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Private School

Inspection Report

Sunrise English Private School

Academic Year 2015 2016

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Sunrise Private English School


Inspection Date
Date of previous inspection

January 25, 2016

to

January 28, 2016

May 11, 2014

to

May 14, 2014

General Information

Students

School ID

120

Total number of
students

2810

Opening year of
school

1988

Number of children
in KG

199

Principal

Thakur Mulchandani

Number of students
in other phases

Primary:
Middle:
High:

School telephone

+971 (02) 552 9989

Age range

4 18 years

School Address

P O Box 71356, Shabiya,


Mussafah, Abu Dhabi

Grades or Year
Groups

KG1 Grade 12

Official email (ADEC)

Sunriseenglish.pvt@adec.ac
.ae

Gender

Mixed

School website

www.seps.auh.com

% of Emirati
Students

0.0%

Fee ranges (per


annum)

Very Low:
AED 5,500 AED 9,300

Largest nationality
groups (%)

1. Indian
2. Pakistani
3. Sri Lankan

Licensed Curriculum

1244
862
505

98%
1%
1%

Staff

Main Curriculum

Indian (Central Board of


Secondary Education)

Number of teachers

175

Other Curriculum

---------

Number of teaching
assistants (TAs)

80

External Exams/
Standardised tests

CBSE / ACER

Teacher-student
ratio

KG/ FS

1:16

Other phases

1:16

----------

Teacher turnover

25%

Accreditation

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Introduction
Inspection activities
Number of
inspectors deployed

Number of
inspection days

Number of lessons
observed

130

Number of joint
lesson observations

13

Number of parents
questionnaires

1093; (response rate: 38%)

Details of other
inspection activities

Observations of students arrival and departure from the


school. Meetings with school leaders, governors, parents and
students. Meetings with teachers and other school staff such
as the nurse, counsellor and social worker. Review of
documentation and policies such as the Child Protection
Policy. Lesson observations, learning walks and scrutiny of
students work in books and on display in corridors and at the
schools art exhibition.
School

School Aims

School vision and


mission

To keep alive the spirit of learning through moulding the total


personality of the students in perfect discipline.
Vision
To foster excellence in educating young people through
collaboration, informed decision-making and continuous
improvement. Learners will be well-prepared and responsible
citizens to meet the further global challenges.
Mission
SEPS vision and values will guide our continuous commitment
and hard work in fulfilling our vision of becoming a high
performing Indian school.

Admission Policy

Admission to Phase 2 and Phase 3 is by application and


interview. Admission to KG and the primary phase is open
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with preference being given to siblings and family members


of existing students.
Leadership structure
(ownership,
governance and
management)

Proprietor, Governing body, Principal, Vice Principal, and


Section Heads

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SEN Details (Refer to ADEC SEN Policy and Procedures)


Number of students
identified through external
assessments

Number of other students


identified by the school with

Visually impaired

Hearing impaired

Multiple disabilities

SEN Category
Intellectual disability
Specific Learning
Disability
Emotional and Behaviour
Disorders (ED/ BD)
Autism Spectrum
Disorder (ASD)
Speech and Language
Disorders
Physical and health
related disabilities

G&T Details (Refer to ADEC SEN Policy and Procedures)


G&T Category

Number of students
identified

Intellectual ability

Subject-specific aptitude (e.g. in science, mathematics,


languages)

Social maturity and leadership

Mechanical/ technical/ technological ingenuity

Visual and performing arts (e.g. art, theatre, recitation)

Psychomotor ability (e.g. dance or sport)

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The overall performance of the school


Inspectors considered the school in relation to 3 performance categories
High performing (Outstanding, Very Good or Good)

Band B

Satisfactory (Acceptable)

Band C

In need of significant improvement (Weak or Very Weak)

(A)

Satisfactory

Good
Band C
In need of significant
improvement

Weak

High Performing

Acceptable

Band B

Good

Band A

Very Good

Performance Standards

BAND

Outstanding

School was judged to be:

Performance Standard 1:
Students achievement
Performance Standard 2:
Students personal and
social development, and
their innovation skills
Performance Standard 3:
Teaching and assessment
Performance Standard 4:
Curriculum
Performance Standard 5:
The protection, care,
guidance and support of
students
Performance Standard 6:
Leadership and
management

Summary Evaluation:
The schools overall
performance

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Very Weak

Band A

The Performance of the School


Evaluation of the schools overall performance
Sunrise English Private School provides a good quality of education. School
leaders have acted decisively to raise standards in all areas of work. Rigorous
interrogation of the data received from examination and test results helps them
to plan new approaches to learning and necessary interventions. As a result of
effective teaching, students overall achievements are good in comparison with
national and international standards. There is a strong, shared vision amongst all
stakeholders for making the school even better.
Students attain well and make good progress in all subjects. Teachers regularly
assess how much students understand in almost all lessons and they carefully
build on students achievements to structure the next step in their learning.
Particularly good support is provided for students who have special educational
needs (SEN). The needs of those who are gifted and talented are not yet fully met.
Protection of and care for students are strong, leading to good personal and
social development.
Progress made since last inspection and capacity to improve
There have been significant improvements since the last inspection in all
performance standards and subject areas. Students attain well and make better
progress in mathematics and science. Their attainment and progress in Arabic has
not yet caught up with other subjects, though they at least match national
standards in this subject taught as a second language. Teachers use of
questioning has improved.
School leaders ensure that students attainment, progress and the quality of
teaching are rigorously analysed. This gives school leaders very useful information
which they use to improve the school.
Most resources have been improved since the previous inspection. The
kindergarten remains cramped. Facilities have been expanded so that all students
now have regular access to the library. Better science resources are in place,
including improvements to laboratories.
As a result of their careful monitoring, their record of intervention and their sound
planning for the future, school leaders show that they have good capacity to
improve the school further.
Development and promotion of innovation skills
There have been some recent developments in promoting the development of
innovation skills. More laptops are available for students to use in classrooms, and
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subjects such as enterprise and marketing have very recently been introduced
into the curriculum. The use of new technologies to support learning in almost all
subjects remains under-developed. Students have some opportunities for
personal research and collaborative working arrangements are good.
Curriculum plans reflect school leaders commitment to promoting innovation
skills. Posters on display around the school offer good role models, highlighting
the work and successes of Indian and Emirati inventors and technicians. They
illustrate the work of students in other parts of the country who are undertaking
projects with a focus on innovation.

The inspection identified the following as key areas of strength:

students educational achievements


students personal and social development
arrangements for protecting and caring for students in a safe and healthy
environment
the clarity of vision and direction for the school set by the principal and
leadership team.

The inspection identified the following as key areas for


improvement:

modification of the curriculum to provide even more opportunities for


students to innovate and work independently
more opportunities for extended writing in all areas of the curriculum.

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Performance Standard 1: Students Achievement


Students achievement Indicators

Islamic
Education

Arabic
(as a First Language)

Arabic
(as a Second
Language)

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Attainment

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Acceptable

Progress

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Acceptable

Attainment

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Progress

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Attainment

N/A

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Progress

N/A

Attainment

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Good

Progress

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Good

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Social Studies

Attainment

Acceptable

Good

Acceptable

Good

Progress

Acceptable

Good

Acceptable

Good

Attainment

Acceptable

Good

Good

Good

Progress

Acceptable

Good

Good

Good

Attainment

Acceptable

Good

Acceptable

Good

Progress

Acceptable

Good

Acceptable

Good

Attainment

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Progress

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Attainment

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Progress

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

English

Mathematics

Science
Language of
instruction (if other
than English and
Arabic as First
Language)
Other subjects
(Art, Music, PE)
Learning Skills
(including innovation, creativity, critical
thinking, communication, problemsolving and collaboration)

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Students overall attainment is good when compared with curriculum standards.


Their good attainment in English, mathematics, science and social studies can be
seen from the results obtained when they sit for Central Board for Secondary
Education (CBSE) examinations. Their attainment is acceptable in Arabic and Islamic
education. Almost all students learn Arabic as a third language. In the primary phase,
achievement in Islamic education is good because students have more chances to
discuss their learning and work together in groups. Attainment in English is good
because students have developed a range of reading and writing skills and a good
ability to use these to make presentations to the rest of the class. By the time they
sit examinations in Grade 12, students are achieving average scores around 16%
above the other CBSE schools in UAE and international average in English. Students
achievements in extended and creative writing are more limited, because they have
insufficient opportunities to practise this skill. Attainment in mathematics is similar,
where scores have been above average for three years. The overall attainment and
achievement of children in the kindergarten is acceptable. Their opportunities for
finding things out for themselves are limited. Similarly, in the middle school, overall
attainment is acceptable Students are not given enough opportunities in lessons to
become innovative, independent and creative thinkers through open-ended
discussions and activities. There is an upward trend for improvement in all subjects
over time, apart from Islamic education where attainment has declined slightly
except in the primary phase.
Good progress is made by different groups of students. Those who have special
educational needs (SEN) are well supported in class and when they attend
withdrawal classes for more intensive work. They make good gains as they follow
the objectives laid out in their individual education plans, such as improving letter
formation to build up words.
Progress in information and communication technology (ICT) is good. Grade 5
students showed how well they have learned to write programmes and command
sequences when they used their laptops to draw simple shapes and recognisable
human forms. Progress is acceptable in art, music and physical education. Students
proudly display their work in the school art exhibition. They confidently play musical
instruments and perform traditional dance routines during assemblies, especially on
occasions such as Republic of India Day.
In every class and subject, students show positive attitudes towards their work. A
large majority demonstrate that they know what they have to do to improve.
Students are beginning to take more responsibility for their own learning, though
this is not entirely consistent across all lessons and grades. Upper school students
regularly find things out for themselves in lessons, especially in science and
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mathematics. Students in other areas of the school are developing problem-solving


skills in limited ways. For example, applying mathematical skills in Grade 3 to
organise a personal, daily diary into time-limited activities.

Performance Standard 2: Students personal and social development,


and their innovation skills
Students personal and social
development, and their innovation skills
Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Very good

Very good

Very good

Very good

Understanding of Islamic values and


awareness of Emirati and world cultures

Good

Good

Good

Good

Social responsibility and innovation skills

Good

Good

Good

Good

Personal development

Students positive attitudes help them to learn well in class. Almost all are eager
participants in lessons. They willingly share their ideas with others, either in small
groups or when staging presentations of their work at the front of the class.
Students behaviour is a real strength of the school: the large majority behave very
well, showing respect for each other and for their school environment. Bullying is
very rarely heard of at this school. Older students organize their own games in the
playground with just very light touch adult support and supervision.
Students show a sound understanding of the benefits of healthy eating and the
large majority bring nutritious snacks into school. They regularly participate in sport
and physical exercise when they attend school at the weekends for games and
recreational activities. Attractive displays around the school corridors provide
evidence of good learning about the hazards of unhealthy lifestyles. At 94%, their
attendance at school is good. Almost all students arrive punctually in the morning
and for lessons following breaks.
Students appreciate their culture and heritage. To illustrate the themes of the daily
assembly, students (including children in the kindergarten) dress in the national
costumes of the UAE and of India, perform dances, play music and sing songs from
both cultures. The Holy Quran is recited daily and students stand to attention and
join in the singing of the national anthems of both countries. Much evidence is on
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display around the school of students learning about other world cultures. Recently,
each grade has learned about a different country, including history, culture,
traditions and language. For example, Grade 9 students showed their understanding
of different features of life in France, including food, geography and language.
Students care for their school and wider environment. The eco-club helps them to
learn about re-cycling, conserving water and energy, as well as providing them with
the opportunity to learn about broader conservation projects, such as marine life
and responsible management of the sea. Many students demonstrated their good
work ethic when they played a leading role in the clean-up of a nearby beach. Their
developing understanding of the use of modern technology to communicate ideas
can be seen in their contributions to the e-letters which are sent home and appear
on the school website.

Performance Standard 3: Teaching and Assessment


Teaching and Assessment Indicators

Teaching for effective learning


Assessment

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Acceptable

Good

Acceptable

Good

Good

Good

Good

Good

Teaching is good at this school because teachers have secure knowledge of their
subjects in all phases, particularly in the primary and upper schools. They use a good
range of appropriate teaching strategies in order to achieve high level results in a
number of core subjects, including English and mathematics. Teachers use of new
technology to enrich learning was seen to good effect in a Grade 10 English lesson.
Images were shown on the whiteboard which helped students to consider what
their reactions might be if stopped by the Ancient Mariner.
In a minority of lessons in the middle school, and in a few lessons in other phases,
teachers do not plan sufficient activities to stretch the most able students, or to
provide additional support for those who struggle. In these lessons the quality of
teaching dips, because students are not always fully engaged in the learning. Those
students identified as having SEN are taught well, because teachers plan lessons
which address their individual needs and break down activities into small steps. This
helps students to understand exactly what they have to do to complete the task.
Teachers in the kindergarten sometimes do too much for their children, and
consequently opportunities for helping them to make their own choices in the
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classroom and play area are not always fully exploited.


Teachers use of challenge and problem solving is a growing and effective element
in a majority of lessons. In a mathematics lesson in Grade 7, students showed good
understanding of how to calculate the area of regular and irregular shapes, because
the teacher provided them with a range of objects and challenged them to work
together to estimate, measure and arrive at the right answer.
In all phases of the school, teachers use a range of assessment techniques
effectively, to gain an understanding of how much progress students are making.
They regularly check and assess students workbooks and files, carefully correcting
errors. In the large majority of lessons, teachers communicate well with their
students. Teachers provide plenty of opportunities for students to practise
examination techniques, by staging mock exams and tests at regular intervals,
especially in the upper school. They give students good advice on how to prioritise
their work. The good opportunities teachers provide for students to work
collaboratively in groups help them to develop as confident learners and
communicators. In almost all lessons, teachers visit each of these groups, to
challenge students ideas and to prompt them to think even harder. Suitable
emphasis on the presentation of results of group work to others provides teachers
with good understanding of how much each one has achieved. Teachers do not give
students sufficient opportunities to practise extended or creative writing. As a
result, students abilities in this skill lag behind their abilities in other English and
Arabic work.

Performance Standard 4: Curriculum


Curriculum Indicators

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Curriculum design and implementation

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Curriculum adaptation

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

Acceptable

The curriculum has been organised in such a way as to ensure acceptable breadth
and balance. It meets the requirements of the CBSE curriculum and addresses UAE
national priorities. The curriculum prepares students adequately for the next stage
in their education, especially in the upper school where students are more likely to
have chances to learn in innovative ways by using new technologies and personal
research. Opportunities for progression within subjects and between phases are
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adequate. For example, students in the kindergarten and primary phase learn about
which plants grow in their local area while those in the upper school consider the
biological and chemical conditions that plants need to flourish.
In each phase, the curriculum is planned in such a way as to promote some use of
skills developed in one subject to support learning in others. For example, students
in the middle school learned about Indian geography as they created tables using
laptops in an ICT lesson. Planning encourages students to use their knowledge of
Emirati culture and of the UAE and India, to think about festivals and celebrations in
different countries, as was noted in a Grade 4 English lesson, for example.
Curriculum content is periodically reviewed to ensure that it meets the needs of the
majority of students. The curriculum has been adapted and broadened to include
subjects such as psychology, marketing and commerce. This enables older students
to make choices which help them learn more about an area which particularly
interests them or helps prepare them for a future career.
The curriculum does not yet fully match the schools stated aims because chances
for students to develop 21st century skills such as enterprise, technology, and
personal research are inconsistent. Planning within the curriculum does not fully
address the needs of all higher or lower attaining students. This is because activities
which will stretch them further or provide necessary support are not always built
into subject plans, especially in the middle school.
A range of extra-curricular activities is offered, particularly in sport and physical
education, much of which happens during the schools weekend opening hours.
Students have the chance to take part in challenging physical activities and games as
well as recreational activities such as chess and music.

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Performance Standard 5: The protection, care, guidance and support


of students
The protection, care, guidance and
support of students Indicators

Health
and
safety,
including
arrangements for child protection/
safeguarding
Care and support

KG

Primary

Middle

High

Very good

Very good

Very good

Very good

Good

Good

Good

Good

The school has introduced rigorous procedures for keeping students safe and
protecting them from harm. These include its child protection policies and practice.
All staff have signed to say that they have read the relevant policies and students
and parents show a clear understanding of them. Very good practices are in place
for teaching students about common dangers, including those posed by the internet
and social media. These include direct teaching during a whole school anti-bullying
topic and effective management of Wi-Fi and websites. Careful, but unobtrusive
monitoring of students well-being during the day is in place, such as the promotion
of healthy eating at lunch and break times. The role of the school nurse in
contributing to health promotion is limited as she tends to focus on clinical work.
The counsellor contributes to topics such as anti-bullying, but opportunities for
further work are limited because she is currently covering for the absent social
worker. Staff regularly check equipment to ensure that it is safe and they maintain
comprehensive records. All entrances and exits to the school are carefully
monitored throughout the day. Parents and students comment favourably on
recent improvements to the cleanliness of all areas, including washrooms and
toilets. Older students ensure the safety of younger ones by helping to monitor their
arrival at and departure from school. Record keeping is thorough, including the
records kept of the very few incidents of bullying or challenging behaviour that
occur. These include follow-up actions and the support offered to perpetrators and
victims. Concerns about behaviour expressed by those who completed the parent
questionnaire were not supported by those who attended the parents meeting
with inspectors, nor during the meeting with students.
There is no elevator for students and staff to access the higher floors, though at
present no students use wheelchairs. Ramps are in place and there are safe
walkways up and down gradients for those who need such facilities.
Students and staff work together amicably displaying mutual respect. Consequently,
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students enjoy attending school: attendance levels and punctuality are good.
Systems for identifying and supporting students who have SEN are good but
provision for those who are gifted and talented is not as effective. This is largely
because the school has not agreed a set of criteria understood by all for identifying,
challenging and supporting the most able. Good guidance is provided for students
who are preparing for the transition from school to university. The recent
introduction of vocational learning programmes add strength to students
understanding of future options. This is supported by regular visits from university
staff which help students make choices about higher education. Children receive
appropriate support as they move from the kindergarten to the primary school, and
then at each phase transition point, which helps them to settle quickly. port

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Performance Standard 6: Leadership and management


Leadership and management Indicators
The effectiveness of leadership

Good

Self-evaluation and improvement planning

Good

Partnerships with parents and the community

Good

Governance
Management, staffing, facilities and resources

Acceptable
Good

The principal and school leaders lead by example. They set a clear strategic direction
for the school. Their vision for Sunrise to become the best Indian school is very
widely shared throughout the school community. All staff understand the school
leadership structure. They have used their knowledge of best practice to bring about
many improvements since the last inspection and to secure a positive learning
culture based on good teaching and strong achievement. Because they regularly and
rigorously monitor the work of the school, leaders know about its strengths and
weaknesses. At the time of the inspection, work was underway to bring the written
self-evaluation and improvement plan up to date. It is evident from talking to school
leaders, governors, staff and parents, that there is a shared understanding of what
more the school needs to do and a keen ambition to bring about further
improvement.
Parents say that they feel included as partners and give examples of how their views
have been taken into account. They consider school leaders and other staff to be
very responsive to their communications and they receive regular advice about their
childrens progress. There are numerous examples of the contribution students
make to the local and international community. There are strong links with a nearby
hospital, which are used to further students learning and as a good cause for
students and their families to support. Students arrange some of their own fund
raising activities for overseas disasters, for example, to help flood victims in the
Chennai. At the same time in lessons, they learn about those countries.
The governing body is undergoing re-organisation. The new chair of governors took
up his post very recently. Governors are seeking to widen representation on the
governing body for example, by strengthening links with the active and influential
parents association. Governors have an acceptable influence on the schools
direction. They have a set of priorities which closely match those of the leadership
team, for example, to address the high rate of teacher turnover. As a result of the
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close working arrangements between the governing body and the school leadership
team, the development of the site and resources has helped to raise students
attainment.
Most aspects of the day-to-day management of the school are well organised.
Deployment of suitably qualified staff is sufficient to ensure that students benefit
from good teaching. The recent introduction of better ICT and science facilities,
along with the improvement of libraries for students, means that resources are now
closely matched to the needs of all learners.

What the school should do to improve further:


1. Modify the curriculum to provide even more opportunities for students to
innovate and work independently by:
i. ensuring that opportunities are more widely available for personal
research such as hands-on experimentation in science
ii. building in more opportunities for children in the kindergarten to
make choices between and within learning and play activities each
day
iii. ensuring that in every lesson, teachers plan activities which fully
stretch the most able students, and offer personalised support to
those who struggle to keep up.
2. Provide more opportunities for extended writing in all areas of the
curriculum, by:
i. ensuring that suitable opportunities are regularly made available for
students to record what they have learned in their workbooks or in
electronic documents
ii. increasing the challenge in English and other subjects where
appropriate, for students to write creatively on a theme related to
their current work.

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