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QUESTION ONE

To draw some inference from the information collected, the graded letters are converted in to
numerical equivalent
A = 1, B = 2, C = 3, D =4, F =5

Table 1. Survey Data, with no. of responses weight calculated

210
170
60

45
48
115

160

160

35

70

66

66

34

Pricing
Season
Ticket Plans

105

105

75

Prices
Selection
Foods

16
of 155

Average /250

105
85
30

score TOTAL
Weighted

90
50
45

Res
ult
F

480
647
715

1.92
2.59
2.86

95

443

1.77

30

150

666

2.66

60

10

50

471

1.88

41

164

561

2.24

58
11

232
44

2
0

10
0

664
391

2.66
1.56

Weighte
d Scores

Res
ult
D
4

Weighte
d Scores

90
50
45

Tickets

Res
ult
C

Weighte
d Scores

Weighte
d Scores

GAME DAY

Parking
Traffic
Seating
Entertainmen
t
Printed
Programs

Res
ult
B

Weighte
d Scores

Conces
sions

Resul
t
A

135
144
345

5
52
35

20
208
140

5
15
25

25
75
125

26

78

10

40

19

68

98

294

22

88

104

208

16

48

15

75

80

160

54

162

16
155

116
60

232
120

58
24

174
72

Speed
Service

of

35

35

45

90

46

Table 2. Arranged issue to develop PARETO


Total
weighted
Score

Cumulative
score

% Total
Cumulative
Weighted
% Score
Score

835

14%

14%

1550

12%

26%

Printed
666
Programs

2216

11%

38%

Prices
Traffic

664
647

2880
3527

11%
11%

49%
60%

Season
Ticket
Plans

561

4088

10%

70%

480
471

4568
5039

8%
8%

78%
86%

443

5482

8%

93%

391

5873

7%

100%

Issue
Speed of
835
Service
Seating
715

Parking
Pricing
Entertain
ment
Selection
of Foods

138

48

192

76

380

835

3.34

PARETO

PARETO

From the PARETO and data it is clear that only 2 main issues (approx. 20%) cause most of the
problems (80% of the effect)
i.e.

Issue

Total
weighted
Score

Cumulative
score

% Total
Cumulative
Weighted
% Score
Score

Speed of
835
Service
Seating
715

835

14%

14%

1550

12%

26%

Table of open ended comments survey


Total

Cumulativ
e

Cumulative
%

Seats

14

14

29%

29%

Parking

23

19%

48%

28

10%

58%

33

10%

69%

36

6%

75%

39

6%

81%

Crowded

41

4%

85%

Bathrooms
Cheerleade
rs

43

4%

90%

44

2%

92%

Programs

45

2%

94%

Traffic

46

2%

96%

Quality
Price
Band
Coach

1
1
0
0

47
48
48
48

2%
2%
0%
0%

98%
100%
100%
100%

Need
Sky
5
Boxes
Other
5
Facilities
Student
Behavior
Access/Vari
ety

Figure1:CauseandEffectDiagramforS.W.U

2. For the survey to be more effective there are certain things that would need
to be there or added
1. Sufficient demographic information - Even if there is a use
of a customer list or other targeted list for a customer
satisfaction, there may later be a need to analyze the results by
smaller segments. Identify segments of interest at the
beginning. Then, include a few relevant demographic questions,
e.g., zip code or region, department or respondents' job titles.
2. Focused
questions
questions
questions

surveys - Avoid question creep. If there are asking


about seats, resist requests from colleagues to insert
on other issues, such as branding, that waste
or make the survey seem unfocused.

3. Clear questions The questions should be easy to understand


by avoiding acronyms, technical words, complex sentences, and
ambiguous language. Be concrete.
4. One-part questions - Subdivide two-part questions. If
participants agree with one part of the question, but not the
other, their answers will not be meaningful.
5. Other options - When none of the answers to multiple choice
questions apply, respondents will select any response. If they
are provide options, such as "other," "neutral," or "none-of-theabove," followed by "please explain," responses will be more
accurate. And, the comments will provide unexpected insights.
6. Logical sequencing of questions - When the questions are
formulated, there needs to be a check if the sequence of
questions is logical. If you say go from Question 9 to Question
12, make sure to have a Question 12, and make sure that
Question 12 logically follows Question 9.
7. Motivation - Using approaches, such as email, phone calls, or
direct mail, to invite the target group to participate in the study.
Thus it is important to ensure participants are sympathetic with
the purpose of the survey or are interested in the subjects
covered in the survey. Provide an incentive or share some of the
results.
8. Openness - Using results as promised. If the report is aggregate
data, there is no need to reveal participants' names. Deceptive
practices give companies bad reputations and cloud future
relationships with participants.

3.

The next step is to improve quality by beginning improvement with the highfrequency item on the left of the Pareto chart for the open-ended Negative
responses
i.e.
Total
Cumulative
%
Seats

14

14

29%

Pareto of open ended Comments

The term total quality management (TQM) a philosophy that involves everyone in
an organization in a continual effort to improve quality and achieve customer
satisfaction refers to a quest for quality in an organization. There are three key
philosophies in this approach. One is a never-ending push to improve, which is
referred to as continuous improvement
Process improvement is a systematic approach to improving a process. It involves
documentation, measurement, and analysis for the purpose of improving the
functioning of a process. Typical goals of process improvement include increasing
customer satisfaction, achieving higher quality, reducing waste, reducing cost,
increasing productivity, and reducing processing time.
Which would include
A. Map the process
1. Collect information about the process; identify each step in the process. For each
step, determine:
The inputs and outputs.
The people involved.
The decisions that are made.

Document such measures as time, cost, space used, waste, employee morale and
any employee turnover, accidents and/or safety hazards, working conditions,
revenues and/or profits, quality, and customer satisfaction, as appropriate.
2. Prepare a flowchart that accurately depicts the process; note that too little detail
will not allow for meaningful analysis, and too much detail will overwhelm analysts
and be counterproductive. Make sure that key activities and decisions are
represented.
B. Analyze the process
1. Ask these questions about the process:
Is the flow logical?
Are any steps or activities missing?
Are there any duplications?
2. Ask these questions about each step:
Is the step necessary? Could it be eliminated?
Does the step add value?
Does any waste occur at this step?
Could the time be shortened?
Could the cost to perform the step be reduced?
Could two (or more) steps be combined?
C. Redesign the process
Using the results of the analysis, redesign the process. Document the
improvements; potential measures include reductions in time, cost, space, waste,
employee turnover, accidents, safety hazards, and increases/improvements in
employee morale, working conditions, revenues/profits, quality, and customer
satisfaction.
After which we develop a solution to the problem to ensure process improvement
1. Develop the Solution: This usually involves the application of one or more
quantitative techniques. Many times the solution should also embody important
qualitative and judgmental factors that cannot be quantified. You solution should be
both quantitative and qualitative. People solve problems, models do not.
2. Test the Solution: External validity investigates the extent to which the solution
and model accurately represent the actual situation under investigation. All
management science techniques can undergo sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity
analysis tests to see how sensitive the final solution is to changes in the input data
or in the model itself. Solutions that are highly sensitive should be analyzed with
care. If the input data could be inaccurate or if the model could be incorrectly
specified, great care should be taken in interpreting the solution.
3. Analyze the results: The solution of the quantitative technique may represent
only one of many inputs a decision-maker uses in solving the stated problem.
Moreover, the model results may have to be tempered with information about the
environment, the assumptions of the model, and the quality of the input data.
Analyzing the results involves incorporating the management science solution with

the judgmental factors that have an important bearing on the possible alternative
actions.
4. Formulate the action plan: The formulation of the action plan is an extension
of the analysis of results. Specific recommendations are made with the objective of
solving all of the present and future problems. Unexpected negative predictable
situations that may occur in the future are addressed during this stage.
All action are with timelines are laid down and well stated.
5. Present the action plan: The action plan or recommendations is presented to
the all stakeholders either in writing or verbally. Each stakeholder should be well
informed of the changes and what is expected of him/her.

6. Implement, evaluate, and maintain the action plan: The action plan must
be carefully implemented and periodically evaluated and maintained for results to
come through.

i. Implementation:
It is the process of whereby the plan into action. Written
procedures are developed for making the action plan
operational. The procedures should be specific, relevant
and detailed.
ii. Evaluation and maintenance
This is the process of periodic monitoring of the action
plan. Since we live in a dynamic environment, it becomes
necessary to evaluate the action plan periodically and
modify it as necessary. This modification is called plan
maintenance.