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Introduction No matter where you are on life’s curve, one fact is inescapable. Every day,

Introduction

No matter where you are on life’s curve, one fact is inescapable. Every day, you are getting older. The question is, how gracefully will you age? Will you remain healthy and grow wiser? Or will your health deteriorate, causing the quality of your life to decline? There’s no question some people age better than others. There are billions of dollars in cosmetics sold each year vying for those customers who want the next big anti-aging fix. But aging well is more than skin deep. It’s not even completely up to your genetics, either. The answer, as it turns out, has a great deal to do with the choices you make now. None of us like to think about the reality of aging, but if you knew there were things you could do right now to look younger and remain healthier as you age, wouldn’t you want to get started? The choices you make today have a cumulative effect on aging. That’s why we put together this report—to help you understand the actions you can take that will really increase your vitality and help you age well. The big truth here is that how young you look is deeply connected to how healthy you are. You know how getting a terrible night of sleep can age you ten years in the mirror overnight? Your overall health. Has a huge affect on how you look, too. So we’ll primarily address the health side of aging, because there’s a huge between what you eat, how you look, and how you feel. For far too many people, the wisdom years are characterized by dementia. In fact, almost half of those aged 85 and older in the U.S. have Alzheimer’s disease or some other form of dementia. And the number of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias worldwide is expected to quadruple between now and 2050.

worldwide is expected to quadruple between now and 2050. Aging doesn’t only show up in your

Aging doesn’t only show up in your brain. Rates of heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes all increase dramatically with age — and they are all shattering families, weakening resolve, and taking lives. Fortunately, you can do something about all this. There are clear, scientifically proven steps you can take that will radically increase your chances of not only adding years to your life, but also of adding bounce to your step and youthful vigor to your years. And it all starts with food. A lot of attention has been paid – and money spent – on supplements and exotic “super foods.,” but the real super foods turn out to be remarkably accessible and affordable. The foods that can make the biggest difference to the greatest number of people offer critical minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, flavonoids, polyphenols, and a host of other important phytonutrients that are good for your brain, your immune system, and your vitality – and that can help you lose weight and gain strength. Here are my top 10 anti-aging super foods. I bet some of these will surprise you. Bon appétit!

Here are my top 10 anti-aging super foods. I bet some of these will surprise you.

CEO, The Food Revolution

Coffee Until recently, you wouldn’t have expected to see coffee listed as a health food.

Coffee

Until recently, you wouldn’t have expected to see coffee listed as a health food. For decades, we’ve been advised to drink less of it.

But now, it turns out, that advice was wrong.

In fact, coffee brings a stunning array of anti-aging health benefits.

The Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) study tracked more than 1,400

Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) study tracked more than 1,400 individuals over the course of 21 years

individuals over the course of 21 years to look at a broad range of diet and lifestyle choices and health outcomes. In the study, people who drank 3-5 cups of coffee per day at midlife were found to have a 65% decreased risk of dementia in later life.

And in another study, 34,670 women in Sweden were tracked for more than 10 years. Those who drank no coffee were at elevated risk of stroke, while the women who drank at least a cup per day reduced their risk of stroke by 22 to 25%.

Also, abundant studies exist on the relationship between coffee and cancer. On this topic, the data is overwhelming.

Consumption of caffeinated coffee could cut mouth and throat cancer risk by 50%, according to one study.

Other studies found drinking coffee to reduce the risk of many types of cancer — uterine cancer, prostate cancer, brain cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, and skin cancer.

In some cases, coffee drinkers seemed to do best with 3-5 cups per day. In other cases, only one cup per day appeared optimal.

Coffee consumption has also been found to lead to decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. And even for people who have it – coffee can prolong life expectancy. In fact, one 20-year study of 3,837 type 2 diabetics found coffee consumption to be correlated with a 30% decreased risk of death from any cause.

Coffee turns out to be loaded with antioxidants (which help to prevent the damaging effects of oxidation on cells throughout your body). In fact, coffee is the #1 source of antioxidants in the

American diet – by a wide margin. When you hear all this, and you add

American diet – by a wide margin.

When you hear all this, and you add in the facts that coffee consumption is also tied to weight loss and reduced rates of Parkinson’s disease, and that it’s been shown to be good for your mood, reaction time, memory, vigilance, and general cognitive function, the question might naturally emerge – why didn’t I know all this before?

Of course, there’s more to the story. The caffeine in coffee makes some people feel jittery, anxious, and restless. And for many people, it can become addictive – leading to headaches and withdrawal symptoms when they miss a day. Also, pregnant women are advised to drink less coffee because fetuses are highly sensitive to it. And coffee that comes packed with sugar, artificial flavorings, factory farmed milk, and high fructose corn syrup may not be a net benefit to anyone’s health.

corn syrup may not be a net benefit to anyone’s health. So just because coffee is

So just because coffee is correlated to a broad range of health benefits doesn’t mean that everyone should drink it by the gallon, or guzzle the Salted Caramel Mocha at Starbucks. But the data is pretty clear that a fresh brewed cup of unadulterated coffee offers a great many health benefits.

Unfortunately, few studies exist on the health effects of decaffeinated coffee. But we do have studies telling us that decaffeinated coffee has about 75% of the antioxidants of the caffeinated version. And while many decaffeination methods involve use of solvents like methylene chloride or ethyl acetate, the Swiss Water Process is a more environmentally friendly and chemical-free method.

Enjoy Coffee Consciously

Because coffee accounts for almost half of the total exports from tropical countries, coffee production has a massive impact on the lives and livelihoods of hundreds of millions of families and farmers. Regrettably, many of them are living in poverty.

Therefore, the kinds of coffee we choose have a profound impact on the kind of world we shape for future generations. Fair trade, shade grown, and organic coffee are the types to reach for to help to shape a fairer and healthier world.

If that’s something you want, your choice of coffee can make a powerful impact on the lives of many, including your own.

Turmeric Turmeric has been popular in India for more than 5,000 years, and this is

Turmeric

Turmeric has been popular in India for more than 5,000 years, and this is widely thought to be one of the primary reasons why both India’s rural and urban populations have among the lowest rates of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in the world. In fact, India has less than 2% as many AD related-deaths, per 100,000 people, compared with the United States.

In the U.S., which has the world’s second highest AD rate (after Finland), a recent study of 3 patients with AD offered a ray of hope. When participants

3 patients with AD offered a ray of hope. When participants took less than a gram

took less than a gram of turmeric daily, for 3 months, they had some extraordinary results.

Researchers described how the patients’ behavioral symptoms were “improved remarkably” as a result of consuming 764 milligrams of turmeric (100 mg of curcumin) per day. After only 3 months of treatment, the patients’ symptoms and the burden on their caregivers were decreased significantly. After a year, the results were even better.

Turmeric is well known for its bright orange color.

In fact, it is sometimes used as a coloring agent.

The orange of turmeric comes from a polyphenol called curcumin — and curcumin turns out to be something of a miracle compound.

A promising study from 2013 conducted by

scientists with China’s Center for Hypertension and Metabolic Diseases illustrated how curcumin may help aging blood vessels to relax, thereby increasing blood flow to the brain. The researchers, writing in the journal Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry, summarized by saying:

“Our findings provide

evidence that curcumin

treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy to reverse age-related cerebrovascular dysfunction.”

Hundreds of studies have demonstrated curcumin’s ability to help reduce unhealthy levels of inflammation, protect against heavy metal toxicity, lower heart disease risk, and to prevent or even reverse Alzheimer’s disease, as well as other forms of dementia.

Also, many studies demonstrate curcumin’s potential to destroy multi-drug resistant cancer and cancer stem cells, and to protect against

radiation-induced damage. How much do you need? That’s hard to know. Research has found low

radiation-induced damage.

How much do you need?

That’s hard to know. Research has found low rates of certain types of cancer in countries where people eat 100 to 200 mg of curcumin per day over long periods of time. The daily intake of curcumin in India is thought to be about 125 mg. To get that much, you need to consume about a teaspoon of turmeric powder daily.

If that seems like a lot (and to many people it does), you may want to consider taking a curcumin supplement. Quantum Wellness Botanical Institute has developed a curcumin supplement that includes a potent delivery enhancer (made using organic lecithin and organic turmeric oil),which they say has been found to increase bioavailability by 500%. Their supplement is 100% vegetarian, organic, soy-free, and non-GMO. If you’d like to find our more, visit: www.turmeric4health.com.

Enjoy Turmeric

Turmeric appears to be one of those spices with minimal toxicity and tremendous benefits. It’s a flavorful addition to sauces, curries, stir-fries, and casseroles. But, you’ll get better curcumin absorption if you combine turmeric with some black pepper and a bit of (healthy) fat. Enjoy it often in as many ways as you can!

of (healthy) fat. Enjoy it often in as many ways as you can! Blueberries The blueberry

Blueberries

The blueberry is one of the few fruits native to North America. Native Americans traditionally used the berries and other parts of the plant for medicine – and for good reason. Blueberries are not only delicious – they’re also anti-aging rock stars.

A study published in The Annals of Neurology analyzed data from 16,000 women with an average age of 74, and found that the women with the highest levels of blueberry consumption delayed their cognitive aging by as much as 2 ½ years.

When you consider the enormous costs of cognitive aging, a 2 ½ year extension in healthy

brain function would make a profound impact on millions of families, and would save far

brain function would make a profound impact on millions of families, and would save far more money than even buying a lifetime’s supply of the most expensive organic blueberries would cost.

The science illustrating a major link between blueberries and brain health is extensive.

For example, scientists at the United States Department of Agriculture research center at Tufts University have been studying the beneficial effects of blueberries on brain function in animal models for over a decade.

A recent study found that object memory loss that occurs normally with age can not only

memory loss that occurs normally with age can not only be prevented, but also reversed, by

be prevented, but also reversed, by feeding blueberries to older rats. Moreover, the improvement persisted for at least a month after they put the animals back on a standard diet.

In a study with 9 elderly human participants, Robert Krikorian and a team at the University of Cincinnati found that, compared to a comparable group that was given a placebo, participants who were given blueberry juice scored higher on memory tests, had improved word list recall, and experienced lower depressive symptoms.

Numerous studies have linked blueberry consumption to reduced rates of cancer and of cardiovascular disease.

Enjoy Blueberries

When they’re in season, you can enjoy them fresh. Out of season, you can easily find them frozen or dried. You can add them to salads, breakfast cereals, or smoothies. Or simply eat them by the handful. Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, and all other berries contain fabulous anti-aging and health-giving benefits, too!

Greens Popeye was on to something. Tursn out, spinach actually does boost muscle strength ,

Greens

Popeye was on to something. Tursn out, spinach actually does boost muscle strength, according to the findings of Swedish researchers.

And it seems like every day another study is coming out showing the extraordinary power of green vegetables. These nutrient dynamos

include not only spinach, but also broccoli, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard, cabbage, collards, mustard greens, kale, beet greens, and even leaf lettuce.

mustard greens, kale, beet greens, and even leaf lettuce. In 2015, researchers at Rush University in
mustard greens, kale, beet greens, and even leaf lettuce. In 2015, researchers at Rush University in

In 2015, researchers at Rush University in Chicago evaluated the diet and mental function of 950 elderly people. After adjusting for variables such as education, exercise and family history of dementia, the researchers found that those participants who ate leafy green vegetables, such as spinach and kale, once or twice a day experienced significantly less cognitive decline than those who didn’t.

In fact, participants who ate greens halted their mental decline by an average of 11 years.

Greens bring powerful antioxidant, anti- inflammatory, and cytoprotective properties. For a specific example, cabbage, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts contain compounds known as isothiocyanates and indoles, which can prevent oxidative damage and fight cancer cells in ways that chemicals from other vegetables can’t.

Several studies examined the impact of cruciferous vegetables (such as kale, collards, cabbage, and bok choy) on the aging process, and found some extraordinary results.

In one study, published in The Annals of Neurology, researchers tracked the diet and lifestyle choices of 13,388 women over the course of 29 years. These women were given a series of tests measuring their cognitive function. Women with the highest consumption of cruciferous vegetables declined less than women who ate only a little of these vegetables.

Greens appear to be particularly helpful in cancer protection. Researchers discovered that components in these veggies can protect your body from the free radicals that can damage your cells’ DNA.

They may also help you eliminate cancer-causing chemicals, help slow the growth of tumors, and

They may also help you eliminate cancer-causing chemicals, help slow the growth of tumors, and encourage cancer cells to die. Studies have also linked increased consumption of greens with a decrease in breast, lung, colorectal, and prostate cancers.

As if that’s not enough, greens are also good sources of vitamin C (which protects cells as an antioxidant and by supporting the immune system). Many greens are also good sources of manganese, folate, potassium, dietary fiber, calcium, and other nutrients, which support bone health, protect against cognitive decline, and help prevent age-related eye problems.

Enjoy Greens

Green vegetables can be enjoyed raw as a salad, and can also be steamed, baked, dehydrated into chips, used as a wrap – even broiled. If you want to maximize your chances of a long and healthy life – bring on the greens!

chances of a long and healthy life – bring on the greens! Tea The story of

Tea

The story of tea begins in China. According to legend, in 2737 BC, the Chinese emperor Shen

Nung, a renowned herbalist, was sitting beneath

a tree while his servant boiled drinking water.

Some leaves from the tree blew into the water, and emperor Shen Nung decided to try the infusion his servant had accidentally created. And so the emperor enjoyed the first teatime in the history of the world.

It would take another several thousand before

tea was to become the national drink of China — some time around the year 700 AD.

And it’s only now that we are discovering how powerful and health-giving tea really is. (Here we mean tea as in the green leaves of the camellia sinensis plant—not herbal teas, like peppermint or chamomile, which have their own distinct health-

giving properties. True tea plants and plantations are only grown in certain parts of the

giving properties. True tea plants and plantations are only grown in certain parts of the world, like India and China.)

There are 4 types of tea: green, white, black, and oolong. All of these can be derived from the same plant, and all are being studied for their considerable health-giving properties.

Dried green tea leaves, which are about 40% polyphenols by weight, seem to be the most potent. White and green teas contain the most EGCG, which is one of the most powerful antioxidants.

And next to water, tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. (Yes, even ahead of Coca-Cola and coffee.)

Researchers have known for years that rates of prostate cancer are considerably lower in Asian countries. Many scientists believe this is because of the high consumption of plant foods among Asian populations. But some also think the consumption of green tea — the most popular tea in Japan, China, and other Asian countries — could play a role.

When it comes to the health benefits of tea, prostate cancer prevention is just the tip of the iceberg. For example:

• Green tea contains catechins, which increase the body’s ability to burn fat as fuel, leading to improved muscle endurance.

• Green tea has been found to help improve body composition and fight osteoporosis by enhancing bone strength.

• Studies have found that drinking tea of any type can help to protect against cardiovascular disease, and may reduce the risk of heart attack. Tea consumption has also been linked to reduced rates of Alzheimer’s Disease, obesity, arthritis, diabetes, infections, malaria, and even AIDS.

• The antioxidants in tea are believed to help protect against a

broad range of cancers, including cancers of the breast (one study found that 3 cups a day of tea reduced the risk of breast cancer by a third), colon, skin, lung, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, pancreas, liver, and more.

• When a team of scientists monitored 29,335 Finnish men and women over the course of 12.9 years, they came to the conclusion that drinking tea was linked to a meaningful reduction in the risk of Parkinson’s disease. This was true in both men and women, even after factoring for other variables like smoking, physical activity, age, and body mass index.

• Of course, unless it’s been decaffeinated, tea has caffeine (more in black and oolong than in green or white). The health effects of caffeine are a controversial topic. But in moderation, a considerable body of evidence shows that the caffeine in tea may increase memory, help to ward off Alzheimer’s, protect against skin cancer and cataracts, prevent weight gain, help with asthma – and even be good for virility.

Also keep in mind that many bottled tea products are mostly sugar-water. For example, Lipton’s Lemon Iced Tea comes with 31 grams of added sugar. That’s probably not a healthy beverage for anyone.

Enjoy Tea

If you’re going to buy pre-bottled tea, it’s best to check the label to be sure it’s either unsweetened or only lightly sweetened. And if you brew it yourself, try it plain, or with a squeeze of lemon and/or just a dab of honey or other sweetener. Teatime can make a huge contribution to your wellness, but not if you over-sweeten it.

Whole Grains Grains have been getting a bad wrap recently, with many Paleo eaters avoiding

Whole Grains

Grains have been getting a bad wrap recently, with many Paleo eaters avoiding them altogether. It’s widely recognized that gluten is harmful for some people, and that refined grains have no significant place in a healthy diet.

But as it turns out, thousands of studies have found considerable value in whole grains (including amaranth, millet, buckwheat, teff, wheat, corn, barley, oats, rye, spelt, and more) as part of a balanced diet.

Rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, whole grains can lower the risk of age-related illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease, gum disease, and cancer.

as cardiovascular disease , gum disease , and cancer . Because they’re digested more slowly than

Because they’re digested more slowly than processed grains, they can also help prevent high blood sugar and diabetes.

The fiber-rich bran, nutrient-packed germ, and starchy endosperm are all natural components of whole grains. Refined grains have had the bran and germ removed, and in the process they lose a great deal of nutrition, fiber, and health-promoting phytochemicals.

Whole grains are good sources of fiber and magnesium, and they can provide some protein, too. Individual whole grains vary — several types are also good sources of manganese, thiamin, niacin, vitamin B-6, and/or selenium.

Many whole grains have been linked to a reduction in cancer risk. According to one meta- analysis of studies, consumption of an average of approximately 6 ounces of whole grains per day reduced colorectal cancer risk by 21 percent.

Considering that 141,000 Americans are expected to be diagnosed with colorectal cancer this year, this means that if the average American ate just 6 ounces of whole grains per day, in one year alone we could prevent an estimated 29,000 cases of colorectal cancer – and save more than 10,000 lives.

Dietary fiber is present in all whole grains, which could be one of the primary reasons that whole grains are so effective in fighting colorectal cancer. Each 10-gram increase in dietary fiber is linked to a 10% lower risk of colorectal cancer. And fiber from whole grains seems to be the most effective kind of all in fighting cancer – even more so than fiber that comes from fruits and vegetables.

Other compounds found in whole grains being studied for their cancer-fighting properties include protease inhibitors,

Other compounds found in whole grains being studied for their cancer-fighting properties include protease inhibitors, phytic acid, phenolic acids, and saponins — all of which have shown effects on cell signaling, gene expression, and inflammation, and all of which may help to slow the development of cancers.

Studies conducted over 10-year periods have also linked consumption of whole grains to weight loss. Nicola McKeown, Ph.D. and a team of Tufts researchers studied 434 adults between the ages of 60 to 80, comparing their diet to their body fat and abdominal fat composition. Whole grain intake and cereal fiber intake were strongly correlated with lower total percent body fat and lower abdominal (“trunk fat”) mass.

If you haven’t already, make sure you especially

get to know the tremendously nutritious “pseudo grains” – these are quinoa, amaranth, millet, and buckwheat. They are technically seeds, and they hold some special nutritional power.

According to a 14-year long Harvard study, eating

a bowl of quinoa per day may lower your risk of

premature death from diseases like cancer, heart disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes by 17 percent.

Quinoa is high in antioxidants, and it’s a complete protein, meaning it contains all 9 essential amino acids. Just be sure to soak it or rinse it before you cook it – doing so will remove bitter compounds, leading to a sweeter tasting meal.

Of course, if you eat too much of anything, including whole grains, and not enough of other things (like fresh vegetables), you’re going to wind up deficient in critical nutrients, and aging faster than you would like. Whole grains are most

effective as part of a diet that is rich with other whole plants foods, including fresh vegetables, seeds, nuts, legumes, and fruits.

One dietary pattern that’s been gaining traction recently, thanks in no small part to the successful results that came from the first major study of it, is the Mind Diet, developed by Professor Martha Clare Morris at Chicago’s Rush University.

This diet advises people to eat at least 3 servings of whole grains, a salad, and one other vegetable each day, along with a glass of wine. The diet also includes nuts, poultry, berries, and fish. And it’s been linked to a stunning 50% reduction in Alzheimer’s rates, as well as to a reduction in rates of heart disease and other ailments.

Enjoy Whole Grains

A variety of whole grains can be nutritious – and delicious. Many are best sprouted, or rinsed, before cooking. Some are good over stir-fries, or in soups or casseroles.

For optimal nutrition, enjoy whole grains that haven’t been processed into flour because flour digests more rapidly and can throw your blood sugar levels out of balance. You might also want to avoid eating too much rice because even organically grown brown rice can carry unsafe levels of arsenic.

Legumes Foods from the legume family include beans, peas, lentils, peanuts, and soybeans. There are

Legumes

Foods from the legume family include beans, peas, lentils, peanuts, and soybeans. There are thousands of colorful legumes, and together they are a critical source of protein and fiber for billions of people worldwide.

Legumes are packed with many critical nutrients. Let’s start with fiber - which is pretty important, considering less than 5% of Americans get the recommended amount of it. Fiber is critical to digestion. It supports weight loss, cardiovascular health, bowel movements, and helps to prevent type 2 diabetes.

It’s also been linked in some studies to reduced rates of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and

reduced rates of breast cancer, colorectal cancer , and prostate cancer . What’s more, healthful gut

prostate cancer. What’s more, healthful gut bacteria feed on fiber, and use it to produce compounds that may protect colon cells.

Legumes are one of the best sources of fiber.

Legumes also contain folate, iron, magnesium and potassium, which can help with general body function and also with neuron firing. They figure prominently in most Alzheimer’s prevention diets. They also contain choline, a B vitamin that boosts acetylcholine (a neurotransmitter critical for brain function).

Legumes also turn out to be potent cancer-fighters.

In an 8-year study in Uruguay involving more than 3,539 cancer cases and 2,032 hospital controls, scientists found that the highest rates of bean and lentil consumption were associated with a 25% reduction in overall cancer rates.

Eating beans and lentils was also correlated with a decreased risk of cancers of the entire digestive tract — including mouth, stomach, colon, and rectal cancers — as well as cancer of the kidney.

A study of more than 58,000 men in the Netherlands found that those with the highest intakes of legumes had a risk of prostate cancer that was 29% lower than those with the lowest intakes.

Similarly, in a case-control study of 1,619 North American men diagnosed with prostate cancer and 1,618 healthy men matched for age and ethnicity, those with the highest legume intakes had a risk of prostate cancer that was 38% lower than those with the lowest intakes.

What is it about legumes that might help with cancer prevention?

For one thing, people who eat more legumes are likely to eat less of the

For one thing, people who eat more legumes are likely to eat less of the stuff we know can cause cancer – like processed foods and especially processed meats. But that’s not the whole story.

Most legumes are also outstanding sources of phytochemicals, including triterpenoids, flavonoids, inositol, protease inhibitors, and sterols. Legumes also contain other health- promoting substances that may protect against cancer, including lignans and saponins.

Enjoy Legumes

Add a serving of legumes a few times a week (you can soak and then cook dry beans, or even just take them from a can) to your menu, and you’ll be reaping some health-giving benefits.

You do need to know how to cook beans if you’re preparing them yourself – or else you might get gas. Read to the end for some fantastic recipes!

might get gas. Read to the end for some fantastic recipes! Omega-3 Fatty Acids Your body
might get gas. Read to the end for some fantastic recipes! Omega-3 Fatty Acids Your body

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Your body can make most of the types of fats it needs from other fats or raw materials, but that isn’t the case for omega-3 fatty acids. Your body needs to get these fats directly from food.

Omega-3 fats are an integral part of cell membranes throughout the body. They provide the starting point for making hormones that regulate blood clotting, contraction, and relaxation of artery walls, and inflammation.

Omega-3 fats have been shown to help prevent heart disease and stroke, may help control lupus, eczema, and rheumatoid arthritis, and may help to protect against cancer and other conditions. In addition, although more study is needed,

research has found omega-3’s to show potential to reduce inflammation in the early stages of

research has found omega-3’s to show potential to reduce inflammation in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease.

People whose diets contain daily omega-3’s have been shown to have a 26% lower risk of having brain lesions that cause dementia compared with those who do not. These fatty acids help your brain to stay in top shape.

Omega-3 fatty acids are thus named because there are three of them – ALA (alpha-linolenic acid), EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).

All three are critical to human health. DHA, in particular, is a major structural fat in the human

DHA, in particular, is a major structural fat in the human brain and eyes, representing about

brain and eyes, representing about 97% of all omega-3 fats in the brain and 93% of all omega-3 fats in the retina. DHA is a major structural component of the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain responsible for memory, language, creativity, emotion, and attention.

Having adequate levels of DHA can protect you from age-related mental decline, and significantly reduce your risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s. Seniors with higher levels of DHA are 47% less likely to develop dementia and 39% less likely to

develop Alzheimer’s compared with other seniors who have low levels.

ALA is found in some plant foods. EPA and DHA are found mainly in fish and certain algae. The human body can convert ALA to EPA and DHA, though the efficiency of conversion varies from person to person. Some people may do just fine if they eat plenty of ALA. Others seem to benefit from some direct form of DHA or EPA – whether from fish or fish oil, or from an algae-based supplement.

The commonly recognized plant foods highest in ALA are flax seeds, chia seeds, canola oil, camelina oil, walnuts, and hemp seeds. EPA and DHA are especially found in salmon, anchovies, herring, sardines, and other fatty fish – as well as in certain forms of algae.

Many leading scientists agree that the optimal ratio of omega 6 fatty acids (found mainly in vegetable oils) to omega-3 fatty acids is about 1:1. But in the diets of most people today, the average ratio is closer to 15:1. This imbalance has been found to fuel cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. That’s why cutting down on overconsumption of omega-6 oils (which are especially high in corn, soy, safflower, and sunflower oils) may be as important as increasing consumption of omega-3’s to your overall balance.

If you choose to eat fish, this can be a good source of omega-3 fatty acids. But you do need to look out for mercury and heavy metal contamination. Wild salmon, sardines, and herring are all fish that are high in omega-3’s and relatively low in contamination. Watch out for farmed salmon, though – it often has much higher levels of mercury

and heavy metals. Some people also prefer to take molecularly distilled fish oil supplements. If

and heavy metals. Some people also prefer to take molecularly distilled fish oil supplements.

If you choose not to eat fish, whether for ethical or environmental reasons, it is almost certainly best for you to incorporate abundant ALA omega- 3s into your diet, and you should likely consider taking an algal DHA supplement, too. For pregnant women, especially, some form of direct DHA consumption is very strongly recommended.

Enjoy Omega 3 Fatty Acids

While flax oil is high in omega-3 fatty acids, the whole flax seed delivers not only ALA, but also highly nutritious lignans and fiber. But you do need to grind it up first or it will likely pass straight through your digestive tract and come out whole on the other end.

You can get a dedicated coffee grinder to make your own fresh flax meal – or buy it ground, and keep it in the freezer because the oils are highly perishable. Chia seeds are delicious made into puddings, added to smoothies and juices, or sprinkled on a salad.

If you choose to eat fish, there are many ways to prepare it including baking, pan frying, or grilling. It can even be added to a salad or a stew. And canned fish contains the same omega-3 benefits as fresh.

If you decide to take an algae DHA supplement, keep in mind that many of them are extracted using hexane, which is toxic and which leads to a poorer quality supplement. Garden of Life makes one that is hexane-free – you can find out more by clicking here. If you want a premium source of sustainably managed wild Alaskan fish that is low in heavy metals, check out Vital Choice Organics here.

in heavy metals, check out Vital Choice Organics here . Nuts A recent archeological dig in

Nuts

A recent archeological dig in Israel found evidence that nuts formed a major part of human ancestors’ diet 780,000 years ago. Dig researchers discovered 7 varieties of nuts, along with stone tools to crack them open. These stone tools, called “nutting stones,” are similar to those found in the United States and Europe which archeologists date back 4,000 to 8,000 years.

Today, many of us enjoy walnuts, almonds, pecans, Brazil nuts, pistachios, cashews, macadamia nuts, and hazelnuts, plus an honorary nut we call peanuts (even though peanuts are technically a legume) with enthusiasm.

Yet we are only beginning to appreciate the vast nutritional benefits that nuts give us.

Yet we are only beginning to appreciate the vast nutritional benefits that nuts give us. They are rich in high-quality protein, fiber, minerals, tocopherols, phytosterols, vitamin E, vitamin B6, folate, and phenolic compounds.

Epidemiologic studies have linked nut consumption with reduced rates of heart disease and gallstones, as well as beneficial effects on hypertension, cancer, and inflammation. Recent studies have also indicated that nut consumption can help to prevent type 2 diabetes.

One study involving over 9,000 North Americans found that those who ate nuts at least 5 times per week gained, on average, an extra 2 years of life expectancy.

The nut eaters also experienced a 50% reduction in heart disease risk.

Another large-scale, 30-year study found that people who regularly ate one ounce of nuts at least seven times per week were 20 percent less likely to die of a health-related illness, compared to those who avoided nuts in their diet.

Many nuts have also been linked to lower rates of certain cancers. Studies done on walnuts, in particular, have found that they appear to be particularly protective against breast and prostate cancers.

Walnuts and many other nuts contain a number of potent nutrients that can help fight cancer and boost overall health. These include ellagic acid, a phytochemical antioxidant, and gamma- tocopherol, a type of vitamin E – both of which have strong anti-inflammatory and cancer- protective effects.

Also, a clinical study published in the International Journal of Impotence Research looked at what happened to men with erectile dysfunction who ate 3-4 handfuls of pistachios a day for three weeks.

They experienced a significant improvement in blood flow through the penis, and significantly firmer erections. The researchers concluded that three weeks of pistachios “resulted in a significant improvement in erectile function…without any side effects.”

Enjoy Nuts

Based on numerous studies, it appears that eating 1-2 ounces of nuts 5 days per week leads to tremendous health benefits. You can enjoy nuts plain, with a sprinkling of salt, in a trail mix, in a nut loaf or casserole, blended into “nut milk,” added to smoothies, or prepared into nut “cheeses,” or even pie crusts.

With walnuts, because of their high omega-3 fatty acid content, fresh is best. You can get a nutcracker and crack them yourself, or you can get them already shelled, in which case it’s best to either eat them soon after purchase, or store them in the refrigerator or freezer. Nuts of all kinds can make a great healthy snack to munch on at just about any time of the day.

Chocolate For several centuries in pre-modern Latin America, cacao beans were considered valuable enough to

Chocolate

For several centuries in pre-modern Latin America, cacao beans were considered valuable enough to use as currency. Both the Mayans and the Aztecs believed the cacao bean had magical properties, suitable for use in the most sacred rituals of birth, marriage, and death.

More recently, chocolate was vilified, as many so- called experts said it caused acne, and called it a junk food. And it’s true that when it’s paired with

it a junk food. And it’s true that when it’s paired with large amounts of sugar,

large amounts of sugar, the final product does have some drawbacks. But don’t blame the chocolate.

In fact, science is now proving that the Mayans and

the Aztecs were on to something.The Kuna people of the San Blas islands, off the coast of Panama, never seem to have lost it – today, as they have for eons, they drink a cocoa beverage daily.

Despite intense poverty, an International Journal of Medical Science article reports, that the Kuna who keep drinking cocoa in their home islands enjoy much lower death rates from heart attacks, strokes, diabetes, and cancer than those who give up their beloved cocoa drink when they move to mainland cities and suburbs. Heart disease rates among the coca-drinking Kuna are a stunning 9 times less than that of mainland Panamanians.

Many scientists believe that the Kuna owe their expanded heart health and longevity to the cocoa beverage they drink so generously – and that supplies them with abundant flavanols, which help to preserve the healthy function of blood vessels. Maintaining youthful blood vessels has been found to lower risk of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, kidney disease, and dementia.

But flavanols aren’t the only phytonutrient in

chocolate. Scientists are learning that chocolate

is also a plentiful source of antioxidants, including

the very same polyphenols that are so renowned

in red wine and green tea. These are substances

that reduce the ongoing cellular and arterial damage caused by oxidative reactions. In layman’s terms – they help fight cancer and heart disease.

A 1999 Harvard study of 8,000 men discovered

that those who ate chocolate as many as three times a month lived a year longer than those who didn’t.

Are chocolate’s benefits limited to the health of the body? Hardly. Chocolate has long been

Are chocolate’s benefits limited to the health of the body? Hardly. Chocolate has long been renown for its remarkable effects on the human mood.

It turns out that chocolate is high in a number of compounds, like theobromine, phenethylamine, and anandamide, that have been linked to mood elevation, stress reduction, and even to enhanced feelings of love and euphoria.

No wonder so many people delight in this ancient treat!

Recipes

LEGUMES, CRUCIFEROUS VEGETABLES, TURMERIC

Sweet Potato, Chickpea & Broccoli Curry

This recipe combines beans, cruciferous vegetables and turmeric in one delicious dish.

Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes Yield: 6 servings Calories per serving: 136 Fat per serving: 1.4g

Enjoy Chocolate

If you want to make the most of your chocolate, remember this: Dark chocolate is higher in the good stuff, and also has less added sugar. That’s why dark chocolate, preferably with at least a 70% cacao content, is the way to go.

And because of the well-documented link between chocolate and abusive worker treatment (including child slavery), choosing organic and/or fair trade matters a great deal.

and abusive worker treatment (including child slavery), choosing organic and/or fair trade matters a great deal.
This simple curry recipe combines 3 anti-aging super foods — beans, cruciferous vegetables, and turmeric

This simple curry recipe combines 3 anti-aging super foods — beans, cruciferous vegetables, and turmeric — in one delicious dish. You may wish to eat this dish by itself or over brown rice or quinoa. The flavors on this curry are also great the next day. Transfer leftovers to a dish, let them cool, cover, and then refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Ingredients

1 cup water, used in smaller quantities

1 onion, diced or thinly sliced

2 medium sweet potatoes, with skins, diced (3–4 cups) (white or red potatoes work, too)

1/2 head broccoli, cut into bite-size florets (3–4 cups)

1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds or ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon turmeric

1/2 teaspoon ground coriander

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/8–1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes or 1 1/2 cups freshly chopped tomatoes

2 tablespoons apple juice concentrate or 1 tablespoon of maple syrup (optional)

1 can or 1 ½ cups of chickpeas (garbanzo beans), drained

1/2 teaspoon salt (optional)

Instructions

Toast cumin seeds, turmeric, coriander, ginger, cinnamon, and cayenne in a large pot over medium heat, stirring constantly, about 2 minutes.

Add onion and stir quickly to coat with toasted spices. Mix in 1/2 cup water and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until onion begins to soften, about 3 minutes.

Reduce heat to medium.

Add sweet potatoes. Continue cooking, stirring often, about 5 minutes. Add water, 1/4 cup at a time, if needed to prevent sticking.

Add in tomatoes, apple juice concentrate or maple syrup (if using), chickpeas, and salt. Stir to mix, then cover and simmer about 10 minutes.

Add in broccoli last and cook until it is bright green and sweet potatoes are soft.

Serve and enjoy!

Variation: For a sweeter curry, add ½ cup golden raisins with the tomatoes, apple juice concentrate, and salt.

Notes

Nutrition Information: Number of servings:

6, Serving size: 235g, Calories: 136, Fat: 1.4g, Saturated fat: 0.2g, Carbohydrates: 26.5g, Sugar:

8.6g, Sodium: 466mg, Fiber: 6.1g, Protein: 5.5g, Cholesterol: 0mg

Adapted from The Cancer Survivor’s Guide by Neal D. Barnard and Jennifer K. Reilly

BLUEBERRIES, OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS Blueberry Chia Pick-Me-Up Start your day with Blueberries and Chia Seeds,

BLUEBERRIES, OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS

Blueberry Chia Pick-Me-Up

Start your day with Blueberries and Chia Seeds, rich in Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Prep Time: 5 minutes Total Time: 35 minutes Yield: 4 cups Serving Size: 1 cup Calories per serving: 205 Fat per serving: 8.1g

This refreshing beverage makes a delightful afternoon snack, or you may wish to enjoy it as part of a healthy breakfast. With 2 super foods, chia seeds and blueberries, this could be a great way to start your day. Once chia seeds are soaked in liquid, the tender, tapioca-like seeds have a delectably crunchy center. They are a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, and provide significant fiber and protein.

Ingredients

6

tablespoons of chia seeds

3

cups cold soy*/almond/rice milk

2

tablespoons maple syrup

2

cups fresh or frozen defrosted blueberries

syrup 2 cups fresh or frozen defrosted blueberries Instructions Place chia seeds in a pitcher and

Instructions

Place chia seeds in a pitcher and pour in milk. Stir chia seeds and milk until all seeds are fully immersed in the liquid. Place the pitcher in the refrigerator and let it sit for 15 minutes. Take it out of the refrigerator, stir it well, and replace it back into the refrigerator for another 15 minutes.

Remove the pitcher from the refrigerator, stir in the maple syrup and blueberries. Pour into 4 glasses or mugs.

Notes

Nutrition Information: Number of servings:

4, Serving size: 282 g, Calories: 205, Fat: 8.1g, Saturated fat: 0.92g, Carbohydrates: 27g, Sugar:

14.8g, Sodium: 68.3mg, Fiber: 8.1g, Protein: 8.4g, Cholesterol: 0mg

*= To avoid GMO-containing versions of these items, use organic or non-GMO certified

Recipe by Marge Wurgel

TEA Chai Tea (no nutritional profile) Ingredients 8 marathi moggu 8 cardamom seeds 8 cloves

TEA

Chai Tea (no nutritional profile)

Ingredients

8

marathi moggu

8 cardamom seeds

8

cloves

4 black peppercorns

1

star anise

2

cinnamon sticks pieces

1/4 teaspoon ginger powder or 1 inch fresh ginger

2

cups nondairy milk

4

teaspoons black tea, green tea or rooibos

sweeten with agave or evaporated cane juice (vegan sugar) to taste

This comforting, fragrant beverage is full of flavor and nutrition.Traditionally drank in India to preserve health and increase peace of mind, this beverage is becoming popular elsewhere, too. Enjoy this dairy-free version without worry in the morning or as an afternoon treat. When you make this recipe, your house will smell amazing, and you’ll be improving your health in numerous ways.

Instructions

Place the cardamom, cloves, marathi moggu, star anise and peppercorns in a bag and crush with a heavy skillet. Or use a morter and pestle.

Place the crushed spices in a medium saucepan, along with the cinnamon sticks, ginger, milk, and 2 cups water; bring to a boil. Remove from heat, add the tea bags, cover, and let steep for 10 minutes.

Strain into cups. Sweeten to taste.

WHOLE GRAINS

Waste-Not Whole-Grain-and-Raisin Breakfast Pudding (Whole Grains and Nuts)

Prep Time: 5 minutes Total Time: 8 minutes Yield: 4 servings Serving Size: 1 cup Calories per serving: 264

4 servings Serving Size: 1 cup Calories per serving: 264 Fat per serving: 10 g This

Fat per serving: 10 g

This cereal is a great way to use leftover cooked grains. You can serve it hot for breakfast, or cold as a pudding dessert. Almost any leftover grain will work in place of rice. For variations, you can try quinoa with almonds and dates, or millet with dried blueberries and walnuts. Keep some extra cooked grains in the refrigerator, and you can prepare this

recipe quickly and easily any time you want. Ingredients 3 cups cooked brown rice (or

recipe quickly and easily any time you want.

Ingredients

3 cups cooked brown rice (or other whole grain)

1/2 cup raisins

¼ cup pure maple syrup

1 cup soy*/almond/rice/other milk

1/2 cup coarsely chopped raw almonds or other nuts, toasted (optional)

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom

Additional milk beverage for serving

Instructions

Put all the ingredients into a medium saucepan and stir together.

Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then immediately reduce the heat to low and simmer, stirring often to avoid scorching, until thickened, 5 to 8 minutes.

Put into individual bowls and serve immediately with a little of your favorite milk beverage drizzled on top.

Notes

*It’s important to purchase organic or certified non-GMO versions of this ingredient.

Nutrition Information: Serving size: about 1 cup or 264 g, Calories: 388, Fat: 10 g, Saturated fat: 0.9 g, Carbohydrates: 67.5 g, Sugar: 26.9 g, Sodium: 33.3 mg, Fiber: 6 g, Protein: 9.7 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg

Recipe from May All Be Fed, Diet for a New World by John Robbins

Tabouli With Quinoa (Pseudo Grain)

Calories per serving: 160

With Quinoa (Pseudo Grain) Calories per serving: 160 Fat per serving: 4.3g This salad, which uses

Fat per serving: 4.3g

This salad, which uses the pseudo-grain quinoa, is fresh tasting and satisfying. You can make it completely raw by sprouting the quinoa overnight or for a couple of days, or you can cook the quinoa if you prefer. Quinoa is naturally gluten free, and is

one of only a few plant foods that are considered a complete protein.

Ingredients

1

bunch mint - minced

1 bunch parsley - minced

3

green onions - chopped

5 tomatoes, chopped

1

cup quinoa

1 tablespoon olive oil

juice from half a lemon Instructions To sprout quinoa: Rinse well and drain. Soak, covered

juice from half a lemon

Instructions

To sprout quinoa:

Rinse well and drain.

Soak, covered in water in a covered glass jar for 8 hours or overnight.

Drain and rinse.

Quinoa can be used immediately or allowed to sprout further for another day or two. To continue sprouting, place in a jar, replace jar lid with cheese cloth or paper towel.

Rinse 2-3 times a day and drain, until tails form. Tails can grow ¼ - ½ inches long. Then rinse well

and store in a jar in the refrigerator until

ready to use.

To cook quinoa:

Rinse well and drain.

Place in a small pot with 2 cups water.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer, covered until water is absorbed, about 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from heat and fluff with a fork.

Allow to cool before using in this salad.

To make the Tabouli Salad:

Mix mint, parsley, green onions, tomatoes and

quinoa in a bowl. Add the lemon juice and olive oil

and

mix well.

Salt

to taste.

Variation: Add one or two chopped cucumbers.

Notes

Nutrition Information Number of servings:

6, Serving size: 194g, Calories: 160, Fat: 4.3g, Saturated fat: 0.6g, Carbohydrates: 25.1g, Sugar:

3g, Sodium: 33.2mg, Fiber: 4.3g, Protein: 6g, Cholesterol: 0mg

Recipe by Caryn Hartglass and Gary De Mattei, Responsible Eating And Living (REAL)

and Gary De Mattei, Responsible Eating And Living (REAL) NUTS Baked Apples Prep Time: 10 minutes

NUTS

Baked Apples

Prep Time: 10 minutes Total Time: 60 minutes Yield: 4 servings Calories per serving: 138 Fat per serving: 2.7g

Treat yourself to a luscious breakfast, brunch, or dessert that is as unbelievably delicious as

Treat yourself to a luscious breakfast, brunch, or dessert that is as unbelievably delicious as it is unbelievably good for you. Among other health benefits, cinnamon lowers blood sugar. And nutmeg has some amazing health benefits, too, like giving you trace minerals to help keep your immune system strong. You can serve this dish plain or with non-dairy yogurt.

Ingredients

4 medium apples, cored, from the top to the center, removing the seeds.

2-3 tablespoons raw almonds

2-3 tablespoons raisins

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

About 1-2 cups water

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350ºF.

Chop the almonds and raisins into a coarse meal and mix with the spices.

Place the apples in a baking dish and add a small amount of water, to about 1/2 inch in depth. Fill the cored centers with the almond/raisin mixture. Larger apples will need more filling.

Bake until apples are soft, about 40-50 minutes. Remove from oven.

Plate each apple with some of remaining juice in the baking dish and serve plain or with soy*/ almond/other types of yogurt.

Notes

*= To avoid GMO-containing versions of these items, use organic or non-GMO certified

Nutrition Information: Number of servings:

4, Serving size: 192g, Calories: 138, Fat: 2.7g, Saturated fat: 0.3g, Carbohydrates: 30.6g, Sugar:

22.2g, Sodium: 2.5mg, Fiber: 5.88g, Protein: 1.6g, Cholesterol: 0mg

Recipe by Caryn Hartglass and Gary De Mattei, Responsible Eating And Living (REAL)

and Gary De Mattei, Responsible Eating And Living (REAL) CHOCOLATE Chocolate Gelato Yield: 5 servings, 2

CHOCOLATE

Chocolate Gelato

Yield: 5 servings, 2 1/2 cups Serving Size: 1/2 cup Calories per serving: 352 Fat per serving: 10.6g 5-Minute, 5-ingredient Chocolate Gelato

Want a super quick treat you don’t have to feel guilty about? This is likely

Want a super quick treat you don’t have to feel guilty about? This is likely to be the easiest frozen dessert you’ve ever made. It doesn’t require an ice cream maker, and it’s still scoop-able after freezing! It tastes so good after blending, you can opt to enjoy as a chocolate mousse or pudding straight away – or freeze to a soft-set for gelato.

Ingredients

1

cup refrigerated coconut cream (from can of regular coconut milk, see note)

1

cup (packed) pitted dates (see note)

1

cup frozen banana pieces

3

TB cocoa powder

1/4 tsp sea salt

optional: 1/4 – 1/2 tsp vanilla bean powder or seeds from one vanilla bean or 1/2 tsp vanilla extract (see note)

Instructions

In a high-speed blender, combine all ingredients (see note if using a standard blender).

Puree until very smooth.

Transfer to a container to freeze (see note for mousse/pudding ideas).

It will take 4-5 hours to freeze to a firm set, but will soft-set like a gelato in less time (about 2-3 hours).

Idea: As a mousse, try serving topped with fresh fruit or layered in a parfait glass with Vanilla Cashew Yogurt!

Notes

Coconut Milk Note:

Use regular coconut milk (rather than light) from a can in this recipe. Before using refrigerate it overnight, or for a few days. The thick cream will rise to the top and be easy to scoop and measure. Use only the thick cream.

Date Note:

Dates must be soft to easily puree. Some pitted dates can be old and dry. If your dates aren’t soft, try presoaking them in non-dairy milk for a half- hour or so until they soften.

Vanilla Note:

I prefer the flavor of vanilla seeds or pure ground vanilla bean, but you can also use vanilla extract if you want to add that touch of flavor.

Blender Note:

A standard blender may have difficulty churning the dates and frozen bananas into a smooth mix. You might want to first process the bananas and dates in a food processor, adding a small amount of the milk and then transferring to a blender to achieve a smoother puree.

Nutrition Information: Number of servings:

5, Serving size: 126g, Calories: 352, Fat: 10.6g, Saturated fat: 9.4g, Carbohydrates: 66g, Sugar:

57.4g, Sodium: 138.2mg, Fiber: 3.9g, Protein: 2.4g, Cholesterol: 0mg

Recipe by Dreena Burton, http://plantpoweredkitchen.com/

Cacao-Nut Truffles Yield: 4 servings, 20 truffles Serving Size: 5 truffles Calories per serving: 369

Cacao-Nut Truffles

Yield: 4 servings, 20 truffles Serving Size: 5 truffles Calories per serving: 369 Fat per serving: 28g

You’ll have fun making these tasty and easy-to- create truffles. You can eat them right after you make them, or you can chill them until you’re ready to serve them. These make great party food or small treats for dessert or as a snack. You can also roll them in other ingredients, like shredded coconut or goji berries.

Ingredients

1 ½ cups raw pecans or walnuts (any size)

1 cup pitted dates

1 ½ teaspoons vanilla

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1/8 teaspoon salt (optional)

1 teaspoon maple syrup

2 Tablespoons cacao powder or cocoa powder

Instructions

Combine nuts, dates, cinnamon, vanilla, cinnamon, salt, and maple syrup in food processor and process until it holds together.

Using about a tablespoon of dough for each, roll the dough into balls.

a tablespoon of dough for each, roll the dough into balls. Roll each ball in the

Roll each ball in the cacao powder or cocoa powder until lightly coated.

Eat, or chill until ready to serve.

Variations: The Food Revolution Network’s intern, Rachel, suggests: “After making the dough, roll the balls in various sorts of ingredients such as coconut, peanut butter, or goji berries. You can also put little treats in the center of them such as nuts, dried fruit, or chocolate.”

Notes

Nutrition Information: Number of servings:

4, Serving size: 80.14g, Calories: 369, Fat: 28g, Saturated fat: 3.1g, Carbohydrates: 30.4g, Sugar:

23.2g, Sodium: 84mg, Fiber: 7.6g, Protein: 5.2g, Cholesterol: 0mg

Recipe by Veg-Appeal

Join The Food Revolution We are John and Ocean Robbins, a father and son team

Join The Food Revolution

We are John and Ocean Robbins, a father and son team that founded the Food Revolution Network to empower YOU with cutting edge, must-have information about the most critical diet and health related issues of our times.

We find the status quo, in which hundreds of millions of people suffer from diet-related ailments while corporate and government policies make junk food normalized and subsidized, unacceptable.

We want a heath industry that acts like food matters. We want a food industry that acts like health matters. And we want government policy that looks out for the wellbeing of we, the people.

Most of all, we want you to be informed, so you can make healthy choices for yourself, your loved ones, and your planet. That’s why we’re so excited to bring you the Food Revolution Summit.

Every year, you have the opportunity to spend an inspiring and life-changing week with revolutionary thinkers and visionaries that will put the POWER IN YOUR HANDS when it comes to the food you eat!

Dare to discover the most cutting-edge information, startling facts, and inspirational wisdom that will heal you and have you CELEBRATING LIFE! (For FREE and without having to leave home.)

Perhaps you’re aware that we’re entering a food crisis, unless something is done. And done now. Never before have the stakes been so high - and the risks. Food is fundamental to your health and to the health of our world. Information is power. We want to empower you with what will help you and your loved ones thrive.

For each summit, we’ll personally interview 24 of the world’s most respected food experts and activists in a week-long “virtual summit.” These visionaries have inspired hundreds of millions of people and changed

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Here’s what’s in it for you. You’ll get

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When voices are rising up everywhere to preserve access to healthy food, it’s never been more important to roll up your sleeves, get involved, listen and be heard.

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