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125,000 Readers Monthly SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER 2003 Statewide Statewide Mexico White Four Corners Region Casinos
125,000
Readers
Monthly
SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER 2003
Statewide
Statewide
Mexico
White
Four Corners
Region
Casinos
Attractions
Festivals
Mountains
RV Resorts &
Campgrounds
Page 34-35
Page 27-31
Page 41
Page 8-10
Page 39
Page 36
Page 43-47

STATEWIDE AZ PAGE 2

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Tourist News

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SEPTEMBER 2003

Contents

 

Four Corners Region 39 Globe-Miami 16 Grand Canyon 12-13

Guest and Dude Ranches 40

Astronomy 33

Laughlin, NV

31

Attractions 34-35

Lodging 26 Mexico 41

Birdwatching

33

Casinos 36 Central Arizona 14-17

Cochise County

20-22

Native American Culture

37-38

Northland 4-13 Public Lands 42 Rim Country 17

Colorado River Region 23

Contest

31

RV Resorts & Campgrounds 43-47

Events, Featured

24

Statewide Map

24-25

September Events

28

Southern Az 18-22 Sports 32 Tombstone 20

October Events

29-30

November Events

30

Car Shows

31

Tucson 18

Flagstaff 6-7

White Mountains

8-10

Letter from the Publisher

Well, hello Arizona and

the rest of the world. Yes, you know who you are. Speaking personally, hav- ing lived for 17 years in Southern Arizona, I know first hand those who did

not originate here

folks, sorry, but unless you are Native American then you fall into the same cate-

and

unless they were looking for it - simply stated would not find it. AZ Tourist News will enhance anyone’s road trip through Arizona. We have a great time promoting this wonderful state to all who visit here, helping to make their visit even more rewarding by providing information

when they need it

particular delight when we bump into folks who have just discovered that, in fact, they wish to live here perhaps for the rest (excuse the pun) of their lives. This month our cover feature sug- gests “Discover Kingman” and what a lot there is to see and do in the town that is “The Heart of Historic Route 66.” Interesting museums, great golf, exciting day trips on the “Mother Road” and into the Grand Canyon, and fabu- lous events from rodeo to air show all wait the visitor to Kingman. Our coverage of the Northland con- tinues as that region’s cooler weather and abundance of events and attractions still beckon desert dwellers and visitors from out of state. Winslow’s famous Corner celebrates its 5th anniversary, Flagstaff opens its artist studios, Pinetop-Lakeside’s big Fall Festival is better than ever, Williams shares its rail-

(NOW!). We take

gory as I do. I’m from the rest of the world just like you and now that September has arrived, many more of us are going to land in Arizona and we would like to be the first to welcome

you. Some of us are here to visit for a week or two with family and friends with no intention of remaining, (little do they know). Others of course are com- ing here as per “Winter getaway” sched-

and many many others are going

when they come

to arrive for all kinds of reasons, i.e. business, military, education etc. Arizona’s visitors won’t only be dri- ving on our Arizona Highways, they will be Driving Arizona’s economy. One

thing is certain

across AZ Tourist News they will read information about all of Arizona that

Pick up your copy of Az Tourist News at any of these fine Village Inn

Pick up your copy of Az Tourist News at any of these fine Village Inn Restaurants!

TUCSON

Village Inn Restaurant And Bakery

6251 N Oracle Rd

(520) 297-2180

VillageInnRestaurantAndBakery

4245ESpeedwayBlvd

(520) 881-3550

Village Inn Restaurant And Bakery

6635 E Grant Rd

(520) 886-6635

TEMPE

Village Inn Restaurant

950 E Baseline Rd

(480) 831-5571

Village Inn Restaurant

1080 W. Elliot Rd

(480) 820-8401

MESA

Village Inn Restaurant

1155 S Dobson Rd

(480) 834-8372

Village Inn Restaurant

1663 E Main St

(480) 898-3403

PHOENIX

Village Inn Restaurant

4040 E Bell Rd

(602) 765-0458

Village Inn Restaurant

17017 N 33 Ave

(602) 993-4177

AZ Tourist News FAST FACTS

September 1997 Founded as Tucson Tourist News in Tucson by Anthony Venuti, Publisher, with a circulation of 50,000 readers. June 1998 evolved to AZ Tourist News with circulation reaching 125,000 readers. Expanded distributed throughout all of Az at over 1,000 locations including hotels, visitor centers, visi- tor destinations, etc. April 1999 - Az Tourist News ON-LINE was established. Currently receiving over 500,000 verifiable hits monthly. Over 700 pages of information on Arizona destination travel. May 2001 Az Tourist Visitor Center opens in Tanger Outlet Mall. Between Phoenix and Tucson on I-10 providing valuable and timely visitor information as needed 7 days a week. April 2002- AOT awards contract to Az Tourist News to publish the Az Event Guide Quarterly. Published now 4 times a year, 10,000 glossy guides are made available to visitor centers, chambers, and cvb’s throughout the state. April 2003 - Arizona Office of Tourism pulls support of the Az Event Guide Quarterly, Az Tourist News goes it alone. For more information or to advertise call 1-800-462-8705

road history and county fairs abound. Meantime, as the temperatures begin to fall - though ever so slightly - the tempo of activity picks up in the Southern and Central regions. As always, Az Tourist News is there to

inform and inspire

Fly-in to Payson’s Fiddlers, Miami’s Fiesta to Safford’s Cowboy Poets and from Art in the Park in Sierra Vista to town fests in Benson and Pearce/Sunsites. We have pulled out Car Shows for the first time this issue and continue to expand our RV listings. In addition to our monthly coverage, the Fall edition of the Arizona Event Guide Quarterly will soon be out. Look

forward to it arriving at Visitor Centers for the first of October - and if you should miss a copy, why you can down- load it directly from our website at www.aztourist.com. Wonderful Arizona, “America’s

Natural Theme Park,” awaits

waste another minute! Grab your copy

of Az Tourist News, peruse its pages,

dream

Ciao,

from Maricopa’s

don’t

plan

act!

its pages, dream Ciao, from Maricopa’s don’t plan act! Anthony Venuti, Publisher EVENT SUBMISSION GUIDELINES: Due

Anthony Venuti,

Publisher

EVENT SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

Due to the demand for listing events, we

have set the following guidelines. We hope that these will clarify our criteria.

1. Space Availability: We simply cannot list all

the events we receive. We reserve the right to select appropriate event listings and when space

is tight, we will give first priority to those who partner with us.

2. Length: 25-30 words in length or 180 char-

acters. This should include the necessary infor- mation such as event title, date, venue, brief description of event, admission and public con- tact number for further information. The name of the city is not included in the word count.

3. Type: Tourism / Visitor related

this leaves out charitable events and events that would draw from only the participants’ family, friends and like demographic reach, unless these have a particularly “western” or Arizona theme. Events submitted on line at www.aztourist.com or e-mailed to Charlis@acttucson.com will be given priority consideration. We have limited staff to retype, fax for approval/proofing, etc. If you can help us help you, it will be in your best interest to do so, for the time we can save will encourage us to choose your events.

typically

Be Sure To Fill Out Our Contest Form on Page 31 for Your Chance to Win a Free Trip!

Congratulations to last month’s winner:

DIANE B. FESSLER

of Flagstaff!

Announcing the winner of the August Photo Contest!

Announcing the winner of the August Photo Contest!

Synda Prindle of Phoenix correctly identified the mystery train car to win an Arizona Getaway. Here is her answer: “The photo is one of several observation cars from the CB&Q railroad’s “California Zephyr.” This car, named “Silver Horizon” is now Amtrak’s depot at Maricopa, AZ. As a child I used to watch these trains come through my home-town in Illinois.” As requested, Synda submitted her answer on a brochure from one of our display advertisers - the Grand Canyon Airlines. Congratulations and thank you for your interesting comments!

one of our display advertisers - the Grand Canyon Airlines. Congratulations and thank you for your

AZ

Tourist News

www.aztourist.com

MAIN OFFICE -TUCSON Publisher/Editor

Anthony Venuti

Managing Editor

Charlis McVey

Art Director

Alaena Hernandez

Associate Editor

Pam Marlowe

Associate Editor

Deb McQueen

Associate Editor

Tom Cline

Listings Editor

Kate Seymour

Webmaster

J.R. McGowan

Distribution

Ron Guerrero

Submissions of Articles & Press Releases: Deadline September 15, 2003. Fax (520) 622-7275. Press releases, etc. are always welcomed.

Az Tourist News, P.O. Box 5083, Tucson, AZ, 85703. Toll Free (800) 462-8705, (520) 624-2897, (520) 622- 7275 Fax, email info@aztourist.com, www.aztourist.com

To reach an account executive, associate editor or to contact the editor or publisher, call (800) 462-8705. Any editorial portion of AZ Tourist News may not be dupli- cated without written permission from the Publisher. Az Tourist News © 2003. 60,000 copies distributed monthly. Look for us at visitors centers, hotels, resorts, movie the- aters, restaurants, major attractions, major events, and everywhere else in Arizona!

WE ARE PROUD TO BE MEMBERS OF:

• Ajo C of C

• Greenlee County C of C

• Arizona City C of C

• Green Valley C of C

• Arizona Tourism Alliance

• Holbrook C of C

• Ahwatukee Foothills C of C

• Jerome C of C

• Black Canyon C of C

• Kingman C of C

• Benson/San Pedro Valley C of C

• Lake Havasu C of C

• Bisbee C of C

• Marana C of C

• Bouse C of C

• Metropolitan Tuc. CVB

• Buckeye C of C

• McMullen Valley C of C

• Bullhead Area C of C

• Oatman C of C

• Camp Verde C of C

• Page/Lake Powell C of C

• Carefree/Cave Creek C of C

• Pearce/Sunsites C of C

• Chino Valley Area C of C

• Phoenix C of C

• Chloride C of C

• Pinetop-Lakeside C of C

• Clarkdale C of C

• Rim Country C of C

• Coolidge C of C

• Sedona/Oak Creek Canyon C of C

• Copper Basin C of C

• Seligman C of C

• Cottonwood/Verde Valley C of C

• Snowflake/Taylor C of C

• Dolan Springs C of C

• Southwest Valley C of C

• Douglas C of C

• Springerville C of C

• Ehrenberg C of C

• St. Johns C of C

• Eloy C of C

• Tombstone C of C

• Flagstaff C of C

• Wickenburg C of C

• Globe-Miami C of C

• Willcox C of C

• Golden Valley C of C

• Williams C of C

• Graham County C of C

• Winslow C of C

• Grand Canyon C of C

• Yarnell-Peeples Valley C of C

• Greater Florence C of C

• Yuma C of C

SEPTEMBER 2003

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STATEWIDE AZ PAGE 3

S EPTEMBER 2003 A Tourist News Z S TA TEWIDE A Z P AGE 3 Running

Running through downtown Kingman is the longest original stretch of Route 66 in Arizona. Kingman was there as the “Mother Road” brought Dust Bowl farm- ers to new opportunities in the West, as the highway transported military supplies in WW II and as the new ‘50s “family vacation” brought thousands more in search of scenic wonders. Today, visitors to Kingman can relive old times and make new memo- ries. First stop should be the Powerhouse Visitor Center. While the helpful staff provides information on all that Kingman has to offer, kids will be enthralled by model trains run- ning around the mezzanine.The building houses the Historic

Route 66 Association Headquarters and Gift Shop, a 50’s Diner, the Route 66 Museum and several busi- nesses. History is a theme to be savored in Kingman. Not only does the downtown offer a walking tour of 27 sites and have over 60 buildings on the National Historic Register, there are antique shops that entice and interesting museums to explore. Newest is the Route 66 Museum, where murals, photos and life-size diora- mas highlight travel along the 35th paral- lel that became Route 66 from frontier days to the 50s. Other attractions include the Bonelli House, a marvelous example of Anglo- territorial architecture furnished with peri-

of Anglo- territorial architecture furnished with peri- od pieces; the Mohave Museum of History & Art,

od pieces; the Mohave Museum of History & Art, including a tribute to local movie star Andy Devine; and the Kingman Army Airfield Museum. Kingman’s history was also shaped by the railroad - in fact the Santa Fe line runs through town - and in Locomotive Park you can visit the last steam engine to travel the route. Another major draw for visitors to Kingman are the many recreational opportunities in the area. The town lies in a high desert val- ley surrounded by scenic mountains and lakes. The 3,400 ft elevation means mild temperatures in which to hike, bike, camp and picnic. A

favorite destination is beautiful Hualapai Mountain Park, 14 miles south- east of Kingman. Hiking trails wind upwards from 5,000 to 8,400 ft and wildlife and birds abound. One of Arizona’s most popular sports is golf and Kingman has two 18-hole championship golf courses including Cerbat Cliffs. a munici- pal course in a beautiful natural setting. Meticulously maintained greens, tough tight fair- ways and sculptured tees with an above-average USGA rating make Cerbat

Cliffs great to play. This very affordable course also provides a driving range, chip and putting greens, a com- pletely stocked pro shop, lessons, and a full bar and grill, not to mention unrestricted tee times. Fun in Kingman may also mean attending one of the exciting events held throughout the year. For great family entertainment there’s nothing like a coun-

Powerhouse Visitor Center Open Daily 9am-6pm 120 W. Route 66 1-866-427-RT66 (7866) www.kingmantourism.org
Powerhouse
Visitor Center
Open Daily 9am-6pm
120 W. Route 66
1-866-427-RT66 (7866)
www.kingmantourism.org

ty fair and on September 11th - 14th the 57th Mohave County Fair brings all the familiar and enticing sights,

sounds, and smells

and thrilling rides provided by Brown Amusements, the 4-H competition and FFA livestock auction, the bak- ing, crafts and other exhibits, and

the delicious foods at the vendors. September 27-28 brings one of the sea- son’s major events - the Andy Devine Days PRCA Rodeo and Parade celebrating Kingman’s western heritage. The public is invited to an “Old Fashioned Western

Family Evening” hosted by Martin Swanty Dodge and the Kingman Area Chamber of Commerce on Wed, the 24th and to the 33rd annual parade downtown at 10pm on the 27th. The rodeo takes place at the Mohave County Fairgrounds at 1pm both Sat. and Sun. Get your fill of exciting action with Team Roping, Saddle Bronc, Barrel Racing, Bull Riding, Calf Roping, Steer Wrestling, Bareback Riding and more. Another premier event is the Kingman Air & Auto Show on October 4-5. The show is honored to have been selected to have the United States Air Force A-10

Demonstration team performing precision aerial maneuvers and to have a Heritage Flight, which teams a state-of-the-art fighter flying in close formation with a World War II P-38 Lightning vintage fighter. Also bringing thrills and delight will be Kent Pietsch’s comedy airplane act, the Silver Wings wing walking, car show with clas- sics to hot rods to one of a kind customs, drag racing and more. One of the pleasures of basing a get-

games

racing and more. One of the pleasures of basing a get- games away in Kingman is
racing and more. One of the pleasures of basing a get- games away in Kingman is
racing and more. One of the pleasures of basing a get- games away in Kingman is
racing and more. One of the pleasures of basing a get- games away in Kingman is

away in Kingman is the variety of day trips in the area. The “almost” ghost towns of Oatman and Chloride entice

with their mining history, gunfight reenact- ments, and local artists and crafters. Hoover Dam is a sight to behold, named one of America’s “7 Modern Civil Engineering Wonders.” Driving Route 66 provides many interesting places to explore, including the Grand Canyon Caverns. Tour the unique dry cave 210 feet below the sur- face with its beautiful rock formations. One of the most exciting options is to visit Grand Canyon West. There, under the guidance of the

native Hualapai Indians, you will find a much less congested look at the canyon than found at the National Park. They offer a variety of tours, relating the histo- ry and legends of their land as you enjoy a bus ride, short hike and BBQ meal; an ATV adventure - the only one available in the Grand Canyon; pontoon rides on the Colorado River - reached by helicopter; and most thrilling of all, a one-day white- water rafting trip available April-October. As you relax, explore and enjoy Kingman, head to JB’s Family Restaurant for home-style cooking. There is a daily breakfast buffet, and a great choice of items for lunch and dinner. Try the soup, salad and fruit bar, the burgers, sandwiches, steaks, seafood, chicken, pasta and desserts. Kids eat free on Wednesdays and a child 10 & under gets a free kid’s meal when an adult entree is purchased. There is also a senior menu and discount.

Beer and wine is served. JB’s is located at 2949 E. Andy Devine Ave (old Rt. 66). Isn’t it time you discovered Kingman?

Come and visit

warm western hospitality that will make you feel right at home. For more informa- tion about these events and attractions see pages 23 and 37. Visit Kingman’s new website at www.kingmantourism.org or call the friendly folks at the Powerhouse Visitor Center at

1-866-427-RT66.

Rodeo photos ©PRCA PRO RODEO

Center at 1-866-427-RT66. Rodeo photos ©PRCA PRO RODEO you’ll be surrounded by Grand Canyon West •
Center at 1-866-427-RT66. Rodeo photos ©PRCA PRO RODEO you’ll be surrounded by Grand Canyon West •
Center at 1-866-427-RT66. Rodeo photos ©PRCA PRO RODEO you’ll be surrounded by Grand Canyon West •

you’ll be surrounded by

Rodeo photos ©PRCA PRO RODEO you’ll be surrounded by Grand Canyon West • Bus Tours (with
Grand Canyon West
Grand
Canyon West

• Bus Tours (with buffet BBQ meal)

• Smooth Water Pontoon Rides

• The River Runners White Water Adventure

• Only ATV Tours Available at the Grand Canyon

“Let the Hualapai People Be Your Guide”

928-699-0269

or 888-255-9550

www.grandcanyonresort.com

11 September 26 & 27, 2003 Friday Noon-11pm, Sat 10am-10pm Hwy 95 between El Rodeo
11
September 26 & 27, 2003
Friday Noon-11pm, Sat 10am-10pm
Hwy 95 between El Rodeo & Aztec
Ft. Mohave, Az

Rumors - The Legend of Fleetwood Mac

4 Way Street - Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young Tribute Band

Carmoco Productions - Hypnotic & Magical Entertainment

Bon Ton Zydeco

Game Booths • Craft Booths • Raffle Prizes • Fresh Hot Corn Moonridge Animal Park • Beer Garden

Free Admission • 928-704-CORN

WEDNESDAY - Prayer Breakfast THURSDAY- Blue Grass • David Parmley & Continental Divide • Arizona
WEDNESDAY - Prayer Breakfast
THURSDAY- Blue Grass • David Parmley
& Continental Divide • Arizona Tradition
FRIDAY - The Coasters
SATURDAY - The Bed Races • The
Grande Parade • Arts & Crafts Fair •
Pooch Party • Music
on the Terrace • Art Walk •
Fall Fun Fair • Papa Doo Run Run
SUNDAY - Arts & Crafts • Art Walk
• Main Buffalo Light House Dedication
• Praise Concert

NORTHERN AZ PAGE 4

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N ORTHERN A Z P AGE 4 A Tourist News Z S EPTEMBER 2003 Tes Nez
Tes Nez Iah Mexican Water Fredonia Page 163 160 Teec Nos Pos 89A Marble Canyon
Tes Nez Iah
Mexican Water
Fredonia
Page
163
160
Teec Nos Pos
89A
Marble Canyon
89 Kayenta
Dinnehosto
Rock Point
Jacob Lake
98 Shanto
Red Rock
Kaibito
Cove
Chilchinbito
Round Rock
89
Tonalea
Many Farms
The Gap
Supai
160 NAVAJO
Tsaile
North Rim
Tuba City
Chinle
Grand Canyon
Village
Pinon
191
Moenkopi
Desert View
Sawmill
264 Hotevilla
Keams
Nazlini
Tusayan
64
Polacca
Cameron
Canyon
Fort Defiance
Shungopavi
264 Ganado
Gray Mountain
Second
C
O
C
O
N
I
N
O
Mesa
Window Rock
Lower
89
Greasewood
191
180
Saint Michaels
64
Indian Wells
Wide Ruins
Seligman
Lupton
Bellemont
87 Dilkon
77 Houck
Williams
Parks
Leupp
Chambers
Sanders
Ash Fork
Flagstaff
40
40 Navajo
180
YAVAPAI
Kachina Village
Mountainaire
Joseph City
Petrified Forest
61
Munds Park
Paulden
89
Winslow
Sedona
17 Mormon Lake
Holbrook
Clarkdale
APACHE
89A
Chino Valley
179 Happy Jack
Cottonwood
87 Woodruff
191
260
Iron Springs
180
377
Bagdad
77
Prescott Valley
Lake Montezuma
Snowflake
169 Camp Verde
Concho
St. Johns
Skull Valley
Prescott
Dewey
Heber
277 Taylor
93 Hillside
Forest Lakes
61
Wilhoit
69 Humboldt
Mayer
Clay Springs
260
89 Kirkland
Overgaard
ShowLow
Vernon
Pinedale
Springerville
Yarnell
60
Bumble Bee
Crown
60
Congress
71 King
Pinetop-
Lakeside
Eagar
Cibeque
260
191
60 McNary
Greer • Greer
Nutrioso
Carrizo
Alpine
Whiteriver
180
Northern Arizona Cities & Towns
Fort Apache
Alpine
Dilkon
Dinnehosto
Joseph City
Ash Fork
Kachina Village
Nutrioso
Overgaard
Bagdad
Kaibito
Bellemont
Eagar
Flagstaff
Kayenta
Page
Parks
Shanto
Bumble Bee
Cameron
Forest Lakes
Fort Apache
Keams Canyon
Kirkland
Paulden
Petrified Forest
Show Low
Shungopavi
Camp Verde
Fort Defiance
Lake Montezuma
Pinedale
Skull Valley
Carrizo
Fredonia
Leupp
Pinetop-Lakeside
Snowflake
Cedar Ridge
Ganado
Lower Greasewood
Pinon
Springerville
Chambers
Grand Canyon Village
Lukachukai
Polacca
Supai
Chilchinbito
Gray Mountain
Lupton
Taylor
Chinle
Chino Valley
Marble Canyon
Cibeque
Clarkdale
McNary
Clay Springs
Greer
Happy Jack
Heber
Hillside
Holbrook
Many Farms
Mayer
Mexican Water
Prescott
Prescott Valley
Red Rock Cove
Rock Point
Rough Rock
Round Rock
Teec Nos Pos
Tes Nez Iah
The Gap
Tonalea
Tsaile
Concho
Hotevilla
Moenkopi
St. Johns
Tuba City
Congress
Houck
Mormon Lake
Saint Michaels
Tusayan
Cottonwood
Humboldt
Mountainaire
Sanders
Vernon
Cow Springs
Crown King
Navajo
Desert View
Indian Wells
Iron Springs
Jacob Lake
Munds Park
Nazlini
Sawmill
Second Mesa
Sedona
Williams
Window Rock
Winslow
Dewey
Jerome
North Rim
Seligman
Woodruff
Yarnell
Things to See and Do In and Near Winslow
Things to See and Do
In and Near Winslow

67 Cedar Ridge

Cow Springs

Rough Rock

Lukachukai

• Historic Route 66 runs through

Winslow’s downtown district with its

classic diners, trading posts, antique shops and art galleries.

“Standin’ on a Corner” Park located at the corner of Historic Route 66 (Second Street) and Kinsley Avenue features an incredible mural by artist John Pugh and life-size bronze sculpture by Artist Ron Adamson depicting the story behind the famous Eagles’ song.

• Little Painted Desert County Park is

a great place to picnic while watching the sun go down.

• Clear Creek offers canoeing, fishing, swimming and camping.

McHood Park, located along the water of Clear Creek, is a perfect spot for camping and pic- nicking at the park’s ramadas.

• Jacks Canyon is the place

for first class rock climbing.

• Homolovi Ruins State

for first class rock climbing. • Homolovi Ruins State • Old Trails Museum , located in

• Old Trails Museum, located

in a bank building dating from 1920, has exhibits ranging from Anasazi artifacts to

ranching life, the railroads and Route 66.

• La Posada is one of the top five his-

toric hotels in Arizona. Built in 1930 by the Santa Fe Railroad, it was the last and

most elegant of the Fred Harvey Hotels and a favorite retreat for Hollywood stars. Self-guided tours available daily.

• Remembrance Garden on east 3rd

Street displays actual wreckage from the World Trade Center. The 14-foot beam and the 16-foot beam are the largest pieces given to any community in the nation.

Park gives insight into the ancient ways of the Hopi.

• Meteor Crater and the dynamic new

Meteor Crater Museum features 25 excit- ing new hands-on exhibits, including a mini-theater that lets you experience the Meteor Crater impact as it ejected 175 million tons of material out of the crater.

Winslow Visitor Center has a Mini- Museum to give you a colorful overview of the local sites and attractions that you won’t want to miss! Located at 300 W. North Rd., Exit 253 off I-40 or call 928- 289-2434 for information.

2nd Annual September 11th Public Commemoration 6pm, September 11, 2003 • Winslow, Az Winslow’s Remembrance
2nd Annual
September 11th
Public Commemoration
6pm, September 11, 2003 • Winslow, Az
Winslow’s Remembrance Garden, East 3rd Street, I-40 Exit 255
Speeches • Color Guard • Honorary Guests • Other Special Activities
For more information contact the
Winslow Chamber of Commerce at 928-289-2434
contact the Winslow Chamber of Commerce at 928-289-2434 Sept 11th Public Commemoration Join Winslow, Arizona in

Sept 11th Public Commemoration

Join Winslow, Arizona in Remembering

SEE9/11 ARTIFACTS
SEE9/11
ARTIFACTS

Who can forget 9/11? Winslow is holding its 2nd

Annual September 11th Public

Commemoration in a very special garden, dedicated to the tragic events of

that September day in 2001 and Northern

Arizona’s promise that “we will never for-

get.”

The Remembrance Garden is located on east 3rd Street. From I-40 take Exit 255.

There you will find as the centerpiece of

the garden the most touching display of

actual wreckage from the World Trade

Center. The 14-foot beam and the 16-foot

beam were entrusted to the citizens of

Winslow by the City of New York. They

are the largest pieces given to any commu-

nity in the nation.

The beams were transported by Wal-

Mart from New York and received an

honor guard escort into the City of

Winslow. Many people have left personal momentos at the base of the beams. You, too, are welcome to leave your own tribute there. The garden is planted in red, white and

blue flowers in the design of the flag. The words “United We Stand” on the front of the garden wall are there to remind the world of America’s approach to terrorism.

A flag that once flew at the Pentagon in

Washington, DC was presented to the City

of Winslow and flies proudly from the gar-

den’s flagpole.

Everyone is invited to join the citizens

of Winslow for this special ceremony on

September 11th at 6pm. There will be speeches, color guards and other special activities. The park is handicapped accessi-

ble. For more information call the Chamber

of Commerce at 928-289-2434 or email

winslowchamber@cybertrails.com.

Great Place to Rock ‘n’ Roll

“Standin’ On A Corner” Park Anniversary

FUN FESTIVAL
FUN
FESTIVAL

The song “Take It Easy”, written by Glenn Frey and Jackson Browne, became The

Eagles first hit single in the 1970’s, and put Winslow on the map. The verse Standin’ on a corner in Winslow,

with music on Friday, October 3rd at

Beginning again on Saturday morning

9am you’ll find more music, food, arts

at

and crafts, clothing, kids stuff and other

vendors. Bring the entire family! The “Just Cruis’n Car Club” will be holding

their annual car show this same weekend

Arizona,” draws visitors from far and

in

Winslow - for more information contact

wide to stand on the famous corner on

Jim Pate at 928-289-5414. Come on out

Historic Route 66. The park, located at the corner of Historic Route 66 (Second Street) and

and take a stroll along Historic Route 66! There is also an annual auction on Saturday. This year’s TOP auction item

Kinsley Avenue in downtown Winslow,

is

a guitar autographed by The Eagles,

Arizona features an incredible mural by

as

well as a 4 CD set “Selected Works” -

artist John Pugh and life-size bronze sculpture by Artist Ron Adamson depict- ing the story behind the song. The “Standin’ On A Corner” Park Anniversary Celebration takes place on October 3 & 4, 2003. Headliner will be “Hotel California, A Salute to the Eagles” and concert time is 7pm on

also autographed by The Eagles. Don’t miss the chance to own these “hot” items! The “Standin’ on a Corner” Park is paved with inscribed bricks, purchased by donors who have made the building of this park possible. If you would like to have a permanent spot “on the corner in Winslow, Arizona” with the purchase of a

Saturday. The Park Anniversary begins

brick, a mural print, a mini bronze sculp- ture or a variety of “Park Merchandise

5:30pm showcasing many talents from far

including sponsorship, please visit our

and wide including, from the Blues Hall

of Fame, “Tommy Dukes” and his band. “Hack and the 57’s” - members of the

official web site www.standinon- thecorner.com. For more information email ghoweth@cybertrails.com. Hope

Rock-a-billy Hall of Fame - will head- line on Friday night! Put on your dancin’ shoes, these guys are awesome.

to

see you there!

Summer Nights on the Corner 20 Weeks of Music Saturday Nights 7-10pm Mix of Country,
Summer Nights
on the Corner
20 Weeks of Music
Saturday Nights 7-10pm
Mix of Country, Rock, Jazz and
International including the Phoenix Bands
“Talk to Sheep,” “Twist/Da/Fable,”
and “Pigna.” 928-289-2434
5th Standin’ on the
Corner Annual Event
October 3 & 4, 2003
Standin’ on the Corner Park
Corner of Kinsley & 2nd, Winslow, Az
Featuring “Hotel California”
- a Salute to the Eagles. Vendors,
music all day, food and lots of fun!
www.standinonthecorner.com
928-289-3434

SEPTEMBER 2003

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NORTHERN AZ PAGE 5

S EPTEMBER 2003 A Tourist News Z N ORTHERN A Z P AGE 5 Sedona’s Red

Sedona’s Red Rock Country

Something for Everyone

OVERVIEW
OVERVIEW

There’s red in them thar hills, a riches beyond gold Sedona’s glorious red rock land-

Sedona’s scenic beauty became a staple of Hollywood westerns, bringing film

stars to its small town main street

Wayne, Gene Autry, Henry Fonda and Elvis Presley to name a few. The artistic appeal of the area was not limited to Hollywood direc- tors looking for a fantastic opening shot. Sedona has an art community that is world famous, beginning with painter and sculptor Max Ernst who set up his Surrealist studio in the 1950’s. It continued to flour-

ish and diversify with the Cowboy Artists of America, a group of western painters founded in 1965. Today, the area is a nexus of art and culture with more than 40 galleries show- casing contemporary arts and crafts as well as Native American arts. There are also many music festivals, notably Jazz on the Rocks and the Chamber Music Festival of Sedona, which will kick-off its 21st season this month. In addition, a variety of gift boutiques and specialty shops attract Sedona’s visitors, and excel- lent restaurants abound. With numerous and high quality bed & breakfasts as well as first class resorts, Sedona offers a wide spectrum of lodging for visitors on a weekend getaway or a more extended stay. No matter what your pleasure, be it indoors or out, there will always be plenty to do for the culturally or athletically inclined, and Sedona’s mystical landscape will never run out of scenery that enchants and soothes the senses. For more information about the area, call the Sedona/Oak Creek Canyon Chamber of Commerce at 800-

288-7336.

John

scape of sculpted buttes and canyons has made it a sacred place since prehis- toric times and one of Arizona’s most popular destinations today. As in the past, modern- day shamans of the New Age have been attracted to this landscape. Four elec- tromagnetic energy sources called vortexes were “discovered” here in the mid-1970s. Whether or

not you believe in the healing power and emotional rejuvenation that is supposed to accompany them, you can’t help but be enchanted by the high desert terrain and the 16-mile gorge of Oak Creek Canyon. Filled with streams and waterfalls that delight everyone from the casual tourist to the avid hiker or fisherman, Oak Creek Canyon lured nearly four million visitors to the area last year, on a par with the Grand Canyon. First popularized by Zane Grey’s “Call of the Canyon,”

What’s On in Sedona

SEP 13-14 SEDONA Sedona Arts & Crafts Show Bell Rock Plaza - wonderful, exciting new art from about 30 artists and craftsmen - paintings, photogra- phy, jewelry, pottery and more. Free adm. 10a-5p.

928-284-9627

SEP 13 SEDONA Fiesta Del Tlaquepaque Traditional Mexican Independence Day Celebration w/mariachi bands, folklorico dancers & fiery flamen- co dancers. Demonstrating artists, food & fun for the kids. Free 10a-6p. 928-282-4838

SEP 19-20 SEDONA EcoFest IIII Sedona Cultural Park - Concert ticket prices vary. www.sedonaecofest.com or 800-780-2787

SEP 25-28 SEDONA Sedona Jazz on the Rocks Legendary jazz vocalist Al Jarreau, w/ Dee Dee Bridgewater, Russell Malone, the Brubeck Brothers & other top-name jazz artists. Meet & Greet party & Sunday Jazz Brunch. 928-282-1985

SEP 27-28 SEDONA Hopi Artists Gathering Tlaquepaque Arts & Crafts Village - 40+ Hopi artists, pottery, painting, silverwork, kachina carving, weav- ing, dancers, lectures on Hopi history/traditions, demos, food. 928-204-2658

on Hopi history/traditions, demos, food. 928-204-2658 Coconino National Forest, Sedona Cathedral Rock Trailhead

Coconino National Forest, Sedona

Cathedral Rock Trailhead temporarily closed Aug. 27 for approx. one month for re-construction project. Improvements of the Back of Beyond Trail Head (also known as Cathedral Rock Trailhead) include additional parking spaces and safer access for visitors. Access to the Cathedral Trail will be limited to walk-in visitors and bicyclists and access from other trailheads in the vicinity. For additional information, call 928-282-4119.

Spectacular Air Tours Sedona from Grand Canyon from Monument Valley from $ 35 $ 165
Spectacular Air Tours
Sedona from
Grand Canyon from
Monument Valley from
$ 35
$ 165
$ 265
928-282-6628 • 928-282-7768
235 Air Terminal Dr, Sedona Airport Main Terminal
www.skytreks.com
Terminal Dr, Sedona Airport Main Terminal www.skytreks.com • Free Continental Breakfast • Outdoor Pool & Spa

• Free Continental Breakfast • Outdoor Pool & Spa • Mountain Views

MENTION THIS AD FOR DISCOUNT!
MENTION THIS AD
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Exit 163 I-40, Williams, AZ

928.635.9888

www.fairfieldinn.com/flgwl

The Wild West in Williams

From Rodeo to Railroads

EVENTS
EVENTS

Rodeo fun in Williams continues with two more week-

ends of the Williams Wild Rodeo Show presented by the 7-J Rodeo Company. On the weekends of September 19-20 and 26-27, join the Wild West fun at the Bob Dean Rodeo Grounds here in Williams. Preparations are underway for our 3rd Annual Railroad Days to benefit the Arizona State Railroad Museum Foundation, dedi- cated to the rich history of Railroading in Arizona. Come to Williams on

September 19-21 for this unique event. You’ll enjoy western and railroad musical entertainment and cultural his- tory brought to life by local historians as

we celebrate the railroads in Arizona. There will be Walking Tours, visits to our museums and historic shops, and Western and Railroad Fine Arts. Dedicated to educating present and future generations about the colorful his- tory of railroading in Arizona, the future museum will serve as an invaluable resource for preserving this unique her- itage and celebrating the people who built the railroad. We invite anyone with a railroad story to share to join us in Williams for this community benefit and educational festival. We would love to hear your story, poem, or dreams about the railroad life that you or your family experienced. Our diverse state is worth preserving, and history comes alive as we share our sto- ries from the past and our dreams for the future.

our sto- ries from the past and our dreams for the future. This event is brought

This event is brought to you by Main Street, Williams-Grand Canyon Chamber of Commerce, and

the Grand Canyon Railway. Our Visitor Center is located in the restored Santa Fe Railway Freight Depot, located next to the Railway Depot, and this will be the location of the event. If you are interested in knowing more about the Arizona State Railroad Museum or Railroad Days, please contact us either in person, by call- ing 928-635-4061, or by writing to us at the Williams Grand-Canyon Chamber of

Commerce, 200 West Railroad Avenue, Williams, AZ 86046.

of Commerce, 200 West Railroad Avenue, W illiams, AZ 86046. William’s Best Western Experience MISS KITTY’S

William’s Best Western Experience

MISS KITTY’S

MISS KITTY’S

Cowboy Steakhouse

Serving Certified Angus Beef

• Pasta • Chicken • Seafood

• Sandwiches • Vegetarian

Baby Back Ribs

• Mexican Favorites

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ROUTE 66 LOUNGE 66 Art Original • • Karaoke Nightly “Sing Song or Sing Fun
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East End of Williams 642 E. Route 66 Williams, Az

928-635-9161

FRIDAY FISH FRY: ALL YOU CAN EAT! $7.95

10%OFF REGULAR MENU PRICE

with this ad.

• Live Entertainment, Stories, History • Historic Walking Tours • Western and Railroad Fine Arts
• Live Entertainment, Stories, History
• Historic Walking Tours
• Western and Railroad Fine Arts & Crafts
• Visit our Museums and Historic Shops
SPONSORED BY: Main Street, Williams-Grand Canyon
Chamber of Commerce, and the Grand Canyon Railway
Call Our Williams & Forest Service Visitor Center
1-800-863-0546 • www.williamschamber.com

NORTHERN AZ PAGE 6

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SEPTEMBER 2003

N ORTHERN A Z P AGE 6 A Tourist News Z S EPTEMBER 2003 Observing Mars

Observing Mars

See the Red Planet at Lowell Observatory

SPECIAL EVENT
SPECIAL
EVENT

Although much of the hype surrounding the August 28 oppo- sition of Mars has started to fade

Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, in part to study the planet Mars. Two years later, he installed the 24-inch Alvan Clark

refracting telescope, which was the major research tool of the Observatory for many years. The Clark Telescope is still in use today as part of the

observatory’s education- al outreach program for our public visitors and school groups, and it will be used for the September 28th Mars viewing. Because it was one of the first tele- scopes of its kind in the late 1800s and early 1900s, it is considered a National Historic Landmark. The Mars Observing Fest will consist of viewing of Mars through a variety of tele-

scopes, including the not only the 24-inch refractor but also many portable telescopes set up around the grounds. These “star party” type events are a great way to look through lots of types of telescopes and chat with their owners about them, particularly if you are considering buying your own telescope. Our doors will open at 7:30 pm with viewing beginning shortly thereafter. Admission is $4 adults; college students, srs, AAA members $3.50; ages 5-17 $2; 4 and under free. For more information call 928-774-3358. See page 33 for a 2- for-1 discount coupon.

from memory, it’s not too late to see Mars. Throughout September, Mars should look as impressive as it did in

August, provided the dust storms that can obscure the entire planet are

subdued. In fact, at Lowell Observatory we have our Mars Observing Fest scheduled for September 28th from 7:30 pm-10 pm. We have scheduled our program on this date for several reasons; first, we will use Percival Lowell’s telescope to view Mars. Since this telescope is 32 feet long, it is inconvenient to point it near the horizon since the eyepiece is then very difficult to reach. In late September, Mars will be high in the sky at a reason-

able time of night so that children may come and see it before bed- time. In addition, there’s a better chance of clear weather since the monsoon should be over or winding down by late September. Also, Mars won’t look that different than it did in August. It will still appear very bright and its apparent size will be larger than what most people have seen. Lowell Observatory is the perfect place to gaze at Mars through Lowell’s historic telescope. In 1894, Percival Lowell, a mathematician and amateur astronomer from Massachusetts, founded

and amateur astronomer from Massachusetts, founded photo circa 1908 Be Sure To Fill Out Our Contest

photo circa 1908

astronomer from Massachusetts, founded photo circa 1908 Be Sure To Fill Out Our Contest Form on

Be Sure To Fill Out Our Contest Form on Page 31 for a Chance to Win a Free Trip!

Book a Tour to Remember

Riordan Mansion State Historic Park

ATTRACTION
ATTRACTION

One of Flagstaff’s most popular attractions is Riordan Mansion State Historic

Reservations are recommended. To reach the park from the I-17/I-40 interchange, proceed north on Milton Rd. 1.3 miles, turn right on Riordan Rd. and the park entrance is approximately 500 yards on the right side. Plan to enjoy the following September Events at Riordan Mansion.

to enjoy the following September Events at Riordan Mansion. Park , featuring the home built by

Park, featuring the home built by Timothy and Michael Riordan. Owners of a logging company at the turn of the century, these pioneers built their dwelling in 1904 in the Arts & Crafts style of architecture. The Mansion is furnished with the original possessions of the Riordans, including an extensive collection of Stickley furniture. The west wing fea- tures the original 1904 landscape wallpa- per, beautiful wainscoting in the formal dining room, and the original stucco fin- ish with embedded petrified wood on the living room fireplace. Five of the original Hillers windows will be on display; these are one of only two sets of Hillers win- dows available for public viewing. Tours of the mansion are given daily on the hour. Please call for current fees.

SEP 9 Traditional Hopi Pottery On-going Series of Brown Bag Lunch Lectures. 12:15 pm on the front veranda of the historic 1904 Riordan Mansion. Dee Setalla, Hopi Artisan, will give this presentation.

SEP 27 “Dear Emma,” John Wesley Powell’s Letters from the Canyon Flagstaff Festival of Science Event, 7 pm. Todd Weber, Living History Presenter, will share John’s penned words to his wife about his expeditions.

For more information call Riordan Mansion State Historic Park at 928-

779-4395.

Arizona Snowbowl Scenic Skyride

See for Miles from Atop the Peaks

ATTRACTION
ATTRACTION

Visitors are in for a big treat if they visit the Arizona Snowbowl located on the San

Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff. The Arizona Snowbowl is known for alpine adventure during the winter months, but during the summer and fall a different experience is offered. Guests can enjoy beautiful and colorful scenery as they soar above the land on the Scenic Skyride. The lift slowly glides up the San Francisco Peaks allowing riders to relax and take a breath of fresh mountain air. At the top, a US Forest Service interpretive ranger is available to answer questions about the biology and geology of the region as the visitors experience over 70 miles of scenic beauty, including views of the Grand Canyon and downtown Flagstaff. For those who want more exer- cise there is a short hike to an observation point at 12,000 feet. Once guests are back at the Agassiz Lodge, they should plan on staying for lunch and drinks on the big outside deck. Tasty food and great views will make your Snowbowl Scenic Skyride visit a wonder-

ful experience. Prices for the Skyride are very reasonable: Adults: $10.00, Seniors ages 65-69: $8.00, Children ages 8-12:

$6.00 and seniors over 70 and kids 7 and under ride FREE. After Labor Day the Skyride is open Friday, Saturday and Sunday through mid October from 10 am to 4 pm. Season passes for the 2003-2004 sea- son are now on sale with savings of up to $300 through September 30, 2003. There are many benefits to purchasing your sea- son pass early, besides these great savings. There is an unlimited amount of skiing and snowboarding, direct access to the lifts, which means no waiting at the ticket windows, free trail passes at the Flagstaff Nordic Center, discounts on food and retail items at Snowbowl, plus discounts available at selected Flagstaff businesses. The Arizona Snowbowl is located 14 miles northwest of Flagstaff via Hwy 180 and Snowball Rd. See the ad below for 25% off the Scenic Skyride! For more information call 928-779-1591 or visit on-line at www.arizonasnowbowl.com.

below for 25% off the Scenic Skyride! For more information call 928-779-1591 or visit on-line at
below for 25% off the Scenic Skyride! For more information call 928-779-1591 or visit on-line at

SEPTEMBER 2003

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NORTHERN AZ PAGE 7

S EPTEMBER 2003 A Tourist News Z N ORTHERN A Z P AGE 7 Science Erupts!

Science Erupts! in Flagstaff

Festival Focuses on Volcanoes

10 DAY EVENT
10 DAY
EVENT

The Flagstaff Festival of Science, one of the longest run- ning science festivals in the coun-

try, is soon to open for its 15th sea- son, which runs from September 26 through October 5. As Flagstaff is situat- ed within a volcanic field of more than 800 craters, the 2003 Festival theme “Science Erupts!” will highlight the vol- canic activity that shaped northern Arizona. The Shoemaker Keynote Presentation will be delivered by vol- cano expert and geologist Wendell Duffield. After decades of chasing fiery lava flows around the world, exploring dark lava tubes that snake beneath the earth and studying the steam from searing

magma for its geothermal energy poten- tial, Duffield will share his spectacular journeys, dramatic pictures and hard- learned lessons with Flagstaff, 7pm on Friday, Sept. 26 in Northern Arizona University’s Ardrey Auditorium. The 10-day Festival will also offer

opportunities to explore geologically interesting sites such as Red Mountain, a highly unusual basalt cinder cone; Lenox Crater, an ancient cinder cone that offers views to examples of a variety of volca- noes in the area; Grand Falls, a spectacu- lar waterfall created by lava damming the canyon of the Little Colorado River; and Lava River Caves, underground passage- ways caused by flowing molten rock. In addition, the Festival will explore volcanic activity on Io, one of Jupiter’s moons, and fascinating volcanic features elsewhere in the universe. Adventures in archaeology, geology, ecology, meteorolo- gy, astronomy, medical technology and much more will be offered, as well. The Flagstaff Festival of Science is designed to promote science awareness and enthusiasm in and about northern Arizona. All activities are FREE. For more information log on to www.scifest.org or contact the Flagstaff Visitor Center at 800-842-7293.

Get Away From It All

Yet Close to Northern Arizona Attractions

PROFILE
PROFILE

“Spent the most restful and peaceful week of our lives here. A must for those who want to just

rest and enjoy nature with plenty to see near by.” “Felt like home!” are com- ments from guests of Arizona Mountain Inn, located one mile from downtown Flagstaff. Secluded on 13 acres, bordered by the Coconino National Forest on three sides with views of the San Francisco Peaks, this family-oriented inn is a quiet mountain retreat. The rustic cabins, fully furnished and each unique, most A-Frames or chalets, provide accommodations for 2 - 16 peo- ple and welcome canine tenants (6 months or older). Three Bed & Breakfast suites are available in the main cabin, serving a continental breakfast to your room. If you crave a little more action than rocking on your deck, various activities and attractions are close at hand. From horseback riding, hiking and fishing in the forest to a quick trip to Sedona or the Grand Canyon, Arizona Mountain Inn is centrally located for Northern Arizona sightseeing.

Come enjoy your vacation “away from

it all” at Arizona Mountain Inn. To make

a reservation or find out more information call 928-774-8959 or go online to www.arizonamountaininn.com.

Na tive Na tive American American Crafts Crafts Arts Arts & & CERTIFIEDAUTHENTIC Sterling Silver

Native Native

American American Crafts Crafts Arts Arts & &

CERTIFIEDAUTHENTIC

CERTIFIEDAUTHENTIC

Sterling Silver and Turquoise Jewelry • Pottery Rugs • Dream Catchers

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OAK CREEK VISTA OVERLOOK

OAK CREEK VISTA OVERLOOK
on Hwy 89A (About 20 miles South of Flagstaff)

on Hwy 89A (About 20 miles South of Flagstaff)

OPEN YEAR ROUND

OPEN YEAR ROUND
520-526-2968

520-526-2968

ENJOY THE SUITES OF FLAGSTAFF

• Spacious suite accommodations

• Sleeper sofa

• Free Bountiful Breakfast Buffet™

• Refrigerator, microwave, wet bar, coffeemaker with coffee in suite

• Indoor pool & fitness center

Rates from $79.00

suite • Indoor pool & fitness center Rates from $79.00 All rates are based on availability

All rates are based on availability at the time of booking. Not valid with any other coupons or discounts.

of booking. Not valid with any other coupons or discounts. Flagstaff Interstate Crossroads 2455 South Beulah

Flagstaff Interstate Crossroads

2455 South Beulah Blvd., Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Tel: (928) 774-8042 Fax: (928) 774-5524

1-800-833-1516

www.amerisuites.com

©2003 Prime Hospitality Corp.

www.amerisuites.com ©2003 Prime Hospitality Corp. Flagstaff’s Artists Invite You Over! Open Studios 6th

Flagstaff’s Artists Invite You Over!

Open Studios 6th Annual Art Tour

BEHIND THESCENES
BEHIND
THESCENES

Flagstaff Open Studios 6th annual FREE weekend self-

guided art tour is your chance to

see behind the art scenes. Over 100 artists open their private art studios to the public for free and show how they create their art on Saturday, September 20 & Sunday, September 21, 2003. See George Averbeck blow hot glass at his new Fire on the Mountain Gallery. Don’t miss Shonto Begay painting his impressionist masterpiece in front of you or Cathi Borthwick of Flag Forge bending iron into her organic forms. Sculptor and jeweler Steve Wikviya LaRance showcas- es the tufa casting technique and Gina Saettone demonstrates floor loom weav- ing. Nancy DeBlois features her vintage mannequins and metal candelaria lanterns, and Sarita Southgate has special hands-on projects for kids. Darcy Falk lets visitors try their hand at her craft. Del Rio Gallery also promises artists’ demon- strations throughout the tour weekend. Flagstaff’s quality and variety shine - meet the stars and divas, and discover emerging talent on a route you design. Pick up a map ahead of time at the Coconino Center for the Arts and view the tasty sampler exhibition, “Appetizers for the Visual Feast.” Open Studios artists each have one art work in this

show, a great place to decide what to see over the September 20 & 21, 2003 Open Studios weekend. Maps also at Flagstaff Visitor Center at 1 East Route 66, gal- leries all over town, and at www.FlagstaffOpenStudios.com. Flagstaff Open Studios is produced totally through volunteer efforts of the members of the Artists’ Coalition of Flagstaff, a nonprofit arts organization founded in 1996. For more information call 928-527-9989 or email to:

info@FlagstaffOpenStudios.com.

Flagstaff Temperatures

MONTH

MAX.

MIN.

PRECIP.

January

42

15

2.00

February

45

17

2.10

March

49

21

2.60

April

57

26

1.50

May

67

33

0.70

June

78

41

0.40

July

81

50

2.80

August

79

48

2.80

September

73

41

2.00

October

63

31

1.60

November

51

22

2.00

December

43

15

2.40

Average annual days of sunshine

288

Annual precipitation

19.80 inches

Annual snowfall

84.40 inches

Av erage annual days of sunshine 288 Annual precipitation 19.80 inches Annual snowfall 84.40 inches

NORTHERN AZ PAGE 8

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N ORTHERN A Z P AGE 8 A Tourist News Z S EPTEMBER 2003 Hon-Dah Resort

Hon-Dah Resort Casino

Your Choice for an Autumn Getaway

ANNIV. 10TH KICKOFF
ANNIV. 10TH
KICKOFF

The White Mountains is one of the most beautiful regions

The Twist is one of the all-time Top 40 jukebox singles. In fact, Chubby Checker was awarded the first ever platinum album in recognition for record sales. In the 60’s dancing The Twist was banned from Florida to China, but its popularity soared. Come see and hear Chubby Checker on September 13th. Hon-Dah’s popular golf and fishing packages are still available. Golfers will enjoy the courses at Pinetop Lakes Golf & Country Club or Torreon Golf Club along with the 2-nights stay at Hon-Dah Resort and 2 breakfast coupons for two people. Fishing fans also receive a 2-nights stay along with fishing and recreation passes, Box Lunches, discount certificate for purchases at the Hon-Dah Outdoor Store and more. Come relax in one of Hon-Dah’s 128 well appointed king and queen rooms with satellite television and all-season pool, spa and sauna. Exciting casino action with Las Vegas style entertainment will liven your evenings. Visit www.hon- dah.com or call 1-800-929-8744 to reserve YOUR getaway in the White Mountains.

in the state and offers some of the best recreational opportunities any-

where. It is a wonderful place to enjoy hiking, fishing, horseback riding and golf among pristine forests and clear mountain lakes. It’s also a place to relax and just let the stresses of daily life drain away. The fall months are a grand time to visit. As the temperatures start to cool, the leaves of the aspen and oak change from the greens of summer to all the hues of yellow, gold, orange, red and bronze. The

autumn beauty lifts your spirit. One of the premier destinations in the area is Hon-Dah Resort Casino. Come in September for the kickoff concert that marks the start of Hon-Dah’s 10th anniversary celebrations. Further events are planned for October and November with a special celebration in December to mark the 10th year. The concert features the ever popular Chubby Checker whose recording of

the ever popular Chubby Checker whose recording of 28th Annual Fall Festival A Potpourri of Fun

28th Annual Fall Festival

A Potpourri of Fun in Pinetop-Lakeside

LOOK ON WHAT’S
LOOK ON
WHAT’S

The 28th Annual Fall Festival on Sept. 27-28 promises something for everyone in the fami-

ly - homemade items and quilts for the craft-minded, classic cars and antiques for the collector, Kids Zone for the children, a 10K and 2-mile fun run for the outdoorsy type and food for every- body. The Fall Festival - billed as one of the largest arts and crafts shows in Arizona - is the highlight of a full schedule of events taking place during the weekend. The show itself takes place at Blue Ridge High School, 1200 W. White Mt. Blvd., on Sat from 9-5 and Sun from 10-4. More than 80 artists, craftsmen, designers and vendors turn out to display and sell hand made items like paintings,

wood crafts, pottery, jewelry, Native American articles, food and more. Donation is $1. Those interested in quilts will want to visit the Blue Ridge Jr. High School’s

Charming Bed & Breakfast in the Ponderosa Pines of the White Mountains. Each room is
Charming Bed
& Breakfast in
the Ponderosa
Pines of the
White Mountains.
Each room is carefully decorated with an old-fashioned
country charm creating a warm atmosphere to make
your visit a memorable one. Affordable Rates.

cafeteria, where the Fifth Annual ‘For The Love of Quilts’ Show will be taking place from 9-5 on Sat and from 9-3 on Sun. Admission is $1. Info: 928-368-2886 Blue Ridge Middle School will host the Pinetop Lions Club Antique Show and Sale on Sat from 9-5 and on Sun from 9-4. Admission is $1. The campus will also be the site for the Kids Zone all weekend long, as well

as the place for a pancake breakfast, the Madonna Guild Pie Sale and White Mountains Chorale pops concert on Saturday evening at 7pm. In addition to the Fall Festival activi- ties on the Blue Ridge campus, visitors will want to attend these family-friendly events:

• The 20th Annual Run to the Pines Car

Show - unique, unusual, and antique cars will fill the driving range at Pinetop Lakes Country Club from 8-4 on Sat and

8-noon Sun. Spectator admission is free.

• The Fall Festival Parade - the official annual parade will make its way down White Mt. Blvd. beginning at 10am Sat, featuring more than 50 entries.

Fall Festival 10K and 2M Fun Run -

both events leave from Woodland Lake Park at 7:30 and 7:45am, respectively, on Sat. For more information contact Pinetop-Lakeside Chamber of Commerce at 928-367-4290 or 800-573- 4031 or www.pinetop-lakeside.com.

A Part of Pinetop’s History Since 1938 Charlie Clark’s Steak House SPECIALIZING IN: • Prime

A Part of Pinetop’s History Since 1938

Charlie Clark’s Steak House

SPECIALIZING IN:

• Prime Rib • Seafood • Mesquite-Broiled Steaks • Mesquite-Broiled Chicken The Meeting Place of the White Mountains

Located on Hwy 260, Pinetop, Az (Main & Penrod)

928-367-4900

Chicken The Meeting Place of the White Mountains Located on Hwy 260, Pinetop, Az (Main &

SEPTEMBER 2003

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S EPTEMBER 2003 A Tourist News Z N ORTHERN A Z P AGE 9 An Arizona

An Arizona Paradise

Relaxing in the Cool White Mountains

TRAVEL

Arizona Paradise Relaxing in the Cool White Mountains TRAVEL WRITER by Phyllis Adams Lured by the

WRITER

by Phyllis Adams

Lured by the promise of a cool vacation, my sister- in-law from Dallas flew out to Phoenix to meet me for a

driving tour, the Pinetop Chamber of Commerce provided helpful information and directions. The Pinetop-Lakeside area offers a broad variety of accommodations, restaurants (including the major fast food chains), shopping, and entertainment, as well as a movie theater. We noticed many families bicycling and fishing at the area lakes. However, we were more easily entertained. At the Woodland Lake Park we pulled out our camp chairs and made ourselves comfortable watching the ducks, squirrels, children, and fishermen. Following a quick lunch, we did some shopping at Pueblo Southwest, where we found an excellent selection of Southwest decorative items, jewelry, and clothing. Later in the day we stopped at the Ranger Station to get directions to the Mogollon Rim Overlook and decided to cover that trail the following morning before breakfast. The short, easy hike took us out to the rocks and overlook to the south, where we could see for miles. The remainder of the day passed quickly as we explored the surrounding area, including the Hon-Dah Casino. When it was time to leave, we took one last, long breath of mountain air and

agreed that our cool, relaxing vacation in the heart of the White Mountains had

been just what we needed

paradise in the beautiful state of Arizona!

trip to the White Mountains of Arizona. We headed up Highway 60 out of the heat and were soon stopping at overlooks to ooh and aah over the views of the Salt River Canyon. The beautiful cliffs and the green river flowing below the winding road were truly surprising to both of us. Before we reached Show Low, the cool temperatures and green pines wel- comed us to the Rim Country. We turned east on Highway 260 to our destination of Pinetop and dinner at the famous Charlie Clark’s Steakhouse. The rustic western decor and attentive service gave us a great first impression, and the food cer- tainly lived up to its reputation. Before leaving the restaurant, the two of us agreed that we would return for another dinner before departing the area. The next stop was our home for three nights at the Best Western of Pinetop, where the friendly and helpful staff made us feel very welcome. Our room was spa- cious, clean, and well-appointed to meet our needs. Early the next morning we put on our walking shoes. The cool tempera- tures and clear air at the 7000 foot eleva- tion were refreshing as we enjoyed our morning exercise. Then we returned the hotel for the free buffet breakfast of make-it-yourself fresh waffles, fruit, juice, coffee, cereal, and pastries. Once we were ready to head out on a

cereal, and pastries. Once we were ready to head out on a another bit of BIO:

another bit of

BIO: Phyllis Adams, a former executive with TXU Electric & Gas in Dallas, TX, took early retirement and moved to Prescott, AZ, with her husband, Chuck, in 2000. She is an avid trav- eler and writer.

Heritage Market Place in Snowflake

Artisans come from far and wide to display their wares at booths set up throughout Heritage Park on Main Street in Snowflake. Food vendors will tempt you with tasty treats of all kinds and the farm-fresh

produce can’t be matched! You can even step down memory lane with a horse-drawn wagon ride and a

step down memory lane with a horse-drawn wagon ride and a tour of Snowflake’s Historic Homes.

tour of Snowflake’s Historic Homes. Home tours cost $1 per person, per home seen, or $12 for a family pass. Music, a Kiddie Train and other games for children round out the day. Heritage Market Place is held the first Saturday of every month from June 7th to October 4th, 9am - 4pm. For more information call 928-536-4331.

4th, 9am - 4pm. For more information call 928-536-4331. Meeting Your Wireless Needs CellularOne of Northeast

Meeting Your Wireless Needs

CellularOne of Northeast Arizona

PROFILE
PROFILE

CellularOne is a regional wireless carrier based out of

Show Low, AZ. It currently serves more than 46,000 customers in north- east Arizona and northwest New Mexico. In order to support the compa- ny’s goal of providing exceptional cus- tomer service, CellularOne employs over 100 people throughout its coverage area. CellularOne also supports more than 20 retail locations. In addition to its monthly and prepaid wireless products, CellularOne offers sub- sidized cellular service through its VisionOne program. VisionOne was established to serve the local Indian reser- vations, where basic telecommunications have historically been lacking. Qualified

individuals can receive cellular service for as little as one dollar per month through the program. VisionOne is cur- rently available to the White Mountain Apache, Hopi and Zuni Tribes, and is also available across most of the Navajo Nation. Expansion of the VisionOne ser-

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vice area is a continuous process and will soon include the Shiprock, NM area. Recently, CellularOne established a digital “overlay,” which added digital ser- vice to augment its analog signal. The digital service allows CellularOne’s cus- tomers to take advantage of the ancillary services that digital wireless offers, such as caller ID, text messaging and extended battery life. Work has already begun to expand this new digital coverage area. These capital improvements illustrate the company’s long-term commitment to serving the needs of the region. CellularOne was founded on the premise that it would give back to the communities that helped it become suc- cessful. It enthusiastically supports local charities, fundraisers and events. For more information please call 928-537-

7567.

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September 11-13, 2003
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Lots of entertainment, food and fun for
the whole family, including horse racing!
• Carnival • 4-H & FFA Events • Horse Show
• Dog Show • Livestock Sale
For more information call
928-337-2000

NORTHERN AZ PAGE 10

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SEPTEMBER 2003

N ORTHERN A Z P AGE 10 A Tourist News Z S EPTEMBER 2003 L yman

Lyman Lake State Park

Pack Your Rod, Tow Your Boat

ATTRACTION
ATTRACTION

Feeling like a swim or a lazy day of fishing? Lyman Lake, at an elevation of 6,000 feet

with summer temperatures in the 80’s to low 90’s, is a perfect spot to chill out. Boating, water-skiing or some land-based fun like rock-hounding or hiking are all options at this popular park. Created as an irrigation reservoir by damming the Little Colorado River in 1915, Lyman Lake later became the first recreational state park in Arizona. The lake is fed by melted snow from the slopes of Mount Baldy and Escudilla Mountain, the second and third highest mountains in the state, and covers 1,500 acres. Because of its size, Lyman Lake is one

of the few bodies of water in northeastern Arizona with no size restrictions on boats. The west end of the lake is buoyed off and restricted as a no wake (5 mph) limit area. This allows anglers a chance at

a variety of fish without being bothered by speed boats and water-skiers. Walleye, Channel Catfish and Largemouth Bass are found here. The large remainder of the lake is open for all other types of water sports. Facilities at Lyman Lake State Park include 61 camping units with 38 hookup sites and 23 non-hookup sites, a reserv- able group camping area, a large day use/picnic area with shade ramadas, and a reservable group-use ramada. Also avail- able are paved boat ramps, dump station, rest rooms and showers, horseshoe pits, and a volleyball court, as well as several short hiking trails. For those interested in archaeology, there is also a Petroglyph Trail and Rattlesnake Point Ruin. Lyman Lake State Park is located on Hwy 191 between St. Johns and Springerville. For more information write P.O. Box 1428, St. Johns, AZ 85936 or call 928-337-4441.

SEP 19-20 SPRINGERVILLE Cowboy Golf on the Range Bar Flying V Ranch - Fri. evening

SEP 19-20 SPRINGERVILLE Cowboy Golf on the Range

Bar Flying V Ranch - Fri. evening steak fry ($10), art show & western entertainment; Sat. golf on the open range, horse rental available. Spectators welcome. 928-333-2123

Best Western Inn of Pinetop 404 E. White Mountain Blvd, Pinetop 928-367-6667 Central Reservations: 1-800-WESTERN
Best Western Inn of Pinetop
404 E. White Mountain Blvd, Pinetop
928-367-6667
Central Reservations:
1-800-WESTERN
• 40 large guest rooms, 1 junior suite, with
refrigerator, microwaves and private balcony
• Complimentary continental breakfast
• In-room coffeemakers • Indoor whirlpool
• Individually controlled heat and air conditioning units
• Cable TV with HBO • Non-smoking rooms available
• Minutes from 25 trout filled lakes and 500 miles of streams
• More than 20 restaurants within 2 mile radius
• 5 minutes to golf • 10 minutes to Hon-Dah Casino
• 10 minutes to the White Mountain Trail System
• 30 minutes to Sunrise Ski Resort
On Highway 260 (White Mountain Blvd.) in Pinetop,
3 hours northeast of Phoenix
Holiday Inn Express - Pinetop
431 E. White Mountain Blvd, Pinetop
928-367-6077
Reservations: 1-800-HOLIDAY
• 40 large guest rooms
• Complimentary deluxe breakfast bar
• In-room refrigerators, microwaves, and coffeemakers
• Indoor whirlpool, sauna, and exercise room
• Individually controlled heat and air conditioning units
• Cable TV with HBO • Meeting room for up to 30 people
• 30 Non-smoking rooms available • Quiet, interior corridor rooms
• 25 trout filled lakes and 500 miles of streams within minutes
• More than 20 restaurants within 2 mile radius
• 5 minutes to golf • 10 minutes to Hon-Dah Casino
• 10 minutes to the White Mountain Trail System
• 30 minutes to Sunrise Ski Resort
On Highway 260 (White Mountain Blvd.) in Pinetop,
3 hours northeast of Phoenix

Alive and Well

Heber/Overgaard Welcomes You

OVERVIEW
OVERVIEW

by Kate Seymour

Among the remains of last year’s

fire, new grass and undergrowth have sprouted and the rebirth of the forest has begun. Although there are areas with no pines, in others the scenery is still breathtaking, and everywhere the air is crisp and the weather much cooler than in most of Arizona. The Heber and Overgaard areas, men- tioned together because of their closeness to each other, are situated in the Apache Sitgreaves National Forest north of the Mogollon Rim. The 2 million-acre forest is home to 34 lakes & reservoirs, 680 miles of rivers & streams, and over 400 species of wildlife including most big game. It is a paradise for hunters, fishers, water sports enthusiasts, photographers, mountain bikers, campers and just plain old nature lovers. There are extensive picnic and camp- ing facilities in Heber/Overgaard as well as scenic attractions such as the Chevelon Canyon Dam, Canyon Creek Fish Hatchery, Chevelon Butte and the Fort Apache Indian Reservation. The Mogollon Rim itself provides many breathtaking views. Willow Springs Lake Trail located in Heber is the first Arizona trail designed specifically for mountain biking. But even if you are not a seasoned

outdoorsman (or woman), the area offers many pleasures. There is the Pine Meadows Country Club with golf open to everyone and rental cabins and hotels with all the modern amenities. The ever popular Bison Ranch offers various lodg- ing choices as well as western fun in Bisontown with the Buffalo Museum of America, shopping, trail rides, fishing, the Chuck Wagon Dinner and Western Stage Show and more. Heber-Overgaard also welcomes you to events such as the upcoming 16th annual Oktoberfest in the Pines, September 20-21 at the Tall Timbers Park, Highway 260 in Overgaard. This year will feature 100 display booths of exceptional handcrafted items, food, Beer Garden, kids games and contests, and a number of raffles. Bring your lawn chair and enjoy the cool pines and entertainment plus the FREE CONCERT by Mogollon both days with opening act Brimfire. Also par- ticipating will be the Hudson Car Show. The event hours are Sat 10-4, Sun 10-3; please, no pets. There is a $5 parking donation to benefit Fireworks 2004. For more information, call 928-535-5777 or www.heberovergaard.org.

Come for the festival

and come for

the relaxation anytime. Heber/Overgaard

will surprise you.

or www.heberovergaard.org. Come for the festival and come for the relaxation anytime. Heber/Overgaard will surprise you.

SEPTEMBER 2003

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NORTHERN AZ PAGE 11

S EPTEMBER 2003 A Tourist News Z N ORTHERN A Z P AGE 11 General Crook’s

General Crook’s Pioneer Days

A Trip Back in Time

OLD WESTEVENT
OLD
WESTEVENT

Camp Verde, Arizona, is the place to be on Sept 13th & 14th, 2003, especially if you are a

mule lover. Camp Verde Parks & Recreation, Camp Verde Historical Society, Friends of Historic Fort Verde and Fort Verde State Park are hosting General Crook’s Pioneer Days. One of the weekend’s main attractions will be Mule Packing and Trails Competitions that will be held at Fort Verde State Park. We will have adult and youth trail classes and also a pack mule race. Fees are $10 per class. If you would be interested in participating, you can call 928-567-0535 ext. 136 to get your regis- tration form.

If that is not enough, you will surely enjoy some of the many other activities going on. You will want to make certain you visit the Fort Verde Museum or stop by the antique tractor & engine show. You won’t want to miss the Fall Gun & Knife Show. There will be live entertainment throughout the weekend and a country dance on Sat night. Another special attraction will be our 1880’s authentic chuck wagon dinner. The whole weekend is like taking a trip back in time and reliving the past. For more information call Parks & Recreation at 928-567-0535 ext 136 or log onto our website at cvaz.org.

Verde Valley Attractions

• Dead Horse Ranch State Park

675 Dead Horse Ranch Road,

Cottonwood, AZ The mild temperatures at 3,300 ft elevation are perfect for hiking, canoeing, picnicking, fishing or just wading in the cool water of the Verde river. Wildlife from bald eagles to river otters and beavers. 928

Visitor center includes a fine display of artifacts. The largest room of the village has been completely reconstructed and is open to the public. 928-634-5564

• Verde Canyon Railroad

300 N. Broadway, Clarkdale, AZ Offers a four-hour ride through a beautiful red-rock landscape. Attractions include Indian ruins, the authentic Perkinsville Ranch featured in the Hollywood movie How the West Was Won, and eagle nesting areas. 800-

movie How the West Was Won, and eagle nesting areas. 800- -634-5283 Fort Verde State Historic

-634-5283

Fort Verde State Historic Park

125

E. Hollamon,

Camp Verde See what life was like back in the days of the Indian Wars in the late 1800’s. Museum filled with uniforms, weapons and other artifacts. Docents in peri- od costume. 928-567-3275

• Montezuma Castle National Monument

P.O. Box 219, Camp Verde, AZ Numerous Sinagua cliff dwellings and irri- gation works built during the 12th century. The Monument extends to Montezuma’s Well, a limestone sinkhole lined with cliff dwellings. The visitor center is 90 miles north of Phoenix, off I-17. Open daily from 8-5. 928-567-3322

• Tuzigoot National Monument

P.O. Box 219, Clarkdale, AZ A 12th century village settlement built by Sinagua Indians close to the Verde river.

y a D s r e e General & Crook's Birthday n September 13 &
y
a
D
s
r
e
e
General
&
Crook's
Birthday
n
September 13 & 14, 2003
o
i
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Camp Verde, Arizona

Sat. 9am to 10pm & Sun. 9am to 4pm

• Antique Tractor & Engine Show • Mule Packing & Trails Competition • Gun Show• Dinner & Dance • Tractor Pull • 1880’s Authentic Chuck Wagon Dinner • Annual Pioneer Picnic - Sunday

F or more information call: Camp Verde Parks & Recreation at 928-567-0535 or Camp Verde

For more information call:

Camp Verde Parks & Recreation at 928-567-0535 or Camp Verde Chamber of Commerce at 928-567-9294.

www.cvaz.org

293-7245

• Cliff Castle Casino 353 Middle Verde Dr,

Camp Verde, AZ 125,000 sq-ft facility with great restaurants and lounges, live entertainment, child care, bowling, a video arcade and the latest in gaming. The Stargazer Pavilion brings in national entertainers. The Yavapai-Apache Nation also operates Native Vision Tours and a Conference Center and Hotel. 75- minute drive from Phoenix at I-17’s exit 289. 800-381-7568

• Clemenceau Heritage Museum

1 N Willard St, Cottonwood, AZ Local history exhibits and the largest H O train display in the state. 928-634-2868

Some Events to Remember!

SEP 14 COTTONWOOD Salsa Festival Old Town Cottonwood - Salsa contest, live enter- tainment, arts, crafts, vendors, free adm, 10a-8p.

928-634-9468

SEP 21 PRESCOTT Antiques on the Square Prescott Courthouse Plaza - Approx. 85 dealers, 9a-5p. 928-776-1728

SEP 26-OCT 5 PRESCOTT Arizona Shakespeare Festival Granite Creek Park - “MacBeth” and “The Merry Wives of Windsor” by AZ Classical Theatre, Sep 26-28 and Oct 3-5. $12/gen, $10/students & snrs, under 12 free. 928-443-1868

SEP 27 COTTONWOOD Verde River Days Dead Horse Ranch State Park - 40+ nature-based exhibits, live animals, canoe rides, entertainment, Car Show, sand castle building, geology tours, food. Free, 9a-4p. 928-634-7593

2003 Yavapai County Fair

You Won’t Want to Miss It!

FAMILY FUN
FAMILY
FUN

The 2003 Yavapai County Fair kicks off on Thursday,

for kids of all ages, the thrills of Sunday’s demolition derby, and much, much more. And what would a fair be without fab- ulous food, outstanding rides supplied by Royal West Amusements, arts and crafts, livestock exhibits, and vendors’ booths galore. This year, as an added bonus, the Yavapai County Fair in con- junction with the U.S. Department of Land Management will be conducting a Wild Horse and Burro Auction, which is open to the public. Come along for the non-stop action at this fair of all fairs! Hours are Thurs. Noon - 10, Fri. and Sat. 9-10 and Sun. 9-

4. Please call for ticket prices. You’ll find the Yavapai County Fairgrounds on Hwy 89A between Prescott Valley and Jerome. For more information call 928-775-

8000.

September 18 and runs through Sunday, September 21. The theme for the 2003 fair is “Fair Memories” in honor of Danny Freeman, who passed away earlier this year. Danny was beloved by everyone in the tri-cities area and was known as the Fair Association historian. He had been a member of the Yavapai County Fair Association for almost 60 years. Danny, this one’s for you. Fair-goers this year will be treated to great entertainment that will include the state finals of the Colgate Country Showdown to be held on Saturday after- noon, an antique tractor pull on Friday and Saturday, local bands from through- out the area, hypnotist Michael Mesner back by popular demand, face painting

Michael Mesner back by popular demand, face painting Downtown Prescott Recipient of Marriott’s Purple Passion
Michael Mesner back by popular demand, face painting Downtown Prescott Recipient of Marriott’s Purple Passion
Downtown Prescott Recipient of Marriott’s Purple Passion Award and Regional Hotel & General Manager of

Downtown Prescott

Recipient of Marriott’s Purple Passion Award and Regional Hotel & General Manager of the Year
Recipient of Marriott’s Purple Passion Award and
Regional Hotel & General Manager of the Year Awards
Spacious Studio Suites, Complimentary Breakfast Buffet,
Indoor Pool, Spa & Fitness Center, High Speed Internet Access,
and Conference Facilities.
$25 OFF a TWO night stay, any day of the week.*
Ask for the AZ Tourist News Special (Rate Code: ARZM).
1-888-466-8440 • 928-776-0998
200 East Sheldon Street
2 blocks North of the Courthouse Square,
Highway 89 or 69 to Sheldon Street
* Advance reservations required. Must present ad at check-in. Rate will be adjusted at check-out
after meeting 2-night minimum. Some restrictions may apply during Holiday Periods or Special Events.
Non-Stop Action At Our New Location September 18-21, 2003 More Rides ~ More Thrills ~
Non-Stop Action At Our New Location
September 18-21, 2003
More Rides ~ More Thrills ~ More Activities
More Music ~ More Entertainment Than Ever!
Fair
Memories
At The Fantastic
Yavapai County Fairgrounds
10501 E. Highway 89A
Prescott Valley, AZ 86314
For Advance Tickets
and Information, Call
928/775-8000 ~ 602/257-9233

NORTHERN AZ PAGE 12

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N ORTHERN A Z P AGE 12 A Tourist News Z S EPTEMBER 2003 Explore the

Explore the Canyon with Us

Great Discounts Offered

CHOICES
CHOICES

Your first glimpse of the Grand Canyon is unforgettable.

include an indoor 18-foot spa, seasonal outdoor pool and hot tub, Southwestern gift shop, full service restaurant and fami- ly buffet. There is also the Garden Atrium with restaurant seating and the Wintergarten Lounge. Enjoy free perfor- mances of Indian Dances Friday through Sunday at 8:30pm. For more information about package adven- tures or to make a reservation call 928-638-2419 or 800-995-2521. Another great choice is the Canyon’s only resort hotel, Best Western Grand Canyon Squire Inn, 3 diamond AAA rated with 250 deluxe guest rooms. Amenities include laundry, full service salon. seasonal outdoor heated pool, exercise room, hot tub, dry sauna and tennis courts. After the sun goes down, the whole family will be entertained with cosmic bowling, bil- liards, video arcade and big screen TV. Two restaurants and a sports bar are located in the Inn. Fine dining can be found in the Coronado Room’s elegant yet comfortable atmosphere. The Canyon Room Restaurant offers family dining with a daily buffet. Enjoy the cowboy museum, the marvelous three story water- fall, and the Southwestern gift shop. For more information or reservations call 928-638-2681 or 800-622-6966.

The immense scale is breathtaking. The many hues of the cliffs shift and change from dawn to sunset, and shad- ows come and go adding new dimensions.

The wonder of this “wonder of the world” is that there are so many

ways to view it

air, by boat and even on the big screen at the IMAX Theatre. Where should you stay while exploring this grand display of nature’s force and beauty? Located only one mile south of the Grand Canyon National Park entrance is the village of Tusayan and there you will find two excellent hotels. Both are offering - for a limited period - a 20% discount on any room, any time! See the ad below for the coupon to present. One choice is the Grand Canyon Quality Inn & Suites, offering 176 deluxe rooms and 56 suites. Both rooms and suites have accommodations for handicapped and nonsmoking guests. Start your day with the complimentary deluxe continental breakfast. Some of the special features that guests will find at this beautiful property

features that guests will find at this beautiful property by foot, by 20% Off! Any Room,

by foot, by

20% Off! Any Room, Anytime! The Grand Canyon’s Finest Accommodations! BEST WESTERN RESERVATIONS Must call
20% Off! Any Room,
Anytime!
The Grand Canyon’s Finest
Accommodations!
BEST WESTERN RESERVATIONS
Must call direct. Must mention code “AZ-01” for dis-
count. Limit four (4). Must present this coupon upon
check-in. Void with any other offer. No cash value.
Limited Time Offer.
(928) 638-2681
Toll Free: (800) 622-6966
www.GrandCanyonSquire.com
Best Western Grand Canyon Squire Inn
10% Off! Any Tour,
Anytime!
The World’s Largest Helicopter Company!
PAPILLON RESERVATIONS
Must call direct. Must mention code “AZ-02” for
discount. Limit four (4). Must present this coupon
upon check-in. Void with any other offer.
No cash value. Limited Time Offer.
(928) 638-2419
Toll Free: (800) 528-2418
www.Papillon.com
Helicopter Tours of the Grand Canyon
20% Off! Any Room,
Anytime!
The Grand Canyon’s Finest
Accommodations!
QUALITY SUITES RESERVATIONS
Must call direct. Must mention code “AZ-03” for
discount. Limit four (4). Must present this coupon
upon check-in. Void with any other offer.
No cash value. Limited Time Offer.
(928) 638-2419
Toll Free: (800) 995-2521
www.GrandCanyonQualityInn.com
Grand Canyon Quality Suites
25% Off! Anytime!
Grand Canyon The Hidden Secrets
IMAX SHOW SCHEDULES
Must call direct. Must mention code “AZ-04” for
discount. Limit four (4). Must present this coupon
upon check-in. Void with any other offer. No cash
value. Limited Time Offer.
(928) 638-2203
www.GrandCanyonImaxTheatre.com
Grand Canyon IMAX Theater
www.GrandCanyonImaxTheatre.com Grand Canyon IMAX Theater T emperatures at the South Rim     JAN FEB

Temperatures at the South Rim

 
 

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

HIGH (F.)

41

45

51

60

70

81

84

82

76

65

52

43

HIGH (C.)

5

7

10

15

21

27

29

28

24

18

11

6

LOW (F.)

18

21

25

32

39

47

54

53

47

36

27

20

LOW (C.)

-8

-6

-4

0

4

8

12

12

8

2

-3

-7

Note: Inner Canyon temperatures average 20 degrees warmer.

 

MILEAGE FROM THE GRAND CANYON TO:

Hopi Indian Reservation

110

Havasupai Indian Reservation

30

Hualapai Indian Reservation

200

Pipe Springs National Monument

200

Glenn Canyon Recreation Area

135

Lake Powell

135

Navajo National Monument

115

Canyon de Chelly National Monument

235

Walnut Canyon National Monument

95

Navajo Indian Reservation

50

Meteor Crater

140

Painted Desert/Petrified Forest

200

Montezuma Castle National Monument

135

Tuzigoot National Monument

135

Phoenix

225

T uzigoot National Monument 135 Phoenix 225 Cafe TUSAYAN Grand Canyon Arizona 928-638-2151 Grand Canyon

Cafe

TUSAYAN

Grand Canyon

Arizona

928-638-2151

Grand Canyon & Flagstaff We Care For You! 4215 N. Hwy 89, Flagstaff, Az 928-527-1920

Grand Canyon & Flagstaff

Grand Canyon & Flagstaff We Care For You! 4215 N. Hwy 89, Flagstaff, Az 928-527-1920 1

We Care

For You!

Grand Canyon & Flagstaff We Care For You! 4215 N. Hwy 89, Flagstaff, Az 928-527-1920 1

4215 N. Hwy 89, Flagstaff, Az

928-527-1920

1 Clinic Rd, Grand Canyon, Az

928-638-2551

located located in in the the Grand Grand Canyon Canyon Village Village Shops Shops Highway
located located in in the the
Grand Grand Canyon Canyon Village Village Shops Shops
Highway Highway 64, 64, Tusayan, Tusayan, Arizona Arizona
928-638-1970 928-638-1970
9am-9pm 9am-9pm Monday-Sunday Monday-Sunday
20% 20% OFF OFF OLD OLD TYME TYME PHOTO PHOTO
with with this this ad. ad. Valid Valid through through Oct. Oct. 31st, 31st, 2003. 2003.
OLD OLD TYME TYME PHOTO PHOTO with with this this ad. ad. Valid Valid through through

SEPTEMBER 2003

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Tourist News

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NORTHERN AZ PAGE 13

S EPTEMBER 2003 A Tourist News Z N ORTHERN A Z P AGE 13 Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon Music Festival

From Classical to Native American Composers

CONCERTS
CONCERTS

Since 1984, the Grand Canyon Music Festival has been dedicated to bringing the

world’s finest musicians to Grand Canyon National Park in celebration of the power and beauty of this magnificent World Heritage site. During its second season, the Festival extended this gift of music to the students of northern Arizona’s under-served and rural communities, primarily at schools on the Navajo and Hopi Reservations. In 2001, the Festival initiated its Native American Composers Apprentice Project to extend its outreach to training talented Native American students in the art of composition. This season’s performances run from

Sept. 5-20 and feature an eclectic and superb mix of the finest chamber music from baroque to today’s classical, jazz,

and fusion. This year’s lineup of musi- cians plays works including Beethoven’s Quartet Opus 131, a retelling of Stravinsky’s “The Soldier’s Tale” (from a Native American perspective), and Paul Moravec’s “Tempest Fantasy.” The Bonfiglio Group presents two evenings of their contemporary sound drawn from a wide variety of musical forms. Area businesses continue to lend their considerable support regarding this unique cultural event. Sponsorship for the festival takes many forms, and the Flagstaff Walk-In Clinic and its sister clinic at the Grand Canyon have spon- sored advertising for the 2003 festival. For more information regarding this 20th Season visit the festival web site at grandcanyonmusicfest.org or call 928- 638-9215 or 800-997-8285.

Café Tusayan

A Diamond by the Roadside

DINING REVIEW
DINING
REVIEW

by Erika Breckel

Just outside the gates of the

Grand Canyon National Park is the small village of Tusayan. Motels, both quaint and modern, and gift shops offer- ing souvenirs line Highway 180. Tucked alongside the highway is a marvelous lit- tle café, Café Tusayan. It looks like most every other roadside restaurant, but once inside, that impres- sion quickly changes. While the booths and table arrangements are similar to other eating establishments, it’s the wel- coming that sets the tone. Every customer is greeted as if he/she were family or an honored guest. How extraordinary in our impersonal peripheral lives.

And the food? The choices are

diverse, from traditional bacon and eggs to Muesli. Spaghetti, BLTs, garden burg- ers, tofu and ceviche all share the same menu and appeal to different tastes. Feeling more conventional? Try the prime rib or omelet or chicken salad. Every item on the menu is interesting and better yet, each item is excellently prepared and tasty. Delicious homemade soups and a variety of salads are available for lighter fare. The café is a diamond - sitting at the side of the road. An excellent meal, cou- pled with a warm greeting, makes stop- ping worthwhile. Include this little café in your Northern Arizona experience - bon appetit!

Café Tusayan, 928-638-2151

A Tradition of Innovation & Pioneering Since 1927. We specialize in customized Air, Ground &
A Tradition of Innovation & Pioneering Since 1927.
We specialize in customized Air, Ground &
Rafting Tours, Charters and Hotel packages.
Located at Grand Canyon Airport and NOW
GRAND CANYON AIR TOURS from Scottsdale Airport!
1-866-2-FLY-GCA (1-866-235-9422)
www.grandcanyonairlines.com
September September 5th 5th through through 20th, 20th, 2003 2003 • • Concert Concert Times-
September September 5th 5th through through 20th, 20th, 2003 2003 • • Concert Concert Times- Times- 7:30 7:30 pm pm
Concert Concert dates: dates: 9/5, 9/5, 9/6, 9/6, 9/9, 9/9, 9/12, 9/12, 9/13, 9/13, 9/16 9/16 - - Orpheum Orpheum Theater Theater in in
Flagstaff ---
Flagstaff
---
9/17, 9/17, 9/19, 9/19, 9/20 9/20 - - Grand Grand Canyon Canyon concerts concerts are are inside, inside,
at at the the Shrine Shrine of of the the Ages, Ages, South South Rim, Rim, Grand Grand Canyon Canyon National National Park Park
Tickets Tickets available available online online or or by by phone: phone: 1-800-997-8285 1-800-997-8285
www.grandcanyonmusicfest.org www.grandcanyonmusicfest.org

Grand Canyon National Park Lodges

We’re Not Just Close, We’re There!

PROFILE
PROFILE

An amazing experience awaits you at the Grand Canyon.

rustic cabin at Bright Angel Lodge. Or choose the elegance of the historic El

Tovar, where you’ll find our gracious staff very accommodating. And if all of these adventures have you working up an appetite, you’re in luck. Because this is the home of the celebrated and historic El Tovar

Dining Room, and a legacy of fine food. Order up a quick bite at Yavapai cafe- teria, or an entire feast at the Arizona Steakhouse. Or have your favorite beverage at the Maswik Sports Bar or El Tovar Lounge. At the South Rim, the choices are endless - and they’re all just outside your door.

Take advantage of increased availability this fall inside the park, including the popular rim lodges. Recent upgrades to our on-line reserva- tions system reflect a more complete inventory of available rooms. Grand Canyon National Park Lodges - We’re not just close, we’re there! Call 303-29- PARKS (297-2757) or 888-29-PARKS (297-2757) for reservations or visit our website at www.grandcanyonlodges.com. Xanterra Parks & Resorts is an authorized concessionaire of the National Park Service.

To take advantage of all there is to see and do, stay with Grand Canyon National Park Lodges, operated by Xanterra Parks and Resorts, the only

accommodations in the park at the South Rim. With 907 rooms in

six distinctly different lodges, rooms are avail- able with some advance planning, or if you plan your visit at the last minute. Whether you stay the night or the week, you’ll find more than enough to fill your hours and free your mind.

Relax aboard a guid- ed motorcoach tour through the beautiful expanse or just watch the sunrise. Daily ranger programs help you discover 1.7 billion years of history embedded in the canyon walls. Experience a rare and beloved tradition as you amble your way to the bottom of the canyon on the back of a sure-footed mule. It’s all waiting for you at the South Rim, and it’s open year-round. On the canyon floor, you can retire for the night at the legendary Phantom Ranch. Then head back to the rim and retreat to a

canyon floor, you can retire for the night at the legendary Phantom Ranch . Then head
canyon floor, you can retire for the night at the legendary Phantom Ranch . Then head

CENTRAL AZ PAGE 14

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Tourist News

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SEPTEMBER 2003

C ENTRAL A Z P AGE 14 A Tourist News Z S EPTEMBER 2003 Central Az
Central Az Cities & Towns Paloma Paradise Valley Aguila Ahwatukee Apache Junction Arizona City Black
Central Az Cities & Towns
Paloma
Paradise Valley
Aguila
Ahwatukee
Apache Junction
Arizona City
Black Canyon City
Buckeye
Carefree
Casa Grande
Cave Creek
Cedar Creek
Chandler
Chuichu
Circle City
Claypool
Coolidge
Dudleyville
El Mirage
Kearney
Payson
Eloy
Mammoth
Peoria
Florence
Maricopa
Peridot
Florence
Mesa
Phoenix
Junction
Miami
Picacho
Fountain Hills
Mobile
Pine
Friendly Corner
Morristown
Punkin Center
Gila Bend
New River
Queen Creek
Gilbert
Oracle
Randolph
Gladden
Oracle Jct.
Red Rock
Glendale
Palo Verde
Globe
Pine
Rio Verde
San Carlos
San Manuel
Scottsdale
Sentinel
Strawberry
Sun City
Sun City West
Superior
Surprise
Tempe
Tonopah
Tortilla Flat
Wickenburg
Strawberry
Goodyear
260
Hayden
Payson
Inspiration
Winkelman
Wintersburg
Wittman
Kaka
87
Young
Young
Black Canyon City
60
Aguila
Wickenburg
NewRiver
Cedar Creek
Cave Creek
Punkin Center
Gladden
Morristown
74
87
Circle City
Carefree
188
73
Sun City
Wittman
17
West
GILA
Rio Verde
Surprise
Sun City
Paradise
Valley
Fountain
Hills
Peoria
El Mirage
88
77
Tortilla Flat
10
Glendale
Scottsdale
Claypool
Tonopah
Inspiration
Mesa
Wintersburg
Apache Junction
Goodyear Phoenix
Globe
60
Tempe
Palo Verde
Superior
Miami
San Carlos
Buckeye
Ahwatukee
60
70
Chandler Gilbert
Peridot
Queen Creek
Florence
177
Junction
85
177
87
79
347
10
Mobile
Kearney
Maricopa
Coolidge
Gila Bend
Florence
238
Hayden
Winkelman
Sentinel
Casa
Randolph
Dudleyville
Paloma
Grande
8
87
79
77
Eloy
Mammoth
MARICOPA
Chuichu
Picacho
Arizona
PINAL
City
10
San Manuel
85
Friendly Corner
Kaka
Red Rock
Oracle Jct.
Oracle
Come See Ahwatukee

Come See Ahwatukee

Come See Ahwatukee
Get the "small town" feeling you crave, with the "big city" convenience you love. The

Get the "small town" feeling you crave, with the "big city" convenience you love. The Ahwatukee Foothills area of Phoenix is known for its friendly faces, fine restaurants, and easy access to all that Arizona has to offer The name “Ahwatukee" means “beautiful dream,” and those of us who live and work here think that's a perfect description. Tucked back in the beautiful foothills of South Mountain, this planned community maintains a "small town" feeling, but has all the modern conveniences you expect to find in a big city, including easy access to freeways and airports. Ahwatukee is proud of its natural beauty, its beautiful parks and hiking trails, and bountiful business community.

Ahwatukee is proud of its natural beauty, its beautiful parks and hiking trails, and bountiful business
parks and hiking trails, and bountiful business community. Come see for yourself. Come see Ahwatukee. Ahwatukee
parks and hiking trails, and bountiful business community. Come see for yourself. Come see Ahwatukee. Ahwatukee
parks and hiking trails, and bountiful business community. Come see for yourself. Come see Ahwatukee. Ahwatukee
parks and hiking trails, and bountiful business community. Come see for yourself. Come see Ahwatukee. Ahwatukee
Come see for yourself. Come see Ahwatukee.

Come see for yourself. Come see Ahwatukee.

Ahwatukee Foothills Chamber of Commerce 12020 S. Warner-Elliot Loop Suite #111 Phoenix, AZ 85044

Ahwatukee Foothills Chamber of Commerce 12020 S. Warner-Elliot Loop Suite #111 Phoenix, AZ 85044

480-753-7676

Fax 480-753-3898 www.ahwatukeechamber.com

Commerce 12020 S. Warner-Elliot Loop Suite #111 Phoenix, AZ 85044 480-753-7676 Fax 480-753-3898 www.ahwatukeechamber.com
Commerce 12020 S. Warner-Elliot Loop Suite #111 Phoenix, AZ 85044 480-753-7676 Fax 480-753-3898 www.ahwatukeechamber.com
Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd. & Cactus Rd. Scottsdale, Arizona Recorded info: (480)860-8810 ® A broad
Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd.
& Cactus Rd.
Scottsdale, Arizona
Recorded info: (480)860-8810
®
A broad range of guided tours are offered daily at this desert
masterpiece which served as Wright’s personal home, studio
and architecture campus.
Phone:(480)860-2700

Ballet Az Performs Under the Stars

Free at Glendale’s Historic Sahuaro Ranch

SPECIAL EVENT
SPECIAL
EVENT

On October 6 at 7:30pm, Ballet Arizona will present Ballet Under the Stars for the first

time at the City of Glendale’s Historic Sahuaro Ranch. Ballet Under the Stars is free and open to the public and allows the community to view a vari- ety of ballets, from the classical to con- temporary, and a never seen before pre-

miere creation. Performances are held in an outdoor

setting complete with a stage, lighting,

costumes and beautiful Arizona weather. Bring a lawn chair or a blanket and enjoy excerpts from Ballet Arizona’s upcoming

season including Allegro Brillante,

Slaughter on Tenth Avenue, Company B,

Scarlet Symphony, and a sneak-peak of Artistic Director, Ib Andersen’s never seen before full-length ballet. In addition, children from a nearby grade school will have the unique oppor- tunity to create and choreograph a new dance work with the guidance of a team of Ballet Arizona dancers. The children will present the dance to the audience at Ballet Under the Stars. This division of Ballet Arizona’s Education and Outreach Program is referred to as “Class Act.” Sahuaro Ranch is located at 9802 N. 59th Ave (59th Ave and Mountain View Rd - 1 block South of Peoria). For more information call 623-930-4203.

Cricket Pavilion in Phoenix

For the Best in Live Entertainment

OCTOBER LINEUP
OCTOBER
LINEUP

Cricket Pavilion is one of

Phoenix, Arizona’s premier des-

tinations for live entertainment.

Since the inception of the Pavilion in 1989, the venue has played host to many top artists showcasing the most

exciting and diverse musical talent. The

top-notch entertainment continues during the month of October. On Saturday, Oct 4, legendary country artists Alabama bring their American Farewell Tour to Cricket Pavilion, cele- brating their Silver Anniversary. The con- cert will feature a dazzling new set and state-of-the-art production and promises to be an event worthy of Alabama’s 25- year career. Two rock and roll giants, influential

rockers Aerosmith along with musical monsters KISS, will perform live in con- cert on Wednesday, Oct 8 for one show only. Aerosmith has been rocking the nation for over a quarter-century, having released such classic rock singles as “Janie’s Got A Gun,” “Livin’ on The Edge,” “Crazy,” “Dream On, “Sweet Emotion,” and “Dude (Looks Like A Lady)” to name just a few. Also performing that same evening is the hottest band in the world, KISS. Purveyors of decadence and excess since the 70s, KISS invented stadium rock with their sci-fi Kabuki costumes, explosive theatrics and, of course, their make-up. They took the “Greatest Rock N’ Roll

C’mon. Take a train ride. MCCORMICK-STILLMAN RAILROAD PARK 7301 E. Indian Bend Road (480) 312-2312
C’mon. Take a train ride.
MCCORMICK-STILLMAN RAILROAD PARK
7301 E. Indian Bend Road
(480) 312-2312
www.therailroadpark.com

Show On Earth” to all corners of the globe. Equipped with an array of memorable hit singles, the incomparable James Taylor will perform on Saturday, Oct 18 at Cricket Pavilion. James Taylor has established himself as one of the greatest voices in the music industry with the smooth sounds of songs such as “Sweet Baby James,” “Carolina On My Mind” and “Fire and Rain.” The first annual 95.5 KYOT Fall- Fest on Saturday, Oct 25, 2003 will fea- ture some of the most talented jazz artists of our time with performances by Peter White, Gato Barbieri, Bobby Caldwell, Al DiMeola, Spyro Gyra, Brian Culbertson, and Candy Dulfer. The daylong festival will also feature vendors from around the state as well as delectable food to excite the palate. One of Latin rock’s most popular bands, Maná comes to Cricket Pavilion on Tuesday, Oct 28, 2003. The music of Maná transcends the Mexican roots they are very proud of with a poetic ability to express universal truths. The band has sold over 18 million albums worldwide, won four Grammy Awards and visited 26 countries. For the most updated show or ticket information, please call 602-254-7200 or visit us on-line at www.cricket-pavil- ion.com. For VIP Season tickets or box seats, please call 602-254-7200 ext. 216. To purchase tickets for groups of 20 or more, call 1-866-544-LAWN. Cricket Pavilion is conveniently located one half mile north of the I-10 Freeway on the SE corner of 83rd Ave and Encanto Blvd in Phoenix, AZ.

Az Tourist News is distributed statewide at participating JB’s Restaurants.

Az Tourist News is distributed statewide at participating JB’s Restaurants.

of 83rd Ave and Encanto Blvd in Phoenix, AZ. Az Tourist News is distributed statewide at

SEPTEMBER 2003

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Tourist News

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CENTRAL AZ PAGE 15

S EPTEMBER 2003 A Tourist News Z C ENTRAL A Z P AGE 15 Remnant of

Remnant of a Lost Civilization

Casa Grande Ruins National Monument

ATTRACTION
ATTRACTION

Casa Grande Ruins National Monument was this

thought the alternating periods of flood and drought stressed the fabric of the society. And, a series of devastating floods in the 1350s and 1380s may well have been the final episodes that led to the breakdown of their economic and political systems. Early Spanish explorers of the 1600s and 1700s found small farming settlements in what had once been Hohokam territory. The early Spanish named the Indians of southern Arizona the Pima

and Papago. In their own language, they are the Akimel O’Odham and the Tohono O’Odham. They may be the descendants of the Hohokam. The Casa Grande Ruins are open daily from 8 am to 5 pm throughout the year but closed on Christmas Day. Entrance to the ruins is $3 per person, 16 and under are free (prices subject to change); National Park Service Passports honored. For additional information write Casa Grande Ruins, 1100 Ruins Dr., Coolidge, AZ 85228, go to the web site www.nps.gov/cagr or call 520-723-3172.

nation’s first archaeological pre-

serve. Its namesake the Casa Grande or “Big House” was built in the early 1300’s. In 1694, Father Eusebio Francisco Kino described Casa Grande as a 4-story structure built by the people the Pima Indians call “Hohokam,” meaning those that came before. Constructed with layers of caliche mud, the walls of the tower are 4 1/2 feet thick at the base. This mysterious structure is believed to have been used for astronomical observa- tion because of holes in its walls that seem specifically placed for this purpose. Casa Grande is the largest structure built by the Hohokam and represents the height of their architecture. Around the late 1300s, they began to abandon their walled compounds and vil- lages for reasons that can only be specu- lated upon. Over the centuries the

Hohokam had built a complex agricultur- al society based upon irrigation; it is

complex agricultur- al society based upon irrigation; it is Casa Grande, Az Boom to Bust and

Casa Grande, Az

Boom to Bust and Back Again

OVERVIEW
OVERVIEW

Casa Grande is a modern city with a rural heritage. Although all the modern amenities

can be found here, it still maintains the small-town charm and relaxed lifestyle that set it apart from other cities of its size. Founded in 1879 and incorporated in 1915, Casa Grande is the second largest community in Pinal County with a popula- tion of nearly 30,000 year-round residents. Casa Grande traces its beginnings 125 years ago to the Southern Pacific Railroad. In the summer of 1879, railroad crews stopped working on the rail line that was being constructed through southern Arizona, due to the heat. By the time the railroad moved on, supplies had built up at this “end-of-the-line”, and the resulting

community was named Terminus. The town was later named Casa Grande for the Hohokam Indian ruins, 20 miles away. By 1882, the town had a diverse multi-cultural population of 500 residents. Downtown Casa Grande burned three times between 1884 and 1915. Each time, merchants and business leaders rebuilt the town. In the 1890s, a national mining slump almost devastated Casa Grande, and by 1902 the business district had declined to a mercantile, a saloon and two smaller stores. Agriculture saved the day, and Casa Grande flourished once again. Casa Grande is celebrating its 125th anniversary in 2004, boasts an abundance of sunny days, dazzling sunsets, a rich multi-cultural history, and area residents who immediately make you feel like friends. Add this to the area’s unique nat- ural beauty where the Old West meets the New West and you have the secret to Casa Grande’s allure. The city bustles with activity during the fall, winter and spring. The season is jam- packed with festivals, activities, and fun, such as the Annual Fiddlers’ Bluegrass Jamboree, Heritage Tourism Days, O’Odham Tash Festival, Arizona State Open Chili Championship, Cactus Fly-In,

Civil War re-enactment, and much, much more. In addition, there is a special series of events specifically created for 55+ win- ter visitors and area residents, called the Winter Celebration, as it is designed to take advantage of Casa Grande’s seven months of glorious weather. An Interstate hub of Arizona, Casa Grande is strategically located halfway between Phoenix and Tucson, and at the intersection of Interstates 8 and 10. The city is the retail center for western Pinal County and includes many merchants from national retail chains to smaller specialty stores to antique shops. A beautiful Historic Downtown district, and a Tanger Factory Outlet Center with more than 35 quality outlet stores attracts nearly two million shoppers per year. For more information call the Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce, 800-916-1515, or 520-836-2125. Web site:

www.casagrandechamber.org

Things to love about Casa Grande ❏ ✔ Fresh air ❏ ✔ Golf, food, hiking

Things to love about Casa Grande

Fresh air

Golf, food, hiking and relaxing

Winter events that just don’t stop

Fascinating history and museums

125 years old and young-at-heart

Historic Downtown District

CG Main Street www.cgmainstreet.org

It’s a bargain hunter’s paradise!

Tanger Outlet Center www.tangeroutlet.com • Retail and specialty shops galore!

For more information call the Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce at 800-916-1515 or visit

For more information call the

Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce at 800-916-1515 or visit

www.casagrandechamber.org

Much More Than an Air Show!

COPPERSTATE Regional EAA Fly-in

DON’T MISSTHIS!
DON’T
MISSTHIS!

The COPPERSTATE Regional EAA Fly-in will be held on October 9-12 at Phoenix

Regional Airport (A39), located 25 miles south of Phoenix, Ariz. Attendees from throughout the U.S. and several for- eign countries are expected at COPPER- STATE, the largest EAA fly-in in the Southwest. COPPERSTATE features an air show on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, with exciting performances by national and regional aerobatic stars. This year’s per- formers include 2002 U.S. Aerobatic Champion Kirby Chambliss. For the first time, the event will feature the come- dy act of veteran performer Kent Pietsch. In addition, the Warbirds will be returning to COPPERSTATE and will perform a fly-by on Saturday and Sunday. Another first will be Family Day on Sunday, featuring flights by radio-con- trol aircraft and a Replica Fighter re- enactment. The R-C modelers will also have “buddy boxes” that enable children and enthusiasts of all ages to experience

flying a radio control model. More than an airshow, COPPER- STATE is a meeting place where enthusi- asts from all aviation-related areas can enjoy a wide variety of events. For the youngest aviation fans Bruce Schoenberger’s award-winning rib-build- ing program allows kids of ages 8-15

years to build a wooden airplane rib in 90 minutes or less. Free flights in general aviation aircraft are offered for youth as part of EAA’s national Young Eagles pro- gram. Educational forums and workshops are another popular attraction at COP- PERSTATE. In previous years, forum top- ics have included FAA certification pro- cedures, border crossing procedures and converting auto engines. Aircraft builders can hone their skills in fabric covering, woodworking, metalworking, composites, welding, engine repair, avionics, and more at the many hands-on workshops. For the aircraft builder looking for avi- ation memorabilia or out-of-production parts, vendor booths present a variety of shopping choices, from books, clothing and collectibles to tools and aircraft parts. The Fly Market offers tens of thousands of dollars worth of aviation goods for sale on a consignment basis. Instruments, air- plane parts, tools, engines, cases, and even whole aircraft projects are typically available for purchase. Show planes are judged in several cat- egories. Awards for best homebuilt (wood, composite or other), best ultra- light, and people’s choice are among the awards presented at the Saturday night banquet. For more information about COPPERSTATE, call 520-400-8887 or visit www.copperstate.org.

October 9-12, 2003 Phoenix Regional Airport, Maricopa, Az 8am-5pm Each Day • 520-400-8887 www.copperstate.org
October 9-12, 2003
Phoenix Regional Airport, Maricopa, Az
8am-5pm Each Day • 520-400-8887
www.copperstate.org
Admission: $10 per person • $7 for EAA members
Kids 12 and under FREE! • FREE PARKING!
BRING THE ENTIRE FAMILY
sponsored by
See All Types of Aircraft!
the Greater
Casa Grande
CUSTOM BUILTS • ANTIQUES • CLASSICS • REPLICAS
MOTORCRAFTS • ULTRALIGHTS • WARBIRDS
Chamber of
Commerce
Activities for Everyone!
AIR SHOW • EDUCATIONAL FORUMS • WORKSHOPS • CONSTRUCTION INFO • FLY-BYS
DEMONSTRATION FLIGHTS • VENDOR DISPLAYS • FOOD COURT • KID’S ACTIVITIES

CENTRAL AZ PAGE 16

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SEPTEMBER 2003

C ENTRAL A Z P AGE 16 A Tourist News Z S EPTEMBER 2003 The Rebirth

The Rebirth of Miami, Az

Art and Antiques Breathe New Life into Town

OVERVIEW
OVERVIEW

by Charlis McVey

fossils. I was taken with an English Lobster-Tail Helmet c. 1630 - you could see actual sword marks sustained during