Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 17

 

 
Baseline Conditions East of Existing Clam Bay Washington 
Salmon Net Pens, November 2009 
 
                      
 
PREPARED FOR: 
 
 
American Gold Seafoods 
P.O. Box 669 
Anacortes, WA 98221 
 
 
FOR DISTRIBUTION TO: 
 
Kitsap County Department of Community Development 
 
 
 
December 4, 2009 
 
 
PREPARED BY: 
 
J.E. Jack Rensel, Ph.D. 
Rensel Associates Aquatic Sciences 
4209 234th Street N.E. 
Arlington, Washington 98223 
360 435 3285 
jackrensel@att.net 
 
     
 
    

 
Contents 
 
1  INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 1 

2  SAMPLING LOCATIONS AND STATION NOMENCLATURE .................................................. 1 

3  OVERVIEW OF METHODS ................................................................................................. 3 

Benthic Sampling Procedure Overview ...................................................................................... 3 
Sediment Chemistry Analysis ...................................................................................................... 4 
Station Positioning ...................................................................................................................... 4 
4  RESULTS ........................................................................................................................... 5 

5  INVERTEBRATE INFAUNA ................................................................................................. 8 

6  MACROFAUNA ............................................................................................................... 10 

7  DISCUSSION ................................................................................................................... 12 

8  REFERENCES CITED ......................................................................................................... 13 

ii 
 
1 Introduction 
 
Benthic sampling at several locations near the existing Clam Bay, Washington net pens in 
Central Puget Sound (Kitsap County) was conducted on 3 November 2009.   Routine sediment 
sampling is conducted during the summer every two years around the existing Clam Bay net 
pen site and the other commercial net pen in Puget Sound that are operated by Icicle 
Acquisition Subsidiary. The routine sediment sampling and the reporting of results to the 
Department of Ecology (DOE) is a requirement of the National Pollution Discharge Elimination 
System (NPDES) permits issued by DOE to these facilities.  The subject site is designated as 
“Clam Bay ‐ Saltwater I: WA‐003152‐6” in the existing state NPDES permit system.    
 
This sampling was designed to investigate existing baseline conditions to the southeast of the 
existing Clam Bay net pens where the Fort Ward pens (currently located near the south end of 
Bainbridge Island) are proposed to be moved. This survey supplements prior studies of the 
Clam Bay net pen effects and provides baseline information on benthic and epibenthic 
condition at the location of the proposed pen relocation.  Grab sampling and a drop video 
camera were used along with specific analytical techniques that comply with Puget Sound 
protocols for data collection and sample analysis.   The contractor preparing this report has 
several decades experience in the field, see Appendix A for a synopsis of qualifications.  

2 Sampling Locations and Station Nomenclature 
 
The subject net pens are located in Clam Bay, Washington, a large bight adjacent to Rich 
Passage that separates Bainbridge Island from the Kitsap Peninsula near the small town of 
Manchester, Washington (Figure 1).  The net pens have been located in this bay for almost 40 
years but there have been one or more site relocations to deeper water over the years.   The 
pens are near the US Navy Manchester fuel depot and other federal agency operations 
including the USEPA laboratory and NOAA marine laboratories.    
 
Sampling was conducted at four locations adjacent to and along the longitudinal axis of the 
existing net pens near the existing Clam Bay net pens  as indicated by the star shapes in Figure 
1.  The proposed pen relocation would be to the southeast of the existing pens, where three of 
the four sample collections were made.  The sampling locations also included stations to the 
northwest and to the southeast of the existing pens a distance of 30 meters.  These locations lie 
at the edge of the sediment impact zone boundary as allow by NPDES permits issued by the 
Washington Department of Ecology.  In addition to these two locations, sampling was also 
conducted 100 meters and 182 meters southeast of the existing pens as the approximate 
intermediate and terminal locations of the extent of the proposed, relocated pens.    Table 1 
indicates details of the sampling locations.  
 
 


 
Figure 1.  Aerial photograph of Central Puget Sound net pen sites near Manchester Naval 
Station (top right) and South Bainbridge Island (left).  State ferry wake seen in lower center 
photograph.  The proposed site to be relocated is labeled “Fort Ward”, the Clam Bay site is to 
the right, Manchester State Park is to the lower right.   Photograph looking toward the east.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 2.  Map of existing Clam Bay net pens with corners indicated as green circles.  Sampling 
locations indicated as green stars (NW30m, SE30m, SE100m and SE 182m). Southeast center 
of net pens indicated with a X in a circle. Image is arrayed with true north up direction.  


 
 
Table 1.  Station location GPS coordinates and characteristics for November 2009 sampling. 
  
GPS Accuracy  Depth 
Location  Latitude  Longitude  DOP 
meters* meters (feet) 
SE 30 m  N47 34 15.7  W122 32 19.0  1.8  0.9  34.1 m (112’) 

SE 100 m  N47 34 14.9   W122 32 16.0    1.9  0.9  36.6 m (120’) 

SE 182 m  N47 34 13.9  W122 32 12.3    2.1  1.0  38.1 m (125’) 

NW 30 m  N47 34 20.4  W122 32 35.6    1.9  1.0  21.6 m (71’) 


GPS accuracy = 95% confidence interval in meters, DOP = dilution of precision (1.0 or less is very good) 
Depth at time of sampling, not adjusted to MLLW datum. 
 
 
Sampling locations are coded by site number or abbreviation, general compass direction of 
station from pens and distance in feet and, if necessary, the replicate number.   For example, 
“CBSE30m rep.2 designates CB = Clam Bay net pens, SE = station located in southeasterly 
direction from the pens; 30m distance from pen perimeter center and rep.2 = replicate number 
two.   

3 Overview of Methods  
 
Benthic Sampling Procedure Overview 
 
 A single 0.023 m2 all stainless steel Petite Ponar all stainless steel grab sampler with full 
opening top and extra weights was used to collect grain size and sediment chemistry samples.   
Extra weight was attached to the sampler to help in penetration of the seafloor.  A small 
sampling vessel with integrated GPS and depth sounder and a power davit was positioned by 
means of a calibrated length of line and a separate bow anchor to maintain a precise sampling 
location perpendicular to the frame of the net pen during sampling.  Cores were collected from 
within the grab sampler for the appropriate sediment tests or, in the case of invertebrate 
infauna, the entire grab content was collected, screened through at 1mm diameter stainless 
steel screen and preserved for later professional analysis in diluted formalin.  Some stations had 
shell, shell hash or gravel/cobble aggregate that prevented effective sampling with the grab 
sampler as noted elsewhere in this report.  A metric ruler was used to measure penetration 
depth of each sample before processing.  
 
Degree of sediment disturbance was estimated by inspection within the grab sampler and the 
sample was rejected if the grab sampler was inadequate as per USEPA Puget Sound protocols, 
depending on the sediment type (more for silt, less for sand).   For Total Organic Carbon (TOC) 
samples, the top 2 cm (referred to herein as the surficial sediment layer) of each core was 
separated from the main core and placed in sterile whirl‐pac containers, labeled inside (with 


 
tags) and on the outside of the container.  These samples were placed on ice immediately and 
frozen later the same day.  Approximately 150 grams of sediment was collected from the 
surface (2 cm depth maximum) of the same sample for sediment grain size, placed in zip lock 
bags, iced and refrigerated later the same day for later transport to the certified laboratory.  
Infauna analyses were performed by Susan Weeks of OIKOS Co., a leading Pacific Northwest 
taxonomist.   
 
Sediment Chemistry Analysis   
 
The TOC samples were homogenized before analysis (no sub‐sampling) and treated with acid to 
remove carbonates.  Analysis of total organic carbon was conducted using standard procedures 
required by Dept. of Ecology and USEPA.  Particle size sample were analyzed and frequency 
distribution were performed by Aquatic Research Inc. of Seattle using dried samples run 
through a set of standard screens.  The same facility performed TOC analyses.  
 
Station Positioning 
 
Distance from the pens was measured using a calibrated line or through the use of a DGPS 
system on the sampling vessel.  GPS observations were taken at all stations, using a Garmin 
GPSMAP 188C sounder with WAAS and differential correction ability and on screen map 
charting.  This GPS was further equipped with software charts providing the general outline of 
the shoreline, bathymetry isopleths, buoys, etc.  Station locations were recorded at least once 
using the waypoint record feature of the unit.  The above‐mentioned DGPS unit was checked 
periodically to be sure that the WAAS signal was being received and performance results were 
recorded.  The same unit was also used to record depths at the beginning and end of each 
station sampling and occasionally in the time period between.   
 
As this sampling was not for regulatory use, no statistical analysis was planned or conducted.  
One station (SE30m) was sampled for triplicate TOC samples, to provide some idea about 
variability in the area.  Single samples were collected at other stations.  
 
Additional sampling protocols and procedures practiced by Rensel Associates are included in a 
formal sampling and analysis play annually submitted to the Washington Department of 
Ecology as part of the routine NPDES permit requirements.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
4 Results 
 
The sea bottom was composed of coarse sand at all four stations but appeared to be slightly 
coarser with much more clam shell, broken shell and some rock in the easterly samples.  
Attempts to sample the furthest station from the existing pens (SE182m), did not yield 
significant volume of sediment due to shell/rock interfering with closure of the grab sampler or 
limiting the volume obtained (Fig. 3).  Increased content of shell in surface sediments and 
coarser sand is likely a result of strong currents that resuspend and relocate fine sediments out 
of the area.  Thus this area could be considered “erosional”, not depositional in nature.  

Figure 3.  Grab sample contents from the sampling station furthest from the existing pens at 
station SE182m in grab sampler (left) and placed on sampling board (right) showing clam 
shell, broken shell and gravel. Note dark colored sediment, which is naturally anaerobic, high 
silt/clay content fines, as discussed in this report. 
 
Slightly finer sediments with much less shell and shell hash was seen in samples and 
photographs from the other stations (e.g., Fig. 4) and none of these other stations exhibited any 
hydrogen sulfide smell or obvious RPD (redox potential discontinuity layer, i.e., the black layer 
found beneath the surface layer, where bacterial respiration is mostly anaerobic).  Penetration 
of the grab sampler was relatively poor in all locations (Table 2) but most of the abundance of 
benthic invertebrate infauna is located in the top two cm of sediment with the exception of the 
few, large and deep living species such as geoduck clams.    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 4.  Grab sample from station SE100m 
with sand, polychaete worm cases and bits of 
seaweed and broken shell.  
 
 
 
Table 2.  Station location GPS coordinates and characteristics for November 2009 sampling. Three true 
replicates were collected at SE30m station for sediment total organic carbon, one sediment grain size 
(sieve only) was collected for each station except SE182 m which was too coarse to obtain adequate 
grab sample volume.  
 
Grab Sampler  Sediment  Hydrogen
Station 
Penetration  Surface  Sulfide  Comments 
Name 
(cm)  Color  Smell 
Mean of  Poor penetration, several misfires due to 
SE 30 m  dark gray  none 
three = 3.7  polychaete worm cases 

green  Poor penetration, coarse sand, with red 
SE 100 m  3.0  none 
gray  seaweed on top of one sample 
Poor penetration, some shell and shell hash 
green  that interfered with grab sampler, no gravel 
SE 182 m  3.0  Very slight 
gray  or rock. No infauna or grain size sample, 
see photographs 
darker  Coarse sand, many small red worms 
NW 30 m  2.5  none 
gray  observed in screened samples 
 
Total organic carbon (TOC) is a primary constituent of marine sediments that is known to be 
positively correlated with the percentage of silt and clay in bottom sediments.  Low 
concentrations of TOC are often associated with coarse sandy bottoms that may be 
impoverished with marine infauna.   TOC is also the chosen performance evaluation screening 
parameter to assess net pen benthic effects.   Pens are not allowed to exceed background levels 
of TOC at a distance of 100’ (30m) from the pens, typically sampled around the four sides of 
Puget Sound net pens.  This distance represents the furthest extent of the allowable sediment 
impact zone (SIZ) that has been used in Washington State since 1995.  
 


 
Table 3 indicates that measurement of TOC at the two SIZ stations was less than the allowable 
amount of 0.5% for coarse sand bottom (i.e., locations with less than 20% silt and clay) under 
Washington Administrative Codes (WAC 173‐204).   Further east the TOC content dropped 
slightly to 0.22% while the silt and clay content was similar but slightly lower (Table 3, Fig. 5). 
 
Table 3.  Percent total organic carbon and silt+clay in sediment grab samples. 
 
Station‐ Silt and Clay 
Total Organic Carbon (%) 
Replicate  Fraction (%) 
Standard 
  By Replicate  Mean   
Deviation 
0.27 
SE 30m  0.20  0.30  0.12  1.3 
0.43 
0.21 
SE 100m  0.20  0.22  0.02  3.8 
0.24 
1.23 
SE 182m  1.10  1.09  0.15  NA* 
0.94 
0.24 
NW 30m  0.69  0.39  0.26  1.01 
0.23 
        *Inadequate volume for laboratory analysis 
 
The most easterly station (SE182m) had by far the highest TOC content (1.09%) despite being far from 
the net pens and having such coarse bottom conditions (Figure 2).   This is due to the heavy shell matter 
acting as a trap for fine sediments, which have higher amounts of silt and clay and TOC as also evidenced 
by the black‐colored sediments found at this station (Fig. 3).  This occurs in other locations in Puget 
Sound and is not an artifact of being in the vicinity of net pens but rather a natural phenomenon.   Tidal 
currents are not able to scour out the fine sediments that eventually become trapped in pockets created 
by the clam shell and other structural debris.   The shells are too heavy to move, and the only tidal 
scouring that occurs is between shells and major shell fragments.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 5.   Percent total 
organic carbon in upper two 
cm of grab samples from this 
study.  


 
5 Invertebrate Infauna 
 
Table 5 contains detailed results of the invertebrate infauna analysis that are further 
summarized by major taxa in Table 6.    
 
Adequate sample volumes were only obtained at SE30m station where three replicate samples 
were collected.  A single marginally‐acceptable‐volume sample from the NW30m station was 
also collected.  One of the SE30m samples was highly diverse with large abundance values but 
the other two were not (Table 6).  The latter two were similar to the single sample obtained 
from NW30m station.   The replete SE30m station had amphipods, polychaete worms, 
ostracods (seed shrimp), bivalves (clams), gastropods (snails), tanaids (small benthic‐only 
shrimp), and a juvenile starfish.   
 
.   
 
 
Table 5.  
Summary of 
species and 
taxa from 
infauna 
samples in 
November 
2009 near 
Clam Bay net 
pens. (Rep. = 
replicate 
number) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
Although TOC concentration was only 0.09% higher at the NW30m station, lower abundance 
and diversity of species suggests that this shallow end of the site is dominated by a stress 
tolerant benthic community.   However, both SE30m and NW30m Rep.1 samples included 
numerous polychaete worm indicator species, Capitella capitata, as discussed below 
 
 
Table 6.  Summary of infauna abundance by major taxa division for sediment samples.  
 

 
 
Replicate samples collected at SE30m station were highly variable in terms of total diversity and 
abundance, as mentioned above and shown in Table 6.  Given the relatively great depth and 
the moderate currents during sampling, it is likely the grab sampler replicates were spread over 
a relatively large area, which could account for the variance.  It is also possible that the bottom 
is somewhat heterogeneous (patchy) over a short distance, that is not uncommon in Puget 
Sound bays and passages where the substrate changes from sand to muddy sand (numerous 
references available on this account).  However, this patchiness was not seen in prior sampling 
(Rensel 2008).  
 
Some of the species are of interest in Table 5 as follows: 
 
Euphilomedes carcharodonta is a small ostracod that appeared in all samples and was unusually 
abundant in all three of the SE30m replicate samples.  This species was found in Hood Canal 
research only when the overlying water was well oxygenated, between 6 and 10 mg/L  (Dutch 
et al. 2004).   It was found in Hood Canal in a stress‐sensitive benthic community (in other 
words, not adversely affected by water or sediment quality).   It was highly abundant in all 
SE30m station samples, but not the NW30m stations.   
 
Capitella capitata is a worldwide indicator of organic carbon enrichment that exceed 
background levels and in some cases, assimilation ability that occurs at some level > 1 gram 
organic carbon per m2 per day.   However, the individuals observed in these samples were tiny, 
compared to highly enriched sites that were investigated by this researcher and others in the 
past (several decades ago, when net pen siting was less appropriate, see Pease 1977, the first 
highly scientific investigation of net pen effects published for Puget Sound).   Typically benthic 
monitoring does not include biomass (weight or volume) estimates, but we have noted the 


 
small size (around 1‐2 mm) in these 2009 Clam Bay baseline samples.  At a highly enriched site 
in Southern Puget Sound (Henderson Inlet, Pease 1977)  Capitella capitata worms reached 
many centimeters in length, up to 10 cm in some cases and proportionately more robust.   
 
While known to be an indicator of seabottom enrichment (or organic pollution, depending on 
the terms used) Capitella capitata worms are actually planted early in the spring in some 
countries like Japan to help aerate the seabottom and introduce oxygen to prevent anaerobic 
conditions from occurring, see Tsutsumi et al. 1991 and subsequent papers).  Anaerobic 
conditions can lead to extirpation of all invertebrate species until the organic carbon flux to the 
seabottom is reduced.   
 
Micropodarke dubia is a semi‐common polychaete worm in Puget Sound (B. A. Vittor & 
Associates, Inc. 2001) and occurred in that prior study in only 0.11% of the samples but was 
relatively abundant in replicate one of SE30m station. 
 
Alvania compacta is a common gastropod (snail) that was the 7th most common infauna species 
in Puget Sound in a federally sponsored prior survey, occurring in 37% of the samples (B. A. 
Vittor & Associates, Inc. 2001).  In this survey, it was modestly abundant in the SE30m replicate 
one sample only.  Accordingly, it may be a pollution intolerant species and useful as such as an 
indicator.     

6 Macrofauna 
 
Drop camera video monitoring was conducted at each station during this sampling cruise.  The 
conditions were not ideal for photography with strong currents and high concentrations of 
suspended matter in the water that causes a snowstorm‐like effect in the video.  But some 
observations were possible and snapshots were taken out of the video as shown below.  It was 
extremely dark at most of the depths sampled, and the camera lights provided not enough 
visibility for colors to show.  
 
In general, there were numerous Dungeness crab observed both near and remote from the 
pens (Fig. 6).  Dungeness crab are abundant at other Puget Sound net pen locations, and may 
be feeding on live organisms that benefit from the waste matter produced by the pens (see 
Rensel and Forster 2007).  The video camera and lights tend to attract the crabs, but even when 
moving the camera over the bottom rapidly to new portions of the viewed areas they were 
seen to be abundant.  
 
Throughout the area and particularly near SE100m there were numerous flatfish seen laying on 
the bottom (Fig. 7) and jetted off when disturbed by the proximity of the camera.  A large 
sunflower star (Pycnopodia helianthoides, multi‐armed starfish) was seen at the NW30m 
station (Fig 8).  These fast moving, extremely large starfish have up to 24 arms.  Arms are added 
as they grow and are voracious predators of a variety of marine life.  This specimen had 18 
arms.  Figures 9 and 10 are photos near Station SE182m showing the coarse bottom nature. 

10 
 
Figure 6.  Dungeness crab at SE100m station.             Figure 7. Outline of flatfish partially buried 
                                                                                                               in sand at the NW30m station. 
 

 
Figure 8. Large sunflower star at NW30m station.   Figure 9.  Coarse bottom at SE182m                                            
                                                                                            and an unidentified anemone in the center.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 10.  Shell, broken shell and small 
rocks at SE182m station.  Note small 
anemone just below center. Backscatter 
caused by camera lights on suspended 
matter flowing by in the strong current.  

11 
 
7 Discussion 
 
All fish farms in marine waters of western Washington are sampled every two years for a 
complete set of total organic carbon, sediment grain size, zinc and copper content of the 
seabottom.  Seabottom video observations are also collected at each station.  The protocols are 
exacting and numerous replicates are collected at each station.  If the net pen site at Bainbridge 
Island is permitted by the county to move to Clam Bay, the Washington Department of Ecology 
would require additional baseline sampling beyond what is reported here and additional data 
would be collected and interpreted.  
 
The TOC results reported here indicate similar, but slightly higher concentrations for the two 30 
meter distant stations compared to 2007 samples reported to the Department of Ecology  
(Rensel 2008, SE100m 0.23% then, 0.30% now; NW100m 0.36% then, 0.39% now) but there 
were no replicate samples possible in the November 2009 sampling so this may be an 
oversimplification. It is also possible that TOC levels fluctuate somewhat intra‐annually, prior 
data is usually from July and August, the present report was prepared with November data.     
 
From observations of bottom sediments with a video drop camera, it appears that tidal currents 
are stronger to the east of the existing Clam Bay net pens than at the existing net pens.  This is a 
reasonable assumption given the increasing distance from the innermost region of Clam Bay.  
This assumption is verified by inspection of results from the Puget Sound physical model that 
shows stronger flows and more bidirectional flow in the main channel of Rich Passage and 
nearer Orchard Point (the most easterly terminus of the Marine Naval Storage Depot).   
 
The existing net pens have an effect on the seabottom beneath the cages but meet the 
requirements of their permits in approximating background conditions near the edge of the 
allowed sediment impact zone, 30 meters from the cages.   Biological measures such as 
invertebrate infauna show a patchy distribution from low to high diversity and abundance and 
no signs of azoic (without invertebrate species) conditions.   
 
Two decades ago, the Clam Bay net pen site was previously located in shallower water with 
more pens arrayed much wider than the existing facility.  Weston (1990) found significant 
impacts including azoic conditions beneath the cages and significant effects up to 150 m distant 
of the west end.  Subsequently, the site was reconfigured to be narrower, with fewer cages and 
moved to a deeper, higher tidal current location.  The increased current velocity allows the 
organic wastes to be diluted but more importantly assimilated more efficiently and prevents 
the bottom from becoming anaerobic and azoic.  It is difficult in this report to predict the exact 
effects of moving the Bainbridge Island net pens to the east end of the existing Clam Bay Pens.  
However, it is possible to say that the east end of the existing site appears suitable for 
additional pens due to the great depths, strong currents, flat bottom and the erosional nature 
of the location.  All of these features would allow for daily aeration and assimilation by the 
benthic community of particulate organic waste matter that would be generated by this facility.   
 

12 
 
Additionally, advances in technology and operating practices have been rapid and dramatic, 
including reduction in food conversion ratio (less food wasted, better assimilation by the fish), 
requirement and use of feedback systems such as underwater cameras for feed loss 
prevention, feeding and fish handling equipment improvements, etc.   It is highly probable that 
the rapid pace of improvement will continue into the future as fish farming now accounts for 
about 50% of the world’s fish supply and demand continues to outstrip supply.   
 

8 References Cited 
 
B. A. Vittor & Associates, Inc. 2001.  Puget Sound benthic community assessment – June 1998 
Contract report to NOAA, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment.  Silver Springs 
Maryland.  
 
Dutch, M.E., E.R. Long, S. Aasen and K.I. Welch.  2004(?)  Benthic infauna community structure 
in Hood Canal in relation to sediment and water quality variables.   Washington Dept. of 
Ecology. Marine Sediment Sampling Website.  
http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/eap/psamp/PSAMPMSedMon/Ecology‐
PSAMP%20Publications_files/HoodCanalDOandbenthos.pdf 
 
Pease, B.G. 1977. The effect of organic enrichment from a salmon mariculture facility on the 
waterquality and benthic community of Henderson Inlet, Washington. Ph.D. Thesis, Univ. 
Washington,Seattle, 145 p. 
 
Rensel, J.E. 2008.  NPDES sampling during 2007: American Gold Seafoods net pen sites in Puget 
Sound.    Prepared for Washington Dept. of Ecology by Rensel Associates Aquatic Sciences, 
Arlington WA.  37 pp. and appendices.  
 
Rensel, J.E. and J.R.M. Forster.  2007.  Beneficial environmental effects of marine net pen 
aquaculture.  Rensel Associates Aquatic Sciences Technical Report prepared for NOAA Office of 
Atmospheric and Oceanic Research. 57 pp.  
http://www.wfga.net/documents/marine_finfish_finalreport.pdf 
 
Tsutsumi, H., S. Fukunaga, N. Fujita and M. Sumida.  1990.  Relationship between growth of 
Capitella sp. and organic enrichment of the sediment.  Marine Ecology Progress Series.  63:157‐
162.  
 
Weston, D.P. 1990. Quantitative examination of macrobenthic community changes along an 
organic enrichment gradient. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 61:233–244. 

13 
 
Appendix A.   Qualifications of Contractor 
 
Dr. Jack Rensel, Rensel Associates Aquatic Sciences 
4209 234th St. N.E. 
Arlington, WA 98223   
jackrensel@att.net                                                  
Education: 
Ph.D. University of Washington, Ocean and Fishery Sciences, Seattle WA 
Attended Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA 
M.Sc. University of Washington, Ocean and Fisheries Sciences, Seattle WA 
B.Sc. Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 
Positions Held: 
Owner – Principal: Rensel Associates Aquatic Science Consultants, 1983‐present 
Natural Resource Manager, Squaxin Island Indian Tribe, Southern Puget Sound, 1980‐83 
Fisheries Biologist, Squaxin Island Indian Tribe 1977‐80 
Fisheries Biologist, NOAA‐NMFS, Manchester Aquaculture Laboratory 1975‐77 
Research Technician, Fisheries Research Institute, University of Washington, 1973‐74 
Marine Taxonomist: Western Washington University, 1972‐73 
 
Special Skills, Training and Experience: 
 
Dr. Rensel works in both business and academic realms, in the U.S. and overseas.  His regular clients 
include fish farms, Seafood company and private non profits environmental organizations such as 
SeaWorld Research Institution and Earthjustice Hawai’i.  He conducts aquatic research project contracts 
for NOAA, USDA and other agencies.  This includes development and use of AquaModel 4D aquaculture 
effects simulation modeling with his partners at University of Southern California.  See 
www.AquaModel.org  Expertise includes: 
 
¾ Aquaculture effects modeling, planning and consulting  
¾ Harmful algal bloom to fish dynamics, HAB monitoring and mitigation studies   
¾ Nutrient‐eutrophication and algal‐zooplankton studies in marine and freshwater habitats 
¾ Food web contamination and pollution studies 
¾ Invertebrate, benthic & food web studies in lakes, rivers and marine waters 
¾ Aquaculture impact assessment including sediment and water column performance studies 
¾ Invertebrate culture expertise including shellfish, crustacean and IMTA (fish‐shellfish) culture 
¾ Nutrient, sediment & pollutant studies re: industrial discharges, golf courses, urbanization 
¾ Fish habitat, capture & population assessment skills; fish bioassay experience  
¾ Fish physiology & bioenergetic studies, bioassays and fish kill assessments 
¾ Physical hydrographic studies of lakes, streams and marine waters, IFIM certified 
¾ Full complement of field equipment, e.g., CTDs, current meters, ADCP, drogues. 

14 
 
Selected Book Chapters, Journal Publications and Technical Reports: 
Anderson, D.M., J.M. Burkholder, W.P. Cochlan, P.M. Glibert, C.J. Gobler, C.A. Heil, R. Kudela, M.L. Parsons, J.E. 
Jack Rensel, D. W. Townsend, V.L. Trainer and G. A. Vargo.  2008.  Harmful algal blooms and eutrophication: 
Examples of linkages from selected coastal regions of the United States.  Harmful Algae, 8: 39–53. 
Rensel, J.E. 2007.  Fish kills from the harmful alga Heterosigma akashiwo in Puget Sound: Recent blooms and 
review.  Prepared by Rensel Associates Aquatic Sciences for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research (CSCOR).  Washington, D.C. 59 pp. 
http://www.whoi.edu/fileserver.do?id=39383&pt=2&p=29109 
Rensel, J.E. and J.R.M. Forster.  2007.  Beneficial environmental effects of marine net‐pen aquaculture.  Rensel 
Associates Aquatic Sciences Technical Report prepared for NOAA Office of Atmospheric and Oceanic Research. 57 
pp.  http://www.wfga.net/documents/marine_finfish_finalreport.pdf 
Rensel, J.E., D.A. Kiefer, J.R.M. Forster, D.L. Woodruff and  N.R. Evans.  2007.  Offshore finfish mariculture in the 
Strait of Juan de Fuca.  Bull. Fish. Res. Agen. No. 19, 113‐129,  
http://www.fra.affrc.go.jp/bulletin/bull/bull19/13.pdf 
Rensel, J.E., D.A. Kiefer and F.J. O’Brien. 2006. Modeling Water Column and Benthic Effects of Fish Mariculture of 
Cobia (Rachycentron canadum) in Puerto Rico: Cobia AquaModel.  Prepared for Ocean Harvest Aquaculture Inc., 
Puerto Rico and The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington D.C. by Systems Science 
Applications, Inc.  Los Angeles, CA. 60 pp. 
http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docaqua/reports_noaaresearch/cobia_aquamodel_final_report.pdf 
Rensel, J.E., A.H. Buschmann, T. Chopin, I.K. Chung, J. Grant, C.E. Helsley, D.A. Kiefer, R. Langan, R.I.E. Newell, M. 
Rawson, J.W. Sowles, J.P. McVey, and C. Yarish. 2006.  Ecosystem based management: Models and mariculture. 
Pages 207‐210 in J.P. McVey, C‐S. Lee, and P.J. O'Bryen, editors.  The Role of Aquaculture in Integrated Coastal and 
Ocean Management: An Ecosystem Approach.  World Aquaculture Society, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70803. United 
States 
Elston, R., E.W. Cake Jr., K. Humphrey, W.C. Isphordring and J.E. Rensel.  2005.  Dioxin and heavy metal 
contamination of shellfish and sediment in St. Louis Bay, Mississippi and adjacent marine waters.  Journal of 
Shellfish Research.  24: 227‐241.  
Rensel, J.E. and D.M. Anderson. 2004. Effects of phosphatic clay dispersal to control harmful algal blooms in 
Puget Sound, Washington.  Proceedings of the Xth International Conference on Harmful Algae, St. Pete’s Beach, 
Florida. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution contribution #10849. K.A. Steidinger, et al. (Eds.) in Harmful Algae 
2002. Rensel, J.E. 2004.   
Rensel, J. E. and J.N.C. Whyte.  2003.  Finfish mariculture and Harmful Algal Blooms. Second Edition.  pp. 693‐722 
In: UNESCO Manual on Harmful Marine Microalgae.  D. Anderson, G. Hallegaeff and A. Cembella (eds). IOC 
monograph on Oceanographic Methodology. http://upo.unesco.org/bookdetails.asp?id=4040 
Anderson, D.M., P. Andersen, V.M. Bricelj, J.J. Cullen, and J.E. Rensel. 2001. Monitoring and Management 
Strategies for Harmful Algal Blooms in Coastal Waters, APEC #201‐MR‐01.1, Asia Pacific Economic Program, 
Singapore, and Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Technical Series No. 59, Paris. 264 
p.http://www.whoi.edu/redtide/Monitoring_Mgt_Report.html 
Rensel, J.E. 1993.  Factors controlling Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning in Puget Sound.  Journal of Shellfish Research 
12:2:371‐376. 
Rensel Associates and PTI Environmental Services.  1991.  Nutrients and Phytoplankton in Puget Sound.  Peer 
reviewed monograph prepared for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, region 10, Seattle.  Report 910/9‐91‐
002. 130 pp.  

15