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Pavement Analysis and Design (CVT 809)

Pavement Maintenance Management System is essentially both strategic


and investment policy issues on pavement structures. Discuss with key
components and relevant literatures
By
OGUNTAYO, D.O
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria.

Highway pavements, once constructed, will not last forever. After a time,
signs of wear and tear which include cracking, rutting and polishing of the
roads surface will appear (Martin, 2013). Maintenance is required at this
time to prolong the highways useful life.
A major problem that faces highway and transportation agencies is that the
funds they receive are usually insufficient to adequately repair and
rehabilitate every roadway section that deteriorates. Thus the strategy used
by many transportation agencies is to balance its work program between
preventive maintenance activities and projects requiring immediate
corrective action (Garber and Hoel, 2009). With ever increasing traffic
loadings coupled with aging of highway infrastructure, highway pavement
maintenance needs continue to outpace the availability of resources, and
transportation agencies seek cost-effective maintenance practices (Labi and
Sinha, 2003).
The term pavement maintenance management is used to describe the
various strategies that can be used to decide on a pavement restoration and
rehabilitation policy (Garber and Hoel, 2009). It is a systematic process for
maintaining, upgrading, and operating physical pavement assets in a costeffective manner. It is the effective and efficient directing of various activities
involved in providing and sustaining pavements in a condition acceptable to
the travelling public at the least life-cycle cost (AASTHTO, 1975). It is
decision support tools for the entire range of activities involved in providing
and maintaining pavements. According to Al-Hallaq (2004), it is a scientific
tool for managing the pavements so as to make the best possible use
of resources available or to maximize the benefit for society.
Preserving and managing the nations highways is a challenge, and
transportation professionals are investigating tools and techniques to assist
in this endeavor.
This tool and technique combines applications of
established engineering principles with sound business practices and
economic theory, thus ensuring that once a set of maintenance strategies
has been developed; the most efficient one must be picked. If all the
strategies provide the same benefit, the most economical strategy can be
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Pavement Analysis and Design (CVT 809)

chosen (Goodman, 1998), hence, pavement maintenance management is


both strategic and investment policy in nature. To further show it strategic
and investment nature, AASHTO (1975) provided two major levels of
pavement management decisions that are included in a PMS; network and
project. Network-level decisions are concerned with programmatic and policy
issues for an entire network. These decisions include: establishing pavement
preservation policies, identifying priorities, estimating funding needs, and
allocating budgets for maintenance, rehabilitation, and reconstruction
(MR&R). Project-level decisions address engineering and technical aspects of
pavement management, i.e., the selection of site-specific MR&R actions for
individual projects and groups of projects.
A logical coherent procedure must be adopted pavement maintenance
management in order to select the most effective form that the maintenance
should take, together with the optimum time at which this work should be
undertaken. This process of pavement maintenance management according
to Garber and Hoel (2009) involves the following steps for a given pavement
section:
Assess present pavement condition,
Predict future condition,
Conduct an alternatives analysis, and
Select an appropriate rehabilitation strategy.
These steps ensure there is an agreement on the need for a rational and
objective process to ensure that funds are efficiently used for pavement
improvements. Garber and Hoel (2009) further stated that the step utilizes a
computer-driven protocol called the pavement management system that
consists of the following components:
Pavement condition survey,
Database containing all related pavement information,
Analysis scheme,
Decision criteria, and
Implementation procedures. (Pavement interactive; Shahin and
Walther, 1990; Al-Hallaq, 2004)
The benefits of pavement maintenance management system instead of
using engineering experience and judgment alone includes (Al-Hallaq, 2004):
provide an inventory of
pavements that includes data on
location, type of
pavement, functional classification, mileage,
pavement area, etc.
provide a comprehensive database containing information relating
to pavement condition, traffic levels, construction, maintenance
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Pavement Analysis and Design (CVT 809)

This

and
rehabilitation
histories,
and
any additional quantifiable
information that may be needed or specified.
show the current condition of the pavement network based on
systematic and sound engineering procedures for obtaining objective
pavement condition information.
help to predict the projected condition of the network over time,
as a function of the funds available to make improvements.
define an estimated budget required to bring the total roadway
network from its current condition to desired condition level s.
define estimated budgets to maintain a roadway network at
specific levels of performance for multiple years, depending on
the level of sophistication included in the system.
provide specific programs and proposed budgets for single or
multi -year programming cycles.
list ways to prioritize expenditures when funding is less than
required to meet specific performance objectives.
be a base for communication among groups such as planning,
design, construction, and maintenance within an agency.
be a base for communication among groups outside an agency,
such as state legislatures, city councils, the media, public interest
groups, etc.
serve as a base for comparing al ternate preservation strategies
for maintenance, rehabilitation, and reconstruction of pavements
within the network.
Produce a list of maintenance and rehabilitation projects.
list will be reviewed by the agency for final project selection.

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Pavement Analysis and Design (CVT 809)

References
AASHTO (1975).Guidelines for Pavement Management Systems. American
Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington DC.
Al-Hallaq M.A.F. (2004).Development of a Pavement Maintenance
Management System for Gaza City. Master thesis submitted to Department
of Civil Engineering, Islamic University of Gaza, Gaza.
Goodman R.A. (1998).A Pavement Maintenance Management System
designed for the city of Winnipeg. Master thesis submitted to Department of
Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg,
Manitoba. National Library of Canada, Canada. ISBN: 0-612-32116-9
Labi S. and Sinha K. (2003).The Effectiveness of Maintenance and its impact
on capital expenditures. FHWA/IN/JTRP-2002/27, SPR-2397.
Martin R. (2003).Highway Engineering. Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Oxford. ISBN
0-632-05993-1. Pp251
Garber N.J. and Hoel L.A. (2009).Traffic and Highway Engineering. Cengage
Learning publisher. Canada. 4th Edition. ISBN: 0-495-08250-3. Pp1133
Shahin M.Y. and Walther J.A. (1990).Pavement Maintenance Management for
Roads and Streets Using the PAVER System.US Army Construction
Engineering Research Laboratory Technical Report M-90/05.
www.pavementinteractive.org/article/pavement-management-systems.
accessed on 18-05-2016.

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