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Found Poetry Lesson Plan

NAME: Shawna Hendrix


Lesson Title: Found Poetry

Grade level: 11-12

Total Time: 1 Hour

# Students:
Learning Goal:
(Content
Standard/Common
Core)

Literacy.RI.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as


they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings;
analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone,
including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly
fresh, engaging, and beautiful.
Literacy.W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose,
and audience.
Literacy.SL.11-12.1a: Come to discussions prepared, having read and
researched the material under study.
Literacy.L.11-12.3: Apply knowledge of language to understand how
language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for
meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or
listening.
Literacy.L.11-12.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language,
word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Target Goal or Skill:

Students will be able to identify key elements of poetry and create their
own found poem based off of the words/phrases chosen from Chapter 1
of Metamorphosis.

Essential
Question(s):
Topical question(s):

What is a found poem and how do we make one?

Instructional
Objective(s):

Students will select descriptive words or sentences from Chapter 1 of


Metamorphosis and arrange them to create their own found poetry.

Assessment
(Criteria / Look

Formative Assessment:
The creation of their own found poems.

What is poetry? What is a rhyme scheme? Do all poems rhyme? Do


they all follow a specific structure? What is figurative language?

Fors/ Performance
Tasks)
Disabilities/Diverse
Needs Represented
Student
Accommodations
and/or Modifications
Instructional
Procedures
(including specific
times)
Introduction:
(including
motivational hook
where applicable)

Learning Activities:

Summative Assessment:
N/A

Introduction:
T: What is poetry? What are some things we know about poetry?
(Show the two examples of poetry- ask: Are these both poems?)
Learning Activities:
T: Does poetry have to rhyme?
No! But sometimes it does.
T: What is a rhyme scheme? (Show example from PPT)
T: Now, who can come up to the chalkboard and jot down the rhyme
scheme in this poem? (Show Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Theme Song
Lyrics)
T: Explain free verse. There are no rules to poetry!
T: What is figurative language? Discuss (Use PPT)
Figurative language is used often in poetry and other types of literature.

Closure:

T: What were going to be focusing on today is creating a found poem.


Who knows what a found poem is? Explain (Use PPT)
T: Share your example with the class. Does it rhyme? Does it have a
particular structure? Is that okay? What do you think the poem is
about? Does it have anything to do with someone turning into a bug?
Found poetry can take another work literature and transform it into
something completely different.
T: Allow students work time to complete their found poem using
Chapter 1 of Metamorphosis. Once they have completed their poem,
they can write it on the drawing paper and decorate it as they please.
Closure:
Continue working on your found poem.

Language Demands:
Function
Vocabulary

Function: Identifying key elements of poetry and creating our own


found poems

Syntax
Discourse

Vocabulary: Figurative language, found poetry, rhyme scheme


Syntax: Lines of poetry, sentences, words

Discourse: Class discussion


5 Questions (Blooms How can you recognize a poem? (DOK 1)
or DOK)
What is a found poem? (DOK 1)
What is figurative language? (DOK 1)
What is your interpretation of the found poem that I created? (DOK 3)
Create your own found poem (DOK 4)
Curriculum (APA)
e.g.
Investigations in
Number, Data, and
Space. (2012).
Pearson.

Materials
Notes

PowerPoint presentation
White drawing paper to write (and decorate) their poem on