with varicose veins, peripheral arterial disease and diabetic foot ulcers
clinically.
Perform clinical examination of trauma patients and explain the basics of the initial care
of these patients e.g. A,B&C.
Interpret common hematologic abnormalities (anemia, Leukocytosis, etc. ) and correlate
them with the clinical condition.
Decide which investigations are mandatory in patients with common surgical problems
e.g. acute abdomen
Interpret urine examination reports especially with reference to the presence of
hematuria and pyuria, and correlate the findings clinically. On the basis of the normal
values for: fasting and post prandial blood sugars, blood urea and S. creatinine, Liver
function tests, coagulation parameters and S. electrolytes and correlate these with the
clinical features.
Interpret plain and contrast X ray films especially of the abdomen and the GIT (Barium
series) and explain the basics of evaluation of abdominal CT films.
Explain to the patient the modalities of vascular imaging Doppler / angiogram and the
indications for these clinically.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

169 | P a g e

Recognize shock, especially hemorrhagic / septic shock and describe the principles of
fluid management.
Demonstrate basic techniques of dressing of wounds
Demonstrate basic techniques of bandaging
Identify clinical conditions that require surgical intervention and list the pre-operative
corrective measures required in common surgical problems. E.g.: Correction of fluid /
electrolyte balance, Correction of anemia
Explain the principles of monitoring patients after surgery urine output, vital
parameters, role of recording central venous pressure etc.
Perform physical examination of patients with disorders of the musculoskeletal system.
Identify common musculoskeletal injuries
Differentiate between life / limb threatening injuries from others.
Identify common musculoskeletal infections.
Identify congenital and skeletal abnormalities.
Identify metabolic bone disorders.
Recognize tumors and tumor-like conditions of bones and soft tissues
Diagnose degenerative and rheumatological diseases of musculoskeletal system.
Recognize abnormalities of Musculoskeletal system in x-rays
Interpret laboratory results in various diseases of the musculoskeletal system.

Attitudes:

Demonstrate ability to communicate with the patient and attendants and explain about
the diagnosis and modalities of treatment available with the risks of each type of therapy
Demonstrate willingness to practice ethical medicine and to respect patients rights for
confidentiality of Information

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

170 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year
Duration
Chairperson
Clerkship Coordinator
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s
Co-requisites / s
Post-requisites / s

Obstetrics & Gynecology


MED 405
Phase III / Year 4 & 5 / Semester VII -X
10 weeks
Prof. Mawahib Abd Salman
Dr. Shanthi Fernandes
Dr. Tarek Fowzy, Dr. Ihsan Ullah Khan &
Dr. Nisha Shantha Kumari
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Radiology, Urology & Physiology
Phase II & Basic clinical skills
Surgery, Medicine, Pediatrics, Ophthalmology &
Otorhinolaryngology
CRRI

Course Description
In the Obstetrics and Gynecology, the student will gain the skills of gynecologic and
obstetric history taking and physical examination in the outpatient and wards and practical
experience in the delivery room under the close supervision of the staff. The student will
avail of these opportunities to reach a diagnosis and discuss the management of
gynecologic and obstetric disorders with the faculty while dealing with patients in the
outpatient, the delivery room, the operation theater and the wards. The performance of
procedural skills like delivering a baby, taking a PAP smear, suturing an episiotomy will be
learnt and practiced in the safe environment of the Simulation Lab. Formal and informal
daily teaching sessions and rounds with the faculty are a part of this clerkship experience.
Aims:
The broad goal of the teaching of undergraduate students in Obstetrics and Gynecology is
that he/she should acquire understanding of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of
the reproductive system and gain the ability to optimally manage common conditions
affecting it.
Intended Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the Obstetric clerkship the student should achieve cognitive proficiency in:
Knowledge:

Physiological changes in pregnancy, the common symptoms & signs of pregnancy.


Normal pelvis, abnormal pelvic types.
Normal and abnormal labor

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

171 | P a g e

Normal & abnormal puerperium


Routine antenatal care, antenatal advice, routine antenatal investigations blood
investigations, ultrasound scan.
High risk pregnancies, abnormal presentations
Complications of labor

Skill:

To elicit a comprehensive history, and calculate Expected Date of Delivery from the date
of Last Menstrual Period, determine gestational age in weeks.
To analyze and document in clinical history in proper chronological order.
Perform general examination; check vital signs, and breast examination.
To perform the various obstetric maneuvers including auscultation for the fetal heart
sounds.
To perform per speculum & digital examination in pregnancy and if necessary assess the
pelvis & Bishops score (cervical assessment)

Attitudinal Outcomes:

Demonstrate readiness to follow ethical guidelines related to pregnancy


Demonstrate readiness to consider the patients welfare as first priority
Recognize the importance of protecting & valuing patients privacy
Demonstrate willingness to accept teamwork in providing medical care

By the end of the Gynecology clerkship the student should have achieved cognitive
proficiency in:
Knowledge:

Symptomatology & presentation of common gynecological disorders.


Various methods of contraception.
Appropriate investigations to be performed to aid in the diagnosis & to interpret the
results. Eg: S.BHCG in titer for cases of ectopic pregnancies & molar pregnancies, etc.
Ultrasound Scan.
Treatment strategies, medical & surgical.

Skills:

Elicit a comprehensive history & analyze it, record in chronological order.


Perform general physical examination; check vitals, thyroid & breast examination,
abdomen examination, per speculum & per vaginal examination.
Prepare a pap smear; collect high vaginal swab & cervical swab.
Make provisional diagnosis & list differential diagnosis.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

172 | P a g e

Order relevant investigations & discuss the line of management.


Interpret the investigations results like Pap smear report, semen analysis report,
Histopathology report of cervical punch biopsy & D&C, HSG (Hystero-salphingogram),
vaginal swab report, ultrasound etc.
Observed common procedures in the OPD like IUCD insertion, colposcopy, cervical
cauterization, endometrial biopsy, and Incision of Bartholins abscess.
Attended & observed surgical procedures (at least 2 each) like fractional curettage,
Diagnostic D&C, Marsupilization of Bartholins cyst, Incision & drainage of Bartholins
abscess myomectomy, hysterectomy Abdominal & vaginal.

Attitude:

Observe medical ethics to consider patients welfare as first priority


Protecting & valuing patients privacy
Spirit of teamwork
Respect for teachers and for fellow students

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

173 | P a g e

Title
Code
Phase / Year / Semester
Duration
Chairperson
Clerkship Coordinator
Members
Participating Departments
Pre-requisite / s
Co-requisite / s
Post-requisite / s

Pediatrics
MED 406
Phase III / Year 4 & 5 / Semester VII -X
10 weeks
Prof. Mahmoud Shamseldeen
Prof. Ignatius Edwin DSouza
Dr. Wesam Khadum, Dr. Malini Vijayan & Prof. Ishtiyaq
Ahmed Shaafie
Pediatrics, Dermatology, Obstetrics & Gynecology and
Biochemistry
Phase II & Basic clinical skills
Surgery, Medicine, Pediatrics, Gynecology & Obstetrics,
Ophthalmology& Otorhinolaryngology
CRRI

Course Description
The student will learn to obtain clinical history in an age-appropriate and sensitive manner
from a child and or the accompanying adult and conduct a pediatric physical examination
appropriate to the condition and the age of the patient. During presentation of the clinical
findings to the faculty, the student will interpret the clinical findings and available lab results
to suggest a diagnosis and discuss the management of the disease. The student will assess
growth and development and advocate safety measures to prevent injury and disease. Many
case based sessions have been planned to provide alternative clinical experiences. The
simulation lab will allow the learner to practice in a safe environment.
Aims:
The broad goal of teaching undergraduate students in Pediatrics is to acquire adequate
knowledge and appropriate skills for optimally dealing with major health problems of
children to ensure their optimal growth and development.
Intended Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of the clerkship in Pediatrics, the student
should be able to:

Recognize common developmental and medical problems in infants and children


Elicit a comprehensive history that includes perinatal, developmental, nutritional and
family history and immunization history in communication with the childs parents.
Conduct an adequate physical examination in sick children of different age group.
Explain developmental milestones in a child and use the information in assessment of
infants and children.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

174 | P a g e

Recognize the specific requirements in neonates and identify differences in the


presentation of clinical problems in this age group compared to children in the older age
group.
Describe the appropriate investigations that would help in confirming the diagnosis in
common problems in infants and children.
Describe the principles of administration of drugs in children and explain the rationale
Describe and assist in resuscitative procedures in the new born.
Participate in clinical problem solving sessions and demonstrate the ability for data
search and analysis

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

175 | P a g e

14.8 Typical Week


14.8.1 PHASE I
Time
8.30 am
9.30 am
9.30 am
10.30 am
10.30 am
11.00 am
11.00 am
01.00 pm

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Formative Quiz

Lecture

Lecture

Lecture

Lecture

Discussion on
Quiz

Lecture

Lecture

Preparation
for Seminar

Lecture

Integrated
Seminar

Mini-project
on Health
Days /
Preceptor
Meeting / SDL

TEABREAK

CBL Part I
(Brainstorming)

Practical / CAL /
SDL

01.00 pm
01.30 pm

Practical / SDL /
Self Study

LUNCH BREAK

CBL Part II
(Review and
Entry)
03.30 pm Faculty office hours- You can meet faculty members in their offices to clarify doubts
04.30 pm
and ask for advice related to academics
Multimedia rooms (Computer Labs) will be used only for CAL sessions.
For SDL, students will use books and own laptops (If needed).
01.30 pm
03.30 pm

Practical/SDL/
Self Study

Practical/CAL/SDL

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Lecture

Lecture

Lecture

CA

Lecture

Lecture

CBL Self Study

CBL Self
Study

14.8.2 PHASE II Year 1


Time
8.30 am
9.30 am
9.30 am
10.30 am

10.30 am
11.00 am
11.00 am
01.00 pm

BCS Batches A
&B

Thursday
Lecture
Lecture

TEABREAK
CBL Part I
Batches
A&B

Practical / Video
/ Reading
Assignments
Batch A / B

01.00 pm
01.30 pm

SDL / CAL /
Practical
Batch A / B

BCS

*SDL

Batches
A&B

Seminar
preparation

LUNCH BREAK
SDL CBL (LO)

01.30 pm
03.30 pm

Wednesday

Batches
A&B

BCS: Basic Clinical Skills


SDL: Self Directed Learning
Computer Assisted Learning

Practical / Video
/ Reading
Assignments

Resource
session

CBL Part II
SS
Batches
Batch A / B
A&B
CBL: Case Based Learning
SS: Self Study
LO: Learning Objectives CA: Continuous Assessment CAL:

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

176 | P a g e

14.8.3 PHASE II Year 2


Time
8.30 am
9.30 am
9.30 am
10.30 am

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Lecture

CA

Lecture

Lecture

Lecture

Lecture

Lecture

Lecture

10.30 am
11.00 am
11.00 am
01.00 pm

Thursday
BCS Batches
A&B

TEABREAK

CAL / Practical
CBL SDL
Batch A / B

Seminar
preparation /
SDL / CAL /
Practical

SDL / CAL /
Practical
Batch A / B

BCS
Batches
A&B

Batch A / B

01.00 pm
01.30 pm
01.30 pm
03.30 pm

LUNCH BREAK
CBL Part I

CAL / Practical

Batch A & B

Batch A / B

BCS: Basic Clinical Skills


SDL: Self Directed Learning
CAL: Computer Assisted Learning

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

SDL / CAL /
Practical
Batch A / B

CBL: Case Based Learning


LO: Learning Objectives

CBL Resource
Session / SDL /
CAL / Practical

CBL Part II /
SDL / CAL /
Practical

Batch A / B
S: Seminar
CA: Continuous Assessment

177 | P a g e

14.8.4 PHASE III Year 1


Day

Sunday

* 8.00 am 01.00 pm

01.30 - 3.00 pm

3.00 4.00 pm

Case Based
Learning (CBL)

Expert Forum

Journal Club / Clinical


Society Meeting
Ward Round & Clinics

Monday

01.00
01.30 pm

Ward Round & Clinics


Grand Rounds

Tuesday
Ward Round & Clinics
Wednesday

Ward Round & Clinics

Thursday

Ward Round & Clinics

B
R
E
A
Grand Rounds

Lecture /
Multidisciplinary
Seminar

Lecture /
Multidisciplinary
Seminar

Note:
* Reporting time depends on Clinical Site requirements
Journal Club meeting 1st Sunday of the month
Clinical Society meeting every 3rd Sunday of the month
Grand Rounds scheduled every 3rd Wednesday & 4th Tuesday of the month

14.8.5 PHASE III Year 2


Clinic

Theory
9.00 am to
12.00 pm

12.00 pm
01.30 pm

Day

* 8.00 am 09.00 am

Sunday

Morning Reporting

Monday

Grand Rounds

Tuesday

Morning Reporting

Wednesday

Morning Reporting

Thursday

Morning Reporting

Ward rounds
/ Clinics

01.30 3.00 pm

3.00
4.00 pm

SGL

Tutorial

* Reporting time depends on Clinical Site requirements

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

178 | P a g e

14.9 PBL Week


14.9.1 PHASE II Year 1
Time

Sunday

8.30 am
9.30 am

PBL Part I

9.30 am
10.30 am

Batches A & B
(5 groups)

Monday

Tuesday

SDL /
Resource
Session

SDL /
Resource
Session

SDL

SDL

10.30 am
11.00 am
11.00 am
01.00 pm

Thursday

BCS Batches A
&B

Expert Forum

TEABREAK
SDL /
Resource
Session

SDL

01.00 pm
01.30 pm
01.30 pm
03.30 pm

Wednesday

BCS
SDL

SDL

Batches
A&B

LUNCH BREAK
SDL /
Resource
Session

SDL / Resource
Session

BCS: Basic Clinical Skills


CA: Continuous Assessment

PBL Part II

PBL Part III


CA
Batches
MEQ
A&B
SDL: Self Directed Learning

Batches
A&B
PBL: Problem Based Learning
MEQ: Modifies Essay Questions

14.9.2 PHASE II Year 2


Time

Sunday

8.30 am 9.30
am

PBL Part I

9.30 am
10.30 am

Batches A & B
(5 groups)

Monday
SDL /
Resource
Session
SDL

10.30 am
11.00 am
11.00 am
01.00 pm

Wednesday

Thursday

PBL Part II

SDL / Resource
Session

BCS

Batches A & B

Batches A & B

SDL

T E AB R E A K
SDL

SDL /
Resource
Session

01.00 pm
01.30 pm
SDL /
Resource
Session
BCS: Basic Clinical Skills
CA: Continuous Assessment
01.30 pm
03.30 pm

Tuesday

PBL Part III


SDL

BCS
Batches A & B

LUNCH BREAK
SDL /
SDL /
Resource
Resource
Expert Forum
MEQ
Session
Session
PBL: Problem Based Learning SDL: Self Directed Learning
MEQ: Modifies Essay Questions

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

179 | P a g e

15.0 List of Text Books, Reference Books, Recommended Readings


Phase I

Course Title: MED 101 Language and Communication Skills


1. McCullagh Marie, Wright, Ros. Good Practice: Communication Skills in English for the
Medical Practitioner (Student's Book). Cambridge University Press; 2008. ISBN:
9780521755900
2. Glendinning, Eric H, Holmstrom, Beverly A.S. English in Medicine. Cambridge
University Press; 2008. ISBN: 9780521606660.
3. Glendinning Eric H, Howard Ron. Professional English in Use Medicine. Cambridge
University Press; 2007. ISBN: 9780521682015.
Additional Readings:

Beebe Steven A, Beebe Susan J, Ivy Diana K. Communication Principles for a Lifetime.
Volume 1: Principles of Communication
Volume 2: Interpersonal Communication
Volume 3: Communicating in Groups and Teams
Volume 4: Presentational Speaking. Pearson Benjamin Cummings; 2009. ISBN:
9780205593576

Gamble Teri Kwal, Gamble Michael. Communication Works. McGraw Hill; 2006.
ISBN: 9780073534220.

Lloyd Margaret, Bor Robert. Communication Skills for Medicine. Churchill


Livingstone; 2004. ISBN: 0443074119.

Bickley Lynn S. Bates Pocket Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking.
Lippincott William & Wilkins; 2004. ISBN: 0781738180 .

Abdel Hamid El-Hawary. Medical Terminology: Made Easy. UAE: Gulf Medical College,
Ajman; 2000.

Jean M.Denneril. Medical Terminology Made Easy. 4th ed. Delmar Cengage Learning;
2006. ISBN-10: 1401898847, ISBN-13: 978-1401898847

JeHarned. Medical Terminology Made Easy. Tobey Press; 2010


ISBN-10:1446525457, ISBN-13: 978-1446525456

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

180 | P a g e

Course Title: MED 102 Psychosocial Sciences


1. Myers David G. Psychology. 9th ed. Worth Publishers; 2009. ISBN: 978-1429215978
2. Graham Scambler. Sociology as Applied to Medicine. 6th ed. Saunders; 2008.
Additional Readings:

Atkinson and Hilgards. Introduction to Psychology.15th ed. Harcourt; 2009. ISBN:


9781844807284

Myers David G. Exploring Psychology. 8th ed. Worth Publishers; 2009. ISBN: 9781429238267.

Barbara Fadem. Behavioral Science in Medicine. 2nd ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins;
2012. ISBN: 978-1609136642.

Sadock Benjamin J, Sadock Virginia A. Kaplan and Sadock's Synopsis of Psychiatry:


Behavioral Sciences. 10th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2007. ISBN: 9780781773270.

Mitchell Feldman, John Christensen. Behavioral Medicine: A Guide for Clinical


Practice. 3rded. McGraw-Hill Medical; 2007. ISBN: 978-0071438605.

Course Title: MED 103 Cells, Molecules and Genes


1. Eroschenko Victor P. diFiore's Atlas of Histology: With Functional Correlations. 12th
ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2012. ISBN: 978-1451113419.
2. Murray Robert. Harpers Illustrated Biochemistry. 29th ed. Mcgraw Hill Professional;
2012. ISBN: 978-0071792776
3. Westman Judith A. Medical Genetics for the Modern Clinician. Lippincott Williams &
Wilkins; 2005. ISBN: 978-0781757607.
Additional Readings:

Vinay Kumar, Abul Abbas. Robbins &Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease. 8th ed.
Saunders; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-1416031215.
Alberts Bruce, Johnson, Alexander. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th ed. Garland
Science; 2007. ISBN: 978-0815341055

Thomas M. Devlin. Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlations. 7th ed. John
Wiley & Sons; 2010. ISBN: 978-0470281734.

Korf Bruce R. Human Genetics and Genomics. 3rd ed. Wiley-Blackwell; 2006.
ISBN-13: 978-0632046560.

Denniston Katherine, Topping Joseph. General, Organic & Biochemistry. 7th ed.
McGraw-Hill; 2010. ISBN: 978-0077354800.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

181 | P a g e

Course Title: MED 104 Tissues and Organs


1. Elaine N. Marieb, Katja N. Hoehn. Human Anatomy & Physiology. 9th ed. Benjamin
Cummings; 2012. ISBN: 978-0321694157
2. Moore, Keith L, Dalley, Arthur F. Clinically Oriented Anatomy. 6th ed. Lippincott
Williams & Wilkins; 2009. ISBN: 978-0781775250
3. Eroschenko Victor P. diFiore's Atlas of Histology: with Functional Correlations. 12th ed.
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2012. ISBN: 978-1451113419.
Additional Readings:

Tortora Gerard J, Derrickson Bryan H. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology. 13 th ed.


Wiley; 2011. ISBN-13: 978-0470565100.

Hall John E. Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology. 12th ed. Saunders; 2010.
ISBN-13: 978-1416045748.

Arthur Anne, M.R. Grant's Atlas of Anatomy. 13th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins;
2012. ISBN-13: 978-1608317561.

Vinay Kumar, Abul Abbas, Jon C. Aster. Robbins &Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease.
8th ed. Saunders; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-1416031215.

Young Barbara, Stewart William, O'Dowd Geraldine. Wheater's Basic Pathology: A


Text, Atlas and Review of Histopathology. 5th ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2009. ISBN-13:
978-0443067976.

Course Title: MED 105 Embryogenesis and Life Cycle


1. Moore Keith L, Persaud T. V. N. Before We Are Born. 8th ed. Saunders; 2012. ISBN-13:
978-1437720013.
2. Stevens Vivian M, Redwood, Susan K. Rapid Review Behavioral Science. 2nd ed.
Mosby; 2006. ISBN-13: 978-0323045711.
Additional Readings:

Schoenwolf Gary C, Bleyl Steven B, Brauer Philip R. Larsen's Human Embryology. 4th
ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2008. ISBN-13: 978-0443068119.

Sadler Thomas W. Langman's Medical Embryology. 12th ed. Lippincott Williams &
Wilkins; 2011. ISBN-13: 978-1451113426.

Sigelman Carol K, Rider Elizabeth A. Life-Span Human Development. 7th ed.


Wadsworth Publishing; 2011. ISBN-13: 978-1111342739

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

182 | P a g e

Course Title: MED 106 Nutrition and Metabolism


1. Mann Jim, Truswell Stewart. Essentials of Human Nutrition. 4th ed. Oxford University
Press; 2012. ISBN-13: 978-0199566341.
2. Pamela Champe. Lippincott's Illustrated Reviews: Biochemistry. 4thed. Lippincott
Williams & Wilkins; 2009. ASIN: B005RQJ1SY
Additional Readings:

Bronk J Ramsey. Human


ISBN-13: 978-0582026551.

Geissler Catherine, Powers Hilary. Human Nutrition. 12th ed. Churchill Livingstone;
2010. ISBN-13: 978-0702031182

Devlin Thomas M. Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlations. 7th ed. John
Wiley & Sons; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-0470281734.

Bender David A. Introduction to Nutrition and Metabolism. 4th ed. CRC Press; 2007.
ISBN-13: 978-1420043129

Murray Robert, Rodwell Victor. Harpers Illustrated Biochemistry. 29th ed. McGraw-Hill
Medical; 2012. ISBN-13: 978-0071765763.

Metabolism.

Pearson

Higher

Education;

1999.

Course Title: MED 107 Internal & External Environment


1. Ananthanarayan R, JayaramPaniker, C.K. Ananthanarayan and Paniker's Textbook of
Microbiology. 8th ed. Universities Press; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-8173716744
2. Goering Richard, Dockrell Hazel. Mims' Medical Microbiology. 5th ed. Saunders; 2012.
ISBN-13: 978-0723436010.
3. Park K. Parks Text Book of Preventive and Social Medicine. 19th ed. BanarsidasBhanot
Publishers; 2007. ISBN 8190128280.
4. Hall John E. Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology. 12th ed. Saunders; 2010.
ISBN-13: 978-1416045748
5. Vinay Kumar, NelsoFausto, Abul Abbas. Robbins &Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease.
8th ed. Saunders; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-1416031215.
6. Katzung Bertram, Masters Susan. Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. 12th ed. McGrawHill Medical; 2011. ISBN-13: 978-0071764018.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

183 | P a g e

Reference Books:

Chatterjee K. D. Parasitology: Protozoology & Helminthology. 13th ed. CBS Publishers


& Distributors Private Limited; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-8123918105

Widmaier Eric, Raff Hershel. Vander's Human Physiology: The Mechanisms of Body
Function with ARIS. 11thed. McGraw-Hill; 2007. ISBN-13: 978-0077216092.

Rosenstock Linda, Cullen Mark, Brodkin Carl. Textbook of Clinical Occupational and
Environmental Medicine. 2nded. Saunders; 2004. ISBN-13: 978-0721689746.

Brunton Laurence, Chabner Bruce. Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis
of Therapeutics. 12th ed. McGraw-Hill Professional; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-0071624428.

Videos and CD ROMs:

Interactive Case Study CD Companion to Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of


Disease 7thEd.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

184 | P a g e

Phase II
Textbooks:
1. McCullagh Marie, Wright Ros. Good Practice: Communication Skills in English for the
Medical Practitioner / Student's Books. Cambridge University Press; 2008. ISBN :
9780521755900
2. Glendinning Eric H, Holmstrom Beverly A.S. English in Medicine. Cambridge Press;
2008. ISBN: 9780521606660.
3. Glendinning Eric H, Howard Ron. Professional English in Use Medicine. Cambridge
University Press; 2007. ISBN: 9780521682015.
4. David G. Myers. Psychology. 9th ed. Worth Publishers; 2009. ISBN: 978-1429215978
5. Graham Scambler. Sociology as Applied to Medicine. 6th ed. Saunders; 2008.
6. Vian M. Stevens, Susan K. Redwood. Rapid Review Behavioral Science. 2nd ed. Mosby;
2006. ISBN-13: 978-0323045711.
7. Victor P. Eroschenko. diFiore's Atlas of Histology: with Functional Correlations. 12th
ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2012. ISBN: 978-1451113419.
8. Elaine N. Marieb, Katja N. Hoehn. Human Anatomy & Physiology with Mastering. 8th
ed. Benjamin Cummings; 2010. ISBN : 978-0321694157
9. Keith L. Moore, Arthur F. Dalley. Clinically Oriented Anatomy. 6th ed. Lippincott
Williams & Wilkins; 2009. ISBN: 978-0781775250
10. John E. Hall. Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology. 12th ed. Saunders; 2010.
ISBN-13: 978-1416045748.
11. Judith A. Westman . Medical Genetics for the Modern Clinician. Lippincott Williams &
Wilkins; 2005. ISBN: 978-0781757607.
12. Moore Keith. Before we are Born. 8th ed. Saunders; 2012. ISBN-10:1416037055.
13. Robert Murray. Harpers Illustrated Biochemistry. 29th ed. Mcgraw Hill Professional;
2012. ISBN: 978-0071792776
14. Harvey Richard A, Ferrier Denise R. Biochemistry (Lippincott's Illustrated Reviews
Series). 5th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-1608314126
15. Jim Mann, Stewart Truswell. Essentials of Human Nutrition. 4th ed. Oxford University
Press; 2012. ISBN-13: 978-0199566341.
16. Ananthanarayan R, C.K.JayaramPaniker. Ananthanarayan and Paniker's Textbook of
Microbiology. 8th ed. Universities Press; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-8173716744

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

185 | P a g e

17. Richard Goering, Hazel Dockrell . Mims Medical Microbiology. 5th ed. Saunders; 2012.
ISBN-13: 978-0723436010.
18. Vinay Kumar, Abul K. Abbas, Jon C Aster. Robbins &Cotran Pathologic Basis of
Disease. 8th ed. Saunders; 2009. ISBN: 978-1416031215
19. Park K. Parks Text Book of Preventive and Social Medicine. 19th ed. BanarsidasBhanot
Publishers; 2007. ISBN 8190128280.
20. Bertram Katzung, Susan Masters. Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. 12th ed. McGrawHill Medical; 2011. ISBN-13: 978-0071764018.

Course Title: MED 201 Integumentary System


Textbook:
1. MacKie Rona M. Clinical Dermatology. 5th ed. USA: Oxford University Press; 2003.
ISBN: 978-0198525806.
Additional Readings:

Campbell Mary K, Farrell Shawn O. Biochemistry. 7th ed. Brooks Cole; 2011.
ISBN-13: 978-0840068583.

Williams Norman S, Bulstrode Christopher J.K, O'Connell P Ronan. Bailey and Love's
Short Practice of Surgery. 25th ed. Hodder Arnold Publishers; 2008.
ISBN-13: 978-0340939321.

Course Title: MED 202 Blood and Immune System


Textbooks:
1. Hoffbrand A.V, Moss P.A.H. Essential Hematology. 6thed. Wiley-Blackwell; 2011.
ISBN-13: 978-1405198905.
2. Playfair J.H.L, Chain B.M. Immunology at a Glance. 9th ed. Wiley-Blackwell; 2009.
ISBN-13: 978-1405180528.
Additional Readings:
1. Colledge Nicki R, Walker Brian R, Ralston Stuart H. Davidsons Principles and Practice
of Medicine. 21st ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-0702030857
2. Abbas Abul K, Lichtman Andrew H. Cellular and Molecular Immunology. 7th ed.
Saunders; 2011. ISBN-13: 978-1437715286.
3. Hoffbrand A. Victor. Color Atlas of Clinical Hematology. 4th ed. Mosby; 2009.
ISBN-13: 978-0323044530.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

186 | P a g e

Course Title: MED 203 Cardiovascular System


Textbooks:
1. Noble Alan, Johnson Robert, Thomas Alan, Bass Paul. The Cardiovascular System:
Systems of the Body Series. 2nd ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2010. ISBN-13: 9780702033742.
2. Dubin Dale. Rapid Interpretation of EKGs. 6th ed. Cover Pub Co; 2000.
ISBN-13: 978-0912912066.
3. Hampton John R. The ECG Made Easy. 7th ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2008.
ISBN 9780443068263.
Additional Readings:

Katz Arnold M. Physiology of the Heart. 5th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2010.
ISBN-13: 978-1608311712.

Lilly Leonard S. Pathophysiology of Heart Disease. 5th ed. Lippincott Williams &
Wilkins; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-1605477237.

Colledge Nicki R, Walker Brian R, Ralston Stuart H. Davidsons Principles and Practice
of Medicine. 21st ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-0702030857.

Aaronson Philip I, Ward Jeremy P.T. The Cardiovascular System at a Glance. 4th ed.
Wiley-Blackwell; 2012. ISBN-13: 978-0470655948.

Course Title: MED 204 Respiratory System


Textbook:
1. Davies Andrew, Moores Carl. The Respiratory System: Basic Science and Clinical
Conditions. 2nd ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2010.ISBN-13: 978-0702033704.
Additional Readings:

Ward Jeremy P.T, Ward Jane, Leach Richard M, Wiener Charles M. The Respiratory
System at a Glance. 3rd ed. Wiley-Blackwell; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-1405199193.

Gardenhire Douglas S. Rau's Respiratory Care Pharmacology. 8th ed. Mosby; 2011.
ISBN-13: 978-0323075282.

West John B. Pulmonary Pathophysiology: The Essentials. 8th ed. Lippincott Williams
& Wilkins; 2012. ISBN-13: 978-1451107135.

Rao Nagesh kumar G. Textbook of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology. 2nd ed. Jaypee
Brothers Medical Pub; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-8184487060.

CDs: Robbins Interactive CD-Rom for respiratory diseases.


MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

187 | P a g e

Course Title: MED 205 Alimentary System


Textbook:
1. Margaret E. Smith. The Digestive System. 2nd ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2010. ISBN9780702033674
Additional Readings:
1. Smith Fred. J. Taylor's Principles and Practice of Medical Jurisprudence. Vol 2 of 2.
Gale, Making of Modern Law; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-1240137978.
2. Rose Suzanne. Gastrointestinal and Hepatobiliary Pathophysiology. 2nd ed. Hayes
Barton Press; 2004. ISBN-13: 978-1593771812.
3. Johnson Leonard R. Gastrointestinal
ISBN-13: 978-0323033916.

Physiology.

7th

ed.

Mosby;

2006.

4. Chatterjee K D. Parasitology: Protozoology & Helminthology. 13th ed. CBS Publishers


& Distributors Private Limited; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-8123918105.

Course Title: MED 206 Urinary System


Textbook:
1. Field Michael, Pollock Carol, Harris David. The Renal System: Basic Science and Clinical
Conditions. 2nd ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2010. ISBN-9780702033711
Online resources Get your username & password from the librarian.
http://www.accessmedicine.com/resourceTOC.aspx?resourceID=57

Course Title: MED 207 Reproductive System


Textbook:
1. Heffner Linda J, Schust Danny J. Reproductive System at a Glance. 3rd ed. WileyBlackwell; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-1405194525.
Reference Textbooks:

Vinay Kumar, NelsoFausto and Abul Abbas. Robbins &Cotran Pathologic Basis of
Disease. 8th ed. Saunders; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-1416031215.

Frohlich Edward D.Rypins Basic Sciences Review. 18thed. Lippincott Williams &
Wilkins; 2001. ISBN-13: 978-0781725187.

DeGown Richard L, Brown Donald D. DeGowin's Diagnostic Examination. 9th ed.


McGraw-Hill Professional; 2008.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

188 | P a g e

Neville F Hacker. Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 5th ed. Saunders; 2009.
ISBN-13: 978-1416059400.

Tortora Gerard J, Derrickson Bryan H. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology. 13th ed.
Wiley; 2011. ISBN-13: 978-0470565100.

Williams Norman S, Bulstrode Christopher J.K, O'Connell P Ronan. Bailey and Love's
Short Practice of Surgery. 25th ed. Hodder Arnold Publishers; 2008.
ISBN-13: 978-0340939321.

Park K. Parks Text Book of Preventive and Social Medicine. 19th ed. BanarsidasBhanot
Publishers; 2007. ISBN 8190128280.

Course Title: MED 208 Central Nervous System


Textbooks:
1. Hirsch Martin C; Kramer Thomas. Neuroanatomy: 3 D- Stereoscopic Atlas of the
Human Brain. Springer; 2013 (reprint). ISBN 978-3642636097.
2. Hall John E. Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology. 12th ed. Saunders; 2010.
ISBN-13: 978-1416045748.
3. Barker Roger A, Barasi Stephen, Neal Michael J. Neuroscience at a Glance. 3rd ed.
Wiley-Blackwell; 2008. ISBN-13: 978-1405150453.
4. Vinay Kumar, NelsoFausto, Abul Abbas. Robbins &Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease.
8th ed. Saunders; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-1416031215.
5. Gilroy John. Basic Neurology. McGraw Hill; 2000. ISBN 007115289x.

Course Title: MED 209 Musculoskeletal System


Textbook:
1. Sambrook Philip, Schrieber Leslie, Taylor Thomas K, Ellis Andrew. The
Musculoskeletal System: Systems of the Body Series. 2nd ed. Churchill Livingstone;
2010.ISBN-13: 978-0702033773.
References Textbooks:

Hamblen David L, Simpson Hamish. Adamss Outline of Fractures Including Joint


Injuries. 12th ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2007. ISBN-13: 978-0443102974.

Moore Keith L, Dalley Arthur F, Agur Anne M.R. Clinically Oriented Anatomy. 6th ed.
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-0781775250.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

189 | P a g e

Young Barbara, Lowe James S, Stevens Alan, Heath John W, Deakin Philip J.
Wheater's Functional Histology: A Text and Color Atlas. 5th ed. Churchill Livingstone;
2006. ISBN-13: 978-0443068508.

Vinay Kumar, NelsoFausto, Abul Abbas. Robbins &Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease.
8th ed. Saunders; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-1416031215.

Course Title: MED 210 Endocrine System


Textbook:
1. Hinson Joy, Raven Peter, Chew Shern. The Endocrine System - Basic Science and
Clinical Conditions. Churchill Livingstone; 2006. ISBN 9780443062377.
Additional Readings:

Guyton A C, Hall J E. Textbook of Medical Physiology. 12th ed. Philadelphia: W.B.


Sauders: 2010

Vinay Kumar, NelsoFausto, Abul Abbas. Robbins &Cotrans Pathologic Basis of


Disease. 8th ed. Saunders; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-1416031215.

Niewoehner Catharine B. Endocrine Pathophysiology. 2nd ed. Hayes Barton Press;


2004. ISBN-13: 978-1593771744.

Reference Books:

Jameson Larry J.Harrison's Endocrinology. 2nd ed. McGraw-Hill Professional; 2010.


ISBN-13: 978-0071741446.

Larsen P Reed, Kronenberg Henry M, MelmedShlomo, Polonsky Kenneth. Williams


Textbook of Endocrinology. 12th ed. Saunders; 2011. ISBN-13: 978-1437703245.

Gardner David G, Shoback Dolores. Greenspans Basic and Clinical Endocrinology. 9th
ed. McGraw-Hill Medical; 2011. ISBN-13: 978-0071622431.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

190 | P a g e

Phase - III
Internal Medicine
1. College Nicki R, Walker Brian R, Ralston Stuart H. Davidson's Principles and Practice
of Medicine. 21st ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-0702030857.
2. Alguire Patrick C. Internal Medicine Essentials for Clerkship Students 2007 2008.
American College of Physicians; 2006. ISBN 9781930513822.
3. Douglas Graham, Nicol Fiona, Robertson Colin. Macleod's Clinical Examination. 12th
ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-0443068485.
4. Wolff Klaus, Johnson Richard. Fitzpatrick's Color Atlas and Synopsis of Clinical
Dermatology. 6th ed. McGraw-Hill Professional; 2009. ISBN-13: 978-0071599757.
General Surgery
1. Williams Norman S, Bulstrode Christopher J.K, O'Connell P Ronan. Bailey and Love's
Short Practice of Surgery. 25th ed. Hodder Arnold Publishers; 2008. ISBN-13: 9780340939321.
2. Adams George A, Adams Gregg A, Garland, Adella M, Shatney, Clayton H, Sherck John
P, Wren Sherry M. Surgery Clerkship Guide. Mosby; 2004. ISBN - 9780323018579.
3. Ciocca Rocco G, Rettie, Candice S, Lowry Stephen F. Learning Surgery: The Surgery
Clerkship Manual. Springer; 2010. ISBN-13: 978-1441919786.
4. Browse Norman L., Black John, Burnand Kevin G.,Thomas William E.G. Browses
Interoduction to the Symptoms and Signs of Surgical Disease. Hodder Arnold; 2005.
ISBN: 9780340815793
5. Das.S. A Manual on Clinical Surgery. 9th ed. S.Dass Publications; 2011.
ISBN:9788190568104
6. Crowther Christy L. Primary Orthopedic Care. 2nd ed. Mosby; 2004. ISBN 0323023657.
7. Courtney M. Twwnsend. Sabiston textbook of Surgery. The Biological basis of
modern surgical practice. 19th ed. Sounders; 2012. ISBN - 9781437715606
Obstetrics & Gynecology
1. Beckmann. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 6th ed. William & Wilkins; 2010.
ISBN 9780781788076.
2. Baker Philip N. Obstetrics by Ten Teachers. 19th ed. Hodder Arnold Publishers; 2011.
ISBN-13: 978-0340983539.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

191 | P a g e

3. Monga Ash. Gynecology by Ten Teachers. 19th ed. Hodder Arnold Publishers; 2011.
ISBN-13: 978-0340983546.
Pediatrics
1. Kliegman Robert M, Stanton Bonita M.D, Geme Joseph St., Schor Nina F, Behrman
Richard E. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 19th ed. Saunders; 2011.
ISBN-13: 978-1437707557.
2. Woodhead Jerold C. Pediatric
ISBN-13: 978-0323043335.

Clerkship

Guide.

2nd

ed.

Mosby;

2008.

Otorhinolaryngology
1. Dhillon R.S. Ear Nose & Throat and Head and Neck Surgery: An Illustrated Color Text.
3rd ed. Churchill Livingstone; 2011. ISBN 9780443073113.
2. Dhingra P L. Diseases of Ear, Nose and Throat. 4th ed. Elsevier Science; 2007.
ISBN 9788131203279.
Ophthalmology
1. Kanski Jack J. Clinical Ophthalmology: A Systematic Approach. 7th ed. Saunders; 2011.
ISBN-13: 978-0702040931.
2. Khurana A K. Comprehensive Ophthalmology. 4thed. New Age international (P) Ltd.;
2007. ISBN 9788122420418.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

192 | P a g e

16.0 Grading, Assessment and Progression Policies


Grading Policy:
Classification

Marks scored in percentage

Letter Grade

Excellent

> = 86

Good

76-85

Pass

65-75

Fail

< 65

Assessment Policy:
Assessments in each Phase will be both formative and summative.
Phase I Assessment Plan
Continuous Assessment: 60% & Professional Examination: 40%
Project Work

Participation in
Quizzes

Course Work

Semester
Examinations

Professional
Examination

5%

5%

20%

30%

40%

Formative Assessments:
This includes:
Informal class tests
Assignments
Weekly quizzes (MCQ / SAQ / MEQ / OSPE)
End-course test (Theory / Practical) with feedback on performance
Assessment of student learning outcomes by faculty
Student self-assessment of learning outcomes
Summative Assessments:
A. Project work: Mini-project in Phase I
It is a group activity undertaken by Phase I students and mini-projects based on WHO
declared Health Days and are assessed for group activity, team work, and communication
skills.
B. Participation in Quizzes:
Student participation in the formative assessment (s) is mandatory and will count for a
maximum of 5% of the summative evaluation in the course.
MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

193 | P a g e

C. Course Work:
The matrix for the course work assessment and the marks allocated for each activity in
Phase I are as follows:
Activity Phase I
Seminars
CBL log book
CBL / SGL / Tutor Evaluation
Practical Record book
Assignments
CBL Peer Evaluation
Reflection
Total

Contributory Marks
15
15
15
15
10
05
05
80

D. Semester Examinations:

Two semester examinations will be conducted during Phase I and shall contribute
30% of marks towards overall summative assessment
Each course will contribute to the semester examination proportionate to their
contact hours
Each semester examination will assess the syllabi covered during the respective
semester as follows:

Semester 1 examination: Cell, Molecules & Genes, Tissues & Organs, Embryogenesis
& Life Cycle
Semester 2 examination: Metabolism & Nutrition, Internal & External Environment

E. Professional Examination:
Phase I Professional Examination will be conducted at the end of Semester 2 as a
combination of theory, practical and viva voce.
The Theory Examination will be in the form of online MCQs and EMIs; SAQs, and MEQs; it
shall be integrated and made up of 2 papers, each of 3 hours duration:

Paper I (Cell, Molecules & Genes, Tissues & Organs, Embryogenesis & Life Cycle)
Paper II (Metabolism & Nutrition, Internal & External Environment)

The practical examination will be in the form of OSPE; Viva Voce will form part of the
practical examination.
The student must appear for each component of the examination (Theory paper I, Theory
paper II, Practical and Viva Voce). Absence in any one component shall be considered as a
disqualification from the examination.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

194 | P a g e

Eligibility for appearing in the Professional examination for Phase I require that the student
fulfills the following criteria:

It is mandatory to attend all courses in the Phase


The student should have not less than 80% attendance in each course of the Phase
In addition, the student should have a cumulative attendance of not less than 80% for
the Phase
The student should have a continuous assessment marks of not less than 60%
Any student who has not fulfilled the above attendance and / or continuous
assessment criteria will be detained from appearing for the professional examination
and made to repeat a year

Re-sit Examination for Phase I

Those students who appeared for the Professional Examination and failed will have a
chance to appear for the Re-sit Examination which will be held within 6 weeks after
the regular Final Examination is conducted
The students who fail in the Re-sit Examination shall be on probation and would have
to re-register and repeat the year along with the next regular batch
They would then take the Final Examination at the end of the repeat year on
satisfaction of the eligibility criteria
Those students who fail again in the Final Examination after the repeat year, will have
the final chance to appear in the second Re-sit Examination held within 6 weeks of
the Final Examination
Those who fail in the second Re-sit examination will be asked to leave the program
Absenteeism will be considered as an attempt

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

195 | P a g e

Phase II Assessment Plan


Continuous Assessment: 60% & Professional Examination: 40%
Project Work

Participation in
Quizzes

Course Work

Semester
Examinations

Professional
Examination

5%

5%

20%

30%

40%

Formative Assessments:
This includes:
Informal class tests
Assignments
Weekly quizzes (MCQ / SAQ / MEQ / OSPE / OSCE)
End-course test (Theory / Practical) with feedback on performance
Assessment of student learning outcomes by faculty
Student self-assessment of learning outcomes
Summative Assessments:
A. Research Project in Phase II
The evaluation of Research (Project work) for 40 marks (5%) shall be done by the project
supervisors under the direction of Department of Community Medicine and students in small
groups are required to carry out a research project and present as a requirement of the
curriculum and to be eligible to appear for the Phase II professional examination.
B. Participation in Quizzes
Student participation in the formative assessment (s) is mandatory and will count for a
maximum of 5% of the summative evaluation in the course.
C. Course Work
The matrix for the course work assessment and the marks allocated for each activity in
Phase II are as follows:
Activity Phase II
Seminars
CBL log book
CBL / PBL / SGL / Tutor Evaluation
Clinical skills Log book
Practical Record book
Assignments
CBL Peer Evaluation
Total

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Contributory Marks
30
30
30
30
20
10
10
160

196 | P a g e

D. Semester Examinations:

Four semester examinations will be conducted over the period of 2 years of Phase II and
shall contribute 30% of marks towards overall summative assessment
Each course will contribute to the semester examination proportionate to their contact
hours
Each semester examination will assess the syllabi covered during the respective
semester as follows:

Semester 3 examination: Blood and Immune system and Cardiovascular system


Semester 4 examination: Respiratory system, Alimentary system and Urinary system
Semester 5 examination: Endocrine system and Reproductive system
Semester 6 examination: Nervous system, Musculoskeletal system and
Integumentary system

Each semester examination will have a theory and practical component


The theory component of the semester examinations will consist of online MCQs and
SAQs / MEQs
The practical component of the semester examination will comprise of OSPE / OSCE and
Viva Voce

E. Professional Examination
Phase II Professional Examination will be conducted at the end of Semester 6 as a
combination of theory, practical and viva-voce.
Components

Portions

Theory Paper I

All organ-system
courses

Theory Paper II

Integrating all organsystems

Practical
Examination

Integrated among
courses

Composition

Duration

Mode

Only MCQ consisting of


160 test-items

4 hrs.

Online

3 hrs.

Paper-andpencil

Face-to-face

Only SAQ & MEQ

Integrated OSPE /
OSCE (including orals)

The Theory paper I is the International Federation of Medicine (IFOM) Basic Sciences
examination conducted online by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME).
The student must appear for each component of the examination (Theory paper I, Theory
paper II, Practical and Viva Voce). Absence in any one component shall be considered as a
disqualification from the examination.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

197 | P a g e

Eligibility for appearing in the Professional examination for Phase II requires that the
student fulfill the following criteria:

It is mandatory to attend all courses in the Phase


The student should have not less than 80% attendance in each course of the Phase
In addition, the student should have an cumulative attendance of not less than 80%
for the Phase
The student should have a continuous assessment marks of not less than 60%
If the student has less than 80% attendance and or less than 60% CA, he or she shall
be detained from appearing for the Professional Examination
From 2012 batch onwards, a student who has not fulfilled the above attendance and /
or continuous assessment criteria will be detained from appearing for the
Professional Examination and made to repeat a year and those who appeared for the
professional examination and failed alone would be permitted to take the re-sit
examination.

Re-sit Examination for Phase II

Those students who were detained due to lack of attendance and / or continuous
assessment marks (till 2011 batch) or those students who appeared for the Final
Examination and failed will have a chance to appear for the Re-sit Examination which
will be held within 6 weeks after the regular Final Examination is conducted for Phase
II
The students who fail in the Re-sit Examination shall be on probation and would have
to re-register and repeat the year along with the next regular batch
They would then take the Final Examination at the end of the repeat year on
satisfaction of the eligibility criteria
Those students who fail again in the Final Examination after the repeat year, will have
the final chance to appear in the second Re-sit Examination held within 6 weeks of
the Final Examination
Those who fail in the second Re-sit examination will be asked to leave the program
Absenteeism will be considered as an attempt

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

198 | P a g e

Phase III Assessment Plan


Continuous Assessment: 60% & Professional Examination: 40%
Phase III

Quizzes

Course Work

Semester
Examinations

Professional
Examination

Total

10%

20%

30%

40%

100%

Marks

100

200

300

400

1000

Formative Assessment:
This includes:
Direct Observation of Clinical Skills (DOCS)
Assessment of clinical skills and attitudes by clinical supervisors and other members of
the health care delivery team
Faculty assessment of case presentations and case discussions by the student followed
by feedback
Assessment of student learning outcomes by faculty
Student self-assessment of learning outcomes
Summative Assessments:
A. Quizzes:
Includes:
Course tests conducted at the end of each course in Phase III year 1
OSCE conducted at the end of each rotation in Phase III year 1 & 2
Professional attributes throughout the rotations (Punctuality / Discipline,
Communication Skills, Professional behavior towards patients & peers, Data gathering)
Contributes 10% or 100 / 1000 marks towards overall summative assessment
B. Course Work: 20% amounting to 200 / 1000 is distributed as:
Activity Phase III
Seminars
Tutor evaluation of SGL
CBL records
Clinical log book
DOCS
General Clinics
RIME
Total

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Mark
Distribution
10
20
10
40
60
30
30
200

IV MBBS
(GMCH)
10
10
10
10
30
30
100

V MBBS
(Al Mafraq)
10
30
30
30
100

199 | P a g e

C. Semester Examinations:
Four semester examinations shall be conducted in Phase III as follows:
Semester 7 & 8 examinations in Phase III, year 1 (IV MBBS)
Semester 9 & 10 examinations in Phase III year 2 (V MBBS)
Semester 7 & 9 examinations will have only theory component as all students do not
have an uniform clinical learning experience at this point
Semester 8 & 10 will have theory and integrated OSCE components as all students
would have completed a 40-week clinical rotation
Semester 9 examination will be conducted in GMU and will comprise of 5 different
papers for the 5 different clinical groups of students; they would be tested in the
respective portions covered in their clinical & classroom teaching sessions.
The 4 semester examinations together will contribute 30% of marks (300 / 1000) towards
overall summative assessment
D. Professional examination: Clinical 60% & Theory 40%
Components

Portions

Composition

Duration

Mode

Theory Paper I

All organ-system
courses

Only MCQ consisting


of 160 test-items

4 hrs.

Online

Theory Paper II

Integrating all organsystems

Only SAQ & MEQ

3 hrs.

Paper-andpencil

Clinical
Examination

Integrated among
clinical disciplines

Integrated OSCE
(including orals)

Face-to-face

The Theory paper I is the International Federation of Medicine (IFOM) Clinical Sciences
examination conducted online by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME).
Eligibility for appearing in the Phase III Professional examination requires that the student
fulfill the following criteria:

It is mandatory to attend all courses / clinical rotations in Phase III


The student should have not less than 80% attendance in each course / clinical
rotation of Phase III
In addition, the student should have a cumulative attendance of not less than 80% for
Phase III
The student should have a continuous assessment marks of not less than 60%
If the student has less than 80% attendance and or less than 60% CA, he or she shall
be detained from appearing for the Professional Examination

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

200 | P a g e

Re-sit Examination for Phase III

Those students who were detained due to lack of attendance and / or continuous
assessment marks or those students who appeared for the Final Examination and
failed will have a chance to appear for the Re-sit Examination which will be held
within 6 months after the regular Final Examination is conducted
These students will undergo remedial clinical rotations in core disciplines before the
resit examination
Those students who fail in the re-sit examination will have to again repeat the
clerkship in the core disciplines of Internal Medicine, General Surgery, Obstetrics and
Gynecology, and Pediatrics and they will have the final chance to appear for the
second Re-sit Examination held after 6 months of the first re-sit examination
Those who fail in the second Re-sit examination will be asked to leave the program
Absenteeism will be considered as an attempt

Requirements for Passing the Professional / Re-sit Examination (Phase I / II / III)

The student must appear for each component (Theory paper I, Theory paper II,
Practical / Clinical and Viva-Voce) of the examination
Absence in any one component shall be considered as a disqualification from the
examination
An aggregate score of 65% in both theory and practical / clinical examinations is
required for passing the professional examination

Academic Progression Policy

The progress of students through the semesters within each Phase would be
continuous
Those students who fail in Phase I / II examinations will not be allowed to progress to
the next phase
Those students who fail in Phase III examinations will not be eligible to commence
the internship

Degree Completion Requirements:


The student will be commended for the award of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of
Surgery Degree upon:

Being continuously enrolled in the program from admission to graduation


Having satisfied all conditions of his or her admission
Attaining a minimum attendance of not less than 80% in each course and in each
Phase
Submission of a research project
Successful completion of a comprehensive professional examination (Phase III) with
an overall score of not less than 65%
Successful completion of 52 weeks of Compulsory Resident Rotating Internship
(CRRI) program with satisfactory evaluation
The student shall complete the program within a maximum period of 10 years.

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

201 | P a g e

17.0 Deans List of Toppers


MBBS Phase I Professional Examination (2012 Batch) - July 2013
Reg. No.

Name

Max.
Mark

Marks
Obtained

Percentage

2012M046

Ms. Shahd Munir Odeh Farajallah

400

365

91

2012M002

Ms. Munira Abubakar Matawalle

400

353

88

2012M016

Mr. Mohammad Sazzadul Huque

400

352

88

Max.
Mark

Marks
Obtained

Percentage

MBBS Phase II Professional Examination (2010 Batch) - July 2013


Reg. No.

Name

2010M025

Mr. Mehdi Saeedan

800

737

92

2010M029

Ms. Rose Sneha George

800

719

90

2010M026

Ms. Yasmin Ghazvini Kor

800

706

88

Max.
Mark

Marks
Obtained

Percentage

MBBS Phase III Professional Examination (2008 Batch) - July 2013


Reg. No.

Name

2008M010

Ms. Gowri Karuppasamy

1000

895

90

2008M007

Ms. Fatima Bala Shehu

1000

841

84

2008M003

Ms. Falak Abdul Jabbar Sayed

1000

830

83

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

202 | P a g e

18.0 Administrators & Faculty


Administrators
Mr. Thumbay Moideen
Prof. Gita Ashok Raj
Dr. P.K. Menon
Prof. Mohammed Arifulla
Prof. R. Chandramouli
Prof. Manda Venkatramana
Dr. Ghaith Jassim Jaber Al Eyd
Dr. Joshua Ashok
Prof. K.G. Gomathi
Dr. Rizwana B Shaikh

Founder President
Provost
Director, Administration
Dean, Admissions & Registers
Dean, Assessment & Evaluation
Dean, College of Medicine
Associate Dean, College of Medicine
Associate Dean Student Affairs
Associate Dean, Admissions & Registers
Associate Dean, Assessment & Evaluation

List of Faculty Members


Faculty of Biomedical Sciences
Name

Prof. R. Chandramouli

Prof. Bushra Hasan


Elshafei Elzawahry
Prof. Hemant Kumar Garg
Prof. Jayakumary
Muttappallymyalil

Qualifications
MSc 1972
PhD - 1981
M.B.B.Ch 1983
MSc 1993
MD (PhD) - 1997
MBBS 1984
MD - 1992
MBBS 1993
MD - 1998
MSc. 1985

Prof. K. G. Gomathi
PhD - 1993
MBBS 1994
Dr. Ramesh Ranganathan
MD - 2001

Dr. Joshua Ashok

Dr. Rizwana Burhanuddin


Shaikh

MBBS - 1984
MD - 1992

MBBS - 1992
MD - 1999

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Conferring University

Designation

University of Madras, India

Dean Assessment &


Evaluation and Professor and
Head of the Department of
Physiology

Al-Azhar University, Egypt

Professor, Department of
Physiology

Aligarh Muslim University, India

Professor of Pharmacology

Bangalore University, India


All India Institute of Medical
Sciences, India
NTR University of Health
Sciences, India

University of Madras, India


M.G.R. University, India

Bangalore University, India


Kevempu University, India

Professor of Community
Medicine
Associate Dean Admission
& Registers and Professor,
Department of Biochemistry
Associate Dean Graduate
Studies and Associate
Professor & Head of the
Department of Microbiology
Associate Dean Student
Affairs and Associate
Professor & Head of the
Department of Forensic
Medicine
Associate Dean, Assessment
& Evaluation and Associate
Professor, Department of
Community Medicine

203 | P a g e

Dr. Nelofar Sami Khan


Dr. Razia Khanam

MSc. 1994
PhD - 1998
B. Pharm 1997
M. Pharm 1999
PhD - 2006

Aligarh Muslim University, India

Associate Professor,
Department of Biochemistry

Hamdard University, India

Associate Professor of
Pharmacology

Dr. Ghaith Jassim Jaber


Al Eyd*

MBChB - 1995
MSc. - 1999
PhD - 2005

Al-Nahrain University, Iraq

Dr. Syed Shehnaz Ilyas

MBBS 1995
MD - 2002

Dr. M.G.R. Medical University,


India

Associate Dean College of


Medicine and Associate
Professor, Department of
Pathology
Assistant Professor,
Department of
Pharmacology

Dr. May Khalil Ismail

MSc. 1986
PhD - 2006

Colarado State University, USA


University of Mosul, Iraq

Assistant Professor,
Department of Biochemistry

Dr. Nisha Shantha


Kumari

MBBS 1999
MD 2005
DNB - 2005

University of Kerala, India


University of Kerala, India
National Board of
Examinations, India

Assistant Professor,
Department of Physiology

Dr. Anuj Mathur


Dr. Sajit Khan Ahmed
Khan
Dr. Biswadip Hazarika
Dr. Anu Vinod Ranade
Dr. Miral Nagy Fahmy
Salama
Dr. Kannan Narsimhan
Dr. Faheem Ahmed
Khanzada

MBBS 1996
MD - 2004
MBBS 1995
MD - 2006
MBBS 1990
MD 2004
MSc 1996
PhD - 2007
MB.B.Ch 1996
MSc 2002
MD - 2007
MBBS 1998
MD - 2004
MBBS 1998

Dr. Mohammad
Mesbahuzzaman

MPH - 2006
MBBS 1998
MD - 2011

Ms. Soofia Ahmed

MSc 1986
MPhil - 1989

Dr. Shiny Prabha Mohan


Ms. Suni Ebby

Dr. Lisha Jenny John

MBBS 2003
MD - 2008
BSc 1996
MSc - 1999
MBBS 2003
MD - 2008

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

University of Rajasthan, India


Bangalore University, India
Annamalai University, India
Dibrugarh University, India
MAHE, Manipal India

Assistant Professor of
Microbiology
Assistant Professor,
Department of Microbiology
Assistant Professor of
Pathology
Assistant Professor of
Anatomy

Ain Shams University, Egypt

Assistant Professor of
Anatomy

Pondicherry University, India

Assistant Professor of
Physiology

University of Karachi, Pakistan


University of Malaya, Malaysia

Senior Lecturer, Department


of Community Medicine

University of Dhaka,
Bangladesh

Lecturer, Department of
Pathology

University of Karachi, Pakistan

Lecturer, Department of
Physiology

University of Kerala, India

Lecturer, Department of
Pathology

Kerala University, India


MG University, India
Rajiv Ghandhi University of
Health Sciences, India

Lecturer in Anatomy
Lecturer in Pharmacology

204 | P a g e

MBBS 2006
Dr. Liju Susan Mathew
MS - 2010

Ms. Devapriya Finney


Shadroch

Gulf Medical University, UAE


Baba Farid University of Health
Sciences, India

Lecturer, Department of
Anatomy

BSc 1985
MSc - 1988

University of Madras, India

Lecturer, Department of
Microbiology

MBBS 2005
MS (Ortho) - 2006

Manipal Academy of Higher


Education, India
Kathmandu University, Nepal

Lecturer, Simulation Centre

MBBS 1996
DCP - 2000

Bangalore University, India


Rajiv Ghandhi University of
Health Sciences, India

Demonstrator, Department
of Pathology

MBChB - 2000

Al Mustanseria University, Iraq

Demonstrator, Department
of Anatomy

MBBS 2006
Masters in General
Pathology - 2010

University of Aleppo, Syria

Demonstrator, Department
of Pathology

MBBS 1995
Diploma in Clinical
Pathology - 2001

Dr. MGR Medical University,


India
University of Kerala, India

Dr. Syed Morteza


Mahmoudi

MBBS 2011

Gulf Medical University, Ajman,


UAE

Demonstrator, Department
of Microbiology and
Coordinator CCE&CO
Demonstrator, Dept. of
Anatomy

Dr. Erum Khan

MBBS - 2001

University of Punjab, Pakistan

Simulation Instructor

University of Science &


technology, Bangladesh
North South University,
Bangladesh

Clinical Tutor

Clinical Tutor

Dr. Nishida
Chandrasekharan

Dr. Mehzabin Ahmed

Dr. Nada A. Kadhum*

Dr. Elias Alkayal

Dr. Priya Sajith

MBBS 2007
Dr. Zannatul Ferdous
MPH 2010
Dr. Farhat Fatima

MBBS 2007

University of Karachi, Pakistan

Dr. Lubna Ahmed

MBBS 2007

University of Karachi, Pakistan

Dr. Rida Zainab

MBBS 2011

University of Health Sciences,


Pakistan

Clinical Tutor
Clinical Tutor

*on Sabbatical Leave

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

205 | P a g e

Faculty of Clinical Sciences


Internal Medicine
Name
Prof. Shaik Altaf Basha
Prof. Salwa Abdelzaher
Mabrouk
Dr. Mahir Khalil Ibrahim
Jallo

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

MBBS - 1974
MD - 1978

University of Madras, India

Clinical Professor & Head of


the Department

Ain Shams University, Egypt

Clinical Professor

M.B.B.Ch 1976
M.S - 1982
M.D - 1992
M.B.B.Ch - 1981
Certificate of Arab
Board of Internal
Medicine - 1992

University of Mosul, Iraq


Arab Board of Medical
Specialization

Clinical Associate Professor

MBBS 2002
MD 2007
MRCP - 2011

Rajiv Gandhi University of


Medical Science, India
Manipal University, India
The Royal College of
Physicians, UK

Name

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

Dr. Ehab Moheyeldin Farag


Esheiba

M.B.B.Ch 1995
Diploma in Internal
Medicine 1999
MSc - 2004
MRCP - 2009

Alexandria University, Egypt


Cairo University, Egypt
Zagazigu University, Egypt
The Royal College of
Physicians, UK

Clinical Assistant Professor &


Head of the Department

MBBS 1995
MSc 2003

Alexandria University, Egypt

Clinical Lecturer

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

MD 1987
PhD - 1995

Aleppo University, Syria


Saint Petersburg Postgraduate
Medical Academy

Clinical Associate Professor

M.B.B.Ch 1999
MSc 2005
MD - 2008

Ain Shams University, Egypt

Clinical Assistant Professor

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

MBBS 1986
MD 1997
Diploma in
Dermatology
2004

University of Madras, India


Dr. MGR University, India
Royal College of Physicians &
Surgeons of Glasgow, UK

Dr. Mohammed Khalid

Clinical Lecturer

Cardiology

Dr. Mohamed Ahmed


Mohamed Fathi Ahmed

Neurology
Name
Dr. Adnan Jalkhi

Dr. Mohamed Hamdy


Ibrahim Abdalla

Dermatology
Name
Prof. Irene Nirmala
Thomas

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Clinical Professor and Head


of the Department

206 | P a g e

Dr. Wesam Khadum

M.B.B.Ch - 1992
FICMS - 2005

Al-Mustanseriah University,
Iraq
Iraqi Commission for Medical
Specialization

Clinical Assistant Professor

Psychiatry
Name

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

Dr. Mohanad Abdulrahman


Abdul Wahid

MBChB - 1984
FICMS - 1999
(Psychiatry)

Al Mustansiriya, University, Iraq


Iraqi Commission for Medical
Specialization, Iraq

Clinical Lecturer & Head


of the Department

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

Prof. Yassin Malallah Taher


Al-Musawi

MBChB - 1974
FRCS - 1983

Baghdad University, Iraq


Royal College of Surgeons,
Glasgow - U.K

Prof. Manda Venkatramana

MBBS - 1987
MS - 1990
FRCS - 2001

General Surgery
Name

Dr. Pradeep Kumar Sharma

MBBS 1984
MS 1997
MRCS - 2010
MBChB - 1996

Dr. Mohanad Mohamad


Sultan

Dr. Mohamed Sobhy Badr


Sobei

FICMS 2004
CABS 2004
MRCS - 2008

Saurashtra University, India


Saurashtra University, India
Royal College of Surgeons,
Edinburg, U.K
Andhra University, India
University of Mumbai
Royal College of Surgeons in
Ireland
Al Mustansiriya University, Iraq
Iraqi Commission for Medical
Specialization, Iraq
Arab Commission of Medical
Specialization, Syria
Royal College of Physicians &
Surgeons of Glasgow, UK

Clinical Professor &


Head of the
Department
Dean College of
Medicine and Clinical
Professor

Clinical Associate
Professor

Clinical Lecturer

MBBCh 2001
MSc 2005

Al Azhar University, Egypt

Clinical Lecturer

Name

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

Dr. Sujaad Al Badran

MBChB - 1972
FRCS 1984

Mosul University, Iraq


Royal College of Surgeons,
Edinburg UK

Dr. Amit Chaturvedi

MBBS - 1993
MS 1999
DNB - 1999
MNAMS - 2004

Orthopedics

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Nagpur University, India


University of Calcutta, India
National Board of
Examinations, India
National Academy of Medical
Sciences, India

Clinical Associate
Professor & Head of
the Department

Clinical Associate
Professor

207 | P a g e

Radiology
Name

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

Dr. Tarek Fawzy Abdou Abd


El Ghaffar

MBBCh - 1988
MSc - 1993

Cairo University, Egypt

Clinical Lecturer & Head


of the Department

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

MBBS 1989
MD - 1998

Kerala University, India


University of Mumbai, India

Clinical Associate
Professor & Head of the
Department

MBBS - 1994
MD - 2001

Nagpur University, India


Nagpur University, India

Clinical Assistant
Professor

Dr. MGR University, India


Gandhi Medical College, India

Clinical Lecturer

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

MBBS 1985
MS 1996
MRCS - 2007

Punjab University, Pakistan


The Royal College of Surgeons
of Edinburg, UK

Assistant Director
Academic Affairs and
Clinical Associate
Professor & Head of the
Department

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

M.B.B.S 1984
DLO - 1989
MS 1992
DNB - 1992

Madras University, India


Dr. MGR University, India
Dr. MGR University, India
National Board of
Examinations, India

Clinical Professor and


Head of the Department

Anesthesiology
Name
Dr. Raji Sharma

Dr. Sona Chaturvedi


Dr. Arun Kumar Muthu
Subramanian

MBBS 1994
MD - 1999

Urology
Name
Dr. Ihsan Ullah Khan

Otorhinolaryngology
Name
Prof. Tambi Abraham
Cherian

Prof. Meenu Khurana


Cherian

MBBS 1987
DLO 1991
MS - 1994

Dr. Effat Radwan Isaa


Radwan

M.B.B.Ch.B - 1969
MS - 1983

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Madras University, India


Dr. MGR University, India
Dr. MGR University, India
University of Cairo, Egypt
Ain Shams University, Egypt

Director Academic
Affairs and Clinical
Professor
Clinical Lecturer

208 | P a g e

Ophthalmology
Name

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

Prof. Salwa Abd El-Razak


Attia

MBBCh 1975
MS 1981
Fellowship in Cornea
and Refractive Surgery
1991
MD - 2000

Alexandria University, Egypt


Alexandria University, Egypt
Atlanta University, USA
Alexandria University, Egypt

Clinical Professor & Head


of the Department

Dr. Pankaj Lamba

MBBS 1997
Diploma in
Ophthalmology 2001
DNB 2004
FRCS - 2004

Nagpur University, India


Aligarh Muslim University,
India
National Board of
Examinations, India
Royal College of Physicians &
Surgeons, UK

Clinical Assistant
Professor

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

Basrah University, Iraq


Arab Board, Syria
College of Mustansiriya, Iraq

Clinical Professor & Head


of the Department

Bangalore University, India

Clinical Professor

Mysore University, India


All India Institute of Medical
Sciences, India
National Board of
Examinations, India

Clinical Assistant
Professor

Obstetrics & Gynecology


Name
Prof. Mawahib Abd
Salman Al Biate
Dr. Kasturi Anil
Mummigatti

Dr. Prashanth Hegde

M.B.Ch.B - 1980
Arab Board for Medical
Specialization
DGO - 1988
MBBS - 1981
MD - 1986
MBBS 1992
MD 2003
DNB - 2004

Dr. Shanti Therese


Fernandes

MBBS 1998
MD - 2002

Manipal Academy of Higher


Education, India

Dr. Malini Vijayan

MBBS 1990
DGO 2003
DNB - 2005

MG University, India
Kerala University, India
National Board of
Examinations , India

Dr. Wajiha Ajmal

MBBS 1997
FCPS - 2005

Dr. Dipti Navanitlal Shah

MBBS 1994
Diploma in OBG - 1997

University of Peshawar,
Pakistan
College of Physicians &
Surgeons, Pakistan
The Maharaja Sayajirao
University of Baroda, India

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

M.B.B.Ch - 1976
MSc - 1981
MD - 1985

Al Azhar University, Egypt

Clinical Professor & Head


of the Department

Clinical Assistant
Professor
Clinical Lecturer

Clinical Lecturer

Clinical Tutor

Pediatrics
Name
Prof. Mahmoud Elsayed
Attia Shamseldeen

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

209 | P a g e

Prof. Imad Oudah Emnakher


Al Sadoon

Prof. Ignatius Edwin


DSouza

Dr. Jenny Cheriathu

MB.Ch.B 1976
DCH 1983
MRCP 1983
FRCP - 1985

University of Basrah, Iraq


The Royal College of
Physicians of London, UK

MBBS 1991
MD - 1996
MRCPCH - 2007

Bangalore University, India


Post Graduate Institute of
Medical Education &
Research, India
Royal College of Pediatrics &
Child Health, U.K

MBBS 2001
DCH
DNB - 2009

University of Mumbai, India


Shivaji University, India
National Board of
Examinations, India

Clinical Professor

Clinical Professor

Clinical Lecturer

Faculty of Graduate Studies


Name

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

MBBS 1970
MD - 1979
MNAMS 1981 (Morbid
Anatomy)

Shivaji University, India


All India Institute of Medical
Sciences, India
National Board of Examinations,
India

Professor & Head of the


Department of
Pathology

MSc 1973
PhD - 1984

University of Mysore, India


University of Madras, India

Prof. Ishtiyaq Ahmed


Shaafie

MBBS 1977
MD 1983

Kashmir University, India


Chandigarh University, India

Prof. Shatha Saeed


Hamed Al Sharbathi

MBChB 1976
DCM 1985
MSc 1989
PhD - 1998

Baghdad University, Iraq

Prof. Gita Ashok Raj

Prof. Mohammed Arifulla

Prof. Elsheba Mathew

MBBS - 1977
MD - 1986
M Phil - 1994

Prof. Joyce Jose

MBBS 1984
MD - 1990

Prof. Mandar Vilas


Ambike

MBBS 1989
MS - 1996

Prof. Anoop Kumar


Agarwal

Master of Veterinary
Science 1985
PhD 1988

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Madras University, India


Madras University, India
Mahatma Gandhi University,
India
Kerala University
Mahatma Gandhi University,
India

Professor & Head of the


Department of
Pharmacology
Professor & Head of the
Department of
Biochemistry
Professor & Head of the
Department of
Community Medicine
Professor, Department
of Community Medicine
Professor, Department
of Pathology

Shivaji University, India


Pune University, India

Professor & Head of the


Department of
Anatomy

Haryana Agriculture University,


India
Postgraduate Institute of
Medical Education & Research,
India

Professor of
Pharmacology

210 | P a g e

Prof. Jayadevan
Sreedharan

Dr. Preetha Jayasheela


Shetty
Dr. Victor Raj Mohan
Chandrasekaran
Dr. Kartik Janak Dave

MSc (Statistics) 1990


PhD (Statistics) 2000
Diploma in Cancer
Prevention 2002
PhD (Epidemiology) 2008
MSc 2000
BEd 2006
PhD - 2011
MSc 2001
Ph.D - 2006
MBBS 1990
MD - 1993

Dr. Nehmat El Banna EP.


Ziad El Banna

MBBS 2000
MS CP - 2012

Annamalai University, India


Kerala University, India
National Cancer Institute, USA
Tampere University, Finland

Assistant Director
Statistical Support
Facility and Professor of
Biostatistics

Mangalore University, India


Bharatiya Shiksha Parishad, India
Osmaniya University, India
Bharathiar University, India
University of Madras, India

Assistant Professor in
Cytogenetics &
Molecular Biology
Assistant Professor of
Toxicology
Lecturer, Dept. of
Pathology
Graduate Program
Coordinator and
Demonstrator

Gujarat University, India


The Lebanese University,
Lebanon
Gulf Medical University, UAE

Centre for Advanced Biomedical Research & Innovation (CABRI)


Name

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

Prof. Palat Krishna Menon

MBBS 1981
MD 1989
PhD - 1996

University of Pune, India


University of Pune, India
Rajiv Gandhi University of
Health Sciences, India

Director CABRI &


Professor of Research

Dr. Tatjana Ille

MD 1993
MSc 1995
PhD - 1999

University of Belgrade,
Serbia

Professor of Statistics

MBBS 2000
MD - 2008

Utkal University, India


University of Mumbai, India

Technical Scientist CABRI


& Adjunct Lecturer

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

BA 1991
MA - 2009

IOWA State University, USA


IOWA State University, USA

Adjunct Instructor

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

MSc (Software
Engineering) - 2010

Sathyabama University, India

Adjunct Lecturer

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

BSc 1988
MSc 1990
PhD - 1997

Mahatma Gandhi University,


India
University of Kerala, India
University of Kerala, India

Adjunct Lecturer

Dr. Monalisa Panda

General Education Faculty


English Language
Name
Mr. Clint Freeman

Information Technology
Name
Mr. Suraj Kochuthoppil
Sebastian

Physics
Name
Dr. Meena Varma V K

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

211 | P a g e

Mathematics
Name
Ms. Rejitha Biju

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

BSc 2001
MSc 2003
BEd - 2004

Mahatma Gandhi University,


India

Adjunct Instructor

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

MPhil 2006
PhD - 2011

Bharathiar University, India


Mother Teresa Womens
University, India

Adjunct Assistant
Professor

Qualifications

Conferring University

Designation

Behavioral Science
Name
Dr. Radhika Taroor

Human Behavior & Socialization


Name
Ms. Avula Kameswari

BA 1996
MA 1998
BEd - 2007

Nagarjuna University, India

Adjunct Instructor

Islamic Studies
Name

Dr. Ahmed Sebihi

Qualifications
Bachelor in Theology
1992
MA 2008
PhD - 2011

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Conferring University
Amir Abd Al-Qadir University,
Algeria
Universiti Sains Malaysia,
Malaysia

Designation
Adjunct Instructor

212 | P a g e

List of Faculty Mafraq Hospital


Department: Obstetrics & Gynecology
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Name
Dr. Mini Ravi
Dr. Karim Medhat Elmasry
Dr. Farha
Dr. Shabnam Faheem Ahamed
Dr. Zakiya
Dr. Mercy Beljouri
Dr. Deepti Kansal
Dr. Soumya Srivastava

Title
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist

Department: Pediatrics
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27

Dr. Ali Memon


Dr. Waseem Fathalla
Dr. Asma Deeb
Dr. Faisal Ezzeddin
Dr. Fathima Hashem ibrahim
Dr. Khaled Zameel
Dr. Laila Obaid Qambar Obaid
Dr. Saggaff Al Saggaff
Dr. Anwar Wajdi Sallam
Dr. Wafa Naji Jaber
Dr. Mohamed Yasser Abd El
Dr. Amer Mehmood Khan
Dr. Shahid Rashid
Dr. Sajeev Vengalath
Dr. Ahmad Abdel Aziz
Dr. Khaled Mohammed Al Baiti
Dr. Salwa Adam
Dr. Dina Ahmed Saleh
Dr. Nishar Ahmed Bathoolunnisa

Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Manager of Dietetics

Department: Internal Medicine


28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37

Dr. Ahmed Osman Shatila


Dr. Ahmed Mohsin Ibn Mahfoudh
Dr. Udugama Ajit Goonetileke
Dr. Amine Rekab
Dr. Ashraf Mohd El Ghul
Dr. Baher al Homsi
Dr. Mahamad Tarek Bakri
Dr. Nahlla Dolly
Dr. Aladdin Maarroui
Dr. Aref Ahmad Chehal

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
213 | P a g e

38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51

Dr. Babar Navid Hassan


Dr. Thar El Baage
Dr. Iman Aboobacker
Dr. Mike Muhannad Bismar
Dr. Mustafa Al Maini
Dr. Shobhit Sinha
Dr. Samer Muhammad Nuhaily
Dr. Sarah Hussain Khan
Dr. Shakkir Hussain
Dr. Ahmed Shahat Saber Shehata
Dr. Farooq Ahmad Mir
Dr. P. C. Sudhir Kumar
Dr. Lidia Sanchez-Riera
Dr. Syed Yousef Abbas

Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist Physician
Medical Practitioner

Department: Surgery
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72

Dr. Abdul Karim Al Fahim


Dr. Yasir Ali Ahmed Suliman
Dr. Ateq Mohsen
Dr. Abdul Nasser Hachem
Dr. Hanaa Madani
Dr. Rashid Al Shaeel
Dr. Seliman Gebran
Dr. Bader Abdullah Al Hashmi
Dr. Michael Stephen Ajemian
Dr. Fawzi Al Ayoubi
Dr. Nahed Ahmed Balalaa
Dr. Mohd. Rahmatulla Korambayil
Dr. Nijamuddin Syed
Dr. Raj Kumar Manickam
Dr. Shakkir Hussain
Dr. Mohd Husin Al Fahil
Dr. Amin Mohamed El Helw
Dr. Ziayazan sabbah
Dr. Abdul Nasser Koroth
Dr. Farook Bacha
Dr. Heyssam Gibboui

Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist

Department: PHC
73
74
75
76
77
78

Dr. Bassam Khaled


Dr. Khulood Obaid
Dr. Medhat Sayed
Dr. Raiham Mohamed Yousef
Dr. George Cherian
Dr. Habib Khan

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
214 | P a g e

79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92

Dr. Inshirah Awadh


Dr. Javed Memon
Dr. Khalid Hassan
Dr. Mohammed Elyas
Dr. Mona Mohammed
Dr. Najla Mohd.
Dr. Saly Phillip
Dr. Shirley Lewis
Dr. Sumaya Abdel Moneim
Dr. Tauheed Najmul Qamar
Dr. Amani Ramses
Dr. Elsayeda Khafagy
Dr. Fatima Al Mahmood
Dr. Gamal Sulaiman

Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner
Medical Practitioner

Department: Psychiatry
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103

Dr. Abdulnaser Arida


Dr. Hassan Said Ahmed
Dr. Mohamad Al Garhy
Dr. Tarek Shahrour
Dr. Alaa Ibrahim Haweel
Dr. Ahmad Almai
Dr. Gamal Mousa
Dr. Adel El Shiekh
Dr. Medhat El Sabbahi
Dr. Mufeed M.S. Raoof
Dr. Ahmad El Boraie

Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
Specialist
Specialist

Department: Ophthalmology
104
105
106

Dr. Khaled Abuhaleeqa


Dr. Ramzi Ghanem
Dr. Rani Jacob

Consultant
Consultant
Specialist

Department: ENT
107
108
109
110
111

Dr. Mondy Hammad


Dr. Amin Al-Menhaly
Dr. Hilal Omar
Dr. Sanooj Sayed
Dr. Zafeer Ahmed

Consultant
Consultant
Specialist
Specialist
Specialist

Department: Accident & Emergency


112
113
114

Dr. Jehad Awad


Dr. Biniam Tesfayohannes
Dr. Jamal Saadah

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

Consultant
Consultant
Consultant
215 | P a g e

List of Faculty Umm Al Quwain Hospital


Department: Anesthesia ICU
Name

Degree

MOH Designation

GMU Rank

Consultant-Head of
Department Professor
Consultant
Associate Professor
Consultant
Professor

Adjunct Clinical Asst.


Professor
Adjunct Clinical Asst.
Professor

MD 1994

Specialist

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Dr. Mohamad Galal Gheith

MSc (Anes) 1996

Specialist

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Dr. Mohammed Abdulla


Mohamed Elsayed

MSc (Anes) 1995

Specialist

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Dr. Ghassan Nouri Awad

MD (Anes)

Specialist

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Dr. Osama Ahmed Zayed


Dr. Ahmed Abdel Wahab
Hassanien
Dr. Obey Mohammed El
Hasan Shaker

MD (Anes)
MD (Anes) 1989
MD (Anes) 1991

Dr. Iffat Haque Kadri

Director Clerkship &


HOD Anesthesia

Department: Internal Medicine


Dr. Mohammed Taisser
Almasry

MRCP (1) 1987

Dr. Salah Eldin Taha Elebidi

MD Cardiology
1988

Dr. Mustafa Sayed Abdul Aziz


Dr. Hassan Ahmed Hassane

MD 2001

Consultant Head
of Department
(teaching skill)
Consultant (teaching
skill)
Consultant
Associate Professor

Adjunct Clinical Asst.


Professor
Adjunct Clinical Asst.
Professor
Adjunct Clinical Asst.
Professor
Adjunct Clinical Asst.
Professor

MRCP

Consultant

Dr. Jafar Sadik Mahdi

Arab Board

Consultant (teaching
skill)

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Dr. Mohammed Abdul


Maksood Mansor

Diploma
Medicine 1996

Specialist

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Dr. Akram Yousef Alkhaldi

MBBS

GP

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

Dr. Mohammed Islam

MBBS

GP

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

216 | P a g e

Department: Nephrology
MD 2000

Consultant Head of
Department
Associate Professor

Adjunct Clinical Asst.


Professor

MSc, MRCP

Specialist

Adjunct Clinical
Lecturer

FRCS

Consultant-Head of
Department-Associate
Professor

Adjunct Clinical Assoc.


Professor

Dr. Mohammad Magdy Zakaria

MD (ENT)

Consultant-Head of
Department-Professor

Dr. Akram Awad Metwally

MD (ENT)

Consultant - Lecturer

Dr. Medhat Ali Ahmed Aref


Dr. Hosam Mohammed Abdullah
Abdellatif

Department: Ophthalmology
Dr. Haifa Abdulghani Nassief

Department: ENT

Dr. Syed Zubair Ahmed Hashmi

Adjunct Clinical Assoc.


Professor
Adjunct Clinical Asst.
Professor

Specialist

Department: PHC
Dr. Mustafa Taha El Shabrawy
Dr. Sameh Mohamed Abdel Satar Abu El Khair

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

GP - Head of Department

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

GP

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

217 | P a g e

List of Faculty Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Hospital


Medical Department
Name
Dr. Fadhil Al Douri
Dr. Fadil H. K. Alazawi

Dr. Ismail Al Bagdadi

Dr. Medhat Mukhtar


Dr. Rhamadan AlSaeed
Dr. Ayman Abdel Moti
Younes

Degree
MB,Ch.B, MRCP
(UK) 1979, FRCP
(London) 1991
Iraqi Board MRCP
(UK)
MBChB, MBBD,
MD 1998,
Cardiology Romania
MBBS, MSc
Medicine 1989
MRCP Part I
(2005), Dip Emerg.
Med 2004
MBBS 2004

MOH Designation

GMU Rank

Consultant A, HOD

Director, Clerkship & H O D


Medicine
Adjunct Clinical Asst.
Professor

Consultant B

Consultant B

Specialist A

Adjunct Clinical Asst.


Professor
Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

GP
Clinical Tutor
GP

Clinical Tutor

Consultant A &
H. O. D

Adjunct Clinical Assoc.


Professor

Consultant A

Adjunct Clinical Asst.


Professor

Consultant A

Adjunct Clinical Asst.


Professor

FICMS - 1994

Specialist A

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

MS Ortho 2000

Specialist A

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Specialist A

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Specialist B

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

GP

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

Orthopedics Department
Dr. Waguih El Sissi

Dr. Mohamed Fahmy

Dr. Magdy Helmy Ibrahim Aly


Elbaroudy
Dr. Raad Abdulla Salman
Dr. Karim Mohd Saied
Dr. Vinith Zachariah John
Dr. Emad Aziz Tawfik
Dr. Ramadan K. R Arafa

MD, Ortho 1980


MBBS, MSc
Ortho 1987,
FRCS-1996
MBBCh, MS
ortho 1987,
FRCS 2000

MBBS, DNB &


MCH (Orth)
Masters (Orth)
2007
MBBS 2002

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

218 | P a g e

Pediatrics Department
Dr. Nadim Ahmed Khan
Dr. Mohamed Ziad Al
Zawahry
Dr. Raef Jamal
Dr. Khalid Ibrahim Al Awadhi
Dr. Mohammad Habbal

Diplomate ABP
1995
MSc (Ped)
1986, MD (Ped)
1997
Masters (Ped)
1987
Dip. (Ped)
1992

Consultant A &
H. O. D.

Adjunct Clinical Asst.


Professor

Consultant B

Adjunct Clinical Asst.


Professor

Specialist B

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Specialist B

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

GP

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

Consultant A &
H.O.D

Adjunct Clinical Asst.


Professor
Adjunct Clinical Asst.
Professor
Adjunct Clinical Asst.
Professor

MBBS

Surgical Department
Dr. Abdul Moti Younes
Dr. Abdel Khaleq Yousef
Dr. Hesham Abdul Moniem
Dr. Abdel Aal Qassim
Dr. Sabah Kaddouri

Dr. Mohammed Redha

Dr. Zaher Abdel Muttalaf


Dr. Eltegani Elmasaad
Eltayeib

MD 1977, FRCS
- 1977
FRCS 1987
MSc, MD (Surg)
- 1997

Consultant A
Consultant A

FICS 2002
Polish Board
(Surg), FMAS
2010
Iraq Board
2001, European
Board of
Urology (FEBU)
2005, FRCS
Iraqi Board
2005
MRCS 2011

Specialist A

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Specialist A

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Specialist B

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Specialist B

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

GP

Adjunct clinical Tutor

Dermatology Department
Dr. Haythem A.G Musa
Dr. Shifa Al-Halabi

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

PhD, 1985

Consultant A &
HOD

MSc. Derma

Specialist B

Adjunct Clinical
Lecturer
Adjunct Clinical
Lecturer

219 | P a g e

Emergency Department
Dr. Abdel Karim Mahmoud
Helmy
Dr. Raeed Al Safadi
Dr. Ahmed Abou Saada

MD Int Med
MBBS 2000
MSc (Orth)

Consultant A &
HOD
GP
GP

Dr. Ahamed Ali Mohamed

GP

Dr. Ahmed Abdel Halim

GP

Dr. Wael Jalal Al Sayed El


Bahtiti

GP

Adjunct Clinical Asst.


Professor
Adjunct Clinical Tutor
Adjunct Clinical Tutor

PHC
Dr. Sana Hassoun
Dr. Lujain M Alhiti

Specialist A
Specialist

Adjunct Clinical Lecturer


Adjunct Clinical Lecturer

Specialist A

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

MBBS 2001

GP

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

Dr. Rawdah AL Safadi

MBChB 1989

GP

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

Suzan Refaat Hassan

MSc (Pedia)

GP

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

MBChB

GP

Adjunct Clinical Tutor

Dr. Iman Ahmed Ismail


Dr. Eihab Abdelrahman Saleh

Dr. Wathib Abdulsamad


Hameed

MD (Pedia) 1985
MBChB
DRCOG 2002,
MRCP 2004

MBBS Student Handbook (AY 2013 2014)

220 | P a g e

www.facebook.com/gulfmedicaluniversity

FOLLOW US ON
www.youtube.com/thumbaytv

Growth Through Innovation

Learn from the world


P. O. Box: 4184, Ajman, United Arab Emirates Tel.: +971 6 7431333 Fax: +971 6 7431222
E-mail: gmcajman@emirates.net.ae Website: www.gmu.ac.ae www.gmchospital.com