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Amity Institute of Psychology & Allied Sciences

Amity University

LESSON PLAN
Name of
Faculty
Date
Semester
BS Title

Dr. Pratima Kaushik

Institute

AIPS

05/06/2014
Programme
UG-----IV
Values and Ethics for Personal & Professional Development

COURSE OBJECTIVE This course aims at imparting an understanding of:

Practice values and ethics in their personal and professional life.


Comprehend the significance of moral values.
Evaluate the challenges in implementation of ethical practices.
Appraise the role of personal and professional value in personality development.

Module I: Introduction to Values & Ethics


Meaning & its type
Relationship between Values and Ethics
Its implication in ones life.
Methodology

(2 Hours)

Administration of Rating scale, PPT, Discussion, psychometric test, Analysis

1) Rating Scale Entry level


2) Activity 1: A story based on values. Discussion on various aspects related to values.*
3) Definition of values and ethics and its types with life examples of great people.
4) Activity 2: Case study discussion**
5) Activity 3: Rokeach Value Survey***

Learning Outcomes :

Define the meaning of values and ethics

Comprehend the relationship between values and ethics

Employ its implications in their personal and professional life


Module II: Values Clarification & Acceptance
Core Values-Respect, Responsibility, Integrity, Resilience, Care, & Harmony
Its process-Self Exploration
Nurturing Good values
Methodology- Questionnaire, PPT, Discussion, Group Activity
Activity 1: Value clarification exercise*.
Activity 2: Group discussion on value acceptance**.
Learning Outcomes :

Classify various core values

Explore core values, and its implications on ones life

Develop ways to nurture good values

2 Hours

Module III: Morality


2
Difference between morality, ethics &values

hours

Significance of moral values

Methodology-PPT, Discussion Psychometric Test

Activity:1

*Group discussion related to difference between morality, ethics and values.

Activity: 2
Learning Outcomes :
Define morality and interpret its significance.
Evaluate the difference between morality, ethics and values
Practice morality for effective personal and professional development.
Module IV: Ethical Practice
Ethical Decision making
Challenges in its implementation.
Prevention of Corruption &Crime

(2 Hours)

Methodology-Presentation, Psychometric testing (Test enclosed) and analysis of results, Activity,


Discussion.
Activity 1: *Discussion on everyday examples of Personal Ethics
Activity 2: **Ethics position Questionnaire
Activity 3: ***Ethical leadership Scale
Activity 4: ****Decision Making Scale
Learning Outcomes :

Inculcate effective decision making in their daily living.

Solve the challenges which come across during implementation of ethical decision making

Formulate guidelines to prevent corruption and crime around them


Module V: Personal & Professional Values
Personal values-Empathy, honesty, courage, commitment
Professional Values-Work ethics, respect for others
Its role in personality development
Character building- A New Self awareness
Methodology- Presentation, Discussion, Activity, Role Play, Questionnaire
Activity 1: *Role play
Activity 2: **Self awareness scale
Learning Outcomes :

Apply personal values such as empathy, honesty, courage and commitment in their daily life.

Practice professional values such as work, ethics, and respect for others at their work place.

Assess their character and develop new self awareness.

Assignment:

Preparation for end term Viva and SAP

ACTIVITIES
ACTIVITIES FOR MODULE-1
Activity 1:*The Story of a Carpenter
An elderly carpenter was ready to retire. He told his employer-contractor of his plans to leave the
house- building business and live a more leisurely life with his wife enjoying his extended family.
He would miss his paycheck, but he needed to retire. They could get by. The contractor was sorry to
see his good worker go and asked if he could build just one more house as a personal favor.
The carpenter said yes, but in time it was easy to see that his heart was not in his work. He resorted to
shoddy workmanship and used inferior materials. It was an unfortunate way to end his career.
When the carpenter finished his work and the builder came to inspect the house, the contractor
handed over the house key to the carpenter. This is your house, he said, it is my parting gift to
you.
What a shock! What a Shame! If only he had known he was building his own house, he would have
done it all so differently. Now he had to live in the home he built none too well.
(Modified from LIVING WITH HONOUR by SHIV KHERA)
Do we find ourselves in similar situations as the carpenter?
Moving through our work hours fast paced, driven to get the job done, without much thought to
moral values.
How do we regain our focus as individuals and organizations?
This is the challenge for the employee and the employer.
Ethics are fundamental standards of conduct by which we work as a professional.
Activity-2
** Case Study discussion:
The ambulance brings to the hospital a man bleeding to death. The hospital, being a free city hospital,
does not admit him. "We dont have room," the man at the receiving desk says falsely. "Take him to
the other city hospital." At the other city hospital he is also refused, on exactly the same grounds. So
he is returned to the first hospital, but by that time he is dead.
Activity-3
***Rokeach Value Survey
On the following pages are two lists of values; 18 terminal values and 18 instrumental
values. Terminal values are end result values describing what you want to get out of
life. Instrumental values are the ways you seek to accomplish your terminal values.
Terminal values are marked with (T); Instrumental values are marked (I).
Your task is to put each value in a priority order - #1 matters most, #18 matters least
for how each value matters to you: how much of a guiding principle is each value
in your life? Don't worry about how you believe you should prioritize the list, or how
others might prioritize it for themselves, or how they might prioritize it for you. Prioritize
the lists according to the way things are for you.
Print the Terminal and Instrumental Values on separate pieces of paper that you can cut
into individual blocks. Start with the Terminal Value blocks. What is it you want most out
of life? Arrange the blocks according to what matters most to you. When you're finished
arranging your Terminal Values, copy the results onto the Terminal Values blank sheet
(page 4). Ignore the why this matters to me column for the moment.

Do the same thing with the Instrumental Values blocks. What is most important to you
about the way you go about achieving your Terminal values? Again, arrange the blocks
according to what matters most to you. After you've finished prioritizing your
Instrumental Values, transcribe them onto the Instrumental Values blank form (page 5).
The final step of identifying your Terminal and Instrumental Values is to write a short
sentence about the meaning of each value. For example, if National Security is one of
your higher values, you might understand it (and yourself!) better by identifying why it
is a priority for you.
There are a couple of ways you can do this exercise: You can arrange the values in a
first thought that comes to mind manner. Some people believe that this way most
closely reflects how you see yourself. The other way is to spend some time on the
project, thinking carefully about your choices. Other people believe that a carefully
thought-out response more accurately reflects your view of yourself. Either way, your
goal is to identify how you see yourself.
Nothing is set in stone: at any time, you should go back and change the ranked order of
either list if you have any new thoughts about your answers.
When you've finished ranking both sets of values, you should have a fairly accurate
picture of how you really feel about whats important in your life.
Why is this important? There are several reasons. First, people tend to try to accomplish
similar results using similar means in a variety of situations in their lives and
relationships. Sometimes its helpful to step back and see oneself through new eyes.
Second, not everyone sees things the same way as another person does. Conflicts can
arise when people hold different values and means of accomplishing their values.
Understanding (and more importantly, accepting!) this may help you work more
effectively with others who have very different Terminal and Instrumental values.

TERMINAL VALUES (T)


A Comfortable Life a prosperous life (T)
Equality brotherhood and equal opportunity for
all (T)
An Exciting Life a stimulating, active life (T)

TERMINAL VALUES (T)


Social Recognition respect and admiration (T)
True Friendship close companionship (T)

INSTRUMENTAL VALUES (I)


Ambitious hardworking and aspiring (I)
Broad-minded open-minded (I)
Capable competent, effective (I)
Clean neat and tidy (I)
Courageous standing up for your beliefs (I)
Forgiving willing to pardon others (I)
Helpful working for the welfare of others (I)
Honest sincere and truthful (I)
Imaginative daring and creative (I)

Wisdom a mature understanding of


life (T)
A World at Peace a world free of war and
conflict (T)
A World of Beauty beauty of nature and the arts
(T)
Pleasure an enjoyable, leisurely life (T)
Salvation saved; eternal life (T)
Self-Respect self-esteem (T)
A Sense of Accomplishment a lasting ontribution
(T)
INSTRUMENTAL VALUES (I)
Independent self-reliant; self-sufficient (I)
Intellectual intelligent and reflective (I)
Logical consistent; rational (I)
Loving affectionate and tender (I)
Loyal faithful to friends or the group (I)
Obedient dutiful; respectful (I)
Polite courteous and well mannered (I)
Responsible dependable and reliable (I)
Self-controlled restrained; self-disciplined (I)

TERMINAL VALUES

WHY THIS MATTERS TO ME?

Family Security taking care of loved ones (T)


Freedom independence and free choice (T)
Health physical and mental wellbeing (T)
Inner Harmony freedom from inner conflict (T)
Mature Love sexual and spiritual intimacy (T)
National Security protection from attack (T)

INSTRUMENTAL VALUES

WHY THIS MATTERS TO ME?

So what? (Discussion)
What difference does this exercise make?
Now that you know these things about yourself, what changes should you consider
making in key areas of your life?
What does this say about your employment?
What does this say about your hobbies or recreational activities?
What does this say about your relationships within your family? Your marriage, children
(etc)?
If you are currently experiencing conflict with someone, what role might differing values
play in the
conflict? How might you respond to this? Are there ways you can respect the other
person's values
while maintaining your own?
What additional insights has this exercise brought to your mind?

ACTIVITIES FOR MODULE-2


Activity 1:
*Value Clarification Excercise
Identifying your personal values is an important part of a successful career plan. In this context, the word
"value" refers to how you feel about the work itself and the contribution it makes to society. Most people who
pursue work that is congruent with their values feel satisfied and successful in their careers. Work values can be
divided into two functional categories:
INTRINSIC values are those that relate to a specific interest in the activities of the work itself, or to the
benefits that the work contributes to society.
EXTRINSIC values relate to the favorable conditions that accompany an occupational choice, such as
physical setting, earning potential and other external features.
Most people, in order to feel truly satisfied with their work, must find some personal intrinsic value in
it.
The following is a list of personal values that many people have identified as being important to them
in their careers. To begin exploring your own personal work values, rate each value listed with the
following scale and add other values you consider essential to your list.
1 - Things I value VERY MUCH
2 - Things I VALUE
3 - Things I DON'T VALUE very much
RATE

PERSONAL WORK VALUES

DESCRIPTIONS

Aesthetics

Participate in studying or appreciating


the beauty of things, ideas, etc.
Have a job in which I am directly
responsible for the work of other
Have work activities which frequently
change
Work in situations where attention to
detail and accuracy are very important
Have a work routine and job duties that
are largely predictable
Be assured of keeping my job and
receiving satisfactory compensation
Be publicly recognized for the high
quality of my work
Work in circumstances where work
must be done rapidly
Experience a high degree of (or
frequent) excitement in the course of
my work
Have work duties which require
frequent risk-taking
Have a high likelihood of achieving
very great monetary rewards for my
work
Do activities that use my physical
capabilities
Be able to determine the nature of my
work without significant direction from
others
Feel that my work contributes to a set
of moral standards which I feel are
very important
Live where I can participate in
community affairs
Be able to work according to my own
schedule

Supervision
Change and Variety
Precision Work
Stability
Security
Recognition
Fast Pace
Excitement
Adventure
Financial Gain
Physical Challenge
Independence
Moral Fulfillment
Community
Time Freedom
*
*
*

*Add any other values that are important to you

Review your ratings and list the top 6 of those you chose as Things I value VERY MUCH in the spaces
below.

AT THIS POINT IN MY LIFE MY 6 MOST ESSENTIAL VALUES ARE:


1.
2..
3
4
5..
6..

Activity-2
**Group Discussion Questions:
What did you learn about yourself? About others?
Was it hard to express disagreement with another person's values? Why or why not?
Were there times when you felt uncomfortable or unsafe? What helped you stand by your values at that
time?
Were there any times when you felt unable to stand for your values? Why do you think that was so?
What would support people at times when they feel unable to stand up for a value they believe in?
ACTIVITIES FOR MODULE-3
Activity-1
* Group discussion related to difference between morality, ethics and values
ACTIVITIES FOR MODULE-4
Activity 1: *PERSONAL ETHICS - everyday examples

Software piracy
Expense account padding
Copying of homework or tests
Income taxes
Borrowing nuts and bolts, office supplies from employer
Copying of Videos or CDs
Plagiarism
Using the copy machine at work

Activity 2: **Ethics Position Questionnaire


Ethics Position Questionnaire was developed to measure individual differences in moral thought, prompted in
part by curiosity about the diverse reactions to one of my favorite social psychological studies: Milgrams
(1963) classic studies of obedience to authority.
Scoring:
In most cases respondents indicate degree of agreement with each item using a scale that ranges from

disagreement (1) to agreement (9). Idealism scores are calculated by summing responses from items 1 to
10. Relativism scores are calculated by summing responses from items 11 to 20. The original response scale
used was a 9-point scale, although people often trim it back to a true Likert 5-point scale.
Analyzing the Results
Because this is a research scale, there are no norms available to interpret the meaning of the scores.
However, if you want to compare your findings to a baserate, then it would be best to use the mean and
median based on the studies reviewed by Forsyth, OBoyle, & McDaniel in their 2008 paper. That way, you
can say things like 80% of the respondents in my study scored below the median on idealism. But, if all
you want to talk about is differences among your respondents, then I would use the median from the
population you studied. That way, you can say things like Among the respondents in this study, those who
were low in idealism were most likely to act immorally. The analyses tend to be easier if you use the
median of your own data because it makes the cell sizes more equivalent if you do any type of median split
analysis (there are equal numbers of people who are high Is and low Is and high rs and low rs).
If you decide to use the normed median, then that median should be based on the version of the EPQ you
used. People use varying numbers of items from the original EPQ, and they also change the response scale.
The original scale had 10 items for each subscale, and the scale ranged from 1 to 9 for each item.
Therefore, people could score from 10 to 90 on these scales, originally. The mean and median, assuming a
9-point response scale (so that scores could range from 10 to 90), based on a review of 139 samples drawn
from 29 different countries, for a total sample of 30,230 respondents, are shown in the table below.

Scale

Mean

Median

Idealism

65.52

66.06

Relativism

52.74

54.54

The Items: The instructions and items for the EPQ

The Ethics Position Questionnaire


Please indicate if you agree or disagree with the following items. Each represents
a commonly held opinion and there are no right or wrong answers. We are
interested in your reaction to such matters ofopinion.Rate your reaction to each
statement by writing a number to the left of each statement where:
1 = Completely disagree
2 = Largely disagree
3 = Moderately disagree
4 = Slightly disagree
5 = Neither agree nor disagree
6 = Slightly agree
7 = Moderately agree
8 = Largely agree
9 = Completely agree
1. People should make certain that their actions never intentionally harm another
even to a small degree.
2. Risks to another should never be tolerated, irrespective of how small the risks
might be.
3. The existence of potential harm to others is always wrong, irrespective of the
benefits to be gained.
4. One should never psychologically or physically harm another person.
5. One should not perform an action which might in any way threaten the dignity
and welfare of another individual.
6. If an action could harm an innocent other, then it should not be done.
7. Deciding whether or not to perform an act by balancing the positive
consequences of the act against the negative consequences of the act is immoral.
8. The dignity and welfare of the people should be the most important concern in
any society.
9. It is never necessary to sacrifice the welfare of others.

10. Moral behaviors are actions that closely match ideals of the most perfect
action.
11. There are no ethical principles that are so important that they should be a part
of any code of ethics.
12. What is ethical varies from one situation and society to another.
13. Moral standards should be seen as being individualistic; what one person
considers to be moral may be judged to be immoral by another person.
14. Different types of morality cannot be compared as to rightness.
15. Questions of what is ethical for everyone can never be resolved since what is
moral or immoral is up to the individual.
16. Moral standards are simply personal rules that indicate how a person should
behave, and are not be be applied in making judgments of others.
17. Ethical considerations in interpersonal relations are so complex that
individuals should be allowed to formulate their own individual codes.
18. Rigidly codifying an ethical position that prevents certain types of actions
could stand in the way of better human relations and adjustment.
19. No rule concerning lying can be formulated; whether a lie is permissible or
not permissible totally depends upon the situation.
20. Whether a lie is judged to be moral or immoral depends upon the
circumstances surrounding the action.

Activity 3: ***THE

ETHICAL LEADERSHIP SCALES

The Ethical Leadership Scales are three scales designed to promote quiet and comprehensive reflection
about qualities that together constitute ethical behaviour and ethical leadership. By using a measuring
scale they also enable a respondent to determine his or her level of ethical competence.
The Instrument
This instrument is presented as three separate Scales to measure the ethical leadership mindstate of
individuals and organizations. Further background on the Scales can be found in the essay entitled " The
Ethical Competence Framework." In each scale separate measures of specific competencies are
presented and these individual items are added to provide a single collective numerical value for that
scale.
The model of the Intelligence Quotient (IQ) is used to derive a score where 100 would be the highest or
most ideal. The Scales are:
1. The Ethical Competence Scale leading to the Ethical Quotient (EthQ)
2. The Ethical Leadership Scale leading to the Ethical Leadership Quotient (EthLQ)
3. The Ethical Organization Scale leading to the Ethical Organization Quotient (EthOQ)
Examples
Several items from each of the above Scales are given below as examples of how the Scales work. The
Scales in complete form are used by the authors for teaching and research purposes. Respondents are
asked to assign values according to whether they consider the quality is:
Always in Place
Usually in Place
Sometimes in Place

(10-9)
(8-7)
(6-5)

Rarely in Place
Never in Place

(4-3)
(2-1)

The bullets in each item provide additional clarification.

Ethical Competence Scale


Personal Ethical Competence
How we maintain our personal commitment to an ethical life
Foundational
Characteristics

How we are grounded Always in Usually in Sometimes in Rarely in Never in Chosen


in thought and action Place
Place
Place
Place
Place
Value

Characteristic

Explanation

1.Trustworthiness

Being reliable and


dependable

10-9

8-7

6-5

4-3

2-1

Being willing to admit


mistakes
Being true to your word
Being worthy of
confidence
Keeping promises

Social Ethical Competence


How we handle relationships

Empathy

How we strive to understand


and appreciate the worth of
others

Always in Usually in Sometimes in Rarely in Never in Chosen


Place
Place
Place
Place
Place
Value

Characteristic

Explanation

10-9

13.Understanding
Others

Being sensitive to others' feelings


and perspectives

8-7

6-5

4-3

2-1

Taking an active interest in


others' concerns
Being attentive to emotional cues
Listening deeply
Being willing to change our mind
or direction to accommodate
others as long as the ethical
foundation remains secure
Being able to walk in someone
else's shoes
Social Skills

How we act to induce


desirable, ethically grounded
responses in others

Always in Usually in Sometimes in Rarely in Never in Chosen


Place
Place
Place
Place
Place
Value

Characteristic

Explanation

10-9

18.Communication

Sending clear, transparent


messages, avoiding mixed

8-7

6-5

4-3

2-1

messages
Seeking to be clearly understood
Participating effectively in giveand-take
Dealing with difficult issues
straightforwardly
Welcoming full sharing of
information
Staying receptive to bad news as
well as good
Making it a point to keep others
informed

Global Ethical Competence


How we see the earth and all life on it as a web of delicate connections requiring stewardship for
sustainability
Connections

How we act as part of a


Always in Usually in Sometimes in Rarely in Never in Chosen
complex interconnected wholePlace
Place
Place
Place
Place
Value

Characteristic

Explanation

10-9

8-7

6-5

4-3

2-1

25.Interdependence Understanding our connections


to each other and the Earth
Searching continuously for
connections
Seeking always to see the big
picture, taking the impact of your
actions throughout the system
into consideration
Seeking to practice systems
thinking
How we act as responsible
Future Orientation participants in creating a
mutually beneficial future

Always in Usually in Sometimes in Rarely in Never in Chosen


Place
Place
Place
Place
Place
Value

Characteristic

Explanation

10-9

28.Future
Orientation

Seeing that actions today create


the future tomorrow
Being guided by a vision of what
is worth doing
Working with others to create a
shared vision
Caring about the legacies you
leave for future generations
Looking forward in a positive
way to the future

Ethical Leadership Scale

8-7

6-5

4-3

2-1

Personal Record Form


Relationship
to Self

Personal Qualities of the


Ethical Leader

Always in Usually in Sometimes in Rarely in Never in Chosen


Place
Place
Place
Place
Place
Value

Characteristic

Explanation

10-9

1.Acts with integrity

Keeps promises and


commitments and expects
others to keep theirs

8-7

6-5

4-3

2-1

Maintains loyalty to those not


present
Apologizes sincerely
Acts with honesty
Takes responsibility and cleans
up after mistakes
Relationship
to Others

Qualities that allow the ethicalAlways in Usually in Sometimes in Rarely in Never in Chosen
leader to connect with and
Place
Place
Place
Place
Place
Value
empower others

Characteristic

Explanation

26.Compassionate

Caring and empathetic

10-9

8-7

6-5

4-3

2-1

Is sympathetic to the needs of


others
Does not turn away from
helping others
Acts from a good heart as well
as a firm resolve
Treats people with genuine
affection
Relationship to the
Whole

Qualities that reveal the


Always in Usually in Sometimes in Rarely in Never in Chosen
ethical leader's sense of
Place
Place
Place
Place
Place
Value
connection with a grand
design and a higher purpose

Characteristic

Explanation

38.Tolerates
contradiction and
anxiety

Is able to live with contradiction

10-9

8-7

6-5

4-3

2-1

Is prepared to wait for closure


Is able to tolerate large amounts
of anxiety
Understands that contradiction
and anxiety can be the
accompaniments of creative
growth

Ethical Organization Scale


Personal Record Form
Always in Usually in Sometimes in Rarely in Never in Chosen

Factor

Explanation

1.Economic
considerations

Is financially successful

Place

Place

Place

Place

Place

10-9

8-7

6-5

4-3

2-1

Its products and services make


a positive contribution to the
economy
Pays the appropriate taxes
Provides appropriate
remuneration to members of its
workforce
Allows its workforce to benefit
from strong profits with shares,
bonuses and/or salary
adjustments
Provides products and / or
services of value and of high
quality
2.Relationships with Creates a safe, healthy,
the workforce
attractive work environment for
its workforce
Treats members of the
workforce with dignity and
respect
Provides fair and equal
opportunity for advancement
without regard for ethnicity,
gender, age or other distinctions
Provides physical and mental
health support for members of
the workforce
Provides meaningful work
Encourages self-development
for members of its workforce
3.Relationships with Pays contractors and suppliers
contractors and
fairly and on time
suppliers
Provides a fair transparent
bidding system for new
contracts
Responds courteously and
promptly to questions from
contractors and suppliers
Provides all necessary
information and feedback to
contractors and suppliers

Activity 4: **** DECISION MAKING QUESTIONNAIRE

Value

Below are twenty-four statements describing how individuals make decisions. Please indicate whether
you agree or disagree with each statement, according to the five-point scale below. For example, if you
agree that "I rarely make important decisions without consulting other people", choose '4'; if you strongly
disagree choose '1'. There are no right or wrong answers; work quickly giving your immediate reaction.
1=strongly disagree
2=disagree
3=neutral (neither agree nor disagree)
4=agree
5=strongly agree

Click the X in the top right hand corner of your screen to return to CMS. Alternatively, press the back
button in the top left hand corner of your screen.
1
Statement

When I make decisions, I tend to rely on my


Agreement
intuition.
I rarely make important decisions without
consulting other people.
When I make a decision, it is more important
for me to feel the decision is right than to
have a rational reason for it.
I double-check my information sources to be
sure I have the right facts before making
decisions.
I use the advice of other people in making my
important decisions.
I put off making decisions because thinking
about them makes me uneasy.
I make decisions in a logical and systematic
way.
When making decisions I do what feels
natural at the moment.
I generally make snap decisions.
I like to have someone steer me in the right
direction when I am faced with important
decisions.
My decision making requires careful thought.
When making a decision, I trust my inner
feelings and reactions.
When making a decision, I consider various
options in terms of a specified goal.
I avoid making important decisions until the
pressure is on.
I often make impulsive decisions.
When making decisions, I rely upon my
instincts.
I generally make decisions that feel right to

me.
I often need the assistance of other people
when making important decisions.
I postpone decision making whenever
possible.
I often make decisions on the spur of the
moment.
I often put off making important decisions.
If I have the support of others, it is easier for
me to make important decisions.
I generally make important decisions at the
last minute.
I make quick decisions.
ACTIVITIES FOR MODULE-5
Activity 1: *Some topics for role play
Situation A
As the new manager you identify areas where changes need to be made. However, these are met with
stiff resistance. What will your approach be?
Situation B
On a variety of issues you feel that your boss is letting you down. He/she is not available when
needed, directly goes to your sub-ordinate and doesn't give you any feedback. What will you do?
Situation C
You have a prolonged crisis at home and a deadline at work.both need urgent attention. How will
you resolve the tension?
Activity 2: Emotional Self-Awareness Scale (ESAS)
All items are on a 5-point likert scale ranging from zero to five (0 = Never, 1 =
Very Little, 2 = Sometimes, 3 = Often, 4 = A lot). Subscales range from 0 to 20.
Total scale ranges from 0
132.

Subscales
Recognition: Items 4, 18, 20, 21, 22, 24. Divided by 6. Multiplied by 5.
Identification: Items 1, 3, 8, 17, 29. Divided by 5. Multiplied by 5.
Commuication: Items 6, 12, 13, 15, 27, 30, 3. Divided by 7. Multiplied by 5.
Contextualisation: 5, 7, 10, 11, 14, 16, 19, 28, 32, 33. Divided by 10.
Multiplied by 5.
Decision-Making: 2, 8, 23, 25, 26. Divided by 5. Multiplied by 5.
Total ESA score: The sum of all subscales.

Item Question
1 My moods are hard to describe (reverse)
2 I examined my feelings and then decided what to do
3 Its important to me to understand what my feelings mean
4 It's hard for me to tell what mood Im in (reverse)
5 I analyze my personality to try to understand why Im upset
6 Expressing emotions is easy
7 I usually know why I feel the way I do
8 I often have trouble deciding what will improve my mood (reverse)
9 I know how I feel about most things
10 I don't know why I feel the way I feel (reverse)
11 I go away by myself and think about why I feel a certain way
12 I like to write down what Im feeling and analyze it
13 I can talk about mood to others
14 I don't really think about why I behave as I do (reverse)
15 I often 'self-talk' to think about feelings
16 Im often confused about how I feel about things (reverse)
17 Im often aware of being emotional, but I cant describe the emotion
18 I frequently take time to reflect on how I feel
19 I often know what caused my mood
20 Im usually aware of my emotions
21 I like to go someplace alone to think about my feelings
22 I don't often think about my feelings (reverse)
23 I often think about ways to make myself feel better
24 I know exactly how I'm feeling
25 Sometimes I can't figure out how to make myself feel better (reverse)
26 When feeling bad, I try to deal with my problems and concerns
27 I can verbalize my feelings
28 I usually have clear idea about how my feelings affects my behaviour
29 Its difficult to make sense of the way I feel about things (reverse)
30 I find it easy to write down how I feel
31 It's difficult to communicate what I feel (reverse)
32 I often think about the way I feel about things
33 I analyze recent events to try to understand why Im upset
Note: Reverse scored items are indicted by (reverse)