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A chilly prom

. Saturday . night . with .Manheim . Township. High . School’s . big . event. Look . for. photos .on . Page . B2 . and . at LancasterOnline.com/prom.

The . local. prom . season . continued

.

.

The . local. prom . season . continued . . EDUCATION Governor uses own formula on

EDUCATION

Governor uses own formula on funds

Commission plan would give local districts more money

KARA NEWHOUSE

KNEWHOUSE@LNPNEWS.COM

The 2015-16 state budget fight is not over. The battlefield has merely shifted. And the casualties on the sidelines are school officials who can’t plan if they can’t trust the numbers they’re hearing. Last month Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf allowed a budget to pass without his sig- nature. At the same time, he vetoed a bi- partisan plan that Republican legislators proposed for divvying up education fund- ing among schools. This week, Wolf announced his own plan for distributing the money. “Normally, when a budget got approved (the Department of Education) would send out a spreadsheet so everybody knew what they were getting,” Hempfield Chief Operating Officer Dan Forry said. “We have not seen any of that yet.” What school officials have seen are com- peting spreadsheets from Wolf’s office and GOP legislators. The governor says money will be dis- tributed through his “restoration for- mula.” Republicans, who say Wolf doesn’t have the authority to do that, are consid- ering a lawsuit to stop him.

Governor’s formula

Under the governor’s plan, all Lancaster County school districts receive a funding increase of at least 1.5 percent more than 2014-15. Octorara and Columbia school districts receive the largest increases — 4.7 percent and 4.2 percent, respectively. In a press release Monday, Wolf said his formula delivers extra money to districts that lost funding under the previous Re- publican governor. Philadelphia schools, for instance, will get almost 8 percent more this year than in 2014-15. But Republicans in both the House and Senate objected to Wolf’s formula this

BUDGET, page A6

UNDECIDED

Prospective voters talk of weighing Trump, Sanders, issues

Prospective voters talk of weighing Trump, Sanders, issues CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS SAM JANESCH
Prospective voters talk of weighing Trump, Sanders, issues CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS SAM JANESCH
Prospective voters talk of weighing Trump, Sanders, issues CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS SAM JANESCH
Prospective voters talk of weighing Trump, Sanders, issues CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS SAM JANESCH
Prospective voters talk of weighing Trump, Sanders, issues CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS SAM JANESCH
Prospective voters talk of weighing Trump, Sanders, issues CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS SAM JANESCH

CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS

SAM JANESCH AND CHRISTOPHER PRATT

SJANESCH@LNPNEWS.COM . and . C PRATT@LNPNEWS.COM

Retired barber Sam Fokas is a fan of Donald Trump, the Republican presidential front-runner. Trump’s beaming face on a button pinned to Fokas’ jacket makes that clear.

F okas likes Trump because he tells the truth, Fokas says. But then some- times the 83-year-old East Hempfield Township resident is “fed up with

him, too,” because Trump can “overdo it.” “He goes too far with women,” Fokas said of Trump’s recent threat to “spill the beans” on Ted Cruz’s wife, Heidi. “He brought the name of Cruz’s wife, and his wife, in the battle.” A registered voter who emigrated from

Greece 65 years ago, Fokas explained his love- hate relationship with the billionaire’s presi- dential campaign while shopping Wednesday at Park City Center. With Pennsylvania’s April 26 primary right around the corner, thousands of county resi- dents, like Fokas, are starting to pay close at- tention to the race. From Trump’s comments on women to his and other candidates’ goal of

VOTERS, page A10

Pictured above, clockwise from top left: Brianna Kinard, 21, of York; Dario Bernardini, 61, of East Hempfield; Robert Watkins, 52, of Lancaster; Gus S. Kouros, 73, of Manheim Township; Ashley Lutz, 23, of Marietta; and Sam Fokas, 83, of East Hempfield Township.

SUNDAY.MAGAZINE

Sam Fokas, 83, of East Hempfield Township. SUNDAY.MAGAZINE The.colors.of.spring: . A.look.at.the.South .

The.colors.of.spring: . A.look.at.the.South . Asian.Association . of.Lancaster’s.Holi . celebration. Exclusive . for.home . subscribers

n . inside

ALSO INSIDE

Jordan Spieth holds on for a 1-stroke lead in the Masters

n.Sports,. page. C1

People line up to get buzz cuts for a good cause in local St. Baldrick’s event

n.Local,. page . A3

Prosecutors release details of child sex abuse by former House Speaker Dennis Hastert

n.Nation .& . World, . page. A21

TRANSPORTATION

Safety of rails, roads compared

Most people killed by trains are pedestrians or motorists, not passengers or employees

TIM BUCKWALTER

TBUCKWALTER@LNPNEWS.COM

An average of 28 people die in train-related incidents in Pennsylvania each year. Very few of them are rail workers or passengers. Most are pedestrian “trespassers” on the tracks or motorists at rail crossings, a review of Fed- eral Railroad Administration data shows. LNP looked at 16 years of administration data following last Sunday’s train accident that killed two Amtrak work-

ers and injured more than 30 passengers near Chester. The accident — in which a train struck a backhoe — has brought renewed attention to rail safety in Pennsylvania, in part because it came less than a year after a derailment that killed eight Amtrak passen- gers in north Philadelphia. The exact cause of last May’s accident is still under inves- tigation, but the train was traveling well above the speed limit, officials have said.

RAILS, page A8

Traffic accidents take big toll, but last year was 2nd safest since 1928

TIM BUCKWALTER

TBUCKWALTER@LNPNEWS.COM

About 1,200 people died in traffic accidents in Pennsylvania in 2015, making it the second- safest year since record- keeping began in 1928. Fatalities were up by only five from 2014, which was the safest year on record, the Depart- ment of Transportation said. In a press release,

PennDOT cited some of

the key trends in its 2015 report.

— Significant decreas-

es were recorded in the number of fatalities in-

volving older drivers (down from 300 to 279), aggressive drivers (down from 134 to 119) and crashes at intersections (down from 271 to 251).

— Fatalities increased

from accidents in which a single vehicle ran off the road (up from 534 to

ROADS, page A8

vehicle ran off the road (up from 534 to ROADS, page A8 INDEX MONEY D1 REAL

INDEX

MONEY

D1

REAL .ESTATE

RE1

CLASSIFIEDS

CL1

NATION.&.WORLD A21

SPORTS

C1

LIVING

B1

OBITUARIES

A24

TRAVEL

B10

LOTTERY

A2

PERSPECTIVE

E1

TV. WEEK

TV1

TODAY'S WEATHER 47 33
TODAY'S WEATHER
47
33

H

FORECAST, PAGE C14

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221st Year, No. 298

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LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1794

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 LNP | LANCASTER, PA PENNSYLVANIA LOTTERY n Here are the winning

PENNSYLVANIA LOTTERY n Here are the winning Pennsylvania and Powerball lottery numbers for the week starting April 3.

 

SUNDAY,

MONDAY,

TUESDAY,

WEDNESDAY,

THURSDAY,

FRIDAY,

SATURDAY,

APRIL 3

APRIL 4

APRIL 5

APRIL 6

APRIL 7

APRIL 8

APRIL 9

DAY PICK 2

6-9

7-7

7-8

8-5

7-5

9-8

9-5

DAY PICK 3

6-8-6

6-4-6

0-9-3

0-5-1

2-9-7

9-8-4

7-3-5

DAY PICK 4

3-7-1-7

7-9-5-5

9-8-8-5

3-5-9-5

6-0-5-2

6-1-5-5

1-7-4-6

DAY PICK 5

3-1-4-3-9

4-8-5-8-3

8-6-0-3-1

5-8-8-0-4

0-2-7-6-0

5-2-7-1-0

8-0-6-4-9

TREASURE HUNT

03-07-08-15-23

04-06-12-13-21

10-11-16-17-22

03-06-07-19-30

06-12-20-22-28

09-12-17-20-30

02-05-07-11-14

NIGHT PICK 2

1-1

6-0

3-9

2-4

3-4

3-9

4-1

NIGHT PICK 3

8-0-6

8-6-4

7-2-1

1-0-8

3-5-2

1-9-0

0-4-1

NIGHT PICK 4

2-3-6-6

9-0-0-3

6-0-0-2

1-5-6-3

2-5-1-3

6-1-8-2

2-8-2-5

NIGHT PICK 5

8-5-9-0-7

2-0-7-7-7

4-8-5-0-6

3-2-2-1-4

6-7-9-9-2

1-9-2-4-5

9-8-9-0-2

CASH 5

08-11-15-26-34

03-07-11-14-35

06-16-17-23-35

02-14-17-29-38

02-06-32-40-42

05-08-13-19-42

07-16-17-23-35

MATCH 6

 

07-23-24-42-44-46

   

06-11-12-24-43-44

   

CASH4LIFE

 

CASH4LIFE:

13-45-52-53-57

04-28-49-60-65

CASH4LIFE:

31-38-52-65-71

14-22-23-41-61

POWERBALL &

05-26-32-36-58

MEGABALL: 10

POWERBALL: 25

02-11-32-50-54

MEGABALL: 15

POWERBALL: 09

MEGA MILLIONS

CASH BALL: 4

MEGAPLIER: 5

POWERPLAY: 2

CASH BALL: 2

MEGAPLIER: 3

POWERPLAY: 3

Through the Viewfinder

RANDY HESS

RHESS@LNPNEWS.COM

3 Through the Viewfinder RANDY HESS RHESS@LNPNEWS.COM S ymmetry, shapes and shadows all combine to help

S ymmetry, shapes and shadows all

combine to help create powerful

imagery. On the corner of King

and Mulberry streets in Lancast-

er, I noticed the signage for The Umbrella Works building. The afternoon shadows helped create contrast, seemingly lifting the sign right off the building. The simple shapes and well balanced design create a clean and powerful look on the north side of the building. I was sporting my Canon F1 film camera to capture this im- age. I processed the film myself and then scanned the negative to create the image you see printed today.

This five-story building was originally built around 1892, according to the City of Lancaster website. At the time, it was known as the Follmer, Clogg and Com- pany Umbrella Works Factory, and it be- came the biggest umbrella manufacturer in the world by the early 1900s. It oper- ated until 1944, when the J.B. Van Sciver furniture store took over and occupied it until 1982. In the early ’90s, it was con- verted into the affordable-housing apart- ments known today as The Umbrella Works. Apartments like these help fill vi- tal housing needs in Lancaster’s increas- ingly competitive rental market.

in Lancaster’s increas- ingly competitive rental market. THE METHOD Canon F1 camera with a Canon 50

THE METHOD Canon F1 camera with a Canon 50 mm lens, f2.0, 1/500 at f8.0. Developed on Kodak Tmax 100 ASA film. For more Through the Viewfinder photos and musings, visit LancasterOnline.com/TTV

CONTACT US
CONTACT US

General info: 291-8811, P.O. Box 1328, Lancaster, PA 17608

Newsroom: Tips, stories and announcements, 291-8622, news@LNPnews.com

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Advertising: 291-8800, advertising@LNPnews.com

Classified: 291-8711,

class@LNPnews.com

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CORRECTIONS

LNP wants to correct substantive errors of fact. To request a correction or clarification, call the news desk at 291-8622 or email news@LNPnews.com

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LOCAL

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

A3

LNP | LANCASTER, PA LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 A3 Catching up on the news HOME

Catching up on the news

HOME PRICES

n Home prices in the

county jumped an exceptional 6.3 percent in February, compared to an year earlier, a data firm reported Tuesday. It was the largest increase in 10 years, close to the national increase of 6.8 percent. Statewide, the rise was 3.7 percent.

DEBATE NIGHT

n State Sen. Lloyd

Smucker and Manheim businessman Chet Beiler, vying to be the Republican nominee for the 16th Congressional District seat, debated Thursday before hundreds of people at Penn Cinema in Lititz and defended their widely decried negative campaign tactics.

OFFICE OPEN

n Democratic socialist

Sen. Bernie Sanders opened a campaign office at 114 W. Orange St., it was reported Tuesday. None of other four presidential hopefuls have offices here.

KILLER DENIED

n Judge Donald Totaro

denied killer Thomas J. Gallagher Jr.’s request to

withdraw his guilty plea in the July 2014 death of Meredith L. Demko, 18, in a DUI-related crash in West Lampeter Township. Gallagher, 30, is serving a 20- to 50- year prison sentence.

CHARGE

DISMISSED

n A felony perjury

charge against city police Sgt. Raymond M. Corll was dismissed Friday for lack of evidence, but he still faces three misdemeanor charges stemming from an alleged assault and false claim of public drunkenness against a city man in March 2014.

SALE PENDING

n A real estate agent

said Molly’s Pub, whose owner Anthony Maglietta is charged with taking part in an assault and covering it up, is being sold to an unidentified buyer. Transfer of the liquor license for the bar at Chestnut and Shippen streets in the city must be approved by the state.

SOUGHT

n Columbia police

released a video to enlist the public in helping to identify a person and vehicle seen near the scene of Monday’s early morning shooting of a 21-year- old Lancaster man in an apartment in the first block of North Ninth Street in the borough. The victim is recovering from multiple gunshot wounds to the abdomen.

FATAL CRASH

n Geno R. Crivelli,

65, of Denver, was pronounced dead at the scene of a Thursday afternoon crash with a tractor-trailer on Route 272 near Ephrata.

CHARITY

with a tractor-trailer on Route 272 near Ephrata. CHARITY RANDY HESS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS BUZZ
with a tractor-trailer on Route 272 near Ephrata. CHARITY RANDY HESS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS BUZZ
with a tractor-trailer on Route 272 near Ephrata. CHARITY RANDY HESS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS BUZZ

RANDY HESS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS

near Ephrata. CHARITY RANDY HESS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS BUZZ CUTS FOR A CAUSE The 9th

BUZZ CUTS

FOR A

CAUSE

The 9th annual event to raise money for childhood cancer brought in more than $92,000 online — so far

cancer brought in more than $92,000 online — so far MARY ELLEN WRIGHT MWRIGHT@LNPNEWS.COM The snow

MARY ELLEN

WRIGHT

MWRIGHT@LNPNEWS.COM

The snow falling Sat- urday might have been a reminder of winter, but the hair falling beneath a tent behind a Lancaster bar offered the spring- like hope of renewed life. About 200 people sub- mitted to hair stylists’ clippers on the patio of Annie Bailey’s Irish Pub & Restaurant on

East King Street, hav- ing their hair shaved off during the ninth annual Lancaster St. Baldrick’s Foundation event. They got buzz cuts as part of raising money to fight childhood cancer, and in solidarity with the kids fighting that battle. By midafternoon Sat- urday, the noisy, jovial

crowd of fundraisers was closing in on its 2016 goal of $100,000, having raised more than $92,000 online. As he approached the line of stools manned by volunteer stylists, Ver- non Moore, of Millers- ville, was at the top of the list of individual fund- raisers, having collected

more than $4,100. His 23-member team, the Lancaster Pub Crawlers, had raised $18,580 as of Saturday afternoon. The event is personal for Moore this year. He just completed his fourth month of chemotherapy for his own rare form of non-Hodgkin lympho- ma called Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia. Moore’s silver hair soon blended with the tufts of brown, blond,

red and even blue hair falling onto the flagstone on the bar’s back patio. One by one, freshly shaved men, women and children ran their hands

HAIRCUTS, page A9

men, women and children ran their hands HAIRCUTS, page A9 Clockwise from upper left: Lancaster city

Clockwise from upper left:

Lancaster city police Chief Keith Sadler got his first haircut in three months at the Lancaster St. Baldrick’s Foundation fundraiser; Brandt Hackman of Quarryville was a first time participant; Thadde- us Stevens electrical technol- ogy instructor Brian Kochan, center, and his students, from left, Shane Stauffer, of Lancaster, Tyler Mena, of Bainbridge, Richard Hinkle, of Coatesville, Aubrey McGarvey, of Lebanon, Tebon Howie, of Delco and Erick Johnson, of Pottstown; 6-year-old Bryce Deeter, of Manheim, sits for his sixth St. Baldrick’s head shave; Ashley Bowser records her husband, James Bowser’s, trim; Alyx Hatton, of Brinegs- ville, shows her support for the foundation.

of Brinegs- ville, shows her support for the foundation. WATCH THE VIDEO n Watch local fundraisers

WATCH THE VIDEO

n Watch local fundraisers get their heads shaved to fight childhood cancer, at bit.ly/StBaldricksLNP.

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SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

LOCAL

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 LOCAL LNP | LANCASTER, PA WEATHER CHILLY SCENES OF SPRING? A

WEATHER

CHILLY SCENES OF

SPRING?

A short-lived April snow created some startlingly wintry scenes Saturday morning. 1. A woman rides a bicy-

cle along South Fairview Road in Clay Township; 2. A robin in the snow along New Holland Pike; 3. a woman walks along the Warwick to Ephrata Rail Trail in Warwick Township; 4. Aiden Rodenberger plays in the snow

at the Garden Spot Village Marathon in New Holland; 5. Tulips are silhouetted against the white background;

6. Small flowers are dusted with snow along a walking path at Warwick Township Municipal Campus Park.

3.

CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

4.
4.

VINNY TENNIS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

1.

CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

2.

VINNY TENNIS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

5.

VINNY TENNIS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

6.

CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Winter’s last gasp drops April snow; forecaster says temperatures will be near 70 by next weekend

RYAN ROBINSON

RROBINSON@LNPNEWS.COM

Most of Lancaster County got 1 to 3 inches of snow in a rare April storm Saturday morn- ing, but that should be the last hurrah of this

33

winter. That’s according to Millersville Univer- sity meteorologist Eric Horst. Temperatures will drop into the low to mid- 20s Saturday night, he

said, but “that should be the coldest night we see until next November.” “You can close the book on winter after (Saturday night),” Horst said. “By the end of next weekend, we have a shot

at getting near 70.” Afternoon sun and slowly climbing tem- peratures on Saturday quickly melted much of the snow that had fallen. The afternoon high, he noted, fell just short of

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40 degrees. There were some re- ports of icy, snow-cov- ered roads Saturday morning, but not many traffic accidents oc- curred. Snowfall amounts var- ied, but less fell in east- ern Lancaster County than in the west. Less than an inch fell in Columbia. Millers- ville got just over an inch. Horst measured 2 ½ inches at his Man- heim Township home, and the same amount fell in Rothsville. “I suspect somewhere in Solanco may have had 3-plus inches” as well as spots in eastern Lan- caster County, he said. There may end up being up to 6 inches reported in a few high-elevation spots. He said 6-8 inches of snow fell north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Lebanon and Dau- phin counties. After the snow, a heavy freeze was to follow most of Saturday night and the low will chal- lenge the record of 22

set for the date in 1920, Horst said. That’s bad news for lo- cal orchardists who have already reported some damage to fruit trees from hard freezes ear- lier in the week.

But Horst is confident this is winter’s last real punch. Today will be mostly sunny and cool, with highs in the low to mid- 40s. By Monday, the high temperature is ex- pected to be near 60 de- grees.

“I can’t rule out an

overnight frost later this

month,” Horst said. “But this should be the last hard freeze.”

A measurable snow

in April is a rare thing,

about once every eight

or nine years, Horst said.

The last time there was

a measurable snow in

April was in 2003. The biggest snow to hit dur- ing April in the past 90 years totaled 6 inches, in April 6, 1982. Staff writer Tom Knapp contributed to this report.

6, 1982. Staff writer Tom Knapp contributed to this report. Follow us on Facebook at LancasterOnline

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

LOCAL

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

A5

LNP | LANCASTER, PA LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 A5 CRIME Man arrested after allegedly stabbing

CRIME

Man arrested after allegedly stabbing parents

Daniel Frey, 41, is charged with attempted homicide; he was accused of slashing tires on 21 vehicles earlier in week

RYAN ROBINSON

RROBINSON@LNPNEWS.COM

A city man was arrest- ed Friday evening after allegedly stabbing his father and stepmother in their southwest Lan- caster home. Daniel Eric Frey, 41, was charged with one count of attempted ho- micide and two counts of domestic violence-relat- ed aggravated assault. Frey’s parents live in the 300 block of Win- throp Drive. He lives in an apartment in the 100 block of North Pine Street, city police Detec- tive Matthew Odenthal said in a criminal com- plaint.

Serious condition

The father, Carl Frey, 76, was stabbed nine times in the neck, back and wrist. He was in se- rious condition at Lan- caster General Hospital on Saturday, a nursing supervisor said. The stepmother, Patri- cia Lee, 59, was cut sev- eral times on her right hand and had ligament damage, the complaint states. She was treated and released from the hospital, police said. City police Officer Ben Bradley saw Daniel Frey standing on the side- walk, holding a knife in his right hand, after the 5 p.m. stabbing. Frey was covered in blood, the complaint stated. The knife was a Black Label folding knife with a 3.5-inch blade. Frey tossed the knife away as Bradley ap-

a 3.5-inch blade. Frey tossed the knife away as Bradley ap- Daniel Eric Frey was com-

Daniel

Eric Frey

was com-

mitted to

Lancaster

County

Prison on

$750,000

bail.

proached in his marked police cruiser, police said. Other officers ar- rived and helped arrest Frey without incident. Carl Frey was leaning against a car near his son, and was bleeding from his neck, police said. Of- ficer Shannon Mazzante retrieved a towel from the Frey home to give first aid to him until EMS arrived and took him to the hospital. Police did not reveal a motive for the alleged attack. A call to the Win- throp Drive home was not returned Saturday. Odenthal charged Daniel Frey before Dis- trict Judge Adam Witko- nis. Frey was arraigned Saturday and commit- ted to Lancaster County Prison on $750,000 bail. Anyone with infor- mation related to this assault is urged to call Lancaster city police at 735-3300 or Lancaster City/County Crime Stoppers at 1-800-322- 1913. You can also click the Submit a Tip button at lancasterpolice.com, or Text a Tip to Crime Stoppers by texting LANCS plus your mes- sage to 847411. Tipsters may remain anonymous and do not have to give their names. Earlier this week, Dan- iel Frey was charged with

names. Earlier this week, Dan- iel Frey was charged with BLAINE T. SHAHAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

BLAINE T. SHAHAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Police, fire and EMS units responded to the double stabbing in the 300 block of Winthrop Drive.

puncturing tires on 21 vehicles near his apart- ment March 24. Police said they found Frey holding a folding knife shortly before 1 o’clock that morning near West Chestnut and North Pine streets after being called there about someone stabbing tires. Witnesses identified Frey, and police found tires on 21 vehicles had been punctured, result- ing in about $2,800 in damage. Frey was charged with 21 counts of criminal mischief, and also disor- derly conduct for alleg- edly yelling on a porch in the 100 block of North Pine Street and refusing police orders to go in- side.

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Lancaster Mitsubishi & Mitsubishi Motors Wants to Congratulate One of Their Own!

Millie Rivera was just named the

#1 Sales Associate of the Year

for Mitsubishi dealers according to Mitsubishi Motor Report

for Mitsubishi dealers according to Mitsubishi Motor Report ued. “We are very happy to have her

ued. “We are very happy to have her as a member of the Lancaster Mitsubishi family.” She also has an extremely high referral rate, with many previous customers recommending her to oth- ers. Her bilingual abilities both with Spanish and English have also tapped

abilities both with Spanish and English have also tapped Millie Rivera, a sales associate for Lancaster

Millie Rivera, a sales associate for Lancaster Mitsubishi and long time area resident, has recently been recognized by Mitsubishi Mo- tors of North America for her dedication and abilities. Starting over two years ago, she is now recognized as the number one salesper- son of all Mitsubishi dealerships in the Phila- delphia region, according to a recent company ranking report. Rivera is also known for going the extra mile, willing to work with her customers for as long as needed to get them the best deal for the car they want. is has been invaluable in her work, given the competitive eld. Rivera beat out over 1100 salespeople to be recognized for such an achievement. As a single parent raising a daughter and a young grandson, she knows the requirements of a family. She is proud of the relationships that she has estab- lished in the local community. “We are very proud of her work ethic,” said Sales Manager Nick Tata. “She also helped bring diversity to the organization.” Mr. Tata credited Ms. Rivera with helping raise the dealership’s standing within Mitsubishi Mo- tors. e Mitsubishi franchise was ranked 360th of 380 nationally in 2012. It is now ranked in the top ten dealerships in the US market. “She embodies the teamwork, knowl- edge, and customer care we value,” he contin-

into new communities within the Lancaster area and increased the dealership’s customer base. “We have worked hard to change the im- age of Mitsubishi in the Lancaster Market” Mitsubishi and Millie Riveria have been a good t. “Mitsubishi has brought some very good vehicles to the market place. e 2016 Outlander has exceeded sales expectations and the 2017 Mirage is staged to arrive in the showrooms very soon. Mitsubishi has all of the items most people are looking for in a new car, great value, an outstanding 5 year 60,000 mile limited bumper to bumper war- ranty and of course our famous LLM Club. Lancaster Mitsubishi gave me all of the tools to make my goal’s happen. Having been in the auto industry for over 15 years , I wanted to be a example that if I can make it they can too. It can be a chore or a challenge it all de- pends on the outlook you have, I never gave up, I knew what my goal was and I am so thankful for all of my customers that helped me make this dream come true”

e entire team at Lancaster Mitsubishi would like to congratulate Millie on her accomplishments and hope her success continues.

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A6

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

FROM PAGE A1

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

A6 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 FROM PAGE A1 LNP | LANCASTER, PA Budget: Competing spending plans

Budget: Competing spending plans from Wolf and GOP

Continued from A1

week, saying it goes against language in the budget he allowed to pass. The budget bill speci- fied that education funds could not be disbursed without the passage of the accompanying fiscal code — which Wolf ve- toed, said Jennifer Ko- cher, spokeswoman for Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman. “When you veto the fiscal code, we view it as the money should be frozen, not that you should begin arbitrarily distributing the money,” she said. Wolf spokesman Jef- frey Sheridan said, “Our actions are consistent with the provisions of House Bill 1801, and we will continue to ap- propriate money to dis- tricts.”

Commission’s

formula

The fiscal code would have distributed new ed- ucation dollars through a formula developed by

a bipartisan legislative commission last year. Under the code, most Lancaster County school districts would see sig- nificantly more money this year than they would

see under Wolf’s formu- la: in total, $8.1 million versus $3.6 million. The difference under- scores the reason the commission was created, said Sen. Lloyd Smucker,

a Republican from West

Lampeter Township, in

a press release Thursday. “A distribution meth- odology based on evi- dence and data was our goal, to keep politics, randomness and un- predictability out of the equation,” the release read in part. Several Lancaster County school leaders also said that the com- mission’s formula is the way to go. “We feel strongly that the bipartisan formula that was crafted was a reliable and predictable means to drive dollars to schools based on student need,” said Matt Przy- wara, chief financial and

operations officer for School District of Lan- caster. Of the 17 county school districts, only Octorara and Columbia would get a smaller boost from the commission’s formula — 4.7 versus 4.1, and 4.2 versus 3.9 percent, re- spectively — than from Wolf’s plan. Even so, Columbia school board President

Tom Strickler said the commission’s formu-

la should be adopted:

“Why did we do it, if it’s not going to be used? It shouldn’t matter one year who gets what.” Among other districts, the increases over 2014- 15 funding would range from 2.9 percent at Man- heim Central to 13.1 per- cent at Conestoga Valley with the commission’s formula.

Considering a lawsuit

The state Department of Education began dis- tributing remaining 2015-16 funds to dis- tricts last week using the

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LANCASTER | EAST LAMPETER | NEW DANVILLE MOUNT JOY | HERSHEY
LANCASTER
|
EAST LAMPETER
|
NEW DANVILLE
MOUNT JOY
|
HERSHEY

| EAST LAMPETER | NEW DANVILLE MOUNT JOY | HERSHEY We feel strongly that the bipartisan

We feel strongly that the bipartisan formula that was crafted was a reliable and predictable means to drive dollars to schools based on student need.

— Matt Przywara, Chief financial and operations officer School District of Lancaster

MONEY FOR SCHOOLS

Gov. Tom Wolf recently announced how he would distribute the remainder of school funding for 2015-16, but Republican legislators want it to be divided using a formula created last year by a bipartisan funding commission. These are the increases that Lancaster County school districts would get this year under each formula.

GOVERNOR PLAN COMMISSION PLAN

SCHOOL DISTRICT

DOLLAR PERCENT DOLLAR PERCENT INCREASE INCREASE INCREASE INCREASE

COCALICO

$128,108

1.8%

$285,385

4.0%

COLUMBIA

$269,970

4.2%

$256,182

3.9%

CONESTOGA VALLEY

$50,167

1.5%

$454,988

13.1%

DONEGAL

$140,787

2.0%

$267,005

3.8%

ELANCO

$82,650

2.0%

$213,868

5.1%

ELIZABETHTOWN

$171,256

2.0%

$315,214

3.6%

EPHRATA

$136,422

1.5%

$396,515

4.3%

HEMPFIELD

$247,514

2.0%

$463,825

3.7%

L-S

$71,829

1.8%

$230,069

5.9%

LANCASTER

$1,233,306

2.2%

$3,139,320

5.6%

MANHEIM CENTRAL

$104,258

1.6%

$196,877

2.9%

MANHEIM TOWNSHIP

$80,744

1.6%

$461,095

9.1%

OCTORARA

$281,004

4.7%

$245,260

4.1%

PENN MANOR

$211,449

1.9%

$409,657

3.6%

PEQUEA VALLEY

$59,721

2.3%

$124,306

4.7%

SOLANCO

$146,679

1.5%

$306,924

3.1%

WARWICK

$177,051

1.8%

$348,732

3.6%

TOTAL

$3.6 M

 

$8.1 M

governor’s formula, ac- cording to a department representative. And of- ficials at some districts reported receiving part of their allocations last week. Senate leaders are considering a lawsuit over the issue, a spokes- woman for Smucker said

SOURCE: OFFICES OF THE GOVERNOR AND THE SENATE MAJORITY LEADER

Friday. Jay Himes, executive director of the Penn- sylvania Association of School Business Of- ficials, said he expects legislators to push ad- ditional legislation to

change the governor’s formula. The continued uncertainty is hamper- ing districts’ abilities to plan for next year, Himes said . Local school officials also want leaders in Har- risburg to move on to figuring out next year’s budget. In Penn Manor, for in-

stance, officials are be- ing very conservative

with estimates for state

contributions in 2016- 17, Superintendent Mike

Leichliter said.

And once this year is settled, administra- tors are preparing for another “multimonth budget fiasco” next year, Leichliter said.

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A8

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

FROM PAGE A1

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

A8 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 FROM PAGE A1 LNP | LANCASTER, PA Rails: Statistically safer than

Rails: Statistically safer than vehicular transportation

LOCAL RAIL FATALITIES IN RECENT YEARS

n May 2015: Marietta man,

85, died of injuries two months after vehicle struck

by oil train at crossing in Bainbridge.

n June 2013: Christiana

man, 34, struck by train near Parkesburg station.

Ruled suicide.

n July 2009: East

Hempfield man, 42, struck and killed by Amtrak train near Salunga. Ruled suicide.

n Aug. 2005: Leola

man, 29, struck and killed by Amtrak train in East

Lampeter Twp. Ruled accidental.

Continued from A1

The investigation of last Sunday’s accident continues. Federal rail-

road officials confirmed this week that Amtrak workers were not fol- lowing basic safety rules prior to the collision.

The numbers

Most of Pennsylvania’s

train-related deaths get much less media atten- tion than those inci- dents. On Monday night, for example, a person was struck and killed by a train in Allegheny Coun-

ty. The Associated Press carried three-paragraph report with few details. The data show that type of rail fatality is much more common than passenger deaths. According to the rail- road administration, 456 people were killed in

rail-related incidents in Pennsylvania from Jan. 1, 2000, through Jan. 30,

2016.

Here’s the breakdown on those 456 deaths:

— 343 victims, or 75 percent, were “trespass- ers,” not in vehicles, who were somewhere other than at a rail crossing.

vehicles, who were somewhere other than at a rail crossing. Connect with us Facebook, Twitter &

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Repair For All Major Brands! www.ReNewedHearingSolutions.com — 79 deaths, or 17 per- cent, occurred at rail

— 79 deaths, or 17 per-

cent, occurred at rail crossings.

— 10 victims, or 2 per-

cent, were rail passen-

gers. (Eight of them died in last May’s crash in Philadelphia.)

— 12 victims were rail-

road employees (not in- cluding the two Amtrak workers killed last Sun- day). — 12 deaths were at- tributed to automobile- train accidents that did not occur at official crossings. According to the data, the Philadelphia derail- ment last May made 2015 the deadliest year on Pennsylvania rail lines this century, with 36 deaths. Had it not been for those eight passenger

deaths, 2015 would have been an average year.

What people think

For passengers, trains are statistically much

safer than automobiles.

A 2013 study by North-

western University found the fatality rate

per-mile-traveled to be about 17 times higher for autos than for passenger trains. At the Lancaster Am- trak station Thursday morning, several Phila- delphia passengers ar- riving in Lancaster for

a conference said they

weren’t personally wor- ried for their safety. “I feel quite comfort- able riding Amtrak, even with these last two ac- cidents,” said Heather

Traino, 42. It’s clear that cars are more dangerous, she said, but “we’re just so car-centric” that most

people don’t dwell on that risk. Caitlin Lam, 27, said

she feels fine riding the train, but added that the Keystone Line between Philadelphia and Lan- caster seems a bit safer than the north-south line that runs through Philadelphia. “I think that corridor

is known for being a bit

more dangerous,” Lam said.

Jack Knauer, 26, noted that there are curves on the north-south track through Philadelphia. “Out here, it’s basically

a straight shot” through farmland, he said.

Roads: Speed, DUI add risk

Continued from A1

LANCASTER COUNTY TRAFFIC DEATHS

580) or hit a fixed object (up from 425 to 459). According to the PennDOT
580) or hit a fixed object
(up from 425 to 459).
According to the
PennDOT report, there
were 48 traffic deaths
in Lancaster County in
2015. That was down
from 62 in 2014 but high-
er than the 45 recorded
in 2013.
Of those 48 deaths last
year, seven victims were
pedestrians and seven
were on motorcycles.
Seventeen victims
died in alcohol-related
crashes, and 14 died in
accidents that involved
speeding. Twenty-six
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2010 2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
YEAR
of
the
victims
died
in
crashes in which a single
vehicle ran off the road.
Only two people here
died in accidents caused
by distracted drivers.
That was down from six
in 2014.
Fourteen people died
in accidents involving
drivers 65 or older. None
of the fatalities involved
a 16- or 17-year-old driv-
J Jacinda
in i Black,
er.
Seventeen of the vic-
Pewter, P White
or o Taupe Snake
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third — were not wearing
seat belts.
PennDOT said it has
invested about $50 mil-
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FROM PAGE A3

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

A9

LNP | LANCASTER, PA FROM PAGE A3 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 A9 Haircuts: St. Baldrick’s fundraiser

Haircuts: St. Baldrick’s fundraiser here draws crowd

Continued from A3 nemacher started orga-

across their newly fuzzy pates. As each “shavee” walked from the outdoor tent back into the bar, a cheer went up and glass- es of beer were raised in the air. We’ve Got the Shorts of It, a loud and rowdy vet- eran fundraising team of ladies clad in black-and- pink T-shirts, brought $5,650 to the party this year. “We did our own bag auctions and sub sales and asked a lot of great people for help,” fresh- ly shorn team captain Coleen Dean said. There was also a lot off the top for Lancaster’s top cop. Lancaster city police Chief Keith Sadler said he hadn’t gotten a hair- cut for more than three months so he’d have a full head of hair to sur- render to the stylists’ clippers Saturday. Sadler said he and other city police officers have been getting their heads shaved ever since city firefighters invited them to join the event eight years ago. “It’s so nice to see so many people participat- ing,” Sadler said. “I’m glad the snow didn’t put a damper on things. “You walk around and talk to total strangers whileyou’rehere,”Sadler said, “and people tell you their stories” about how cancer has touched their lives. “That makes you feel really good about do- ing this.” As of Saturday after- noon, Sadler had raised $1,380 for St. Baldrick’s. The Lancaster City Po- lice stood in fourth place among the fundrais- ing teams, with nearly $6,300 raised. Billy Nonnemacher’s dark curls joined the piles of pruned locks on the ground too. Non-

nizing the Lancaster St.

Baldrick’s event after at- tending a similar event

14 years ago in York.

Nonnemacher noted Lancaster’s is the larg- est St. Baldrick’s event in Pennsylvania in terms of the amount of money raised. Saturday’s gathering at Annie Bailey’s was per- sonal for Nonnemacher as well. “I was diagnosed with cancer when I was 3,” Nonnemacher said. “I had a brain tumor.” While he wasn’t expect-

ed to live to the age of 5, Nonnemacher is nearly

33 now.

His childhood treat- ment took place at Chil- dren’s Hospital of Phila- delphia, he noted, one of the research institutions that benefit from St. Bal- drick’s funding. All of the cancer research funds raised Saturday will stay in Pennsylvania, he add- ed. Sydney Bush, of Lan- caster, found it “amaz- ing” that her friends and neighbors, members of the Shaving for Syd team, lose their locks ev- ery year in recognition of the brain tumor she bat- tled when she was just 2 years old. Gamma-knife radia- tion treatments helped save her life, her older sister, Katie, said. Now a happy, healthy 12-year-old, Sydney in- spired 10 people (includ- ing her father, Pete) to get their heads shaved Saturday and raise more than $7,800. “Our neighbors are the best,” Sydney added. Sydney’s young friends, Aidan and Liam Hodge, ages 10 and 7, said their heads felt “soft” and “funny” after they and their father, Jake, went under the clippers in Sydney’s honor. They

Jake, went under the clippers in Sydney’s honor. They Sean Leipart, of Windsor, shows off his

Sean Leipart, of Windsor, shows off his shorn locks.

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were all smiles, though, and enthusiastic about helping the cancer char- ity. Tony Kambouroglos was already a three-year participant in the St. Bal- drick’s fundraiser when he was diagnosed with thyroid cancer last fall. Despite the afteref- fects of a thyroidectomy and other cancer treat- ments, Kambouroglos was there again Saturday to surrender his hair for the cause — now an even more powerful symbol in his own life.

n For more information on the St. Baldrick’s Foundation or the Lancaster fundraising effort, or to make a donation, visit bit.ly/Lancaster StBaldrick.

or to make a donation, visit bit.ly/Lancaster StBaldrick. RANDY HESS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS Lancaster police

RANDY HESS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS

Lancaster police Sgt. Bill Hickey and his sons, 8-year-old Joseph, left, and 9-year-old Benjamin, right, got their heads shaved Saturday.

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24897A

A10

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

FROM PAGE A1

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

A10 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 FROM PAGE A1 LNP | LANCASTER, PA Voters: What they’re looking

Voters: What they’re looking for in a future president

Continued from A1

a border wall or tuition- free college, voters are narrowing in on the is- sues that matter most to them and their families. The latest statewide poll from Franklin & Marshall College found that both Democratic and Republican vot- ers — 29 percent each — consider the personal characteristics of the presidential candidates as the most important factor. Next most important are issues of “terrorism, war and foreign policy” for 13 percent of Repub- licans and 11 percent of Democrats; and “unem- ployment, economy and finances” for 10 percent of Republicans and 12 percent of Democrats. LNP talked with peo-

ple across the county this week to learn which issues are influencing their vote.

Immigration and foreign policy

Jessica King, a 31-year- old secretary from Peach Bottom, said the next president’s approach to national security is im- portant to her. At Good’s Store in Quarryville, the regis- tered Republican said she expects to support Trump, having been drawn by his promise of building a wall to keep out illegal immigrants from Mexico — paid for by the southern neigh- bor. But it’s this same bold rhetoric that is also pushing most of the na-

this same bold rhetoric that is also pushing most of the na- I like the fact

I like the fact that he’s not owned by anybody.

— Cory Wiggins, of Peach Bottom, on Donald Trump.

tional electorate — 70 percent, according to an AP-GfK poll this week — away from Trump.

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MORE VIEWS FROM LANCASTER COUNTY VOTERS

• 717-569-7000 MORE VIEWS FROM LANCASTER COUNTY VOTERS CHRISTOPHER PRATT | STAFF Elliot Sterenfeld, 53-year- old

CHRISTOPHER PRATT | STAFF

Elliot Sterenfeld, 53-year- old physician from Manheim Township, likes Hillary Clinton’s ability to work with Congress. He has not yet made up his mind, but is leaning toward Clinton.

has not yet made up his mind, but is leaning toward Clinton. CHRISTOPHER PRATT | STAFF

CHRISTOPHER PRATT | STAFF

Cory Craft, 55-year-old school bus driver from Smoketown, is drawn by Ted Cruz’s conservative message. “He’s concerned

about liberty, staying with

the Constitution

farther we get from that, the more the government’s going to be dictating, like so many other countries.”

The

going to be dictating, like so many other countries.” The CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Mary

CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Mary Peterson, 76, of Man- heim Township, supports John Kasich. “He has the experience. He’s a person with poise and know-how. It does bother me when they say he doesn’t have a chance.”

“I feel like he’s a rac- ist,” Brianna Kinard, a 21-year-old Millersville University student from York, said Wednesday at Park City Center. Many prospective vot- ers expressed to LNP the same sentiment, citing

Trump’s plan to build a border wall, deport 11 million illegal immi- grants, and ban Muslims from entering the coun- try. Kinard doesn’t under- stand why Trump would make those his goals.

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Others understand on a personal level. Sitting with Fokas at the mall, Gus Kouros, who also emigrated from Greece and worked for 30 years at Armstrong World Industries, said he’s a registered Demo- crat who would vote for Trump in November be- cause “he’s going to fix immigration.” “We have so many mil- lion people here, and they work and they make their money and send it back to their countries. They don’t pay taxes,” Kouros, 73, of Manheim Township said, empha- sizing that he came to the country legally 48 years ago. “I work all my life and I never get anything, but these people, they get so much free.” Peach Bottom resident Cory Wiggins consid- ers himself a “die-hard Republican,” but the 53-year-old mainte- nance worker is up in the air about whom to support. Wiggins doesn’t agree with all that Trump has said, but “I like the fact that he’s not owned by anybody.” For 23-year-old Mari- etta resident Ashley Lutz, Trump’s candidacy is “ridiculous,” but strict- er immigration policies may be worthwhile. “I think the fact that there was an ISIS mem- ber found in Harrisburg, that scares me,” Lutz said of the December arrest of 19-year-old Jalil Ibn Ameer Aziz. “So in some ways it could be a good thing, but then every- body compares (Trump) to Hitler, and that’s kind of how it seems.”

VOTERS, page A11

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

FROM PAGE A10

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

A11

LNP | LANCASTER, PA FROM PAGE A10 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 A11 Voters: Leanings Continued from

Voters: Leanings

Continued from A10

Jobs and

economy

As he visited the Nep- tune Diner with a friend Wednesday, Rakee DaSilva, 27, of Lancaster city, said Bernie Sanders’ populist economic mes- sage has resonated with him. “I’m thinking this guy is going to help me, as someone who earns less than $15 an hour,” the cook said as he ate corn chowder. “I like how he portrays himself.” While both Sanders and Trump have attract- ed lower-income voters in the primaries, the Ver- mont senator’s push to raise the minimum wage and break up the power of Wall Street resonated with more than a few lo- cal voters. “People are doing bad. People are trying to make it,” said Rob- ert Watkins, 52, a city resident taking a break from his job at Park City Center. Watkins hadn’t decided whom he would vote for but knew he wouldn’t vote for any of the Republican candi- dates. “We got a little push with Obama trying to straighten things out with the health care and everything, and still the Republicans are trying to fight it,” Watkins said of the GOP stance that raising the minimum wage would hurt busi- nesses. “Are they for the people, or are they for the rich people?” Paul Murray, 20, a ju- nior studying psychol- ogy at Franklin & Mar- shall College, said at the mall that while he still needs to get clarity on some of the specific is- sues, Sanders’ economic stances “seem to make sense.” “I think there are times when it’s appropriate for the government to step in and regulate (the economy), like the gen- eral concept of minimum wage,” said Murray, who is as yet undecided.

Education

Education was also on the minds of potential voters this week. Dario Bernardini, working Wednesday in the Manheim Township Public Library, said that as a professor at Ameri- can University, he and his students naturally have been concerned with the costs of higher

naturally have been concerned with the costs of higher I’m thinking this guy is going to

I’m thinking this guy is going to help me, as someone who earns less than $15 an hour.

— Rakee DaSilva, of Lancaster, on Bernie Sanders.

education. His students are look- ing at loans they’ll be paying off for decades, and there are real fears of not finding a good- paying job, he said. And while Sanders has had his fair share of critics for proposing tuition-free college, Bernardini, 61, of East Hempfield Town- ship, said he thinks the money could be found in the federal budget. “I think Sen. Sanders is addressing more of those concerns with more of a significant change than Secretary (Hillary) Clin- ton, where she would just have more of an in- cremental change,” Ber- nardini said. Troy Richardson, a human services worker from Lancaster Town- ship, said improving ed- ucation was a top issue for him, and he’s “ten- tatively, probably now leaning toward Sanders.” The registered Demo- crat said he’d like to see reforms to the student loan system. “It’s America, so edu- cation should be a top priority for everybody,” Richardson said at Nep- tune Diner.

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Program seeks to help seniors stay ‘healthy. vibrant and active’

HEATHER STAUFFER

HSTAUFFER@LNPNEWS.COM

Two Lancaster city hospitals are mount- ing an extensive effort to engage local senior citizens through a new initiative called Senior Circle. The goal is “to help seniors stay healthy, vibrant and active,” according to Alondra Thomas, who’s coor- dinating the program for Lancaster Regional Medical Center and Heart of Lancaster Re- gional Medical Center. “We hope to also en- courage seniors to pur-

sue the things they love, try new hobbies and interests, and meet new friends,” she said. For $15 a year or $27 for couples, the hospi- tals will offer members age 50 and older over- the-counter discounts, free vitamins and free prescription deliveries from the pharmacy at 250 College Avenue in Lancaster; a free daily meal ticket for a care- giver during hospital- izations; and free lunch- es during educational programs. Other membership perks include discounts

at the hospital cafete- rias, from some local businesses and from participating vision and hearing care providers. Senior Circle will also offer monthly member meetings and coordinate visits to local restaurants and cultural attractions, morning walks and fit- ness classes. The program is launching locally with an April 11 event at Eden Resort featuring humorous motivational speaker Charles Mar- shall. For more infor- mation call 625-5756

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LOCAL

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

A12 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 LOCAL LNP | LANCASTER, PA CRASH 1 injured when minivan strikes

CRASH

1 injured when minivan strikes pole

Report: Passenger suffers leg injury

STAFF

A minivan crashed

through a sign shortly af-

ter 3 p.m. Saturday, then struck a pole at 2626 Lincoln Highway E. One person in the minivan was injured, ac-

cording to officials at the scene.

The Dodge Grand Cara-

van was traveling west when it crossed over the eastbound lane, crashed

through a large sign be-

fore striking a pole. Ini- tial radio reports from Lancaster County-Wide Communications indicat- ed a passenger in the van had suffered a leg injury. Traffic in the area was slowed around the crash scene while firefighters from Ronks, Gordonville Ambulance and East Lampeter police worked the scene.

Ambulance and East Lampeter police worked the scene. Follow us on Twitter at LancasterOnline WHO DO

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CHARGES

Report: Woman housed

children in ‘unsanitary’

dwelling with drugs

Drug task force says it discovered conditions when serving warrant

RYAN ROBINSON

RROBINSON@LNPNEWS.COM

An eastern Lancaster County woman had two young children living in unsanitary conditions with illegal drugs within their reach, police al- leged. Amy Lynn Geisel, 26, of 6231 North St. in Salisbury Township, was charged Thursday with two counts of endanger- ing the welfare of chil- dren.

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Lancaster County Drug Task Force mem- bers discovered the con-

ditions of Geisel’s home when they tried to serve a warrant there Aug. 19, 2015, state police Troop-

er Nelson Renno said in

a criminal complaint.

A 3-year-old boy and a

5-year-old girl were liv-

ing in “unsanitary con- ditions” in a home in “complete disarray.” Drug task force mem- bers found a purse con- taining methamphet- amine, marijuana and drug paraphernalia on the floor of a bedroom that was accessible to the children, the com- plaint stated. A used

hypodermic needle was also found next to a play

set outside.

Possible abuse

Geisel was later ques- tioned and said money she was found with was from drug sales and child support, the com-

plaint stated. In Octo- ber, Lancaster County Children and Youth gave state police a report de- tailing the possible child abuse and neglect at the home. Police in February tried to contact Geisel but were unsuccessful, the complaint stated. Her attorney later told police she would not be giving a statement re- garding the investiga- tion. Calls to Geisel on Fri- day and Saturday went

to a machine that said

she was not available. A preliminary hearing before District Judge Raymond S. Sheller is scheduled for April 28.

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A14

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

LOCAL

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

A14 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 LOCAL LNP | LANCASTER, PA DRUG ABUSE Doctors tackle ‘No. 1

DRUG ABUSE

Doctors tackle ‘No. 1 question’

Physicians meet to discuss how to treat patients with chronic opioid use

SUSAN BALDRIGE

SBALDRIGE@LNPNEWS.COM

Physicians are becom- ing more worried about opioid abuse among their patients, and some are weighing whether to impose “controlled sub- stance agreements,” en- roll them in a statewide registry or conduct ran- dom urine drug testing. The suggestions were raised by doctors meet- ing at a recent seminar to discuss how to treat patients who have been on opioid medications — including Percocet, Oxy- Contin, Vicodin and De- merol — for years. The ongoing seminars are sponsored by LG Health Physicians/Penn Medi- cine. “Now that the whole opioid epidemic has come to light, we know this isn’t the way to go,” said Dr. Paul Conslato, an internist and the di- rector of clinical affairs at LG Health Physicians/ Penn Medicine. Conslato said the issue is the top concern among primary care physicians here. Opioids are often associated with abuse and overdose, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. They are the most common pre- scription drug found in overdose deaths.

most common pre- scription drug found in overdose deaths. Now that the whole opioid epidemic has

Now that the whole opioid epidemic has come to light, we know this isn’t the way to go.

—­Dr.­ Paul­ Conslato, internist and director of clinical affairs at LG Health Physicians/Penn Medicine

Conslato supports the nearly 300 primary and specialty medical groups in 40 offices across Lan- caster County that are part of the LG Health/ Penn Medicine organi- zation. Those medical groups treat 180,000 pa- tients in the county. Out of those, an estimated 3,100 are on chronic opi- oid therapy. Doctors are now meet- ing to discuss what to

do with their patients who suffer from chronic neck, back or stomach

pain and are on pre- scribed opioids as part of their treatment. “It’s the No. 1 thing I’m asked about,” Conslato said. “How do they deal with these patients who are chronic users of opi- oids? How do they main- tain their relationships with the patients?” LG Health/Penn Medi- cine has been sponsoring education seminars over the past nine months for doctors and nurses to learn from each other. At

a recent seminar, more

than 40 health profes- sionals gathered at the Ann Barshinger Cancer

Center to discuss how to treat patients on chronic opioid therapy for pain. The suggestions in- cluded:

— Assessing the risk

and appropriateness of the opioid prescription.

— Having a controlled substance agreement with the patient.

— Avoiding high doses

of prescribed opioids.

— Registering the pa-

tient with the statewide prescription drug medi- cal project.

— Conducting random

urine drug testing. In some cases, patients have been using opioids

testing. In some cases, patients have been using opioids Opioids are the most common prescription drug

Opioids are

the most

common

prescription

drug found

in overdose

deaths.

for more than a de- cade and are using them with many other medications as well. Doctors suggested a warning sign of addic- tion is when a patient calls and wants an early prescription or a

partial prescription of opioids. “We now know the

danger of long-term opioid use, especially when combined with

benzodiazepines,”

said Dr. Joseph Tron-

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HISTORY

Genocide forum looks at Armenia

TIM STUHLDREHER

TSTUHLDREHER@LNPNEWS.COM

“There’s really no way

to

rid history completely

of

politics,” scholar Ron-

ald Grigor Suny told his audience Thursday eve- ning at Millersville Uni-

versity. That’s certainly true in the case of the Arme- nian genocide, the topic to which Suny, a profes- sor at the University of Michigan and professor emeritus at the Univer- sity of Chicago, has de- voted much of his career. The genocide remains

a political flashpoint in

Turkey today, Suny said in his keynote address for Millersville’s 34th Conference on the Holo- caust and Genocide that ended Friday. The three-day confer- ence, which was open to the university com- munity and the general public, is one of many ways Millersville pro- motes engagement with world issues, and its les- sons illustrate the need for greater tolerance in the world, university President John Ander- son said. Donegal High School social studies teacher Justin Neideigh found Suny’s talk fascinating, and his style clear and accessible. A number of Neideigh’s students were attend- ing for extra credit. For college-bound students, having the chance to be exposed to a scholar like Suny is “invaluable,” Neideigh said. The Turkish gov- ernment continues to downplay the scope and meaning of the mass death; while for progres- sive Turks acknowledg- ing it is a key litmus test of a tolerant, pluralistic worldview. Historians believe the Ottoman government, beginning in 1915, pros- ecuted a campaign of

mass killing and depor- tation that resulted in the deaths of as many as 1.5 million Armenians. Starting in the late 1990s, Suny organized an international consor- tium of researchers and worked with them to de- velop a scholarly consen- sus on what occurred. Suny said he did not initially use the word “genocide,” but has come to consider it the appropriate word, given the documentary record of the Ottomans’ inten- tions.

“Genocide is not the mass killing of people,” he said. “It is the mass killing of a people.” But genocide did not fit the nationalist narrative of the modern, secular Turkey that ruler Kemal Ataturk sought to build in the mid-20th century, so the history of the Ot- toman Armenians was both marginalized and misrepresented. Today, Turkey is bat- tling another minority, the Kurds. President Re- cep Tayyip Erdogan, an authoritarian Islamist, has taken a hard line, portraying the Kurds and their sympathizers as terrorists and vowing to crush their “treach- ery” once and for all. The Kurds, Suny said, see parallels between themselves and the Ar- menians: “What the Turks did to you, they’re

doing to

They had

you for breakfast, they’ll have us for dinner.” Armenians, Turks and Kurds will always have to live near each other, Suny said. Perhaps histo- rians, by exposing “foun- dational crimes” such as the Armenian genocide, can make people more

skeptical of national- ism and of competing nationalist claims of ex- clusive sovereignty over this or that stretch of land.

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You can help us choose the COVER PHOTO for the Mother’s Day Tribute!
You can help us choose the
COVER PHOTO
for the Mother’s Day Tribute!

The Mother’s Day Tribute will be

VOTE favorite from for APRIL photo your 10-23! ll be ’s 12
VOTE
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your 10-23!
ll be
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published in LNP on Mother’s

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

LOCAL

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

A15

LNP | LANCASTER, PA LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 A15 ELECTION 2016 PUBLIC WORKS GOP candidates

ELECTION 2016

PUBLIC WORKS

GOP candidates for 13th District to debate Monday

LNP Media Group, Lancaster Chamber co-sponsor event

Playground, pool due for makeovers

City seeks grant for Long’s Park project, fixes Reservoir Park wading pool

DAN NEPHIN

DNEPHIN@LNPNEWS.COM

The city is planning upgrades for the large playground at Long’s Park. The wooden play structures, known as the castle, would be replaced. So would mulch, with more du- rable rubber matting, and stormwater man- agement features, such as a rain garden, would be added. “We’ve made about as many repairs as we can,” said Charlotte Katzenmoyer, the city’s public works di- rector. The play struc- ture’s wood is rotting and splintering, caus- ing safety concerns. Katzenmoyer es- timates the project would cost about $750,000, which includes about $250,000 for play equipment and about $200,000 for the rub- ber matting. The city wants to apply to the state Department of Con- servation and Natu- ral Resources for a Community Conser- vation Partnerships Program grant to pay for about half of the cost. The city would look for fundraising opportunities to help with the remaining cost — the Sertoma Club of Lancaster, which hosts an annual

chicken barbecue fund- raiser, was mentioned as a possibility — along with city money. City council voted at Monday’s committee meeting to move the plan to council for con- sideration. Presuming council approves applying for the grant, the city likely wouldn’t learn if it gets the grant until fall. Work would take place next year or in 2018, Katzen- moyer said.

Reservoir Park wading pool

Workers renovating Reservoir Park’s wading pool found it was built on unsuitable fill, which

led to cracks and leaks, Katzenmoyer said. Though a contractor wanted $60,000 to re- move and dispose of the material and replace it with appropriate fill, the city’s public works de- partment staff was able to do the job for $23,500, Patrick Hopkins, the city’s business adminis- trator, told council. The city had budgeted $360,000 for repairs. Council moved Hop- kin’s request to transfer the additional $23,500 between city accounts to pay for the work to council for consider- ation. Workers ran into the same problem last year with the King Elemen-

tary School wading pool. But that was more costly, as the pool ulti- mately had to be entirely rebuilt at a cost of about $550,000, instead of the anticipated $380,000 in repairs. Reservoir Park’s wad- ing pool was last reno- vated in the 1980s. Katzenmoyer said it was common practice

a long time ago to use

demolition debris and the like for fill instead of disposing of it in a land- fill, but that’s not done today. Despite the additional work, Reservoir Park’s wading pool is sched- uled to open on time, along with the city’s oth-

er wading pools, in June.

STAFF

The three Republicans running for state Senate in the 13th District will appear together Monday at their first and only public debate before the April 26 primary. The debate, which is free and open to the pub- lic, begins at 7 p.m. and is being held in the the- ater of the Willow Valley Communities Cultural Center in Willow Street. The 90-minute debate is co-sponsored by LNP Media Group and the Lancaster Chamber of Commerce & Industry. It will be live-streamed on LancasterOnline. com. It will also air on Spanish American Civ- ic Association radio, WLCH 91.3 FM. The three Republi- can candidates — Ethan Demme, Scott Martin and Neal Rice — are seeking the seat being vacated at the end of 2016 by two-term state Sen. Lloyd Smucker, who is running for Con- gress. The winner of the Re- publican primary will face Democrat Greg Paulson, the chief of staff to state Rep. Mike Sturla and a former chairman of the Lancaster City

Democrats. Paulson is unopposed for his par- ty’s nomination. Martin, a former coun- ty commissioner from West Lampeter Town- ship, and Demme, an East Lampeter Town- ship supervisor and head of Demme Learning, ap- peared together at a de- bate in Paradise Town- ship in late January. Rice, an attorney from West Lampeter Town- ship, did not attend. The Willow Valley Communities Cultural Center is located at 900 Willow Valley Lakes Drive in Willow Street. The moderators are Barbara Hough Roda, executive editor of LNP, and Tom Baldrige, presi- dent and chief executive officer of the chamber. The 13th District covers Lancaster city; Christiana, Millersville, Quarryville and Stras- burg boroughs; and Bart, Colerain, Conestoga, Drumore, East Drumore, East Lampeter, Eden, Fulton, Lancaster, Lea- cock, Little Britain, Manheim, Manor, Mar- tic, Paradise, Pequea, Providence, Sadsbury, Salisbury, Strasburg, Up- per Leacock and West Lampeter townships.

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A16

SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016

LOCAL

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 LOCAL LNP | LANCASTER, PA West Lampeter Township police released these
A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016 LOCAL LNP | LANCASTER, PA West Lampeter Township police released these

West Lampeter Township police released these still pictures taken from a surveillance video of a man wanted for shoplifing at Kmart at Kendig Square.

CRIME

Man is wanted in shoplifting at Kmart

RYAN ROBINSON

RROBINSON@LNPNEWS.COM

A shoplifter was caught on a surveillance camera at a Willow Street store, police said. Now, they need the public’s help to identify him. The man removed security features on numerous items and fled without paying for them at the Kmart store in the Kendig Square shopping center

on Thursday, West Lampeter Township police said. Police ask anyone with information to call township police Cpl. Jeremy Schro- eder at 464-2421. Tipsters also may call Lancaster City/ County Crime Stop- pers at 1-800-322- 1913 or anonymously text LANCS plus your message to 847411

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Police log

AGGRAVATED

ASSAULT

n LANCASTER: Amy L.

Hunt, 40, of the 800 block of Columbia Avenue, was charged after she stabbed

a man in the leg during a

domestic incident at her home April 5, police said.

CRIMINAL

MISCHIEF

n LITITZ: Joshua C.

Hendershott, 27, of Lititz, was charged with breaking

a rear windshield of a

vehicle in the first block of Kleine Lane Feb. 6, police said.

n SALISBURY TWP.: Four

homes had marbles from

a moving vehicle shot into

their homes on Feb. 23, state police reported. The homes were located on the 800 block of Narvon Road, the 1000 block of Elwood Road and the 5000 block of Meadville Road.

DISORDERLY

CONDUCT

n MANHEIM TWP.:

Shareef N. Ahmed, 21, of Philadelphia, was charged after he chased a woman and caused a disturbance in the 100 block of North Pointe Boulevard April 4, police said.

DRUG CHARGES

of marijuana and drug paraphernalia after a traffic stop in the 1000 block of Columbia Avenue on April 6, police said.

n WEST LAMPETER TWP.:

Philip H. Adams, 23, of Budview Drive, Willow Street, was charged with possession of marijuana

and drug paraphernalia

after a traffic stop in the township March 30, police

said.

n LITITZ: Tucker Bolich, 18,

of Lititz, was charged April

8 for possession of a small

amount of marijuana after

police said he was found

inside a parked vehicle in the 100 block of Forney

Drive.

DUI

n

CONOY TWP.: Daniel

D.

Jones Jr., 27, of 428

S.

Market St., Apt. 102,

Elizabethtown, was charged after he rolled his vehicle in the 2600 block of Bainbridge Road March 7, police said. A passenger in the vehicle, Sarah E. Vanname, 19, also of the same address, was charged with underage drinking, police said. Neither was injured in the crash.

n LITITZ: A 17-year-old

boy was charged March

5 after a vehicle accident

in the 300 block of North Elm Street. Police said he drove a truck into a parked vehicle which then struck another vehicle.

HARASSMENT

incident April 7, police said.

n LANCASTER TWP.:

Brandon C. Balmer, 40,

of Greythorne Road, was charged after he grabbed

a Lancaster man during a

recent incident at his home, police said.

ROBBERY

n LANCASTER TWP.: A

Lancaster woman reported

that two males grabbed

her from behind, took her cellphone and attempted

to take her purse while she was walking in the 100 block of Charles Road at 6 a.m. April 1. She began screaming for help, and the two fled on foot. They are described as teenagers wearing white T-shirts and dark shorts.

SHOOTING

n LANCASTER: Police

were called to a report of

a shooting at a basketball

court in Crystal Park on First Street around 7:26 p.m. April 8. Dispatchers

said a 17-year-old boy had been shot in the head with

a BB gun. The wound was

called “superficial.”

TERRORISTIC

THREATS

n NEW HOLLAND: A

16-year-old New Holland boy was charged after

a fellow student at

Garden Spot High School overheard him make threats to harm students and a school resource

officer March 29, police

said.

THEFT

n MANHEIM TWP.: Two

rifles were taken from a vehicle in the first block of Roosevelt Boulevard on April 4, police said. Loss is

$1,290.

n EAST PETERSBURG: A

truck bed cover was taken from a vehicle parked in the 6400 block of Lemon Street overnight April 2, police said. Loss is $600.

n EAST LAMPETER TWP.:

Jorge Luis Perez, 28, of

Lancaster, was charged

with stealing $190 in cash and two rental movie DVDs

from a woman’s purse in

C O N T R O L www.KirchnerBrothers.com 717.394.8838 P E S T

C O N T R O L

www.KirchnerBrothers.com

717.394.8838

P E S T

Since 1952 Home for Funerals Modest Funerals • Plain Cof ns Philip W. Furman, F.D.
Since 1952
Home for Funerals
Modest Funerals • Plain Cof ns
Philip W. Furman, F.D.

a shopping cart April 7 at

the Wal-Mart on Lincoln Highway East. When the woman reported the theft, store officials viewed the

theft on surveillance video,

police said, and were able to apprehend Perez, who was still in the store.

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