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ENG

101: Introduc1on to College English


TERM:

Fall/2015

INSTRUCTOR(S):

PONDERATION:

2 hours of theore,cal work


2 hours of prac,cal work
4 hours of homework

DISCIPLINE:

English

COURSE CREDIT:

2.66

PREREQUISITES:

Not applicable

OFFICE HOURS:

Oce hours will be posted on


Omnivox and your Teachers
oce door at the beginning
of the term.

Dr. Len Berdichevsky


I-205C

COURSE CODE(S) AND MESRS OBJECTIVES


General Educa,on, registered in 603-101-MQ
4EA0. To analyze and produce various forms of discourse

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES
Elements of Competency and Performance Criteria
1. To iden,fy the characteris,cs and func,ons of the components of literary texts:
Accurate explana,on of the denota,on of words
Adequate recogni,on of the appropriate connota,on of words
Accurate deni,on of the characteris,cs and func,on of each component

2. To determine the organiza,on of facts and arguments of a given literary text:


Clear and accurate recogni,on of the main idea and structure
Clear presenta,on of the strategies employed to develop an argument or thesis

3. To prepare ideas and strategies for a projected discourse:


Appropriate iden,ca,on of topics and ideas
Adequate gathering of per,nent informa,on
Clear formula,on of a thesis
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Coherent ordering of suppor,ng material

4. To explicate the discourse:


Appropriate choice of tone and dic,on
Correct development of sentences
Clear and coherent development of paragraphs
Explica,on of a 750-word discourse

5. To edit the discourse:


Appropriate use of revision strategies
Accurate correc,on of the discourse

REQUIRED TEXT(S) / MATERIALS


1. Coursepack

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2. Gabriel Garca Mrquezs Collected Novellas (ISBN: 0-06-093266-X)

All course texts, including the course reader, are available at the Concordia University Bookstore (1400
de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, tel: 848-2424 ext. 3615).
SUPPLEMENTAL TEXTS
I will provide copies of all other texts.

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DICTIONARIES
!

Although dic,onaries are not required texts, the Oxford Canadian Dic:onary of Current English (ISBN:
9780195422832) has been determined as an appropriate dic,onary and valuable resource for college-
level English. Moreover, as of December 2014, the Oxford Canadian Dic:onary of Current English is
approved for use on the English Exit Exam.
Guideline for Academic Papers
Students should use the guidelines established by the Modern Language Associa,on (MLA) when
wri,ng academic papers. A hardcopy of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers can be found
in the library.

For more informa,on on cita,on styles, consult the Marianopolis Librarys cita,on style links at hgp://
marianopolis.edu/Current-Students/Resources-and-Services/Library/Cita,on-Styles/

COURSE CONTENT AND METHODOLOGY


The objec,ve of this course is to enable students to analyze and produce wrigen and oral work.
Students will learn to read literature cri,cally. Students will also learn to write an analy,cal essay
containing a thesis statement that is clearly supported and developed.

On successful comple,on of this course, students, with the aid of reference material, will be able to
produce a 750-word essay analyzing a literary text. This essay will demonstrate the following: Correct
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grammar, syntax, and spelling; appropriate tone and dic,on; and eec,ve sentences and paragraphs.
This essay will also demonstrate thorough revision of form and content.

A variety of methodologies will be used in the course:

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!

1. Lectures, some,mes accompanied by PowerPoint and mul,-media, will introduce students to


the terms and relevant background necessary for a literary analysis of the work being studied.
This informa,on will form the basis of class and group discussions.
2. Guided class discussions, small-group discussions, group work, and oral presenta,ons will
encourage students to explore the ideas and ques,ons raised by the assigned readings and by
lecture material. This ,me may also be used to ask ques,ons, make observa,ons, exchange
ideas, and debate dierent points of view with other students in a respeclul environment.
3. Wri,ng workshops will allow students to focus on work in progress as well as to receive
feedback from the instructor.
4. Rubrics and checklists will provide students with revision strategies needed to complete major
wri,ng assignments.
5. Consulta,ons during oce hours will permit students to work one-on-one with the instructor
to clarify understanding, get feedback on work in progress, and to address specic areas for
improvement.

EVALUATION
1) in an introductory paragraph demonstrate the ability to pinpoint a theme in a short story we
have read thus far. Write a strong thesis statement with a clear argument. This is a formative
assignment and will not count toward your final grade.
2) in an in-class close-reading exercise demonstrate how you would analysis specific passages
from Kafkas A Hunger Artist. This is a formative assignment and will not count toward your
final grade.
3) in a quotation integration exercise, using MLA guidelines, demonstrate evidence of being able
to properly introduce and integrate quotations in the format of a creative newspaper article. This
is a formative assignment and will not count toward your final grade.
4) in an in-class reading assignment of 400-500 words, demonstrate the ability to construct an
analytical argument, to coherently organize ideas, properly integrate evidence from a story by
Garca Mrquez, and to write clearly and correctly.
5) in a take-home essay of 500-600 words, demonstrate the ability to construct an argument in
support of a thesis, to coherently organize ideas, properly integrate evidence from a story by
Bozak, and to write clearly and correctly.
6) in a final essay of at least 750-words, applying the skills you have learned to write essays,
demonstrate the ability to analyze the use of literary devices and structure present in a poem.
7) in an oral presentation, demonstrate the ability to work constructively in groups to analyze one
or more themes present in a text. Ideally the groups presentation would inspire further
discussion that day in class.
8) in short quizzes demonstrate the ability to recall important elements (subjects, themes, passages,
names, settings, etc.) of the readings required for homework, and, if asked, provide concise and
coherent interpretations.
9) throughout the semester demonstrate an active engagement in class through your ability to avoid
distractions (e.g. electronic devices), formulate stimulating questions, and participate in class
discussions. It is understood that poor attendance and/or tardiness have an automatic negative
effect on this evaluation, regardless of how engaged you are when present. This will be
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performed as a self-evaluation, however the instructor reserves the right to adjust the grade in
certain cases.

Due Date /Due Type


Week

Value

Ongoing

Quizzes (4-8)

10

Ongoing

Participation

Ongoing

Oral presentation

10

Sept. 3

In-Class Short Story analysis (introductory paragraph only) 200 words Bradbury, Prac,ce
Cortazar, or Le Guin

Sept. 29

In-Class Close-Reading Exercise (200 words) A Hunger Artist

Prac,ce

Oct 6

Take-home essay (500 words minimum) Bozak

25

Oct. 13

In-Class Integrating Quotations work

Prac,ce

Nov. 3

In-Class Close-Reading Assignment (400 words minimum) Chronicle of a Death 20


Foretold

Dec. 3

Final Essay (750 words minimum) Doda/Uppal

30

For further informa,on about evalua,on, please consult the Ins:tu:onal Policy for the Evalua:on of
Student Achievement (IPESA) and the Language Policy for Marianopolis College appended to it
(available at www.marianopolis.edu > About Us > Ins,tu,onal Policies > IPESA).

READING SCHEDULE

Class

Date

Day

Text(s) to be Discussed

Class 1!

A20

TH

None

Course objectives and


Introductions!
Profile questions!
Diagnostic !
Syllabus

Class 2

A25

Star Guitar

How to Read? Connotation vs


Denotation

Class 3!

A27

TH

Smiths Girlfriend in a
Coma

Library Orientation @ 2:15!

Class 4

S1

Kaleidoscope

How to give Oral Presentations

Class 5

S3

TH

The Wifes Story

How to Write Intro?!


Model Intro

Orals 1

Class 6

S8

Peer Edit Intro/Thesis practice

Intro Practice

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Further Activity

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Due

Class 7

S15

Class 8

S17

TH

Class 9

S22

Class
10

S24

TH

Class
11

S29

Class
12

O1

TH

Class
13

O6

Class
14

O8

TH

Integrating Quotations Practice

Class
15

O13

Integrating Quotations Practice

Class
16

O15

TH

Review of Int. Quotations


Assignment!
Organization of Reading Circles

Class
17

O20

Chronicle of a Death
Foretold

Reading circles

Orals 5

Class
18

O22

TH

Chronicle of a Death
Foretold

Reading circles

Orals 6

Class
19

O27

Chronicle of a Death
Foretold

Reading circles

Orals 7

Class
20

O29

TH

Chronicle of a Death
Foretold

Reading circles

Orals 8!

Class
21

N3

Class
22

N5

TH

Class
23

N10

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Southern Thruway

What is Close Reading?

Orals 2

Heavy Metal
Housekeeping

Review of Intro. Practice!

Orals 3!

A Hunger Artist

Hansel and Gretel

Orals 4

Academic Integrity @ 2:15!


Marxism and Feminism 101
Debate Preparation!

In-Class CloseReading
Practice

Review of Close Reading


Practice
Debate

Bozak Essay
Due

Integrating
Quotations
Practice Due

In-Class
Assignment on
Garca Marquez
Intro to film!
Film Screening (film TBA)
Film Screening part II !
-Discussion

FALL/2015

Class
24

N12

TH

Form of Poetry

Class
25

N17

Love Poetry

Class
26

N19

TH

Death Poetry

Class
27

N24

Class
28

N26

TH

Class
29

D1

Final In-Class Essay on poetry

Class
30

D3

TH

Final In-Class Essay on poetry

Orals 9!
(on film)

Contemporary Songs as
Poetry?

Orals 10!

Poetry TBA

Orals 11!

POLICIES OF MARIANOPOLIS COLLEGE


Ins1tu1onal Policy on the Evalua1on of Student Achievement (IPESA)
The Ins,tu,onal Policy on the Evalua,on of Student Achievement (IPESA) reects the Colleges
philosophy on educa,on and guides the assessment of student achievement by way of progressive and
systema,c evalua,on. This policy describes the goals and objec,ves of such evalua,on, documents the
means taken to arrive at comprehensive and fair evalua,on, and establishes the rights and sharing of
responsibili,es for all par,cipants. All students and faculty, administra,on and sta members are
responsible for knowing the provisions of the policy.
The Marianopolis IPESA is available online:
www.marianopolis.edu/ipesa

Language Policy
The Marianopolis graduate shall be prepared to bring the powers of thought and language not only to
the challenge of academic studies but also to that of personal and public leadership in the
contemporary world. In all course ac,vi,es, agen,on shall be paid to the structure of thought and the
language characteris,c of the discipline; to reinforcing and integra,ng the language objec,ves of the
dierent programs; and to the criteria of the ministerial exit examina,on in language: comprehension
and insight, organiza,on of response, and expression. High standards in the quality of wrigen and
spoken language shall be maintained.
The Marianopolis Language Policy is available online:
www.marianopolis.edu/language-policy
Student Code of Conduct
This document outlines expectations for Student behaviour.
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The Marianopolis Student Code of Conduct is available in your Student Agenda and online:
www.marianopolis.edu/student-code-of-conduct

Chea1ng & Plagiarism


Chea1ng is a serious academic oence. Chea,ng means any dishonest or decep,ve prac,ce. It
includes, but is not restricted to, making use or being in possession of unauthorized material, obtaining
or providing unauthorized assistance in wri,ng an examina,on or test, communica,ng with anyone
other than the ocial proctor(s) during an examina,on or test, or agemp,ng to do any of the above.
Plagiarism is academic thep. Plagiarism means the presenta,on or submission of the work of another
as though it were ones own, and includes using material from any source that is not properly
documented, ghost wri,ng, or receiving unwarranted assistance from well-meaning tutors, family, or
friends.
Suspected instances of chea1ng and plagiarism will be reported to the Associate Academic Dean for
inves1ga1on. Penalty shall be decided by the Associate Academic Dean, and may include, but is not
limited to, a grade of zero on the examina,on, test or plagiarized work; a grade of zero in the course;
and/or expulsion from the College. Any judgment resul,ng in this grade or penalty is nal; associated
work is excluded from any grade appeal, and no assignment may replace such work.
Regula,ons related to chea,ng and plagiarism are available online in the Marianopolis IPESA:
www.marianopolis.edu/ipesa

POLICIES SPECIFIC TO THIS COURSE


AYendance Policy
Regular agendance is required throughout the term. Missing classes aects a students ability to
succeed. As a consequence, a student's chances of failing a course increase in direct propor,on to the
number of classes missed. While absent, students are responsible for staying up to date in their
coursework. Students who will be absent from classes for religious reasons must inform their teachers,
in wri,ng at the beginning of the semester, of the dates of these holidays. In the case of extended
absences, students must inform the Academic Dean's oce.
Take-Home Assignments
Take-home assignments are due at the beginning of class on the date specied and should adhere to
MLA format and cita,on style. Electronic submissions of assignments are not accepted. Extensions
may be granted only under special and veriable circumstances and only with the prior permission of
the instructor.

All wrigen work must be typed (double-spaced, 12 font, Times New Roman), and must include the
appropriate MLA format.
In-Class Evalua1ons
In the event of a jus,able absence from an in-class evalua,on (quiz, test, exam, or in-class essay
wri,ng), students must submit to me a wrigen explana,on, accompanied by suppor,ng
documenta,on. In the case of an an,cipated absence, the request for accommoda,on should be made
as early as possible and, without excep,on, prior to the day of the evalua,on. I reserve the right to
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refuse a make-up if the reason or documenta,on provided is unacceptable, or if the request for
accommoda,on or the accompanying documenta,on is not submiged to me in a ,mely way. No make-
up essays will be provided once the evalua,on has been returned to the class. Quizzes and in-class
wri,ng exercises cannot be made-up, but if the absence is jus,able, they will not aect the students
evalua,on.
Oral Presenta1ons
Oral presenta,ons must be presented at the ,me and date specied. Extensions may be granted only
under special circumstances and only with the prior permission of the instructor. Students who arrive
late for their group oral presenta,ons will be penalized 2% per minute. Students who miss their group
oral presenta,ons will receive a grade of 0. All members of a group are responsible for the presenta,on
as a whole and should be prepared to present even if a member of their group is not present. As group
presenta,ons open rely both on technology and other individuals, many things could poten,ally go
wrong. It is the students responsibility to minimize or address these issues as eec,vely as possible.
Medical or other documenta,on is required for any excep,ons to these rules.
Late Assignments
Late assignments will be penalized 3% per day, including weekends, up to a maximum of ten days. Aper
ten days, the assignment will be given a 0. No submissions will be accepted once the assignment has
been returned to the class. Medical or other documenta,on is required for any excep,ons to these
rules. All late assignments must be submiged via the dropbox setup on LEA for these purposes. Hard
copies and electronic versions over MIO are not permiged.
Rules for Tes1ng Situa1ons
Materials required and permitted during in-class evaluations will vary by case, but under no circumstances
will students be allowed to use any electronic aids.

Use of Student Work:


Unless students let the instructor know otherwise, they will be deemed to have consented to the use of
their work as anonymous examples in this and other courses.

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