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Nursing Management
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Nursing Management for client with Ovarian Cancer


Nursing Assessment
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Leukorrhea (Lewis et al, 2007).


Irregular vaginal bleeding and vaginal discharge (Lewis et al, 2007).
Increase in abdominal pain and pressure (Lewis et al, 2007).
Bowel and bladder dysfunction (Lewis et al, 2007).
Vulvar itching and burning (Lewis et al, 2007).
Nursing Diagnosis

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Anxiety related to threat of a malignancy and lack of knowledge about the disease process, and prognosis.
(Lewis et al, 2007).
Acute pain related to pressure secondary to an enlarging tumor. (Lewis et al, 2007).
Disturbed body image related to loss of body part and loss of good health. (Lewis et al, 2007).
Ineffective sexuality pattern related to physiologic limitations and fatigue. (Lewis et al, 2007).
Ineffective breathing pattern related to presence of ascites and effusions (Lewis et al, 2007).
Grieving related to poor prognosis of advanced disease. (Lewis et al, 2007).
Imbalance nutrition: Less than body requirment (Lewis et al, 2007).
Patient Goals

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Patient will actively participate in in treatment decisions (Lewis et al, 2007).


Patient will achieve satisfactory pain and symptom management (Lewis et al, 2007).
Patient will recognize and report problems promptly. (Lewis et al, 2007).
Patient will maintain preferred lifestyle as long as possible (Lewis et al, 2007).
Patient will continue to practice cancer detection strategies (Lewis et al, 2007).
Patient will appear relaxed and report anxiety is to a manageable level. (Doenges, Moorhouse, & Murr, 2008)
Patient will use resources/support systems effectively. (Doenges, Moorhouse, & Murr, 2008)
Patient will verbalize understanding of adequate nutrition and controlling nausea. (Doenges, Moorhouse, &
Murr, 2008)

Nursing Interventions
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Teach women the importance of having routine screenings for cancer of the reproductive system. (pap smear,
and pelvic exam) (Lewis et al, 2007).
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Teach women about the risk factors of the reproductive system. (Lewis et al, 2007).
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Teach women about menopause signs and symptoms after bilateral oophrectomy. (Lewis et al, 2007).
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Teach women about hormone replacement therapy and the side effects. (Lewis et al, 2007).
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Manage client's pain related to chemotherapy (Lewis et al, 2007).
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Monitor for infection (Lewis et al, 2007).
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Teach client to prevent DVTs after surgery, i.e. frequent changes in positions, leg exercises to promote
circulation. (Lewis et al, 2007).
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Offer encouragement and allow the patient to discuss her fears regarding ovarian cancer. (Doenges, Moorhouse,
& Murr, 2008)
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Provide additional education and help the patient find a support group. (Doenges, Moorhouse, & Murr, 2008)
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Explain the need for increased intake of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Also, a decreased fat intake of
<30% of calories. (Doenges, Moorhouse, & Murr, 2008)
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Administer anti nausea (antiemetic) medications as needed.(Doenges, Moorhouse, & Murr, 2008)

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Assess patient for body image changes as a result of disfiguring treatment. (Doenges, Moorhouse, & Murr, 2008)

References
Lewis, M.L., Collier, I.C., & Heitkemper, M.M. (2007). Medical-Surgical nursing:Assessment and management of
clinical problems (7th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby.
Herbal medicines for menopausal symptoms. (2010). Evidence-base Nursing, 13(29-33), Retrieved
fromhttp://ebn.bmj.com.librarynt.occc.edu/content/13/1/29.full [11/19/2010]
Doenges, M.E, Moorhouse, M.F., & Murr, A.C. (2008). Nursing diagnosis manual: planning, individualizing, and
documenting client care. Philedelphia, PA: F.A. Davis.