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SELF ASSESSMENT REPORT

(SAR)
FOR ACCREDITATION OF
UG ENGINEERING PROGRAMME (Computer Science & Engineering)
(TIER-II)

Submitted to

NATIONAL BOARD OF ACCREDITATION

New Delhi

AMAL JYOTHI COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Koovappally P. O., Kanjirappally
Kottayam Dst. Kerala

SEPTEMBER 2015

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Contents
Title

Page
No.

PART-A
1 Institutional Information

2 Departmental Information

12

3 Programme Specific Information

15

PART-B
1 Vision, Mission and Programme Educational Objectives

17

2 Programme Outcomes

28

3 Programme Curriculum

75

4 Students Performance

89

5 Faculty Contributions

102

6 Facilities and Technical Support

115

7 Academic Support Units and Teaching-Learning Process

124

8 Governance, Institutional Support and Financial Resources

151

9 Continuous Improvement

167
177

Declaration

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Self Assessment Report (SAR)


Part A

1. Institutional Information
I.1. Name and address of the institution and affiliating university:
(Instruction: The name, address of the institution, and the name of the university which has given
affiliation to this institution, are to be listed here.)
Amal Jyothi College of Engineering
Koovappally P.O., Kanjirappally,
Kottayam Dst., Kerala.
PIN 686518
Affiliating University: Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686560/Kerala Technological
University, Trivandrum, Kerala

I.2. Name, designation, telephone number, and e-mail address of the contact person
for the NBA:
(Instruction: The name of the contact person, with other details, has to be listed here.)
Rev. Fr. Dr. Jose Kannampuzha
Principal
Telephones: O: 04282-305503; R: 048282-51136; M: 09447870275
E-Mail: principal@amaljyothi.ac.in

I.3. History of the institution (including the date of introduction and number of seats of
various programmes of study along with the NBA accreditation, if any) in tabular form:
(Instruction: History of the institution and its chronological development along with the r e c o r d s
o f past accreditation need to be listed here.)

Year

Description
Institution established with the following programmes (intake)
B. Tech. Computer Science and Engineering (45)

2001

B. Tech. Electrical and Electronics Engineering (45)


B. Tech. Information Technology (45)
B. Tech. Electronics and Communication Engineering (45)

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Intake of B. Tech. CSE increased (60)


Intake of B. Tech. EEE increased (60)
2002
Intake of B. Tech. IT increased (60)
Intake of B. Tech. ECE increased (60)
2004
2005

Intake of B. Tech. ECE increased (90)


Started
B. Tech. in Mechanical Engineering (60)
Started

2006

B. Tech Civil Engineering (60)


Intake of B. Tech. ECE increased (120)
NBA accreditation visits and accreditation for
B. Tech. Electronics and Communication Engineering, and

2008

B. Tech. Electrical and Electronics Engineering


Started MCA Programme (60)
Started M. Tech. Communication Engg (18)
Intake of B. Tech. CSE increased (90)

2009
Intake of B. Tech. ME increased (90)
Started
B. Tech. Automobile Engineering (60)
M. Tech. Machine Design (18)
2010

M. Tech. Communication Engineering (24)


M. Tech. in Power Electronics & Power systems (18)
MCA lateral entry (60)
Intake of B. Tech. Civil Engineering increased (90)
Started

2011

M. Tech. Computer Science (18)


Intake of B. Tech. Mechanical Engineering increased (120)

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Started
B. Tech. Metallurgy (60)
2012
M. Tech. (Civil) Structural Engg. & Construction Management (24)
Intake of B. Tech. Civil Engineering increased (120)
Started
B. Tech. Chemical Engineering (60)
2013

M. Tech. Energy Systems (18)


Intake of B. Tech. CSE increased (120)
Intake of M. Tech. CSE increased (24)
Started

2014

MCA Dual Degree (60)


M. Tech. (Civil) Computer aided structural design (24)

2015

Started M. Tech. in Nanotechnology (24)

I.4. Ownership status: Govt. (central/state) / trust / society (Govt./NGO/Private) /


private/ other:
(Instruction: Ownership status of the institute has to be listed here.)
Managed by the Catholic Diocese of Kanjirapally, Kottayam, Kerala

I.5. Mission and Vision of the Institution:


(The institution needs to specify its Mission and Vision).
Vision
To be a center of excellence in technical higher education, research and support services, capable of
making significant contribution to individual and societal empowerment.
Mission
To create technically qualified world-class professionals with social commitment through Careeroriented courses conducted by high profile faculties, complemented with globally Interactive
learning processes and leading edge technology.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

I.6. Organizational Structure:


(Organizational chart showing the hierarchy of academia and administration to be included)

ORGANISATION STRUCTURE OF AJCE

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

DEPARTMENTS

Head of Departments

Professors

Assistant
Professors

Associate
Professors

Lab/Workshop
Superintendent

Lab/Workshop
instructors
Tradesmen

I.7. Financial status: Govt. (central/state) / grants- in- aid / not- for- profit / private
self - financing / other:
(Instruction: Financial status of the institute has to be mentioned here.)
Private self-financing

I.8. Nature of the trust/society:


Also, list other institutions/colleges run by the trust/society
(Instruction: Way of functioning and activities of the trust/society have to be listed here.)
Diocesan Educational Trust, Kanjirapally having its office at Pastoral Centre, Kanjirappally,
Kanjirappally Panchayathu, Ward IV, Building No.533 is the promoting body of the institution. The
deed of the trust is made on 6th September, 2000 and registered under # 254 /2000 /4. The trust is
promoted by the catholic diocese of Kanjirappally, a religious institution of the catholic
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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

denomination, which is a minority community, engaged in charitable activities for the benefit of the
public, irrespective of caste, creed and community.
Amal Jyothi College of Engineering, Kanjirappally is the only institution under this Trust.

I.9. External sources of funds:


(Instruction: The different sources of the external funds over the last three financial years are to
be listed here.)
(All amounts in Lakhs of Rs.)
Name of the
external source

CFY

CFYm1

CFYm2

CFYm3

Loan from Banks

3551

3235

2129

1399

I.10 Internally acquired funds:


(Instruction: The different sources of the internal funds over the last three financial years are to
be listed here.)
(All amounts in Lakhs of Rs.)
Name of the internal source

CFY

Students fee

2387

2643

2260

1804

532

522

513

498

Refundable deposit

CFYm1 CFYm2

CFYm3

I.11 Were scholarships or any other financial assistance provided to students?


(Instruction: If any scholarship or financial assistance has been provided to the students, then
the details of such assistance, over the last three financial years, has to be listed here. Also,
mention the basis for the award of such scholarship).
The scholarships available to students are listed in the following Table.

Name /Nature of
scholarship
TFW
TFW

GOVT.
MGMT

CFYm3
2011-2012
Nos.
81
2

Amt
54.51
0.75

CFYm2
2012-2013
No. s
98
4

Page 8

Amt
67.26
2.00

CFYm1
2013-2014
No. s
113
7

Amt
84.75
4.625

CFY
2014-15
No. s
123

Amt
92.25

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

AJECS
MOMAMCM
CSS
PGGATE
FISHER
MEN
SCHOL
ARSHIP
AJCE
MERIT
AJCE
MERIT
CUM
MEANS
CEELOW
INCOM
E
VATTA
KKUNN
EL
LINSA
ANNIE
LUKES
JOY
BALU S
PILLAI
LIZ
SIMON
SILVER
ORDIN
ATION
SARAM
MA IPE
MEMOR
IAL
RODRIG
UES
MEMOR
IAL
VENGA
L IPE
MEMOR
IAL
PROF.
VIJAYA

AJECS
GOVT.
GOVT.
GOVT.
AICTE

39

6.15

43

11.30

14

4.26

19

5.65

125

34.60

136

39.925

2.90

45

43.2

11

10.56

30

28.8

11

0.38

1.16

38

0.45

GOVT
MGMT

32

0.48

49

0.49

22

0.22

43

7.97

57

7.56

MGMT

MGMT
4

0.075

0.075

0.075

0.08

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.10

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.10

0.05

0.05

0.05

0.04

0.02

0.01

0.02

0.02

EF
EF
EF
EF
EF

EF

EF

EF

EF
EF
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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

NS
TFW: Tuition fee waiver; MOMA: Ministry of Minority Affairs; CSS: Central Sector Scholarships
MGMT: Management; MCM: Merit cum Means; EF: Endowment Fund
Basis of award of all the above scholarships: Merit or Merit cum annual income of parents.

I.12 Basis/criterion for admission to the institution:


(Instruction: The basis/criterion for student intake has to be listed here.)
All India entrance / state- level entrance / university entrance/12th standard mark sheet /
others:
State-level entrance: 50% of the seats are filled from the rank-list published by the Commissioner of
Entrance Examinations, Government of Kerala. The other 50 % seats under Management quota are
filled from the rank list prepared from the applications received by adding the marks scored by the
candidates in Plus 2 examination (Mathematics + Physics + Chemistry) and the marks scored by
them in the Entrance examination conducted by the Commissioner of Entrance Examinations, Govt.
of Kerala.

I.13 Total number of engineering students:


(Instruction: Total number of engineering students, both boys and girls, has to be listed here. The
data may be categorized in tabular form under graduate or post graduate engineering, or other
programme, if applicable.)
CAY

CAYm1

CAYm2

CAYm3

Total no. of boys:

1612

1516

1350

1187

Total no. of girls:

1157

1160

1119

1040

Total no. of students:

2769

2676

2469

2227

CAY
2014-15

CAYm1
2013-2014

CAYm2
2012-13

CAYm3
2011-12

Total no. of boys:

86

59

61

51

Total no. of girls:

166

108

112

78

Total no. of students:

252*

167

173

129

Total number of other students, if any: MCA


MCA Students

* 2014 -15 MCA includes MCA (Dual Degree), MCA (Lateral Entry) & MCA (Regular)

I.14 Total number of employees

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

(Instruction: Total number of employees, both men and women, has to be listed here. The data
may be categorized in tabular form as teaching and supporting staff.)
Minimum and maximum number of staff on roll in the engineering institution, during the
CAY and the previous CAYs (1st July to 30th June):
A.

Regular Staff

CAY
Items
Teaching staff in
engineering
Teaching staff in
science &
humanities
Non-teaching
staff

CAYm1

CAYm2

CAYm3

Min

Max

Min

Max

Min

Max

Min

Max

104

117

116

96

103

100

95

104

81

81

76

68

80

80

69

74

15

14

10

12

13

10

11

13

19

14

17

15

15

14

11

12

78

83

81

72

78

73

63

67

18

24

21

18

21

22

23

18

(Instruction: Staff strength, both teaching and non-teaching, over the last three academic years has
to be listed here.)
B.

Contractual Staff
CAY
Items
Teaching staff in
engineering

Teaching staff in
science &
humanities

Non-teaching
staff

CAYm1

CAYm2

CAYm3

Min

Max

Min

Ma

Min

Max

Min

Max

F
M
F

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

II. Departmental Information


II.1. Name and address of the department:
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
AMAL JYOTHI COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
KOOVAPPALLY P.O., KANJIRAPPALLY
KOTTAYAM, KERALA
II.2. Name, designation, telephone number, and e-mail address of the contact

person for the NBA:


Prof. MANOJ T. JOY
PROFESSOR and HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT
TELEPHONE NUMBER: 04828 305544(O), 9447661414(M)
FAX NO: 04828251136
E MAIL: hodcse@amaljoythi.ac.in

II.3. History of the department including date of introduction and number of seats
of various programmes of study along with the NBA accreditation, if any:
Programmes

Description
Started with 45 seats in 2001

UG in Computer
Science & Engineering

Intake increased to 60 in 2002


Intake increased to 90 in 2009
Intake increased to 120 in 2013

PG in Computer
Science & Engineering

Started with 18 seats in 2011

MCA

Approved by AICTE in 2008

Intake increased to 24 in 2013

Started with 60 seats in 2009

II.4. Mission and Vision of the Department


(The department is required to specify its Mission and Vision).
Vision
The Computer Science and Engineering department is committed to continually improve the
educational environment in order to develop professionals with strong technical and research
backgrounds.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Mission
To provide quality education in both theoretical and applied foundations of Computer Science and
Engineering.
Create highly skilled computer engineers, capable of doing research and also develop solutions
for the betterment of the nation.
Inculcate professional and ethical values among students.
Support society by participating in and encouraging technology transfer.

II.5. List of the programmes/ departments which share human resources and/or
the facilities of this department/programme (in %):
(Instruction: The institution needs to mention the different programmes which share the human
resources and facilities with the department/programme being accredited.)

Level

Department/Programmes

UG Programmes
of other
Departments

PG Programmes

Sharing in %
HR

Facilities

11.1

40

7.4

10

B. Tech Civil Engg

11.1

40

M. Tech

11.1

10

B. Tech Electronics and


Communication
Engineering
B. Tech. Metallurgy

II.6. Total number of students:


UG: 409 B. Tech CSE (4 Years)
PG: 36 M. Tech CSE (2 Years)

II.7. Minimum and maximum number of staff on roll during the current and
three previous academic years (1st July to 30th June) in the department:
Items

CAY
(2014-15)
Min.

Max.

CAYm1
(2013-14)
Min.

Max.

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CAYm2
(2012-13)
Min.

Max.

CAYm3
(2011-12)
Min.

Max.

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Teaching staff
in the
department
Non-teaching
staff
Total

23

27

24

27

23

28

25

31

29

33

30

34

28

34

30

37

II.7.1. Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in
the CFYm1, CFYm2 and CFYm3 (for the department):

Budgeted in
CFYm3 (2011-12)

Actual Expenses in
CFYm3 (2011-12)

Miscellaneous
expenses for
academic
i ii
Total

Actual Expenses in
CFYm2 (2012-13)

Training and
Travel

Budgeted in
CFYm2 (2012-13)

Laboratory
consumable
Maintenance and
spares

Actual Expenses in
CFYm1(2013-14)

Software

Budgeted in
CFYm1( 2013-14)

Laboratory
equipment

Actual expenses in
CFY (2014 -15)

Items

Budgeted in CFY
2014-15*

*All amounts in Lakhs of Rupees

20.34

1.88

3.38

22.91

2.72

2.97

3.69

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

0.5

0.45

0.50

0.5

0.68

0.1

0.84

0.44

0.70

0.46

0.1

0.07

0.08

0.08

0.08

0.07

0.07

0.06

1.5

0.95

1.5

0.85

1.25

0.65

0.12

0.06

27.04

6.35

14.59

9.27

9.33

24.63

6.69

3.8

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III. Programme Specific Information


III.1. Name of the Programme
(List name of the programme, as it appears on the graduates certificate and transcript, and
abbreviation used for the programme.)
UG in Computer Science and Engineering (CSE)

III.2. Title of the Degree


(List name of the degree title, as it appears on the graduates certificate and transcript, and
abbreviation used for the degree.)
Bachelor of Technology in Computer Science and Engineering (B. Tech. CSE)

III.3. Name, designation, telephone number, and e-mail address of the


Programme Coordinator for the NBA:
Prof. MANOJ T. JOY
PROFESSOR and HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT
TELEPHONE NUMBER: 04828 305544(O), 9447661414(M)
FAX NO: 04828251136
E MAIL: hodcse@amaljoythi.ac.in

III.4. History of the programme along with the NBA accreditation, if any:
Programme

Description
Started with 45 seats in 2001.

UG in Computer
Science &
Engineering

Intake increased to 60 in 2002


Intake increased to 90 in 2008
Intake increased to 120 in 2013

III.5. Deficiencies, weaknesses/concerns from previous accreditations:


N/A

III.6. Total number of students in the programme:


B. Tech CSE (4 Years): 409

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III.7.Minimum and maximum number of staff for the current and the three
previous academic years (1st July to 30th June) in the programme:
Items

CAY

CAYm1

CAYm2

CAYm3

Min.

Max.

Min.

Max.

Min.

Max.

Min.

Max.

Teaching staff
in the
department

23

24

27

26

23

25

19

25

Non-teaching
staff

Total

29

30

33

33

28

31

24

31

III.8. Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in
CFYm1, CFYm2 and CFYm3 (for this programme in the Department
exclusively):
*All amounts in Lakhs of Rupees
Budgeted in CFY
2014-15*

Actual expenses in
CFY (2014-15)

Budgeted in
CFYm1(2013-14)

Actual expenses in
CFYm1(2013-14)

Budgeted in
CFYm2(2012-13)

Actual Expenses in
CFYm2 (2012-13)

Budgeted in
CFYm3(2011-12)

Actual Expenses in
CFYm3 (2011-12)

Items

Laboratory
equipment

4.09

0.52

5.00

2.94

3.00

16.55

3.00

2.21

Software

3.00

2.97

3.00

3.69

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

0.50

0.30

1.00

Nil

1.50

0.35

0.70

0.30

0.50

0.48

0.50

0.82

0.75

0.33

0.70

0.46

Travel

0.05

0.03

0.07

0.06

0.06

0.05

0.05

0.05

Miscellaneous
expenses for
academic
activities

0.90

0.42

1.00

0.65

1.00

0.55

0.10

0.06

Total

9.04

4.72

10.57

8.16

6.31

17.83

4.55

3.08

Laboratory
consumables
Maintenance
and spares

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PART B

1. Vision, Mission and Programme Educational Objectives (75)


1.1. Vision and Mission (5)
1.1.1. State the Mission and Vision of the institute and department (1)
(List and articulate the mission and vision statement of the institute and department)
Institute
Vision: To be a center of excellence in technical higher education, research and support services,
capable of making significant contribution to individual and societal empowerment.
Mission: To create technically qualified world-class professionals with social commitment
through career-oriented courses conducted by high profile faculties, complemented with globally
interactive learning processes and leading edge technology.
Department
Vision: The Computer Science and Engineering department is committed to continually improve
the educational environment in order to develop professionals with strong technical and research
backgrounds.
Mission: To provide quality education in both theoretical and applied foundations of Computer
Science and Engineering.
Create highly skilled computer engineers, capable of doing research and also develop solutions
for the betterment of the nation.
Inculcate professional and ethical values among students.
Support society by participating in and encouraging technology transfer.
1.1.2. Indicate how
disseminated (2)

and

where

the

Mission

and

Vision

are

published

and

(Describe in which media, e.g. websites, curricula, books, etc. the mission and vision are
published and how the same is disseminated among stakeholders)
Published in Institution Website
Web Link : http://www.ajce.in/amal-jyothi/courses/computer-science-and-engineering/csvision-mission/
Posted Location: Poster in main foyer of Department (Divisional Block A Building). They are
also prominently displayed on the departmental notice boards.
Catalogs of CSE department- Distributed during student admission and to industries for
placement purposes.
Apart from this, Mission and Vision are disseminated to all the stakeholders of the programmes
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through faculty meetings, parent meetings, Alumni meets and also through electronic media.
1.1.3. Mention the process for defining the Mission and Vision of the department (2)
(Articulate the process involved in defining the mission and vision of the department from the
mission and vision of the institute.)
The department established the Vision and Mission through a consultative process involving the
stakeholders, faculty of the department and Institutional Advisory Board as shown in Figure 1
below. In establishing the Vision and Mission of the department, the indicated steps were
followed:

Figure 1. Process defining Department Vision & Mission

1.2. Programme Educational Objectives (15)


1.2.1. Describe the Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs) (2)
(List and articulate the programme educational objectives of the programme under
accreditation)
Programme educational objectives are broad statements that describe the career and professional
accomplishments that the programme is preparing graduates achieve within 3 to 5 years after
graduation.
The Programme Educational Objectives of the B. Tech CSE programme are:
1. Work productively as Computer Engineers, including supportive and leadership roles in
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multidisciplinary domain.
2. Participate in life-long learning through the successful completion of advanced degrees,
continuing education, certifications and/or other professional developments.
3. Promote design, research, product implementation and services in the field of Computer
Science and Engineering through strong technical, communication and entrepreneurial
skills.
1.2.2. State how and where the PEOs are published and disseminated (2)
(Describe in which media, e.g. websites, curricula, books, etc., the PEOs are published and how
the same is disseminated among stakeholders)
Published in Institution Website
Web Link : http://www.ajce.in/amal-jyothi/courses/computer-science-and-engineering/
cs-peos-and-pos/
Posted Location: Poster in main foyer of Department (Divisional Block A Building) They are
also prominently displayed on the departmental notice boards.
Catalogs of CSE Department- Distributed during student admission and to industries for
placement purposes.
Apart from this, PEOs are disseminated to all the stakeholders of the programmes through faculty
meetings, parent meetings, Almuni meets and also through electronic media. Each student
receives a copy of the Programme Educational Objectives and Programme Outcomes as part of
their student folder during the new student orientation programme.
1.2.3. List the stakeholders of the programme (1)
(List the stakeholders of the programme under consideration for accreditation and articulate their
relevance)
Stakeholders/Constituencies
For the development and assessment of the Program Education Objectives, the significant
constituencies of the department were identified and a review/feedback process is in place to
continuously improve the curriculum to which the Programme Educational Objectives are being
met. To accomplish the program educational objectives the faculty identified the primary
Computer Science Department constituencies consisting of the following groups: students,
industry, faculty, alumni and parents.
1. Students: Students are the important constituents due to the fact that the major investment
(both money and time) is envisaged in the students. Student evaluations and opinions are
obtained through student exit surveys, course and project surveys.
2. Industry: The corporate input from industry representatives is considered essential in
assessing student performance. The feedback from the employers is another milestone for
the vision achievement.
3. Faculty: The faculty is the backbone in providing an excellent teaching-learning
experience and the ultimate facilitator for engineering education. As a real facilitator, the
faculty has an excellent opportunity to evaluate student deliverables. Evaluations of
student performance in classes are used as assessment tools.
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4. Alumni: Alumni of the programme represent a much broader spectrum of individuals


with a wide range of experience in their lives and careers. It is very important to include
their feedback, through Alumni surveys, in evaluating the programmes success in
meeting its desired programme educational objectives.
5. Parents: Parents are another important stakeholder for the academic programme. The
parent constituency contributes by providing valuable suggestions and feedbacks.
1.2.4. State the process for establishing the PEOs (5)
(Describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates that the PEOs are based on
the needs of the various stakeholders of the programme)
In accordance with NBA, Programme Educational Objectives are developed to be consistent with
the Mission of the institution, the CSE Department, and the needs of the major constituencies of
the programme: students, alumni, employers, parents and faculty. The process to establish and
monitor the Programme Educational Objectives is pictorially shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2. PEO Definition & Assessment Process


The Programme Educational Objectives were developed and approved by the Department

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Advisory Committee during the 2010 even semester based on the Institution, CSE Department
Mission and Vision and the perceived needs of our constituents. These objectives are evaluated
periodically using a variety of instruments including faculty, students, alumni and employer
surveys, various faculty meetings, and industry advisory boards at the college and department
levels. The results of the various surveys are analyzed by the Department Assessment Committee.
We plan to review and revise the Programme Educational Objectives once in every four years.
1.2.5. Establish consistency of PEOs with Mission of the Institute (5)
(Describe how the Programme Educational Objectives are consistent with the Mission of the
Department.)
The PEOs flow naturally from the missions of the department and the institution. All the three
PEOs support the mission of the department as follows:
Department Mission
Components
Quality technical education
Skilled computer engineers
Research
Professional and Ethical values
Social commitment

Programme Educational
Objectives
PEO1
PEO2
PEO3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

1.3. Achievement of Programme Educational Objectives (20)


1.3.1. Justify the academic factors involved in achievement of the PEOs (5)
(Describe the broad curricular components that contribute towards the attainment of the
Programme Educational Objectives.)
Curricular Components
Basic Sciences
Humanities
Basic Engineering
Discipline Core
Discipline Electives
Inter disciplinary subjects
Project

1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

PEOs
2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

1.3.2. Explain how the administrative system helps in ensuring the achievement of the
PEOs (5)
(Describe the committees and their functions, working processes and related regulations.)
The various committees with their clearly defined functions exist for ensuring the attainment of
PEOs and POs. All committees work in good coordination for the smooth functioning of the

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institute and the department which helps each stake holder to work towards the attainment of
PEOs.
Internal Quality Assurance cell
Assessment and evaluation at institutional level
Programme wise assessment semester/year
Continuous improvement initiatives
Programme coordinator
Interacts and maintains liaison with key stake holders, students, faculty, Department Head
and employer.
Interacting with course coordinators towards attainment of PEOs and POs and
review/update the changes required for curriculum contents.
Conducts and interprets various surveys required to assess POs and PEOs.
Course coordinator
Coordinates and supervise the faculty teaching the particular course.
Assess the attainment of COs (course outcomes) by conducting Course End Surveys and
review/update the course delivery and assessment methods.
Recommend and facilitate workshops, development programmes, meetings or conferences
for students and faculty to meet the COs.
Analyzes results of particular course and recommends the Programme coordinator and
Head of the Department to take appropriate action.
Programme Assessment Committee
Programme Assessment Committee consists of Program Coordinator, Course Coordinator
and faculty representatives.
The committee monitors and evaluates the programme effectiveness and proposes
necessary changes for the attainment of PEOs and POs.
Conducts and interprets various surveys required to assess POs and PEOs.
Prepares periodic reports/records on programme activities and progress and submits to
Department Advisory Board(DAB).
Interact with students, faculty and other stakeholders in facilitating PEOs.
Department Advisory Board
Initiates process for defining/revising department and programme goals, PEOs and POs.
Survey of department academic functioning.
Advice on improvements in functioning.
DAB include the HOD, Programme Coordinator, faculty representatives and the
representatives of key stake holders.
DAB chaired by head of the department, receives the report of the Programme Assessment
Committee and monitors the progress of the programme.
In addition there are the following individual positions by faculty members that handle
specific tasks - Alumni Coordinator, Project-in-charge, Co-curricular Coordinators.
Conducts and interprets various surveys required to assess POs and PEOs.

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Institutional Advisory Board


Review of the attainment of PEOs, POs and suggest improvements.

1.3.3. Indicate the additional co-curricular activities undertaken towards the attainment of
the PEOs (10)
The co-curricular activities are arranged at institute and department level every year towards the
attainment of communication, technical and professional skills. The events covered under this are:
Placement training
GATE coaching
Lab and Practical Sessions
Project Exhibitions
Workshops
Technical talks, Guest Lectures
Seminars
National and international conference - Publications and Participations
Technical fest
Arts and other non technical events
Tour and Industrial visits - Exposure to advanced set up, technology, industrial discipline
and ethics and nature of work
Event Volunteering - Enhance managerial and leadership qualities
Social Service Programme - Social Commitment
NSS Activities
Retreat and other renovation programmes
Entrepreneurship activities -I2U, IEDC
Professional Body activities-ISTE,CSI

1.4. Assessment of the achievement of the Programme Educational Objectives


(25)
1.4.1. Indicate the tools and processes used in assessment of the achievement of the PEOs
(15)
Describe the assessment process that periodically documents and demonstrates the degree to
which the Programme Educational Objectives have been attained. Also include information on:
a) Listing and description of the assessment processes used to gather data upon which the
evaluation of each Programme Educational Objective is based. Examples of data collection
processes may include, but are not limited to, employer surveys, graduate surveys, focus groups,
industrial advisory committee meetings, or other processes that are relevant and appropriate to the
programme;

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Assessment Tools

Direct/Indirect

Alumni Survey

Remarks
Alumni Survey conducted among
alumni at the end of each academic
year
Employer Survey conducted among
employers both as formal and informal
mode of communication
Student Exit Survey conducted among
the graduates.
Project Evaluation conducted among
the students towards the end of their
final year
Course evaluation is collected from the
faculty at the end of each semester.
Modes of evaluation are End Semester
Exam, Class Tests, Series Tests, Model
Exams, Assignments, Attendance and
Seminars.

Indirect

Employer survey

Indirect

Student Exit Survey

Indirect

Project Evaluation

Direct

Course Evaluation

Direct

The former two surveys will give broad idea about attainment of PEOs by alumni while latter
three will help the department to find out how students and faculty are moving towards
developing those aspects in students and implement corrective measures so that attainment of
PEOs within 3-5 years of their graduation happens. The inputs from different stakeholders are
obtained in survey forms where they to give their judgment in the scale of 1 to 5 for the
attainment of each of the three PEOs.
b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out.
Assessment Tools

Frequency

Stakeholders

Alumni Survey

Yearly

Alumni

Employer survey

Every two
years

Employer

Student Exit
Survey

Yearly

Graduates

Project Evaluation

Yearly

Students

Course Evaluation

Twice an
Year

Students

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Coordinating
Committee
Department Advisory
Board(DAB)
Department Advisory
Board(DAB)
Programme coordinator
Department Advisory
Board(DAB)
Department Advisory
Board(DAB)

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

1.4.2. Provide the evidence of the achievement of the PEOs (10)


a) The expected level of attainment for each of the programme educational objectives;
b) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent to
which each of the Programme Educational Objectives is being attained; and
c) How the results are documented and maintained.

PEOs

Assessment
Tool

Alumni
Survey

PEO1
Employer
Survey
Project
Evaluation

Student Exit
Survey

Alumni
Survey
PEO2

Employer
Survey

Performance Metrics
Engineering knowledge
Problem analysis
Design/Development of
Solutions and Investigations
of complex problems
Use of modern tools
Societal, Environment and
Sustainability awareness
Ethics and Professional
responsibilities
Individual and Team work
Project management
Technical knowledge
Individual and Team
work/Leadership qualities
Overall performance
Rubrics

Expected Level of
Attainment/Goal
(%)

75%

20%

60%

Engineering knowledge
Problem analysis
Design/Development of
Solutions and Investigations
of complex problems
Ethics and Professional
responsibilities
Individual and Team work
Societal, Environment and
Sustainability awareness
Ethics and Professional
responsibilities
Lifelong learning
Members of Professional
Societies/organizations
Higher Studies/Attending

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75%

75%

20%

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Workshops/Conferences etc.
Other Professional
development since graduation
Project
Evaluation
Student Exit
Survey
PEO3

Alumni
Survey

Employer
Survey

Project
Evaluation
Student Exit
Survey

Rubrics

60%

Societal, Environment and


Sustainability awareness
Ethics and Professional
responsibilities
Lifelong Learning
Problem analysis
Design/Development of
Solutions and Investigations
of complex problems
Communication skills
Project management
Communication skills
Design/Development of
project
Overall performance

75%

75%

20%

Rubrics

60%

Problem analysis
Design/Development of
Solutions and Investigations
of complex problems
Communication skills
Project management

75%

Figure 3: Results of PEO Evaluation Attainment %


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Documentation of Results:All the data files of Project Evaluation, Exit Surveys and Employer Survey are placed in
Department office.
Alumni Survey data is collected through Google Docs which was send through email.

1.5. Indicate how the PEOs have been redefining in the past (10)
(Articulate, with rationale, how the results of the evaluation of the PEOs have been used to
review/redefine the PEOs)
The process is initiated by Department Advisory Board, and assessed by the Assessment
Committee during PEOs assessment and attainment process.
To redefine, the existing PEOs assessment results are gathered through direct and indirect
assessment methods like Alumni, Employer and Student exit surveys.
Results of the survey are tabulated and reviewed at the next Department Advisory Board
meeting. Based on these results, recommendations for any changes in PEO or how those
PEOs are evaluated are solicited from advisory committee members.
These recommendations are reviewed by Assessment committee, and based on identified
curricular gaps appropriate changes in curriculum and PEOs are made.
The process to monitor Programme Educational Objectives is pictorially shown in Figure
2.

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2. Programme Outcomes (150)


2.1. Definition and Validation of Course Outcomes and Programme Outcomes
(25)
2.1.1. List the Course Outcomes (COs) and Programme Outcomes (POs) (2)
(List the course outcomes of the courses in programme curriculum and programme outcomes of
the programme under accreditation)
Programme Outcomes
After completion of the course, B. Tech Computer Science and Engineering graduates will have
an ability to:
1 Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals and computer science
and engineering for the solution of engineering problems.
2 Investigate, design and conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data, make inferences
from the resulting data and apply the research skills to provide valid conclusions.
3 Design and construct a computing system , component or process to meet desired needs,
within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, health &
safety and sustainability
4 Make effective use of modern tools and techniques for modeling complex engineering
activities.
5 Understand the impact of engineering practices on all aspects of environment and society
and to demonstrate the knowledge of and need for sustainable development.
6 Work as professionals in accordance with the norms of computer engineering practices and
commit to social, ethical and professional responsibilities.
7 Demonstrate the management and engineering principles, to work as a team member and/or
leader in multidisciplinary areas of engineering
8 Communicate effectively through written and oral modes to all levels of society.
9 Understand and apply project management techniques, tools and practices to plan manage
and complete a project.
10 Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability to engage in independent and lifelong learning.
Course Outcomes
Semester 1 & 2
Sl.
Subject
No.
1
Engineering
Mathematics I

Code
EN010101

Course Outcomes
CO[1] Understand the use of matrix algebra
techniques this is needed by engineers for
practical applications.
CO[2] Understand the application of derivatives in
more than one variable and also find the
derivatives higher orders.

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Engineering
Physics

EN010 102

Engineering
Chemistry &
Environmental
Studies

CS010 103

Engineering
Mechanics

EN010104

CO[3] Have a fundamental understanding of double


integration, triple integration and visualize the
concept of volume .
CO[4] Apply different techniques to solve ordinary
differential equations.
CO[5] Take Laplace transformation of different
types of functions, derivatives and integrals,
and how it converts complex systems into
simple algebraic equations to find out
solutions.
CO [1] Find Innovative solutions to real world issues
in Physics and Computer Science.
CO [2] To design, fabricate, produce test and
supervise the manufacture the complex
products and systems for a no. of industries
like computer industry.
CO [3] Supervise manufacturing process and oversee
installation and maintenance.
CO [4] To work with microprocessors, fibre optics and
in telecommunication, television and radio.
CO [5] To the interdisciplinary aspects of nanoscience
by integrating important components of the
broad research field together.
CO [1] A Systematic approach to solve problems.
CO [2] An Analytical reasoning/thinking.
CO [3] Both of the above will provide a computational
thinking
like
abstraction,
hierarchical
modelling.
CO [4] Knowledge in chemistry helps the students to
use their software/professional skills in the
areas of research and analytical chemistry in
the future (eg. Computational chemistry)
CO [1] Develop the ability to work comfortably with
basic engineering mechanics concepts required
for analysing static structures.
CO [2] Identify an appropriate structural system to
studying a given problem and isolate it from its
environment, model the problem using good
free-body diagrams and accurate equilibrium
equations.
CO [3] Identify and model various types of loading
and support conditions that act on structural
systems.
CO [4] Understand the meaning of centres of gravity
(mass)/centroids and moments of Inertia.

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Engineering
Graphics

EN010 105

Basic Civil
Engineering

EN010 106

Basic
Mechanical
Engineering

EN010 107

CO [5] Apply equations for straight line motion to


solve problems with variable acceleration.
CO [6] Analyze dynamic problems using work energy
and impulse momentum techniques.
CO [1] Students will be able to prepare and understand
drawings.
CO [2] The drawing skills of students will be
improved.
CO [3] By studying Engineering Graphics students
will be able to visualize three dimensional
objects and that will enable them to design
new products.
CO [4] The students will be able to describe the details
of objects,
machine parts etc and represent
them in a drawing.
CO [1] Get a general idea on the varieties and cost of
construction materials available in the market,
their manufacture processes and types.
CO [2] Understanding on the different parts of
buildings and its construction practices making
him eligible to analyse a construction work.
CO [3] Get the idea about different foundations
practically used and about the structural
significance of the same.
CO [4] Get the concepts on surveying and surveying
results like maps, remote sensing, GPS, GIS
etc.
CO [5] Understand the basics of transportation
engineering, sanitary engineering, building
regulations and modern concepts of building
construction.
CO [1] Students become interested in the field of
mechanical engineering and understand its
relevance in the industry.
CO [2] By learning the basics, the student will be able
to appreciate the importance of this subject.
CO [3] Student
gets
a
better
idea
about
Thermodynamics, Heat transfer, IC engines
and its fundamentals.
CO [4] Student will get basic idea about power
transmission systems
CO [5] The student will understand the basics of
working of turbines and pumps
CO [6] Student can understand the working of

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machine tools and manufacturing process


8

Basic Electrical
Engineering

EN 010 108

CO [1] Solve the electrical networks mathematically.


CO [2] Achieve
elementary
knowledge
of
electromagnetism.
CO [3] Distinguish between DC and AC circuits and
analyse them.
CO [4] Achieve elementary knowledge of Electric
machines.
CO [5] Apply different energy conservation measures
and create social awareness on home energy
management.

Basic
EN010 109
Electronics
Engineering and
Information
Technology

CO [1] Identify the main component of a computer


and input output devices/drivers.
CO [2] Identify the different types of memory.
CO [3] Differentiate the function of system software
and application software.
CO [4] Basic working of a computer network and
different type of networks.
CO [5] Identify IP Address and its working with DNS.
CO [6] Understand the methods to analyse and
characterize basic Electronic circuits and
components like transistors, Diodes, OP-AMP
etc..
CO [7] Understand various frequency bands, analog
modulation techniques, principles related to
the operation and concepts of Satellite and
mobile Communication.
CO [8] Know about electronic measuring instruments,
Transducers, and consumer electronics.
CO [9] Understand the basic idea about components of
a digital computer, its programming, different
computer networks, internet and IP addressing.

Semester 3
Sl.
Subject
No.
1
Engineering
Mathematics II

Code

Course Outcomes

EN010301 B

CO[1] Have the ability to solve integer problems


effectively, and apply the properties of integers
for Computer Applications.
CO[2] The student will be able to apply Graph
Theoretical knowledge in solving Network
problems, optimization problems and many

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Economics and
Communication
Skills

EN010 302

Problem
Solving and
Computer
Programming

CS010 303

Computer
Organization

CS010 304

Switching
Theory and
Logic Design

CS010 305

other important areas in Computer Science.


CO [1] Ability to communicate effectively.
CO [2] Ability to function on multi disciplinary teams.
CO [3] Ability to understand current economic
situations and economic problems of the
nation.
CO [4] Ability to understand the effects of economic
policy and the changes in the industrial sector.
CO [5] Understand the performance of the IT sector.
CO [1] Describe fundamentals of programming such
as variables, conditional and iterative
execution, methods, etc.
CO [2] Analyze and solve programming problems
using a procedural and algorithmic approach
with functional decomposition.
CO [3] Apply knowledge of computing and
mathematics using simple data structures.
CO [4] Develop skill to use pointers, memory
allocation and data handling through files in
C.
CO [5] Understand the process of compiling, linking,
and running a program using a computing tool.
CO [1] Understand the digital representation of data
and differentiate between number systems and
codes.
CO [2] Outline the organisation of a computer system
in terms of its main components.
CO [3] Describe and demonstrate the detailed
operation of electronic logic elements of a
simple microprocessor.
CO [4] Identify the various parts of a system memory
hierarchy with cost performance tradeoffs in
designing memory hierarchy and instruction
sets.
CO [1] Identify the different number systems, codes
and will be able to simplify the Boolean
expressions.
CO [2] Analyze the performance of combinational
logic circuits for different operations.
CO [3] Design and analyze the performance of
sequential and clocked sequential logic
Circuits.
CO [4] Design and identify the application of counters
and shift registers.
CO [5] Understand the concepts of the faults tolerance

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Electronics
Devices and
Circuits

CS010 306
(EC)

Semester 4
Sl.
Subject
No.
1
Engg.Maths-III

EN010 401

CS010 402

Object Oriented
Programming

and diagnosis and characteristics of digital IC


families.
CO [1] Ability to design power supplies and DC
regulator circuit using zener diode.
CO [2] Ability to explain basic circuits like dc and
biasing circuits, small-signal ac circuits with
emphasis on single-stage amplifier.
CO [3] Ability to analyze and design circuits with
operational amplifiers (OP-AMPs).
CO [4] Ability to understand the operation of a 555
timer IC.
CO [5] Ability to conduct experiments involving
electronic devices and circuits.

Code

Course Outcomes
CO [1] Analyze the different types of Fourier series
and Parsevals relation and also understand the
Harmonic analysis.
CO [2] Differentiate Half range and Finite cosine and
sine transforms and application of Parsevals
identity and convolution theorem for Fourier
transforms.
CO [3] Identify the difference between the partial and
linear differential equations and analysis
through their four different types. Formation
of Lagranges equation.
CO [4] Analyze the different type of probability
distributions and its applications in engineering
stream.
CO [5] Form samples from collections and test the
different properties based on sample taken
from population called testing.
CO [1] To demonstrate the differences between
traditional structured design and objectoriented design.
CO [2] To understand the role of inheritance,
polymorphism, dynamic binding and generic
structures in building reusable code.
CO [3] Map an object-oriented program design into
the class and template model of C++.
CO [4] Apply traditional error and exception handling
mechanisms in C++ for creating efficient
codes.
CO [5] To distinguish programming constructs

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between JAVA and C++.


3

Data structures
and Algorithms

CS010 403

Signals and
Communication
Systems

CS010
404(EC)

Microprocessor
Systems

CS010 405

Theory of
Computation

CS010 406

CO [1] Identify, understand and determine the usage


of various data structures, operations and
associated algorithms.
CO [2] Analyze and compare the efficiency of
algorithms.
CO [3] Implement applications using basic data
structures such as array, stack, queue and
linked list.
CO [4] Understand the concept of trees and graphs and
their implementation using basic data
structures and algorithms.
CO [5] Able to implement standard algorithms for
searching and sorting.
CO [1] Familiarize with the elementary signals.
CO [2] Analyze the difference between analog and
digital communication systems .
CO [3] Understand the different types of modulation
techniques.
CO [4] Understand the concept of amount of
information, channel capacity, error-detection
and error-correction codes.
CO [5] Apply information theory and coding to
modern communications technology.
CO [1] To
understand
the
fundamentals
of
Microprocessor systems.
CO [2] To describe the instruction set of
Microprocessor system.
CO [3] To apply the programming techniques in
designing simple assembly language programs
for solving problems.
CO [4] To identify the different types of interrupts in
8085.
CO [5] To understand the various data transfer
schemes in 8085.
CO [6] To describe a typical I/O interface and apply a
combination of hardware and software to
address a problem.
CO [1] Recall and identify different concepts of set
theory, proving techniques and also be able to
explain the language classifications.
CO [2] Analyze and prove the equivalence of
languages and illustrate how to design finite
state machines and convert regular expressions

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to FSA.
CO [3] Construct
pushdown
automata
and
demonstrate the construction of context free
grammars.
CO [4] Demonstrate the construction of a Turing
Machine.
CO [5] Classify the problems based on their
complexity.
Semester 5
Sl.
Subject
No.
1
Engineering
Mathematics IV

Code
EN010501 B

Principles of
Management

EN010 502
(ME)

Database
Management
Systems

CS010 503

Course Outcomes
CO [1] Evaluate real integrals using contour
integration and residue theory.
CO [2] Use numerical methods of integration and
differentiation for solving various problems.
CO [3] Use Z-transforms to solve various differential
and integral equations which are used in
various engineering areas.
CO [4] To use various numeric functions and
generating functions to solve various problems
in Mathematics and Engineering.
CO [5] Provide the student with a rigorous framework
with which to model and analyze queueing
systems.
CO [1] Understand the fundamentals of management
and perform effectively as a leader.
CO [2] Understand the functions and duties an
individual should perform in an organization.
CO [3] Communicate effectively to all levels of
society.
CO [4] Have base level knowledge on financial
management
CO [5] Understand the impact of
engineering
solutions in a global economic &societal
context.
CO [6] Understand the different aspects of personnel
management.
CO [1] State the importance of DBMS and describe
fundamental elements of a relational data
models.
CO [2] Master the basics of SQL and construct
queries using SQL, Relational Algebra and
Calculus and apply query processing and
optimization
CO [3] Develop skills to use a commercial relational

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Digital Signal
Processing

CS010 504
(EC)

Operating
Systems

CS010 505

Advanced
CS010 506
Microprocessors
& Peripherals

database system (Oracle) and indexing


methods by writing SQL using the system.
CO [4] Apply design principles for logical design of
databases, including the ER method and
normalization approach.
CO [5] Identify the basic issues of transaction
processing, concurrency control ,recovery
techniques.
CO [6] Enhance team work by design and
development of a database application system.
CO [1] Understand the fundamentals of LTI DSP
systems.
CO [2] Understand Transforms (DFT, DTFT, FFT) in
digital domain.
CO [3] Familiarize Convolution and its relation with
linear convolution.
CO [4] Understand design of FIR & IIR filters and
realization schemes.
CO [5] Learn about the working of DSP processors
and various applications, recent trends in DSP
and practical exposure to applications.
CO [1] Differentiate the working of an operating
system and its components.
CO [2] Describe process management and analyze the
synchronization process.
CO [3] Identify the working methodology of
multithreaded applications and distinguish
different scheduling algorithms.
CO [4] Identify the reasons of deadlocks, and their
remedial measures in an operating system.
CO [5] Understand different memory management
techniques used in operating systems.
CO [6] Classify different file systems and apply the
knowledge earned into various operating
systems.
CO [1] Understand the architecture and software
aspects of microprocessor 8086.
CO [2] Outline the basic features of advanced
microprocessors including 80286, 80386,
Pentium, Intel, AMD.
CO [3] Identify the different peripheral devices and
recognize the need of different bus standards
like PCI and USB.
CO [4] Classify different storage devices and

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understand the operations performed.


CO [5] Distinguish different memory organization for
peripheral devices.
Semester 6
Sl.
Subject
No.
1
Design and
Analysis of
Algorithm

Code
CS010 601

Internet
Computing

CS010 602

System
Software

CS010 603

Course Outcomes
CO [1] Describe, apply and analyze the complexity of
certain divide and conquer, greedy, and
dynamic programming algorithms.
CO [2] Identify and analyze criteria and specifications
appropriate to new problems, and choose the
appropriate algorithmic design technique for
their solution.
CO [3] Describe the classes P, NP, and NP-Complete
and be able to prove that a certain problem is
NP-Complete.
CO [4] Demonstrate a familiarity with major
algorithms and data structures and write
rigorous correctness proofs for algorithms.
CO [1] Fundamental study and demonstrate the ability
to employ repetition constructs in a Java
program.
CO [2] Understand object oriented programming
concepts, packages, interfaces, exception
handling and applying the concepts of
multithreading.
CO [3] Develop Input/output handling capability with
applets and graphical user interfaces in Java
programs.
CO [4] Implementation of clientserver networking in
Java by applying TCP, UDP and RMI.
CO [5] Develop an understanding about advanced Java
applications.
CO [1] Understand the basic concepts, conditions and
mechanisms to create system software.
CO [2] Understand functions of single and multi-pass
assemblers through assembly language
concepts.
CO [3] Understand the pre-processing, linking and
loading of programs.
CO [4] Describe about the working of text editors and
debuggers.
CO [5] Differentiate between device drivers and
outline its working.

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Computer
Networks

CS010 604

Software
Engineering

CS010 605

Unix Shell
Programming

CS010 606
L04

Semester 7
Sl.
Subject
No.

CO [1] Develop a fundamental understanding of


network design principles and performance
metrics.
CO [2] Understand the data link-layer concepts,
protocols, and services and basic concepts of
wired and wireless networks.
CO [3] Distinguish packet switching and circuit
switching techniques.
CO [4] Understand different network interfaces and
routing techniques for IP based networking
infrastructure.
CO [5] Develop mechanisms for effective network
management,
congestion
control
and
congestion avoidance in the internetwork.
CO [6] Apply the knowledge earned into various
application level services like email, www etc.
CO [1] Understand different process models and
concepts such as design lifecycles, cost
estimation techniques, and testing methods.
CO [2] The student will able to relate and outlines the
engineering process of software and will be
able to explain, apply in software development
process.
CO [3] Enhance team work, critical thinking and
communication skills to construct a software
of high quality.
CO [4] Develop skills to make use of tools that helps
in software specification, design, testing, and
maintenance.
CO [1] Have a fundamental understanding about the
development of open source software, basic
architecture of UNIX.
CO [2] Have a thorough understanding about the
different Flavours of UNIX.
CO [3] Develop skills to use UNIX tools like grep,
sed, awk etc for large scale text processing.
CO [4] Create small to medium sized shell scripts to
complete various computing tasks.
CO [5] Understand the Graphical User Interface of
LINUX / UNIX systems.

Code

Course Outcomes

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Web
Technologies

CS010 701

Compiler
Construction

CS010 702

Computer
Graphics

CS010 703

Object Oriented
Modeling and
Design

CS010 704

CO [1] Define the various steps in creating a dynamic


webpage.
CO [2] Understand the use of CSS for effective
customized web pages.
CO [3] Analyze and create XML documents and XML
schema.
CO [4] Design and build interactive web pages using
PERL and PHP.
CO [5] Develop skills to generate rail applications
with databases and ajax.
CO [1] Identify and understand different phases and
passes of Compiler and their functioning.
CO [2] Understand lexical, syntax and semantic
analysis processes.
CO [3] Understand and define the role of lexical
analyzer, use of regular expression and
transition diagrams.
CO [4] Understand Finite state machine and use
Context free grammar, and parse tree
construction.
CO [5] Understand the working of lex and yacc
compiler for debugging of programs.
CO [6] Determine code generation and optimization
techniques.
CO [7] Apply error detection and correction methods.
CO [1] Understand the working of contemporary
graphics hardware.
CO [2] Create interactive graphics applications in C++
using one or more graphics application
programming interfaces.
CO [3] Apply
geometrical
transformations
on
graphical problem solving.
CO [4] Develop skill to generate computer graphics
animation software.
CO [5] Describe and demonstrate 2D and 3Dgraphics
processing techniques.
CO [1] Analyze system requirements and apply model
for problem domains.
CO [2] Evaluate the model by performing analysis
process.
CO [3] Design and build object-oriented systems with
different architectural frameworks.
CO [4] Implement object-oriented design with suitable
algorithms.
CO [5] Develop skill to demonstrate object oriented

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Principles of
programming
languages

CS010 705

Client server
architecture and
Applications

CS010
706l06

Semester 8
Sl.
Subject
No.
1

High
Performance
Computing

system design in the Unified Modelling


Language (UML).
CO [1] Understand the concept and applications of
different programming languages.
CO [2] Develop skill to create a new programming
language.
CO [3] Outline the pre requisites for creating a new
programming language.
CO [4] Develop an understanding about advanced
programming language techniques.
CO [5] Design basic algorithms in implementing
simple programming languages in hardware
and software developments.
CO [1] Describe the history of web-based client-server
architecture concepts.
CO [2] Outline the concepts of security on securing
Client-Server system.
CO [3] Understand the use of Windows NT and
NetWare OS.
CO [4] Describe about multitasking, synchronization
and network communication in client-server
systems
CO [5] To have exposure to applications of ClientServer system.

Code
CS010 801

Course Outcomes
CO [1] Classify and describe the operation of parallel
computer architectures.
CO [2] Understand the basics of pipelining and related
design issues.
CO [3] Outline advanced concepts in multiprocessor
architecture and interconnection networks.
CO [4] Understand the concepts of parallelism
especially inter process communication and
synchronization.
CO [5] Discriminate
between
various
design
alternatives of dataflow computers.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Artificial
Intelligence

CS010 802

Security in
Computing

CS010 803

E-Commerce

CS010 804
L01

CO [1] Understand the problem spaces, problem


solving and learning methods in artificial
intelligence.
CO [2] Develop skill to create small to medium sized
programs in Python.
CO [3] Apply basic artificial intelligence algorithms to
solve problems.
CO [4] Analyse how uncertainty is being tackled in the
knowledge representation and reasoning
process, in particular, techniques based on
probability theory and possibility theory (fuzzy
logic).
CO [5] Master the skills and techniques in machine
learning, such as decision tree induction.
CO [1] Understand the fundamental security features
in Computing.
CO [2] Apply modular arithmetic and fundamental
properties of finite field to cryptographic
techniques.
CO [3] Describe basic concepts and algorithms of
cryptography, including encryption/decryption,
hash functions, digital signature.
CO [4] Make assessment on the network, web security
of cryptographic functions, and evaluate their
strength.
CO [5] Identify and classify system security threats
and develop a security model to prevent, detect
and recover from attacks.
CO [1] Demonstrate an understanding of the
foundations and importance of E-commerce.
CO [2] Describe the network infrastructure and
security needed for E-commerce.
CO [3] Analyze the impact of E-commerce on
business models and strategy.
CO [4] Assess electronic payment systems.
CO [5] Use the conventional approaches that are
widely used in E-Commerce applications and
the current ideas that are applicable to the
Electronic Commerce world.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Software
Architecture

CS010 805
G04

CO [1] Design and understand software architecture


for large scale software systems.
CO [2] Recognise major software architectural styles,
design patterns, and frameworks.
CO [3] Understand the formal definition of a number
of architectures and be able to reason precisely
about the properties of those architectures.
CO [4] Describe a software architecture using various
documentation approaches and architectural
description languages.
CO [5] Identify the architectural alternatives and
connectors for a problem and select among
them.

2.1.2. State how and where the POs are published and disseminated (3)
(Describe in which media (e.g. websites, curricula, books, etc.) the POs are published and how the
same is disseminated among stakeholders)
Published in Institution Website
Web Link: http://www.ajce.in/amal-jyothi/courses/computer-science-and-engineering/cspeos-and-pos/
College Calendar
Posted Location: Poster in main foyer of Department (Divisional Block A Building)
They are also prominently displayed on the departmental notice boards.
Catalogs of CSE department- Distributed during student admission and to industries for
placement purposes. We communicate our PEOs to the stakeholders especially employers and
Alumni through electronic media and meetings.

2.1.3. Indicate the processes employed for defining of the POs (5)
(Describe the process that periodically documents and demonstrates that the POs are defined in
alignment with the Graduate Attributes prescribed by the NBA.)
The Computer Science & Engineering programme requires that students completing a B.Tech
degree acquire the skills necessary to succeed in the engineering profession. The necessary skills
were identified and approved by the faculty, students, and the Advisory Board. These
requirements must also meet the Graduate Attributes established by NBA for Engineering
programmes. To make sure that the skills are delivered to the students, Programme Outcomes
were established along with the perceived needs of our stakeholders and are related to the
programmes Educational Objectives (PEO). Direct and Indirect assessment methods were
conducted to determine if the Programme Outcomes were achieved. If they are not achievable,
necessary modifications in curriculum and teaching learning process are recommended by the
Department Advisory Board. The process for establishing and monitoring of POs are shown in the
Figure 4.
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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Figure 4. PO Definition & Assessment Process


2.1.4. Indicate how defined POs aligned to Graduate Attributes prescribed by the NBA
(10)
(Indicate how the POs defined for the programme are aligned with the Graduate Attributes of
the NBA as articulated in accreditation manual.)
The Graduate Attributes of Engineering Programmes as identified by NBA (January 2013) are:
1. Engineering knowledge: Apply the knowledge of Mathematics, Science, Engineering
fundamentals, and an engineering specialization to the solution of complex engineering
problems.
2. Problem analysis: Identify, formulate, research literature, and analyze complex
engineering problems reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles of
mathematics, natural sciences, and engineering sciences.
3. Design/development of solutions: Design solutions for complex engineering problems
and design system components or processes that meet the specified needs with appropriate
consideration for the public health and safety, and the cultural, societal, and environmental
considerations.
4. Conduct investigations of complex problems: Use research-based knowledge and
research methods including design of experiments, analysis and interpretation of data, and

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

synthesis of the information to provide valid conclusions.


5. Modern tool usage: Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and
modern engineering and IT tools including prediction and modeling to complex
engineering activities with an understanding of the limitations.
6. The engineer and society: Apply reasoning informed by the contextual knowledge to
assess societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities
relevant to the professional engineering practice.
7. Environment and sustainability: Understand the impact of the professional engineering
solutions in societal and environmental contexts, and demonstrate the knowledge of, and
need for sustainable development.
8. Ethics: Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and
norms of the engineering practice.
9. Individual and team work: Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or
leader in diverse teams, and in multidisciplinary settings.
10. Communication: Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the
engineering community and with society at large, such as, being able to comprehend and
write effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give
and receive clear instructions.
11. Project management and finance: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the
engineering and management principles and apply these to ones own work, as a member
and leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments.
12. Life-long learning: Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability to
engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological
change.
Mapping between GAs and POs
Programme Outcomes
NBA Graduate Attributes
1
2

Engineering knowledge
Problem Analysis
Design/development of
3
solutions
Conduct investigations
4
of complex problems
5 Modern Tool usage
The Engineer and
6
Society
Environment and
7
sustainability
8 Ethics
Individual and team
9
work
10 Communication

PO1
X

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X

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PO9 PO10

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Project management and


finance
12 Lifelong learning
11

X
X

2.1.5. Establish the correlation between the POs and the PEOs (5)
(Explain how the defined POs of the programme correlate with the PEOs)
Programme
Educational
Objective

PO1

PO2

PO3

PEO 1

Programme Outcomes
PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7
x

PEO 2
PEO 3

X- Strong Mapping

PO8

PO9

PO10

x
X
X

x-Weak Mapping

2.2. Attainment of Programme Outcomes (40)


2.2.1. Illustrate how course outcomes contribute to the POs (10)
(Provide the correlation between the course outcomes and the programme outcomes. The
strength of the correlation may also be indicated.)

Semester 1 & 2
Engineering Mathematics I (EN010 101)
PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

10

10

Engineering Physics (EN010 102)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CO [1]
S

CO [2]

M
M

CO [3]

CO [4]

M
S

CO [5]

Engineering Chemistry & Environmental Studies (EN010 103)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

10

Engineering Mechanics (EN010104)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

10

CO [1]

M M

CO [2]

M M

CO [3]

M M

CO [4]

M M

CO [5]

M M

CO[6]

M M

Engineering Graphics (EN010105)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

S
S

10

S
M

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CO [4]

10

Basic Civil Engineering (EN010 106)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

M M M

M M

CO [2]

M M

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

M M
M

M M

M M

Basic Mechanical Engineering (EN 010 107)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

10

10

S
M
S

CO [4]
CO [5]

Basic Electrical Engineering (EN 010 108)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

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Basic Electronics Engineering and Information Technology (EN010 109)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

CO [6]

10

10

CO [7]

CO [8]

CO [9]

Semester 3
Engineering Mathematics II (EN010301 B)
PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

M M

Economics and Communication Skills (EN010 302)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

M M

CO [2]

M M

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

M M

Page 48

10

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Problem Solving and Computer Programming (CS010 303)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

10

S
M

CO [4]

CO [5]

M
S

Computer Organization (CS010 304)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

10

10

CO [3]

CO [4]

S
S

M
M M

Switching Theory and Logic Design (CS010 305)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]
CO [3]

S
S

CO [4]

S
S

CO [5]

Electronics Devices and Circuits (CS010 306(EC))


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

Page 49

10

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

M
M

S
M
S

Semester 4
Engineering Mathematics -III (EN010 401)
PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

10

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

S
S

Object Oriented Programming (CS010 402)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME

COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]
CO [5]

10

S
S

Data structures and Algorithms (CS010 403)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

Page 50

10

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

S
M

CO [4]
CO [5]

S
S

Signals and Communication Systems (CS010 404(EC))


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

M M

CO [4]

10

10

M
M

CO [5]

Microprocessor Systems (CS010 405)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]
CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

S
S

CO [5]

CO [6]

Theory of Computation (CS010 406)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]
CO [2]

S
S

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10

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CO [3]

CO [4]
CO [5]

Semester 5
Engineering Mathematics IV (EN010501 B)
PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

10

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

M M

Principles of Management (EN010 502(ME))


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

10

CO [4]
CO [5]

CO [6]

Database Management Systems (CS010 503)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]
CO [4]

S
M

S
S

S
M

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10

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CO [5]

CO [6]

Digital Signal Processing (CS010 504 (EC))


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

10

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

Operating Systems (CS010 505)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [3]

CO [4]

10

S
S

S
M

CO [2]

CO [5]

CO [6]

M M

Advanced Microprocessors & Peripherals (CS010 506)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]
CO [2]

CO [3]
CO [4]
CO [5]

S
S
S

10

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Semester 6
Design and Analysis of Algorithm (CS010 601)
PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]
CO [4]

10

Internet Computing (CS010 602)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

10

S
M

10

System Software (CS010 603)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]
CO [5]

M
M
M

Computer Networks (CS010 604)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

Page 54

10

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

S
M
S

CO [4]

CO [5]

S
S

CO [6]

S
S

Software Engineering (CS010 605)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

S
S

10

S
M

Unix Shell Programming (CS010 606 L04)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

10

M
S

CO [4]

CO [5]

S
S

Semester 7
Web Technologies (CS010 701)
PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]
CO [2]

S
S

Page 55

10

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

Compiler Construction (CS010 702)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]
CO [4]

S
S

CO [5]

10

M M

CO [6]

CO [7]

Computer Graphics (CS010 703)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]
CO [3]

S
S

10

M
S

M M

CO [4]
CO [5]

Object Oriented Modeling and Design (CS010 704)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]
CO [2]
CO [3]

M
S

Page 56

10

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CO [4]

CO [5]

Principles of programming languages (CS010 705)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]
CO [3]

CO [4]
CO [5]

M
M

10

Client server architecture and Applications (CS010 706 L06)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]
CO [4]

S
M

CO [5]

10

S
S
M

Semester 8
High Performance Computing (CS010 801)
PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]
CO [3]
CO [4]
CO [5]

S
M

S
M

10

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Artificial Intelligence (CS010 802)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]
CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

10

M
M
S

10

Security in Computing (CS010 803)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

CO [3]

CO [4]

CO [5]

M
M

S
S

E-Commerce (CS010 804 L01)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

CO [2]

S
S

CO [3]
CO [4]

M
M

CO [5]

10

S
S

S
M

S
S

10

Software Architecture (CS010 805G04)


PROGRAMME OUTCOME
COURSE
OUTCOME

CO [1]

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CO [2]
CO [3]

M
M

CO [4]
CO [5]

S
S

M
M M

2.2.2. Explain how modes of delivery of courses help in the attainment of the POs (10)
(Describe the
different course delivery methods/modes, e.g. Lectures, interspersed with
discussion, asynchronous mode of interaction, group discussion, project etc., used to deliver the
courses and justify the effectiveness of these methods for the attainment of the POs. This may
be further justified using the indirect assessment methods such as course-end surveys.)
Course Delivery Methods/Modes:
Class room Lectures - The main delivery method for the courses is lecture interspersed
with discussion. This helps in the obtaining a sound understanding of the course
fundamentals, design and implementation issues, etc.
Presentations - The abstract concepts difficult to imagine are presented through power
point presentations and animation tools to impart insight into the subject. Presentations
also illustrate ideas and concepts in graphics form. Video presentations effectively
communicate the working of actual engineering solutions and their impact.
Laboratory session- Laboratory work demonstrates how theory can be verified by
experiments through interpretation of results. Experiments are normally done in groups so
students learn to work in teams.
Simulations or demo - In some courses, the design and experimentation issues are also
discussed in the form of demo or simulations. The students are thus exposed to different
tools for implementation and experimentation.
Assignments - Writing assignments deepens thinking and increases students' engagement
with course material. Good writing assignments prompt students to think more deeply
about what they're learning. Some assignments carry a bigger problem nearer to reality
that cannot be done in the classroom. Group assignments help them to work effectively in
a team.
Case Studies - Case studies are descriptions of a real life experience, related to the field of
study or training, which are used to make points, raise issues or otherwise enhance the
students understanding and learning experience. Case studies are a great way to improve
a learning experience, because they get the learner involved, and encourage immediate use
of newly acquired skills. They differ from lectures or assigned readings, because they
require participation and deliberate application of a broad range of skills.
Project - Micro projects, Mini projects and Final projects are carried out by a group of
students under the guidance of faculty wherein students apply the knowledge of all related

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

courses in providing hardware/software solutions and present demonstrable product to a


panel of supervisors.
Comprehensive Viva Voce - The Viva Voce is an important mode of assessment,
providing an opportunity for students to demonstrate their knowledge, approach and
understandings with the examiners. They are not just an assessment of the student's
performance but usually an opportunity for the external examiner to get feedback from the
students on the performance of the department.
Seminar - The students collect knowledge related to a topic and present it in a technical
report and oral lecture comprehensively.
Industrial Visits - Industrial visits are arranged to get the students acquainted with
industrial environment and work ethics.
E- Learning Resources- Videos and E-learning material are used for giving exposure to
domain expertise of the faculties from various reputed institutes like NPTEL, Stanford,
and MIT Open Courseware etc.

Course Delivery
Methods
Class room
Lecture
Presentations
Laboratory
session
Simulations or
demo
Assignments

Programme Outcomes
PO
PO
PO
PO
4
5
6
7

PO
1

PO
2

PO
3

X
X

Project
Comprehensive
Viva Voce
Seminars

X
X

PO 10

X
X

PO
9

Case Studies

Industrial Visits
E-Learning
Resources

PO
8

X
X

X
X

2.2.3. Indicate the extent to which the laboratory and project course work are
contributing towards the attainment of the POs (20)
(Justify the balance between theory and practical for the attainment of POs. Justify how the
various project works (a sample of 20% best and average projects from total projects) carried as
part of the programme curriculum contribute towards the attainment of the POs.)

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Semester

III

Lab
Name

Programm
ing Lab

III

Logic
Design
Lab

IV

Data
Structures
Lab

IV

Electronic
Circuits
Lab

VI

Database
Lab

Hardware
and
Microproc
essors Lab

Operating
Systems
Lab

Lab Code

CS010 307

CS010 308
(EC)

CS010 407

CS010 408
(EC)

CS010 507

CS010 508

CS010 607

Lab Objectives

Theory-1

To acquaint the students with the


fundamentals of programming.
To provide the students with good
knowledge in C programming and
develop problem solving skills.
To provide an introduction to Logic
Systems Design thereby giving a
hands on experience on working
with digital ICS, which enable the
study Computer System
Architecture.
To provide experience on design,
testing, and analysis of Algorithms
and Data Structures.
To acquaint the students with the
Data Structures used in the
Computer
Science field.
To provide an introduction to
Electronic Circuits Design thereby
giving a hands on experience on
working with various Electronic
Components, and Devices
To acquaint the students with the
implementation and fundamental
algorithms of database systems.
To provide experience on design,
querying, and processing of data in a
relational database.
To acquaint the students with the
implementation and fundamental
algorithms of database systems.
To provide experience on design,
querying, and processing of data in a
relational database.
To familiarize the students with
8085, 8086, Masm programming and
various PC hardware components
To provide experience on design,
querying, and processing of data in a
relational database.
To provide a practical exposure of
all algorithms and behavior of
processes in the system with respect
to all its timings.
This lab also explains the allocation

CS010 303:
Problem
Solving and
Computer
Programming

Page 61

CS010 305
Switching
Theory And
Logic Design

CS010 403:
Data
Structures
and
Algorithms
CS010
306(EC):Elec
tronics
Devices and
Circuits
CS010 503:
Database
Management
Systems

CS010405:
Microprocess
or Systems
CS010 506:
Advanced
Microprocess
ors &
Peripherals

CS010 505:
Operating
Systems
CS010
606L04 :

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

of process in the memory with some


memory management techniques.

VI

Mini
Project

CS010 608

VII

System
Programm
ing Lab

VII

Networkin
g Lab

CS010 708

VII

Seminar

CS010 709

VIII

Computer
Graphics
lab

CS010 806

VIII

Project
work

CS010 707

To estimate the ability of the


student in transforming the
theoretical knowledge studied so far
into application software.
For enabling the students to gain
experience in organization and
implementation of a small project
and thus acquire the necessary
confidence to carry out main project
in the final year.
To understand and gain the
knowledge of software engineering
practices, so as to participate and
manage large software engineering
projects in future.
To familiarize the design of all
phases of compilers up to a stage of
intermediate code generation.
To enable the students to design
and implement modern compilers for
any
environment.
To provide experience on design,
testing, and analysis of Java
Programs.
To acquaint the students with the
Networking Protocols and
Communication
using ports and sockets.
Communicate effectively about
work both orally and in writing
journals/technical reports.
To acquaint the students with the
implementation of fundamental
algorithms in Computer Graphics.

To understand and gain the


knowledge of software engineering
CS010 710 practices, so as to participate and
manage large software engineering
projects in future.

Page 62

UNIX Shell
Programming

CS010 503:
Database
Management
Systems
CS010 605:
Software
Engineering

CS010 603:
System
Software
CS010 702:
Compiler
Construction

CS010 602:
Internet
Computing

CS010 703:
Computer
Graphics
CS010 503:
Database
Management
Systems
CS010 605:
Software
Engineering

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Laboratory Outcomes
After completion of the Laboratory the students will be able to:
LO [1] Develop an ability to understand / solve key concepts discussed in the classroom.
LO [2] Apply the knowledge of engineering practices, science and mathematics to propose and
apply effective engineering solutions.
LO [3] Identify suitable hardware/software part to implement algorithms/procedures hence
analyze and make inferences from the output.
LO [4] Work effectively in groups or as individual member to complete the assigned
responsibilities by holding ethical standards with concern to global, environmental, economic,
social issues and life- long learning.
LO [5] Communicate effectively about laboratory work both orally and in writing technical
reports.
Correlation between Laboratory Outcomes and Programme Outcomes:
S- Strong, M- Moderate
LO/PO

PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10

LO1
LO2
LO3
LO4

S
M

M
S

S
S

LO5
Balance between Theory and Practical (including project)

Figure 5. Distribution of credits for Theory and Practical

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Procedure for Final Year Project Work


Phase

Phase I

Subject
and Code

Project
work
CS010 710

Semester

VII

Nature of Work
Literature Survey, Problem
Definition
Finalize project theme /title ,
Define Objectives, Completion
Timelines
Interim Report (Evaluation
Committee)
Project Implementation

Phase II

Project
work
CS010 807

Project Completion, Testing,


Report Writing
VIII
Term work Assessment
University Viva (External
Evaluation)

Assessment
Progress
Presentation
Progress
Presentation
Project Report
Progress
Presentation
Project
Demonstration
Project Report
and
Demonstration
Project Report

List of sample of 20% best and average projects from total projects and achievement of POs
Best and Average Projects
Mini Project Topics
2012-2016 Batch
1 Mark Analysis & Rating System
2 Free My Brain
3 Online Pc Assembling
4 Online Advertisement Publishing System
5 Univ-Port
6 Medispace
2011-2015 Batch
1 Online Project Eval
2 E-Justice
3 Panchayath Automation
4 Online Hostel Management
5 Online Gas Booking
6 Online University Portal
2010-2014 Batch
1 Rarking & Parking
2 Campus Network
3 Shop N Shop
4 Work Web
5 Nest
6 Film Club

POs
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

2009-2013 Batch
1 Leave Tracker
2 Amal Jyothi Leave & Out pass
Registration System
3 Smart Classifieds
4 Taste Buds
5 Online Food Court System
6 Online Auction System
Main Project Topics
2011-2015 Batch
1 Bat- Blind Assistive Technology
2 Psychological Health Assessment
Through Video Analysis (Psychanteena)
3 Voice Navigated Pc (Speecom)
4 Movies Subtitles And Tracks
Search/Retrieval.
5 Online Penetration Testing Tool
6 Digital Paper Valuation
2010-2014 Batch
1 Lokpal
2 She
3 Eyes
4 Ekayana
5 Mall Surf
6 Virtual Scanner
2009-2013 Batch
1 Zeropass: A User Authentication Scheme
2 Theft Recovery Over Notification
3 Inhunt
4 Inst-alert
5 Mcop 3g : Mobile Police System
6 Loc n Rem

1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9

1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,7,8,9

Page 65

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Figure 6. Attainment level for Project and Practical

2.3. Evaluation of the attainment of Programme Outcomes (75)


2.3.1. Describe assessment tools and processes used for assessing the attainment of each PO
(50)
Describe the assessment process that periodically documents and demonstrates the degree to
which the Programme Outcomes are attained. Also include information on:
a) Listing and description of the assessment processes used to gather the data upon which the
evaluation of each the Programme Outcome is based. Examples of data collection processes
may include, but are not limited to, specific exam questions, student portfolios, internally
developed assessment exams, project presentations, nationally-normed exams, oral exams,
focus groups, industrial advisory committee;
b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out.

a) List & Description of assessment processes


Assessment Tools

Direct/Indirect

Remarks

Project Evaluation

Direct

Project Evaluation conducted


among the students towards
the end of their final year

Course Evaluation

Direct

Course evaluation is
collected from the faculty at

Page 66

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

the end of each semester.


Modes of evaluation are End
Semester Exam, Class Tests,
Series Tests, Model Exams,
Assignments, Attendance
and Seminars.
Course End Survey

Indirect

Course Survey conducted


among students at the end of
each semester

Alumni Survey

Indirect

Alumni Survey conducted


among alumni at the end of
each academic year

Student Exit Survey

Indirect

Student Exit Survey


conducted among the
graduates.

b) The frequency with which these assessment processes are carried out.
Coordinator/
Assessment Tools
Frequency
Stakeholders
Committee
Project Evaluation Yearly
Students
Department Advisory
Board(DAB)
Course Evaluation

Twice a Year

Students

Department Advisory
Board(DAB)

Course End
Survey

Twice a Year

Students

Course Coordinator

Alumni Survey

Yearly

Alumni

Department Advisory
Board(DAB)

Student Exit
Survey

Yearly

Graduates

Programme coordinator

2.3.2. Indicate results of evaluation of each PO (25)


a) The expected level of attainment for each of the Program Outcomes;
b) Summaries of the results of the evaluation processes and an analysis illustrating the extent
to which each of the programme outcomes are attained; and

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

c) How the results are documented and maintained.


Using Direct Methods of assessment
Given below is a graph showing the average attainment level of each PO, assessed using direct
measures like Course Evaluation and Project Evaluation conducted during academic year 20142015.

Figure 7. PO Attainment level by Direct Assessment


Using Indirect Methods of assessment
Alumni Survey conducted in 2015

Figure 8. PO Attainment-Alumni Survey(2015)

Page 68

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Graduate Exit Survey for past three years (Plotted on a scale of 5)

Figure 9. PO Attainment-Student Exit Survey

Figure 10. PO Attainment-Student Exit Survey

Page 69

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Figure 11. PO Attainment-Student Exit Survey


Course End Survey

Figure 12. PO Attainment-Course End Survey(2014-15)

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Given below are the Course End Survey attainment results (Indirect Assessment Method) for
subjects of Even Semester during the year 2014-15.

Figure13. Course End Survey(2015)

Page 71

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Figure14. Course End Survey(2015)

Page 72

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Figure15. Course End Survey(2015)

2.4. Indicate how the results of evaluation of achievement of the POs have been
used for redefining the POs (10)
(Articulate, with rationale, how the results of the evaluation of the POs have been used to
review/redefine the POs)

Based on the evaluation and review of attainment of POs modifications will be recommended
for adding or deleting components of theory, electives, practical etc.
The recent developments in the field are also considered for inclusion in the curriculum so that
the students are well updated and can put forward a better performance than their competitors.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

The results of evaluation are discussed in faculty meetings and new methods of course delivery
and evaluation are formulated. New and effective methods will be evolved for more efficient
delivery of courses.
In times of need special coaching is provided to students, like remedial classes.
The suggestions at institution level are taken to meetings of curriculum revision committee at
university level, where after discussion, recommendations to revise curriculum are sent for
approval of BOS.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

3. Programme Curriculum (125)


3.1. Curriculum (15)
3.1.1. Describe the structure of the curriculum (5)

Course
Code
EN010 101
EN010 102
EN010 103
EN010 104
EN010 105
EN010 106
EN010 107
EN010 108

EN010 109

EN010 110

EN010 111

EN010 301

EN010 302

Course
Title
Engineering
Mathematics I
Engineering
Physics
Engineering
Chemistry&
Environmental
Engineering
Mechanics
Engineering
Graphics
Basic Civil
Engineering
Basic
Mechanical
Basic Electrical
Engineering
Basic Electronics
Engineering
&Information
Technology
Basic
Mechanical
Workshop

Total Number of contact hours


Lecture Tutorial Practical#
Total Hours
(L)
(T)
(P)
2

Basic Electrical
& Civil
Workshop
Engineering
Mathematics II
Economics &
Communication
Skills

Credits

Page 75

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CS010 303

CS010 304

CS010 305

Problem Solving
And Computer
Programming
Computer
Organization
Switching
Theory And
Logic Design

CS010 306

Electronics
Devices and
Circuits

CS010 307

Programming
Lab

CS010 308
EN010 401

Logic Design
Lab
Engineering
Mathematics III

CS010 402

Object Oriented
Programming

CS010 403

Data Structures
and Algorithms

CS010 404

Communication
Systems

CS010405

Microprocessor
Systems

CS 010 406
CS010 407

Theory of
Computation
Data Structures
Lab

CS010 408

Electronic
Circuits Lab

EN010 501

Engineering
Mathematics IV

EN010 502

Principles of
Management

CS010 503

Database
Management
Systems

Page 76

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CS010 504
CS010 505
CS010 506
CS010 507
CS010 508

CS010 601

CS010 602

Digital Signal
Processing
Operating
Systems
Advanced
Microprocessors
& Peripherals

Database Lab
Hardware And
Microprocessors
Lab
Design And
Analysis of
Algorithm
Internet
Computing

CS010 603

System Software

CS010 604

Computer
Networks

CS010 605

Software
Engineering

CS010 606L04 Elective I


CS010 607
CS010 608
CS010 701
CS010 702
CS010 703
CS010 704

CS010 705

Operating
Systems Lab
Mini Project
Web
Technologies
Compiler
Constructions
Computer
Graphics
Object Oriented
Modelling And
Design
Principles Of
Programming
Languages

CS010 706L06 Elective II

Page 77

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CS010 707

Systems
Programming
Lab

CS010 708

Networking Lab

CS010 709

Seminar

CS010 710

Project Work

CS010 801
CS010802
CS010 803

High
Performance
Computing
Artificial
Intelligence
Security in
Computing

CS010 804L01- Elective III


06
CS010 805L01- Elective IV
06
Computer
CS010 806
Graphics Lab
CS010 807

Project

CS010 808

Viva Voce

Total
#Seminars, project works may be considered as practical
3.1.2. Give the Prerequisite flow chart of courses (5)
(Draw the schematic of the prerequisites of the courses in the curriculum)

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Page 79

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

3.1.3. Justify how the programme curriculum satisfies the programme specific criteria
(5)
(Justify how the programme curriculum satisfies the programme specific criteria specified by the
American professional societies relevant to the programme under accreditation)
PROGRAMME SPECIFIC CRITERIA:
Lead Society: IEEE
These program criteria apply to engineering programs that include electrical, electronic, computer,
or similar modifiers in their titles.
1. Curriculum
The structure of the curriculum must provide both breadth and depth across the range of
engineering topics implied by the title of the program.
The curriculum must include probability and statistics, including applications appropriate to the
program name; mathematics through differential and integral calculus; sciences (defined as
biological, chemical, or physical science); and engineering topics (including computing science)
necessary to analyze and design complex electrical and electronic devices, software, and systems
containing hardware and software components.
The curriculum for programs containing the modifier electrical in the title must include
advanced Mathematics, such as differential equations, linear algebra, complex variables, and
discrete mathematics.
The curriculum for programs containing the modifier computer in the title must include
discrete Mathematics.
The Programme Curriculum satisfies the IEEE Programme Specific Criteria can be shown by
dividing into core components
Mathematical logic: These subjects provide depth as well as breadth to the Computer Science and
Engineering program. This structure includes probability, statistics and calculus necessary to
analyze and design complex software and systems. Discrete mathematics gives an emphasis on
discrete mathematical structures and using in modeling routing on the internet.
Science: These subjects include chemical and physical science to analyze and solve advanced
engineering subjects.
Computing: This structure increases the ability to find, analyze and solve simple and complex real
world systems containing hardware and software components. This helps in improving
mathematical knowledge to decode and execute real time problems. It also helps in developing web
applications.
Programming Languages and paradigms: Developing an ability to think and analyze real world
problems using mathematical reasoning and algorithms. These subjects help in developing web
applications using software components.
Engineering Basics: Developing awareness about various mathematical structures and its
applications. These programs also provide breadth across the range of engineering topics implied by
the title of the program.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Professional Core: Developing skills that are relevant to students future career. It helps in
providing an academic perspective on computer science, addressing areas such as the theory of
algorithms, computer programming, hardware design and software engineering. Also giving focus
on discrete mathematical structure.

3.2. State the components of the curriculum and their relevance to the POs and the
PEOs (15)
Programme curriculum grouping based on different components

Course Component

Curriculum Content
Total
(% of total number of number of
Total number
credits of the
of credits
contact
hours
programme )

POs

PEOs

Mathematics

7.21

15

15

1, 2, 10

1, 2, 3

Science

1.92

1, 2, 10

1, 2, 3

Humanities

3.85

5, 6, 7, 9,
10

1, 2, 3

Engineering Basics

8.17

17

17

1, 2, 5, 6

1, 2, 3

Computing

7.69

17

16

1-10

1,2,3

12.98

27

27

1-10

1, 2, 3

20.19

42

42

1-10

1, 2, 3

Discipline Electives

7.69

16

16

1-10

1,2,3

Inter disciplinary
Courses

7.69

16

16

1-10

1,2,3

161

161

Programming
languages and
Paradigms
Professional core

TOTAL

3.3. State core engineering subjects and their relevance to Programme Outcomes
including design experience (30)
(Describe how the core engineering subjects in the curriculum provide the learning experience with
the complex engineering problems)
Core Engineering Subjects and their Relevance
CS010 304: Computer Organization
Introduces fundamental concepts of computer science and computer architecture.
Page 81

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Helps to develop a good understanding of a complete computer system through an integrated


approach to hardware, software and processor design.
To emphasize on both background theory and actual design.
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,8]
CS010 403: Data Structures and Algorithms
To impart the basic concepts of data structures and algorithms
To develop understanding about writing algorithms and step by step approach in solving problems
with the help of fundamental data structures.
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [1, 2, 3, 4]
CS010 503: Database Management Systems
To give an introduction to the theory and practice of database systems.
To develop basic knowledge on data modeling and design of efficient relations.
To provide exposure to oracle database programming.
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
CS010 505: Operating Systems
To understand the fundamental concepts and techniques of Operating Systems.
To be aware of how a computer works at its innermost levels.
To study the basic structure of Linux system.
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9]
CS010 603: System Software
To introduce the techniques adopted in the design and implementation of System Software.
To know how a system program manages and supports the computer resources and operations of a
computer system while it is running application software.
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9]
CS010 604: Computer Networks
To develop basic knowledge on the mode of operation of different types of computer networks
those are used to interconnect a distributed community of computers and various interfacing
standards and protocols.
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10]
CS010 605: Software Engineering
To familiarize the steps in designing a Computer Software System following the conventions in
Engineering Design.
To introduce the fundamentals of Structured and Object Oriented Designs and Design Tools.
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [ 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
CS010 702: Compiler Constructions
To introduce the various techniques involved in the translation of source programs into object
programs by a compiler.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

To understand the inner working of a compiler using the various data structures used in the
translation process.
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10]
CS010 703: Computer Graphics
To understand the basic concepts of Computer Graphics & display techniques.
To develop basic knowledge on imaging techniques and to create an ability to quickly visualize
newly designed shapes
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10]
CS010 704: Object Oriented Modeling and Design
To impart ideas on building systems through the object oriented modeling approach using the
Unified Modeling Language.
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10]
CS010 802: Artificial Intelligence To provide introduction to the basic knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning
methods of Artificial Intelligence.
To familiarize with Fuzzy Logic and knowledge processing in expert systems
To give exposure to problem solving in AI using Python
o
These objectives facilitate a method to achieve Program Outcomes [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10]

3.4. Industry interaction/internship (10)


(Give the details of industry involvement in the programme such as industry-attached laboratories
and partial delivery of courses and internship opportunities for students)
Industrial Visit By Students

Company
Name

Company
Sector

Incorpo
ration
Status

CISCO,
Bangalore

IT

Private

Doordarsha
n,
Bangalore

Broadcasti
ng

Public

Intel,
Bangalore

IT

Private

Discipline
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Page 83

Level

Date
From

Date To

No
of
Stud
ents

Degree

6/17/2013

6/21/2013

54

Degree

6/17/2013

6/21/2013

54

Degree

8/21/2013

8/25/2013

53

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Wipro ,
Mysore

IT

Private

Doordarsha
n, Goa

IT

Private

TCS,
Bangalore

IT

Private

IPSR
solutions,
Kottayam

IT

Private

All India
Radio , Goa

Broadcasti
ng

Public

TCS,
Bangalore

IT

Private

TCS,
Hydrabad

IT

Private

UST
Global,
Ernakulam

IT

Private

Icubes
(Qoutient
Four),
Ernakulam

IT

Private

UST
Global,
Trivandrum

IT

Private

Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied
Computer &
IT
Engineering
and Allied

Degree

12/6/2013

12/11/2013

38

Degree

9/9/2014

9/9/2014

33

Degree

3/8/2013

3/8/2013

45

Degree

9/11/2014

9/11/2014

10

Degree

9/9/2014

9/9/2014

33

Degree

6/8/2014

6/8/2014

40

Degree

7/7/2014

7/7/2014

43

Degree

10/1/2014

10/1/2014

40

Degree

10/1/2014

10/1/2014

40

Degree

2/12/2015

2/12/2015

52

Student Internship

Company
Name

Compa
ny
Sector

Incorp
oration
Status

Discipline

Page 84

Level

Date
From

Date To

No of
Stude
nts

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Aabasoft,
Cochin

IT

Private

VSSC,
Trivandrum

IT

Public

IPSR
Solutions
Ltd.

IT

Private

IBM

IT

Private

Private

Aceware
Technologi
es,
Trivandrum

IT

Computer &
IT Engineering Degree 12/9/2013
and Allied
Computer &
IT Engineering Degree 6/30/2014
and Allied
Computer &
IT Engineering Degree 1/29/2014
and Allied

12/13/2013

7/4/2014

1/29/2014

60

Computer &
IT Engineering Degree 3/10/2014
and Allied

3/10/2014

87

Computer &
IT Engineering Degree 1/27/2014
and Allied

2/1/2014

87

3.5. Illustrate the measures and processes used to identify the curricular gaps to
the attainment of the COs/POs (15)
(Details of the processes used to curricular gaps to the attainment of defined course outcomes and
programme)
Some of the measures and processes that have been implemented are detailed below.
a) At the end of the semester, student feedback (on an anonymous basis) is taken for the quality
of the course contents along with the course delivery specific for a faculty member. This
enables the Department to make proactive changes to successive courses and functioning
methods of the faculty.
b) Module wise tests are conducted to identify weak students at the beginning of the course.
Tutorial classes and confidence building measures are provided to such students.
c) The placement drive identifies performance gaps in the students. Such gaps are mitigated by
providing training by way of Add-on courses and Soft skills which complement regular
classes.
d) One such gap identified was the lack of communication skills. Students have been found to
exhibit interview phobia. This is being countered by the inclusion of Communication classes
which have been included in the timetable and Spoken Tutorial classes conducted by IIT,
Bombay in association with MHRD.
e) The subject expertise identified lack of knowledge in core areas of computer science. This
curriculum gap is bypassed by taking content topics beyond syllabus and by providing
QEEE sessions by IIT, Madras on computer science subjects.
f) Adequate changes have been introduced in the syllabus and the subjects to keep them abreast
with technology changes.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Process for identifying curricular gaps


Curriculum development team

1. Define curriculum approach and scope of


practice

2. Make decisions about learner characteristics, intended


outcomes, methods, content

3. Perform Curriculum Based Measurement


3.3 Perform Mastery
Measures

3.1 Perform General


outcome Measures

3.2 Perform Skill Based


Measures

4. Conduct Curriculum Based Assessment

Yes

4.1 Conduct Survey-level


Assessment

Yes

Check for
curriculu
m gaps

4.2 Conduct Specific-level


Assessment

No

Prescribed Curriculum results in subject-oriented and


competent based education

Figure16. Process for identifying curricular gaps

Page 86

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

3.6 Indicate the content beyond syllabus imparted for the attainment of the
COs/POs(35)
(Details of the content beyond syllabus imparted for the attainment of the COs/PO s. This
information may be provided course wise or module wise)
Semester
Course/Module
3
Problem Solving and Computer
Programming
4

Data Structures and Algorithms

Microprocessor Systems

Theory of Computation

Database Systems

Algorithms

Computer Networks

Web Technologies

Compiler Construction

Computer Graphics

Page 87

Content beyond Syllabus


1. Functions with any datatype
arguments
2. Bitwise operators programming
1. Learn data structures by
simulations.
1. Assembly language programming
2. Modular programming
3. Hardware details of Intel Pentium
processors
1. Recent trends and applications
2. Regulated Rewriting
3. Matrix Grammers
4. Insertion-deletion Systems
5. L systems and P systems
1. Distributed Databases and Client
Server architecture
1. Machine Learning Algorithms
2. Genetic Algorithms
1. Multimedia NetworkingMultimedia over IP
2. Introduction to Ad Hoc and
Sensor Networks, Cellular Networks
1. Structure of Web Architecture
2. Web Servers-Microsoft IIS,
net,MySQL, Apache, Tomcat,
Oracle
3. Semantic Web
4. Online Services-Facebook,
Google, Social Web and Virtual
Worlds
1. Compilation for high performance
architecture
2. Selected topics from compilers
for imperative, object oriented and
mark up languages
1. Virtual reality Programming

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Artificial Intelligence

Security in Computing

2. Audio, Video and Image


Enhancement Techniques
3. Animation Software Development
1. Introduction to natural language
Processing
2. Artificial Neural Networks
1. Server Side Security-Web Server,
Database Server, App Server
2. Cloud Security
3. Mobile Security
1.Mobile e-commerce
2. Data mining for e-commerce

8
E-Commerce
8

Software Architecture

1. Documenting Software
Architecture,
2. Evaluating Software Architecture
3.Case studies and Recent Research
Trends

3.7. Course Syllabi (5)


(Include, in appendix, a syllabus for each course used. Syllabi format should be consistent and
shouldnt exceed two pages.)
The syllabi format may include:

Department, course number, and title of course


Designation as a required or elective course
Pre-requisites
Contact hours and type of course (lecture, tutorial, seminar, project etc.)
Course Assessment methods (both continuous and semester-end assessment)
Course Outcomes
Topics covered
Text books, and/or reference material

Attached in Appendix I

Page 88

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

4. Students Performance (100)


Admission intake in the programme
Item

CAY

CAYm1 CAYm2

CAYm3

Sanctioned intake strength of the programme (N)

120

120

90

90

Total number of students admitted in first year


minus number of students migrated to other
programmes at the end of 1st year (N1)

126

107

89

91

Number of students admitted in 2nd year in the same


batch via lateral entry (N2)

NIL

Total number of students admitted in the


programme
(N1 + N2)

126

109

90

94

4.1. Success Rate (30)


Provide data for the past seven batches of students
Incomplete Number of students who have
Number of students
Year of entry (in admitted in 1st year
successfully completed*
reverse
+ admitted via lateral
chronological order entry in 2nd year (N1
4th Year
+ N2)
1st Year
2nd Year 3rd Year
126
CAY
CAYm1

109

64/109

CAYm2

90

51/91

40/90

CAYm3

94

67/93

50/91

57/91

CAYm4 / LYG

94

46/94

36/94

36/92

53/90

CAYm5 / LYGm1

93

49/93

39/93

45/93

60/93

CAYm6 / LYG m2

62

55/62

33/62

48/62

55/62

*successfully completed implies zero backlogs


Page 89

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Success rate = 30 mean of success index (SI) for past three batches
SI= (Number of students who graduated from the programme in the stipulated
Period of course duration)/ (Number of students admitted in the first year of that batch and
admitted in 2nd year via lateral entry)
Item

LYG
(CAYm4)

LYGm1
(CAYm5)

LYGm2
(CAYm6)

Number of students admitted in the


corresponding First Year + admitted via lateral
entry in 2nd year

94

93

62

Number of students who have graduated in the


stipulated period

53

60

55

0.56

0.64

0.88

Success index (SI)

Average SI = 0.69
Success rate = 30 Average SI = 20.8
4.2. Academic Performance (20)
Academic Performance = 2 * API
Where API
= Academic Performance Index
= Mean of Cumulative Grade Point Average of all successful
Students on a 10 point CGPA System
OR
= Mean of the percentage of marks of all successful students / 10
Item
LYG
LYGm1
(CAYm4) (CAYm5)

LYGm2
(CAYm6)

Approximating the API by the following mid-point


Analysis
9 < Number of students with CGPA < 10.0 / 91-100 %

8 < Number of students with CGPA < 9.0/ 81- 90 %

7<=8 / 71- 80 %

33

25

30

6<=7 / 61 - 70 %

15

33

23

5<=6 /50 - 60 %

Total

53

60

55

7.31

6.98

7.12

Approximating API by Mid-CGPA


Mean of CGPA/Percentage of all the students (API)

Page 90

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Av. API = 7.14


Academic Performance = 2 x Av. API = 14.28

4.3. Placement and Higher Studies (30)


Assessment Points = 30 (x + 1.25y)/N
Where, x = Number of students placed
y = Number of students admitted for higher studies with valid qualifying scores/ranks, and
N = Total number of students who were admitted in the batch including lateral entry subject to
maximum assessment points = 20
Item

LYG

LYGm1

LYGm2

Number of students admitted corresponding to LYG


including lateral entry (N)

94

93

62

Number of students who obtained jobs as


per the record of placement office (x1)

33

10

21

Number of students who found employment


otherwise at the end of the final year (x2)

10

36

20

24

11

22

15

15.88

15.32

20.69

x = x1 + x2
Number of students who opted for higher
studies with valid qualifying scores/ranks (y)
Assessment points
Average assessment points =

17.29

4.4. Professional Activities (20)


4.4.1. Professional societies / chapters and organizing engineering events (4)
(Instruction: The institution may provide data of the past three years).
CAYm2 2012-13
Date
6/4/2013

Event Name
Reboot 1.0

Details
Technical Fest
organized by Final
year students

Page 91

Professional Society
Computer Science and
MCA Department of Amal
Jyothi College of
Engineering in association

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

6/4/2013

Android Workshop

One-day workshop
conducted for the
students of CSE
and IT department

with MAGNIFICATA.
Computer Science and
MCA Department of Amal
Jyothi College of
Engineering in association
with MAGNIFICATA.

CAYm1 2013-14
Date
24/01/2014

Event Name
Opportunities in
Startup village

03/02/2014, TECH TALK


11/02/2014,
17/2/2014,
3/3/2014

Details
One day workshop.
Sessions handled by
Ms.Meera Radhakrishnan,
Mr. Sreerag and Mr.
Akash from Startup
Village
Sessions handled by final
year students on various
technical topics

Professional Society
Computer Science
Association in
technical partnership
with Startup village
Computer Science
Department of Amal
Jyothi College of
Engineering in
technical partnership
with CSI-Cochin
chapter
Computer Science
Department of Amal
Jyothi College of
Engineering in
technical partnership
with CSI-Cochin
chapter

18/2/2014
and
19/2/2014

Ethical hacking &


Cyber Security

Mr. Manu Zacharia,


founder of Matriux,
Information Security
Research Association
and c0c0n hacking
conferences was the
resource person for the 2
day workshop

29/3/2014

SEASTA14

5/4/2014

Firefox OS App
Days &WEB
MAKER Party

18/6/14

Gaming using C
Programming

A technical fest to find out Computer Science


the best programmer.
Department of Amal
Jyothi College of
Engineering in
technical partnership
with CSI-Cochin
chapter
One day workshop
CSE Department
AJCE in association
with CSI Cochin
Chapter & Mozilla
Firefox Community
Familiarization of C
Association of
Computer Science &
language for gaming
Engineering

Page 92

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

CAY 2014-15
Date
26/09/2014

Event Name
Exuro 2k14

1/12/20144/12/2014

Latex Workshop Four day


Workshop on
Document
Typesetting
tool-Latex
Golden Tech
One day
Bridge
workshop
Programme for
intended for
Women
computer
literacy of
women
HTML
One day
Workshop
workshop on
HTML for S1S2
students

9/8/2014

16/9/201417/9/2014

Details
Technical Fest

Professional Society
Computer Science Department
of Amal Jyothi College of
Engineering in technical
partnership with CSI-Cochin
chapter
CSE & CA Department AJCE
in association with ISTE
Kerala Chapter
CSE Department AJCE in
association with CSI Cochin
Chapter

Association of Computer
Science & Engineering

7/3/2015

Design and
Development of
Raspberry Pi
Based Systems

One-day
Workshop for
students

CSE Department AJCE in


association with CSI Cochin
Chapter and FABER-FUN

14/3/1515/3/15

MEGAPIXELS

Two day basic


digital
photography
workshop
headed by
resource person
Dr Ullas G
Kalappura, an
avid
photographer
and a travel
enthusiast.

CSE Department AJCE in


association with CSI Cochin
Chapter

Page 93

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

4.4.2 Organization of paper contests, design contests, etc., and achievements (4)
(Instruction: The institution may provide data of t h e past three years).
Date
Event Name
06/04/2013 Project Presentation

Details
Developed
applications for
mobile platforms, web
or any OS

06/04/2013 Poster designing

Developed posters on
the given theme
within the allotted
time

06/04/2013 Paper Presentation

Provided a platform
for emerging
engineers to suitably
present their
innovative ideas
To find the bugs and
errors in C Program

06/04/2013 C Debugging

02/02/2015 QUIZ UP

Technical Quiz
competition

Professional Society
Computer Science and
MCA Department of Amal
Jyothi College of
Engineering in association
with MAGNIFICATA.
Computer Science and
MCA Department of Amal
Jyothi College of
Engineering in association
with MAGNIFICATA.
Computer Science and
MCA Department of Amal
Jyothi College of
Engineering in association
with MAGNIFICATA.
Computer Science and
MCA Department of Amal
Jyothi College of
Engineering in association
with MAGNIFICATA.
CSE Department AJCE in
association with CSI
Cochin Chapter

4.3. Publication of technical magazines, newsletters, etc. (4)


(Instruction: The institution may list the publications mentioned earlier along with the names of
the editors, publishers, etc.).
(Instruction: The institution may specify the efforts and achievements.)
Publication Description

Editor/Author

Publisher

In CAYm2
Chief Editor :
Manoj T Joy
Digital Magazine
Editorial board :
Ashams Mathew,
Chief Editor :
Manoj T Joy
BYTES- Computer Science
Editorial
board :
Department Bi-Yearly Newsletter
Neenu R, Ansamol

Page 94

AJCE

AJCE

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Mr. Ajith G.S

C For YOU

Mr.Ajith G.S

In CAYm1
Chief Editor :
Manoj T Joy
BYTES- Computer Science
Editorial board :
Department Bi-Yearly Newsletter Neenu R, Ansamol
Varghese, Anjana V
In CAY

AJCE

Chief Editor :
Manoj T Joy
BYTES- Computer Science
Editorial board :
Department Bi-Yearly Newsletter
Neenu R, Ansamol
Varghese, Anjana V

AJCE

4.4.4. Entrepreneurship initiatives, product designs and innovations (4)


(Instruction: The institution may provide data of the past three years).
Entrepreneurship initiatives
Student Name
Sarath Sasi

Company Name
Filanza Security
Services and Solutions
Ltd.

Ajith Mathew

Educrib

Paul Emil Johnson


Karthik M

Awesome Daddies

Designation
Director
Co-Founder, Chief
Technical Officer
Founder, Creative
Head

Year
Nov 2011
Feb 2013
Jan 2014

Product designs
Student Name
Ashams Mathew,Sebin
Jose,Josekutty Jose

Nidhin George Joseph

Project Name
Project "Web Doctor "
has been submitted to
National Science and
Technology
Entrepreneurship
Development
Board(NSTEDB) under
Department of Science
and Technology(DST)
EyeS

Page 95

Details
Got Fund of
Rs.100000 from
DST

Year
2012

Application for
Android Smart
Phones used for

2014

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Arun John
Jevin George Thuruthy
Anakha Krishnakumar
Arya Aravind

Psychological health
assessment through
video analysis- got
selected for Tech Top
2015

Tony Toms
Rinjo Joy
Minnu Cherian

Voice navigated PC got selected for Tech


Top 2015

Jesvin James George


Aleena Roy
Geena Sara Mathew
Jinu Rose Mathew

Blind Assistance
technology- got selected
for Tech Top 2015

Page 96

advanced tracking of
People.
Tech Top 2015 is
the 10 Annual
National Innovation
Challenge for
engineering students,
meant to identify,
promote and
celebrate
outstanding
engineering talents
with Innovative
ideas that can be
demonstrated and
commercialized
Tech Top 2015 is the
10 Annual
National Innovation
Challenge for
engineering students,
meant to identify,
promote and
celebrate
outstanding
engineering talents
with Innovative
ideas that can be
demonstrated and
commercialized
Tech Top 2015 is the
10 Annual
National Innovation
Challenge for
engineering students,
meant to identify,
promote and
celebrate
outstanding
engineering talents
with Innovative
ideas that can be
demonstrated and
commercialized

2015

2015

2015

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

4.4.5. Publications and awards in inter-institute events by students of the programme of


study (4)
(Instruction: The institution may provide a table indicating those publications, which received
awards in the events/conferences organized by other institutes. A tabulated list of all other
student publications may be included in the appendix.)
CAYm2 (2012-2013)
Publications
Paper Title

Conference

Date
(from to)

Venue

Author Name
Francis Alexander

Bypassing SQL
Injection Filters

Defcon Kerala
2013

21st April
2013

LALIT
RESORT AND
SPA BEKAL,
Kannur

Awards in Inter-Institute Events


Name

Event Name

Category

Date

Venue

Prize/Awards

Haritha B

MG
University
Youth
Festival

Light Music

26th Feb
2013

MG
University

Second

Adarsh
Mathew

MG
University
Inter-Zone

Chess
Tournament

26th Feb 2013

MG
University

Runner Up

CAY m1 ( 2013-2014)
Publications
Author Name

Grace Mary James

Paper Title

Conference

BLUE BRAIN
CHEATS
DEATH
THROUGH A.I
: Blue Brain
Technology and
Life after Death

National
conference on
innovative
computing
applications and
networking

Page 97

Date
(from to)

Venue

31st Oct 1st Nov


2014

ICET,Muvattup
uzha

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Francis Alexander

Francis Alexander

NoSQL
Exploitation
Framework Tool
Pentesting
NoSQL
Databases using
NoSQL
Exploitation
Framework

Nullcon Goa Feb 13th - 14th


February
2014
2014
Hack in Paris 2014
23rd - 27th
June 2014

The Bogmallo
Beach Resort,
Goa
Disneyland
Resort, Paris

Awards in Inter-Institute Events


Name

Event
Name

Stephinmon
Antony, Tony
Thomas

CSI
Regional
Student
Conventio
n

Jewel John,
Albin P Albert,
Amal Paul,
Jishnu
Muralikrishnan

Ascend
2013

Amal Krishna

Francis
Alexandar, Joe
N Sabu
Francis
Alexandar, Joe
N Sabu, Allen
Mathew
Joe N Sabu
Amal Krishna T
Joel Varghese
Joy
Francis
Alexander

Dyuthi13
National
Level
Multi Fest
Dyuthi13
National
Level
Multi Fest
Dyuthi13
National
Level
Multi Fest
Dyuthi13
National
Level
Multi Fest
Trana
2K14
Trana
2K14

Prize/Aw
ards

Category

Date

Venue

Scramble

6th -7th
Sept 2013

Rajagiri School of
Engineering and
Technology
Kochi

Arcade Raider

2nd Aug
2013

Saintgits College
of Engg.,
Kottayam

Second

Web Bully

11th -13th
Sept 2013

Govt. Engineering
College Thrissur

First

Capture The
Flag

11th -13th
Sept 2013

Govt. Engineering
College Thrissur

First

Backtrack

11th -13th
Sept 2013

Govt. Engineering
College Thrissur

First

Ultimate Geek

11th -13th
Sept 2013

Govt. Engineering
College Thrissur

Web crunch

Red Sector

14th -15th
KMEA Engg
March 2014 college
14th -15th
KMEA Engg
March 2014 college

Page 98

First

First

Second
First

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Aswin Tom

Anjali Tom
Jerry Kurian
Mathew,
Joemon Jacob
Maria Thomas
Tharian,
Faizal Ashraf,
Sanjana Joshy,
Shilpa Susanna
Mathew

All Kerala
inter
collegiate
Table
tennis
champions
hip

Table tennis

7th Feb
2014

St. Albert's
college,
Ernakulam

Nakshatra

Mr and Mrs
Nakshatra

28th Feb 1st March


2014

Lumiere1
4

C Debugging

10th -11th
Feb 2014

Saintgits College
of Engg.,
Kottayam
College of
Engineering,
Kidangoor

Ethnicity

28th Feb 1st March


2014

Nakshatra

Second

Second

Second

Saintgits College
of Engg.,
Kottayam

First

CAY (2014-2015)
Publications
Date
(from to)

Venue

44CON 2014 London

9th - 12th
September
2014

ILEC Conference
Centre , London

c0c0n 2014

21st -23rd
August 2014

Le Meridien Hotel,
KOCHI

Nullcon Goa
2015

4th - 7th Jan


2015

The Bogmallo
Beach Resort,
Goa, India

Author Name

Paper Title

Conference

Francis
Alexander

Pentesting NoSQL
Databases using
NoSQL
Exploitation
Framework
Addressing NoSQL
Issues
NoSQL
Exploitation
Framework
Version2 Release

Francis
Alexander
Francis
Alexander

Awards in Inter-Institute Events


Name
Allen M Mathew
Joe N Sabu

Event
Name
Abhiyanthr
iki 2k14

Category

Date

Enigma

19th -20th Sept.


2014

Page 99

Venue
Rajagiri
School of
Engg.

Prize/Award
s
First

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Allen M Mathew
Ajmal Basheer
Charles C Sebastian
Joseph Michael
Xavier
Athira Haridas
Abina Ajith

Abhiyanthr
iki 2k14

A3K
Legal
Event

19th -20th Sept.


2014

Rajagiri
School of
Engg.

27th - 28th Aug


2014

Marian
College,
Kuttikkana
m
Saintgits
College of
Engg,
Kottayam
Govt. Engg
College,
Thrissur
Govt. Engg
College,
Thrissur
Govt. Engg
College,
Thrissur
Govt. Engg
College,
Thrissur
Govt. Engg
College,
Thrissur
Saintgits
College of
Engg
,Kottayam

Navigator
'14

C -coding

RADIEUX
6.0

Technical
Event

Francis Alexander,
Alex Thomas

Dyuthi15

Back
Track

19th -21st Feb


2015

Francis Alexander,
Joe N Sabu

Dyuthi15

Ultimate
Geek

19th -21st Feb


2015

Francis Alexander,
Joe N Sabu, Joel
Varghese Joy

Dyuthi15

Capture
The Flag

19th -21st Feb


2015

Joe N Sabu

Dyuthi15

Play
Along

19th -21st Feb


2015

Amal Krishna

Dyuthi15

Web
Bully

19th -21st Feb


2015

Thomas Mathew

NAKSHA
TRA 15

Android
App
Developm
ent

23rd Jan 2015

Delma Varghese,
Fathima Zaya
Imthiaz, Dhanya
Mary George,
Geethu Alphonsa
Thomas, Treesa
Joy, Riya Rose
Sebastian

NAKSHA
TRA 15

Amazing
Race

Scaria Dixon, Ben


George

NAVIGAT
OR14

Jikku Joyce,Amal
Dev Thomas &
Tony Toms

Asthra

Athira Haridas
Abina Ajith

30th Aug 2014

Second

Third

Second

First

Second

Second

Second

First

Second

22nd Jan 2015

Saintgits
College of
Engg,
Kottayam

Third

Quiz

27th -28th Aug


2014

Marian
College
Kuttikanam

Second

Technical
Event

14th March
2015

SJCET
,Pala

First

Page 100

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Arun John & Amal


Dev Thomas

Ritu

Jeril George &


Abhijith S

ASTHRA
15

Jobis James & Arun


Varghese

Syam Krishnan

Belanove K Binu

General
Event

26th Feb 2015

RIT,
Pampady

Second

Cyberton

14th March
2015

SJCET,
Pala

Second

LUMIERE
15

CDebuggin
g

3rd -4th Feb


2015

College of
Engg.
Kidangoor

Second

Nakshatra
15

Spot
Photograp
hy

IRIS 2015

Photograp
hy contest

22nd Jan 2015

th

14 Feb 2015

Page 101

Saintgits
College

St. George
College
Aruvithura,

First

Second

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

5. Faculty Contributions (175)


List of Faculty Members: For the programme exclusively / Shared with other
programmes

Name of
the
faculty
member

Manoj T.
Joy

Distribution Number of
research
of teaching
publication
Designatio load (%)
R&D and
Holding
s
in
Qualification, n and date
consultanc
Interaction
an
journals IPRs y work
university, and of joining
with outside
incubatio
and
year of graduation
the
with
world
1st UG PG conference
n unit
institution Year
amount
s since
joining
M. Tech.
Web
Attended
(Network
Professor
Doctor
STTP,
Communication &
and
Head,
Project
Workshops,
Security),
NIL 100 0
12
NIL
NIL
14/01/2004
under
took classes for
Dr. MGR
IEDC (1
other institutes
Educational &
in Kerala
lakh)
Research Institute,
2007)

M. Tech.
(Network
Communication Assistant
Shiney
& Security),
Professor, NIL 47 53
Thomas
Dr. MGR
19/5/2004
Educational &
Research Institute,
2007)

14

NIL

NIL

NIL

Resmipriy ME (Computer
Assistant
Science and
a
Professor, NIL 25 75
Engineering),
M. G. Anna University, 17/08/2006
2013

NIL

NIL

NIL

Santhosh M.E (Computer & Assistant


Communication),
Kumar G Anna University, Professor, NIL 66 34
17/2/2007
S
2007

NIL

NIL

NIL

Page 102

Attended
STTP,
Workshops,
took classes for
other institutes
in Kerala
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
STTP,
Workshops,
took classes for
other institutes
in Kerala

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Syam
Gopi

ME (Computer
Assistant
Science and
Professor, NIL 100 0
Engineering),
Anna University, 22/09/2009
2009

ME (Computer
Science and
Elisabeth
Engineering),
Thomas
Anna University,
2009
M. Tech. (Cyber
Security), Amrita
Ashji S
Vishwa
Raj
Vidyapeetham ,
2010

Assistant
Professor, NIL 100 0

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

24/06/2010

Assistant
Professor, NIL 100 0
26/07/2010

ME (Computer
Assistant
Science and
Professor,, NIL 100 0
Engineering),
Anna University 14/02/2011
2009

NIL

NIL

NIL

Anishamo ME CSE, Anna


Assistant
l
university
Professor, NIL 100 0
Abraham Coimbatore, 2011 1/07/2011

NIL

NIL

NIL

M. Tech. (CSE), Assistant


Karunya
Professor, NIL 100 0
University, 2011 17/10/2011

NIL

NIL

NIL

Tintu
M. Tech. (SE),
Assistant
Alphonsa
Karunya
Professor, NIL 66 34
Thomas University, 2011 17/10/2011

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

Jerin
Thomas

Niya
Joseph

Sumy
Joseph

M. Tech. (SE),
Karunya
University, 2011

Assistant
Professor, NIL 100 0
2/11/2011

Page 103

Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

M. Tech.
Computer and
Assistant
Jayakrish
Information
Professor, NIL 100 0
na V
Technology
04/11/2011
M.S university
Tirunelveli, 2010
ME (Computer
Assistant
Science and
Professor, NIL 100 0
Neenu R
Engineering),
01/02/2012
Sathyabama
University, 2012

11

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops

NIL

Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops

ME(Computer
Assistant
Science and
Ansamol
NI
Professor, NIL 100
Varghese Engineering),Anna
L
01/02/2012
University,2008

NIL

NIL

NIL

ME (Computer
Science and
Assistant
Krishnalal
Engineering),
Professor, NIL 50 50
.G
Anna University, 2/7/2012
2009

NIL

NIL

NIL

M Tech(Computer
Science &
Assistant
Engineering),
Anjana V
Professor, NIL 100 0
Amrita Vishwa
10/01/2013
Vidyapeetham,
2012
M. Tech.
Sharon (Computer Science
and Information
Sunny
Systems), M.G
University 2012
M. Tech.
(Computer and
Sruthi.S
Information
Science), CUSAT
2012

NIL

NIL

NIL

Assistant
Professor, NIL 100 0
16/01/2013

NIL

NIL

NIL

Assistant
Professor, NIL 100 0
16/01/2013

NIL

NIL

NIL

Page 104

Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Neethu C
Sekhar

Deepu
Benson

M. Tech
(Computer Science
& Information
Systems)
MG University,
2011
ME (Computer
Science and
Engineering),
Anna
University,2009

M.
Teenu
Tech.(Computer
Therese
Science and
Paul Engineering), M.G
University 2013
M. Tech.
Shany (Computer Science
Jophin and Engineering),
M.G University
2013

Assistant
Professor, NIL 100 0
12/07/2012

Assistant
Professor, NIL 66 34
01/08/2013

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

NIL

Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops

NIL

Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops

Assistant
Professor, NIL 74 26
07/07/2014

NIL

NIL

NIL

Assistant
Professor, 20
07/07/2014

NIL

NIL

NIL

80

Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops
Attended
Seminars,
Conference,
STTP &
Workshops

(Instruction: The institution may complete this table for the calculation of the student-teacher
ratio (STR). Teaching loads of the faculty member contributing to the undergraduate
programme only (2nd, 3rd, and 4th year) are considered to calculate the STR.)

5.1. Student-Teacher Ratio (STR) (20)


STR is desired to be 15 or superior
Assessment
= 20 15/STR; subject to maximum assessment of 20
STR
= (x + y + z)/N1
where, x = Number of students in 2nd year of the programme
y = Number of students in 3rd year of the programme
z = Number of students in 4th year of the programme
N1 = Total Number Faculty Members in the program (by considering fractional load)

Year
CAYm2
CAYm1

x+y+z

N1

STR

89

92

93

274

18.8

14.57

Assessment
(Max. = 20)
20.59

90

91

90

271

19.8

13.69

21.91

Page 105

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

109

CAY

87

87

283

19.09

14.82

20.24

Average assessment

20

For item nos. 5. 2 to 5. 8, the denominator term (N) is computed as follows:


N = Maximum {N1, N2}
N1 = Total number of faculty members in the programme (considering the fractional load)
N2 = Number of faculty positions needed for student-teacher ratio of 15
Year

N1

N2

N = Max. (N1, N2)

CAYm2

18.8

18.3

18.8

CAYm1

19.8

18.1

19.8

CAY

19.09

18.9

19.09

5.2. Faculty Cadre Ratio (20)


Assessment

= 20 CRI

where, CRI

= Cadre ratio index

where, x
y

= 2.25 (2x + y)/N; subject to max. CRI = 1.0


= Number of professors in the programme
= Number of associate professors in the programme

Year

CRI

CAYm2

18.8

0.72

14.36

CAYm1

19.8

0.22

4.5

CAY

19.09

0.24

4.8

Average assessment

5.3. Faculty Qualifications (30)


Assessment

4 FQI

where, FQI

Faculty qualification index

(10x + 6y +2z0)/N2
such that, x + y +z0 N2; and z0 z

Number of faculty members with PhD

where, x

Page 106

Assessment

7.89

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Number of faculty members with ME/ M Tech

Number of faculty members with B.E/B. Tech

Year

FQI

Assessment

CAYm2

28

18.8

10

40

CAYm1

27

19.8

8.18

32.72

CAY

24

19.09

7.54

30.17

Average assessment

34.30

5.4. Faculty competencies in correlation to Programme Specific Criteria (15)


(Provide evidence that programme curriculum satisfies the applicable programme criteria
specified by the appropriate American professional associations such as ASME, IEEE and
ACM. You may list the programme specific criteria and the competencies (specialization,
research publications, course developments etc.,) of faculty to correlate the programme
specific criteria and competencies.)
Sl. No.

Name of faculty

Manoj T. Joy

Shiney Thomas

Qualification,
(Specialization)
M. Tech.
(Network Communication
& Security)

M. Tech.
(Network Communication
& Security)

Resmipriya M. G.

ME
(Computer Science and
Engineering)

Santhosh Kumar G S

M.E
(Computer &
Communication)

Syam Gopi

ME
Page 107

Areas of Research
Interest
Computer Graphics
Image Processing
Computer Networks
Multimedia
Wireless Sensor
Networks
Data Structures &
Algorithms
Cryptography &
Security
Programming
languages
Information Security
Mobile Computing
Networks
Wireless
Communication
Computer Architecture
Computer Organization
Big Data Analytics
Computer Networks
Ad-hoc Networks

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

(Computer Science and


Engineering)
Elisabeth Thomas

ME
(Computer Science and
Engineering)

Ashji S Raj

M. Tech.
(Cyber Security)

Jerin Thomas

ME
(Computer Science and
Engineering)

Anishamol Abraham

ME
(Computer Science and
Engineering)

10

Niya Joseph

M. Tech.
(Computer Science and
Engineering)

11

Tintu Alphonsa
Thomas

M. Tech.
(Software Engineering)

12

Sumy Joseph

M. Tech.
(Software Engineering)

13

14

15

Jayakrishna V

M. Tech.
(Computer and
Information Technology)

Neenu R

ME
(Computer Science and
Engineering)

Ansamol Varghese

ME
(Computer Science and
Engineering)

Page 108

Mobile Computing
Software Engineering
Data Mining

Cyber Security
Wireless and Network
Security
Digital Image
Processing
Computer Networks
Embedded Systems
Database Management
Systems
Operating Systems
Network Computing
Cryptography &
Steganography
Image Processing
Operating systems
Knowledge Discovery
and Data Mining
Image Processing
Data Mining
Software Engineering
Entrepreneurship
Management
Ion-Molecular
Structure Modelling
Medical Informatics
Formal Language
Theory (Grammar
Constructions)
Algorithms and
Complexity Theory
Medical Automation
Medical Image
Processing
Steganography
Genetic Algorithms
Database Management
System
Operating Systems
Wireless
Communication

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

16

Krishnalal.G

ME
(Computer Science and
Engineering)
M Tech
(Computer Science &
Engineering)
M. Tech.
(Computer Science and
Information Systems)

17

Anjana V

18

Sharon Sunny

19

Sruthi.S

20

Neethu C Sekhar

21

Deepu Benson

22

Teenu Therese Paul

M. Tech.
(Computer Science and
Engineering)

Shany Jophin

M. Tech.
(Computer Science and
Engineering)

23

M. Tech.
(Computer and
Information Science)
M. Tech
(Computer Science &
Information Systems)
ME
(Computer Science and
Engineering)

Digital Image
Forensics
Data Mining
Mobile Computing
Cloud Computing
Software Engineering
Data structures
Security in computing
Graph theory
Data Structures
Algorithm Analysis
and Design
Data Structures
Computation Theory
Graph Theory
Wireless
Communications
Network security
Ad-hoc networks
Design and Analysis of
Algorithms
Theory of Computation
Cryptography &
Security
Programming
languages
Cyber Forensics
Networking

5.5. Faculty as participants/resource persons in faculty development/


training activities (15)
(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five points f o r a participation/resource
person)
Participant/resource person in two week faculty development programme: 5 points
Participant/resource person in one week faculty development programme: 3 Points

Name of the faculty


Manoj T. Joy

Max. 5 per faculty


CAYm2
3

CAYm1
3

CAY
3

Shiney Thomas

Page 109

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Fabeela Ali Rawther

Resmipriya M. G.

Santhosh Kumar G S
Syam Gopi

3
5

0
5

3
5

Elisabeth Thomas

Ashji S Raj

Jerin Thomas

Anishamol Abraham

Tintu Alphonsa Thomas

Sumy Joseph

Ansamol Varghese

Krishnalal.G

Anjana V

Sharon Sunny

Sruthi.S

Neethu C Sekhar

Sum
N (Number of faculty positions required
for an STR of 15)

36

33

50

18.8

19.8

19.09

5.74

7.86

Assessment = 3 Sum/N
Average assessment

6.2

5.6. Faculty Retention (15)


Assessment
where RPI

=
=
=

3 RPI/N
Retention point index
Points assigned to all
faculty members

where points assigned to a faculty member = 1 point for each year of experience at the
institute but not exceeding 5.

Page 110

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Item

CAYm2

CAYm1

CAY

Number of faculty members w i t h experience of less than l


year (x0)
Number of faculty members w i t h 1 to 2 years of

11

Number of faculty members with 2 to 3 years of

Number of faculty members with 3 to 4 years of

Number of faculty m e m b e r s with 4 to 5 years of

18.8

19.8

19.09

55

75

71

8.78

11.36

11.15

Number of faculty m e m b e r s with more than 5 years of


experience (x5)
N
RPI = x1 + 2x2 + 3x3 + 4x4 + 5x5
Assessment

Average assessment

10.4

5.7. Faculty Research Publications (FRP) (20)


Assessment of FRP = 4 (Sum of the research publication points scored by each faculty
member)/N
(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five research publication points depending
upon the quality of the research papers and books published in the past three years.)
The research papers considered are those ( i ) which can be located on t h e internet
and/or are included in hard-copy volumes/proceedings, published by reputed publishers,
and ( i i ) w h e t h e r the faculty members affiliation, in the published papers/books, is of the
current institution.
Include a list of all such publications and IPRs along with details of DOI, publisher,
month/year, etc.
Name of the faculty (contributing
to FRP)

FRP points (max. 5 per faculty)


CAYm2

CAYm1

CAY

Manoj T. Joy

Shiney Thomas

Dr. Biju John

Resmipriya M. G.

Santhosh Kumar G S

1
1

5
1

3
0

Syam Gopi

Page 111

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Elisabeth Thomas

Jerin Thomas

Anishamol Abraham

Tintu Alphonsa Thomas

Sumy Joseph

Jayakrishna V

Neenu R

Krishnalal.G

Neethu C Sekhar

Deepu Benson

Teenu Therese Paul

Lisha Varghese

28

32

28

N (Number of faculty positions


required for an STR of 15)

18.8

19.8

19.09

Assessment o f FRP = 4

5.96

6.46

5.87

Sum

Average assessment

6.1

List attached in Appendix II

5.8. Faculty Intellectual Property Rights (FIPR) (10)


Assessment of FIPR = 2 (Sum of the FIPR points scored by each faculty member)/N
(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum five FIPR points per year. FIPR includes
awarded national/international patents, design, and copyrights.)
FIPR points (max. 5 per faculty member)
Name of faculty m e m b e r (contributing
to FIPR)

CAYm2

CAYm1

CAY

.................

.................

Sum
N
Assessment o f FIPR = 2 Sum/N
Average assessment

Page 112

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

5.9.

Funded R&D Projects and Consultancy (FRDC) Work (20)

Assessment of R&D and Consultancy projects = 4 (Sum of FRDC by each faculty


member) /N
(Instruction: A faculty member scores maximum 5 points, depending upon the amount.)
A suggested scheme is given below, for a minimum amount of Rs. 1 lakh:
Five points for funding by national agency,
Four points for funding by state agency/ private sector,
Two points for funding by the sponsoring trust/society.
FRDC points (max. 5 per faculty)

Name of faculty member (contributing


to FRDC)

CAYm2

CAYm1

CAY

Syam Gopi

Manoj T. Joy

Krishnalal G.

Santhosh Kumar G.S.

Resmipriya M.G.

Shiney Thomas

15
18.8
3.19

5
19.8
1.01

25
19.09

Sum
N
Assessment o f FRDC = 4 Sum/N

Average assessment

5.23
3.14

List attached in Appendix III

5.10. Faculty interaction with outside world (10)


FIP = Faculty interaction points
Assessment = 2 (Sum of FIP by each faculty member)/N
(Instruction: A faculty member gets maximum five interaction points, depending upon the
type of institution or R&D laboratory or industry, as follows)
Five points for interaction with a reputed institution abroad, institution of eminence in
India, national research laboratories.
Three points for interaction with institution/industry (not covered earlier).
Points to be awarded, for those activities, which result in joint efforts in publication of
books/research paper, pursuing externally funded R&D / consultancy projects and/or
development of semester-long course / teaching modules.

Page 113

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

FIP
Name of faculty member (contributing
to FIP)

CAYm2

CAYm1

CAY

Manoj T. Joy

Syam Gopi

Krishnalal G.

Santhosh Kumar G.S.

Resmipriya M.G.

Shiney Thomas

Jayakrishna V.

Sruthi S.

Tintu Alphonsa Thomas

Jerin Thomas

Sum

20

15

45

18.8

19.8

19.09

2.13

1.52

4.71

Assessment o f FIP = 2 Sum/N

Average assessment

List attached in Appendix III

Page 114

2.78

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

6. Facilities and Technical Support (125)


Description of classrooms, faculty rooms, seminar, and conference Halls: (Entries in the
following Table are sample entries)
Table 6.1

Shared /
Exclusive

Room Description

Usage

Class Room No
CC 205

Class Room For


2nd Year A Batch

Class Room No
CC 206

Class Room For


2nd Year B Batch

Exclusive

65

Class Room No
CC 305

Class Room For 3rd Exclusive


Year A Batch

65

Class Room No
CC 306

Class Room For 3rd Exclusive


Year B Batch

65

Class Room No
CC 405

Class Room For 4th Exclusive


Year A Batch

Class Room No
CC 406

Class Room For 4th Exclusive


Year B Batch

Exclusive

Capacity

Rooms Equipped with

65

Projector, Black Board,


Chalk, Duster, Notice
Board
Projector, Black Board,
Chalk, Duster, Notice
Board
Projector, Black Board,
Chalk, Duster, Notice
Board
Projector, Black Board,
Chalk, Duster, Notice
Board

65

Projector, Black Board,


Chalk, Duster, Notice
Board

65

Projector, Black Board,


Chalk, Duster, Notice
Board

Exclusive

65

Projector, Black Board,


Chalk, Duster, Notice
Board

Tutorial Room 6 nos.

Batch Tutorials

Seminar Room
no. R204,
Alphonsa Hall,
Auditorium

Students Project
Presentations,
Seminars, Guest
Lectures

Shared

90/ 200/
500

Meeting room ,
Conference hall

Staff meetings

Shared

25

Page 115

Projector, Laptop,
Internet, Laser Pointer,
White Board, White
Board Marker, Duster
Projector, Laptop,
Internet, Laser Pointer,
White Board, White
Board Marker, Duster

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Faculty rooms 5 rooms


Faculty room,
including HOD
counseling,
Exclusive
room,27
discussion
individual cabins
Library Books,
Dept. Library
Seating for Librarian
Exclusive
DA 109
and Assistant
Librarian

20

PC, Laptop, Internet,


Intercom, Printer,
Scanner, Wi-Fi,

20

PC, Internet, Book rack,


Reading Tables

6.1. Classrooms in the department (30)


6.1.1. Adequate number of rooms for lectures (core/electives), seminars, tutorials, etc.,
for the programme (10)
Adequate number of class rooms are available for conducting of lectures and tutorials. The
class rooms operate on a shared basis for theory and tutorials. The class rooms are equipped
with most modern wall mounted LCD projectors which can be made useful for taking power
point presentations and showing videos of interest. Conventional black boards are also
provided in every class. Classrooms are spacious enough to accommodate 60 students and are
well furnished and ensures proper circulation of fresh air and light State of the art seminar
halls are available which are made use for conducting lecture talks by eminent persons from
industry and academia.
Please see Table 6.1 for a description.
6.1.2. Teaching aids, Multimedia projectors, etc. (15)
The class rooms are equipped with most modern wall mounted LCD projectors which can be
made useful for taking power point presentations and showing videos of interest. Panasonic,
InFocus and Epson are the different projector makes available. The basic
requirements/specification of these models are so chosen to satisfy the lighting conditions of
the classroom or to engage a multimedia class/session:
Brightness: 2800 lumens
Contrast ratio: 10000:1
0.63" 1024 x 768 LCD panel
Resolution: 1024 x 768 (XGA)
HDMI in
1.2X Zoom Lens
2W built in speaker
Conventional black boards are also provided in every class. Adequate number of Multimedia
Projector, Netbooks, Laser Pointer are available in the department for the smooth conduct of
the class. In addition, WiFi is made available in all the classrooms.
Please see Table 6.1 for a description.

Page 116

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

6.1.3. Acoustics, classroom size, conditions of chairs/benches, air circulation, lighting,


exits, ambience, and other such amenities/facilities (5)
All class rooms are fully furnished with tables, benches and desk made of high quality timber.
Some classes are equipped with aesthetically designed metal seating systems. They are
periodically checked and maintained. Class rooms are spacious enough to accommodate 60 to
70 students. Class rooms are well lit with windows opening to natural light and air. In
addition sufficient number of tube lights and fans are provided.
Since all class rooms have good ventilation, acoustic echo is minimum. So allclass rooms
enjoy good acoustics. No complaints have been received from students on this.

6.2.

Faculty rooms in the department (20)

6.2.1. Availability of individual faculty rooms (5)


The Department of CSE operates from Divisional Block-A. The faculty seating is spread over
the Research Square and Divisional Block-A. There are 27 individual cabins for faculty in
addition to a separate room for H.O.D. The cabins are partitioned such that each faculty gets
sufficient working space for himself/herself as well interaction with the students. Each faculty
is provided with a personal computer in the form of desktop computers or net books. Internet
connectivity in the form of LAN or Wi-Fi are also provided.
6.2.2. Room equipped with white/black board, computer, internet, and other such
amenities/ facilities (10)
All the faculty rooms are equipped with Computer, internet facility and Wi-Fi facility.
Telephone/intercom facility is also made available for effective communication. Three
netbooks are also available for use in the classrooms. For meetings within the Department and
interaction with small groups of students, two LCD projectors, one LCD projection screen, a
white board and a green board are available in the Department. A portable audio system is
available in the laboratory for department meetings.
6.2.3. Usage of room for discussion/counselling with students (5)
(Instruction: Assessment based on the information provided in the preceding table and the
inspection thereof.)
Staff rooms are made student friendly. Students are always welcome to approach the faculty
both for their academic as well as personal needs. Students can meet the faculty for
discussion and guidance regarding Seminars and Project works. Mentoring sessions are held
regularly in the cubicle/staffrooms where students can approach their respective mentors for
guidance/counseling. Students meet faculty for doubt clearance and remedial classes in their
cabin as and when required.
For meetings with larger groups faculty is free to use vacant classrooms.
Page 117

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

6.3. Laboratories in the department to meet the Curriculum Requirements and


the POs (60)
The following table is required for the subsequent criteria
Table 6.2

Lab
Exclusive Space,
Description in
use /
Number of
the Curriculum Shared
students

Advanced
Systems Lab

Number of
Experiments

Laboratory
Manuals

Shared

115 m2,
32+30
Workstati
ons

C, C++ Programming
Java Programming
DBMS Lab
Graphics Lab
Mini Projects

Intel Dual Core


Processor with
40GB Hard Disk
& 512MB RAM
(Wired Network)
+
Processor INTEL CORE i5
3470
RAM - 4GB
Yes
DDR3 ZION
Motherboard ASUS P8H61M-Lx3
HDD -500GB
SAMSUNG
SATA
Cabinet ZEMBRONICS
ATX

Shared

C , C++ Programming
101 m ,
Java Programming
34
MP Lab
Workstati
DS Lab
ons
Hardware &
Networking Lab

Intel Dual Core


Processor with
40GB Hard Disk Yes
& 512MB RAM
(Wired Network)

Project Lab

Quality of
Instruments

Page 118

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Programming
Lab

Hardware &
Networking
Lab

M. Tech. Lab
CCF

Shared

C, C++ , System
Software lab
115 m2,
Java Programming
66
MP Lab
Workstati
Operating System
ons
lab, Linux Lab
Main Project

Shared

101 m2,
66
Workstati
ons

Shared

C, C++ , System
Software lab
Java Programming
MP Lab
Operating System
lab, Linux Lab

HCL ME Laptop
with Core2Duo
Processor,
320GB Hard
Yes
Disk and
2GB Ram,
(Wireless
Network)
Processor INTEL CORE i5
3470
RAM - 4GB
DDR3 ZION
Motherboard ASUS P8H61M-Lx
HDD -250GB
SAMSUNG
SATA
Yes
Cabinet ZEMBRONICS
ATX
Monitor - AOC
15.6"
LED MouseLOGITECH
Optical Scroll
Black
KeyboardOG
CProcessor

INTEL CORE i5
3470
RAM - 4GB
DDR3 ZION
Motherboard ASUS P8H612
52 m ,
C, Linux Lab,
M-Lx
24
Network Simulations HDD -250GB
Yes
Workstati
NS2, Project
SAMSUNG
ons
SATA
Cabinet ZEMBRONICS
ATX
Monitor
Samsung
18.5LED

Page 119

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

6.3.1. Adequate, well-equipped laboratories to meet the curriculum requirements and


the POs (20)
The Department possesses sufficient computer laboratories systems which are used
throughout the year. These cater to undergraduate students of the Computer Science (CSE),
Electronics (ECE), Civil (CE) and Metallurgy (MT) disciplines. In addition, post graduate
students of the Department (M. Tech.-CSE) make use of some of these facilities.
The laboratories are equipped with sufficient hardware and licensed software to run
programme specific curriculum and off-programme curriculum(Refer Table 6.2). Each lab
operates on a specific schedule which is dictated by the corresponding time table of the
specific semester/branch. On a general note, each laboratory course consists of two sessions
(each forming three periods) every week. Each lab can accommodate a batch of 30/60
students. Laboratory sessions are conducted to ensure the attainment of laboratory outcomes
which in turn contribute to the Programme Outcomes.
6.3.2. Availability of computing facilities in the department (15)
Four computer labs with sufficient number of computers with high speed internet connectivity
of 100MBPS(optical) is available for students use. Usage of Open source software is
promoted.
All Microsoft products with MSDNAA, which is the Microsoft Academic Alliance program
and consists of a bundle of Microsoft Software for academic purposes. Development
environments like MS Visual Studio, MS Visual Studio .NET, Visual Prolog, MS Office
developer, etc. are actively used for development purposes by the department.
IBM Rational Rose software development suite is used to familiarize the students with
various software developmental models.
Oracle RDBMS with Oracle products and Oracle Academic Initiative (OAI Membership
license). Network Simulator (NS2,NS3), Python, PHP, Latex, Java compiler and applet
viewer, C/C++ compilers and Lisp interpreters.
Laser printer for printing purposes is also provided in the Server room and Faculty room.
6.3.3. Availability of laboratories with technical support within and beyond working
hours (15)
All labs are assisted by competent technical staff with thorough knowledge of various
experiments and procedures. Students are encouraged to make maximum use of labs for
conducting their project works and carrying out extra lab assignments during and beyond the
class hours. Support is extended by the technical staff beyond the working hours, even on
holidays. Additional programmes like QEEE(IIT-Chennai),Spoken Tutorials(IIT-B) and
GATE Coaching classes (GATE Academy) are conducted beyond office hours. Please see
Table 6.3 for list of technical staff

Page 120

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

6.3.4. Equipment to run experiments and their maintenance, number of students per
experimental setup, size of the laboratories, overall ambience, etc. (10)
All labs are well lit and have continuous power supply which ensures unhindered working of
machines. The student-computer ratio is 1:1. Each laboratory maintains a Stock register
detailing the equipment history within it. One Teaching faculty and a Lab instructor will be
incharge of the overall functioning/maintenance of each lab.
Maintenance of Laboratory Equipments
Regular check up of computers/equipment is carried out as and when required and also
at the end of every semester.
Maintenance register is maintained in the laboratories.
As per requirement minor repairs are carried out by the lab assistant & faculty
member.
Major repairs are outsourced by following the procedure of the institute.
Overall Ambience
All laboratories are equipped with state of art equipments to meet the requirements of
curriculum.
Laboratory manuals are prepared and are available in soft and hard copy.
All laboratories are well furnished.
Laboratories kept open beyond office hours as per the need.
All laboratories have sufficient natural light, good ventilation with tubes and A/C or
fan arrangement.
Overall ambience of laboratories is good.

6.4. Technical Manpower Support in the Department (15)


As is evident from Table 6.3 given below adequate technical manpower support is available
in the department:
Table 6.3
Name of the Designation Payscale
technical
staff

Mr. M.R.
Arun

Lab
Instructor
Grade 1

16580

Exclusive / Date of
shared work joining

Qualification
At
Joining

Now

Other Responsi
technical bility
skills
gained

Hardware
M. maintenanc In charge
Tech.
e
of
Diploma in
20/9/201
in
&
Hardware
Computer
Exclusive
0
Comput Networkin
&
Hardware
er
g,
Networki
Science Programmi ng Lab
ng

Page 121

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Mr. Nishad
C.V.

Mr. Manoj
Joseph

Mr. Binesh
Babu

Mr. Noble
Philip

Ms. Anju
Mohanan

Lab
Instructor

Lab
Instructor

Lab
Instructor

Lab
Instructor
(On
Probation)

Lab
Instructor
(On
Probation)

13540

ITI &
Web
ITI & Diplom
In charge
Designing,
11/8/200 Diploma in a in
of
Exclusive
Hardware
9
Computer Comput
Program
maintenanc
Science
er
ming lab
e
Science

13567

Hardware
Diplom maintenanc
Diploma in
In charge
a in
e
Electronics
of Project
&
27/9/201
Electron
Exclusive
&
Lab & M.
0
ics & Networkin
communic
Tech.
commu g, Server
Lab
ation
nication maintenanc
e

12550

Diplom Hardware
a in maintenanc
Diploma in
e
In charge
Comput
Computer
&
of AS lab
er
Exclusive 1/8/2012 Science &
Science Networkin Departme
Engineerin
g, Server nt Printer
&
g
Enginee maintenanc
e
ring

9000

11000

Diplom
All
a
in
Diploma in
Departme
Hardware
Computer Comput
nt faculty
maintenanc
er
Exclusive 1/8/2014 Science &
system
e, Java ,
Engineerin Science
maintena
Python
&
g
nce &
Enginee
service
ring
AMIE,
Diplom
AMIE,
a in
Diploma in
Lab
Comput
Computer
PHP,
Exam
Exclusive 1/8/2014
er
Science &
ASP.Net document
Science
Engineerin
ation
&
g
Enginee
ring

Page 122

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

6.4.1. Availability of adequate and qualified technical supporting staff for programmespecific laboratories (10)
Qualified technical staff is available for all labs as is evident from the above table (Table 6.3).
Technical staff assists teaching facility, preparation and arrangement of experimental setup.
Technical staff also takes care of minor maintenance of laboratory equipments.

6.4.2. Incentives, skill upgrade, and professional advancement (5)


All technical staff is encouraged to attend skill enhancement programmes organized by the
institute as well as other institutes. They are encouraged to attend external courses (STTPs,
Workshops) in order to hone their professional acumen and improve their communication
skills.

Page 123

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

7. Academic Support Units and Teaching-Learning


Process (75)
Students Admission
Admission intake (for information only)
(Instruction: The intake of students during the last three years against the sanctioned
capacity may be reported here.)

Item
Sanctioned intake strength in the institute
(N)
Number of students admitted on merit b a s i
s
(Number
)
of students admitted on

CAY
780

CAYm1
780

CAYm2
720

CAYm3
600

594

562

540

512

122

122

100

716

684

640

515

management quota/otherwise (N2)


Total number of students admitted in the
institute (N1 + N2)
Admission quality (for information only)

Divide the total admitted ranks (or percentage marks) into five or a few more meaningful
ranges
(Instruction: The admission quality of the students in terms of their ranks in the entrance
examination may be presented here.)
Rank range

CAY

CAYm1

CAYm2

CAYm3

More than 80 percentile

50--80 percentile

30--50 percentile

30

11

61

20--30 percentile

69

44

112

10--20 percentile

215

200

231

45

0--10 percentile

273

302

126

453

Admitted outside rank list

122

122

100

Tabular data for estimating student-teacher ratio and faculty qualification for first year
common courses

Page 124

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

List of faculty members teaching first year courses:


(Instruction: The institution may list the faculty members engaged in first year teaching
along with other relevant data here.)

Name of faculty Qualification Designation Date of joining Department


member
the institution with which
associated
Abin Manoj
Shinto Sebastian
Aju S Nair
Nobin Thomas
Neenu K Mathew
Linu Tess Antony
Joy Cyriac
Thomaskutty
Stephen
Jibin C Jacob
Ashwin Chandy
Alex
Abu Mani
Mathew K.J.
Jacob Philip
Reeju Elisa Baby
Manu Harilal

Distribution of teaching
load
(%)
1st year
UG
PG
100.00
0.00
0.00
60.00
40.00
0.00
25.00
20.00
65.00
61.54
38.46
0.00
35.20
64.70
0.00
30.95
69.05
0.00
100.00
0.00
0.00

Ph. D
M. Tech.
M. Tech.
M. Sc, MPhil
M. Tech.
M.Sc. B. Ed
M.Sc.

Assoc. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Professor

26-01-2005
01-11-2010
06-02-2014
07-01-2013
06-03-2014
07-02-2008
10-01-2004

DBS
ECE
EEE
DBS
CE
DBS
DBS

M.Sc.
M. Tech.

Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.

01-11-2010
28-01-2008

DBS
ME

30.68
31.25

53.70
68.75

15.63
0.00

M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
Ph. D
Professor
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M Sc., MPhil,
B. Ed
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.

07-09-2013
07-01-2013
29/12-2010
14-07-2014
28-06-2011
18-06-2014

ME
ME
AUE
DBS
ECE
MT

33.33
33.33
33.33
100.00
50.00
25.00

66.66
66.66
76.67
0.00
50.00
75.00

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

07-02-2012
08-01-2014
07-01-2013
24-07-2014
24-07-2014
22-07-2013
07-04-2013
07-04-2013
16-07-2014
20-08-2013
07-01-2013
08-01-2014
08-01-2014

DBS
CE
ME
CE
CE
CE
CE
CE
CE
CE
CE
CE
ME

30.68
44.60
25.00
48.80
48.80
31.25
26.92
31.30
48.82
42.55
31.30
33.30
62.50

53.69
55.40
37.50
51.21
51.21
68.75
5023.08
68.75
51.21
57.46
37.40
40.00
37.50

15.63
0.00
37.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
31.30
26.70
0.00

Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.

15-07-2013
07-01-2014
07-01-2011

ME
CE
ECE

31.25
10.53
23.08

68.75
52.63
76.92

0.00
36.84
0.00

Sini Rose Devasia


Sharon Jacob
Francis.K
Deepthi I Gopinath
Priya Philip
Deepak John Peter
Jose Joseph
George Mohan
Minnu M
Jeena B Edayadiyil
Linu Theresa Jose
Maria Michael
Vipin Vijayan
Rony Thomas
Murickan
M. Tech.
George M Varghese M. Tech.
Tessy Annie
M. Tech.

Page 125

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Varghese
Subin P George
Richu Zachariah
Merene Joseph
Mathew George
Midhu Das B.
Jinson Paul
Shany Jophin
Rino Laly Jose
Margret Sherin
Joseph
Anjana P.
Nimmy Chacko
Jose J Edathala
Anitta Jose
Dona Sebastian
Ajosh Abraham

MS
M. Tech.
M. TECH.
M. Tech.
M. Tech
M.E
M. Tech.
MSc, B.Ed.,
NET

Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.

12-09-2013
07-01-2014
07-01-2013
07-01-2013
16-06-2014
07-02-2014
07-07-2014

ECE
ME
ECE
ECE
EEE
AUE
CSE

20.00
63.33
21.54
38.08
30.95
29.32
25.50

0.00
10.00
78.46
61.92
56.55
4239.07
65.50

80.00
26.67
0.00
0.00
12.50
0.00
9.00

Asst. Prof.

22-08-2012

DBS

57.00

43.00

0.00

07-02-2012
01-01-2015
07-04-2011
16-08-2007
07-07-2015
07-01-2013
28-12-2009

CE
CE
DBS
ECE
CE
EEE
ME

31.30
43.75
29.17
25.00
48.82
40.00
21.88

68.75
0.00
55.21
62.50
51.21
60.00
78.13

0.00
0.00
15.63
12.50
0.00
0.00
0.00

20-07-2009
15-12-2008
16/08/2007
07-04-2005
28-08-2006
01-01-2015

DBS
ME
AUE
ME
ME
ME

32.50
12.50
9.38
62.50
68.75
17.64

62.50
50.00
91.13
37.50
0
82.00

5.00
37.50
0.00
0.00
31.25
0.00

08-01-2013
14-8-2008
07-08-2013

ME
HUM
ME

17.64
6.25
40.63

47.05
81.25
43.75

35.29
6.25
15.63

26-11-2006

HUM

100.00

0.00

0.00

31-12-2007
07-02-2012

AUE
ME

70.00
62.50

30.00
37.50

0.00
0.00

07-04-2007
01-08-2006
22-06-2009
07-04-2011
07-06-2010
10-01-2002
12-01-2014
15-12-2008
15-07-14

DBS
EEE
EEE
HUM
DBS
ME
CE
EEE
DBS

53.57
29.00
26.67
6.25
32.50
17.00
26.67
28.00
100.00

9.38
0.00
73
62.50
67.50
83.00
73.33
28.00
0.00

37.05
71.00
0.00
31.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
44.00
0.00

M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M.Sc
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M Sc., MPhil.
Deepamole S
B. Ed
Asst. Prof.
Rakesh Reghunath M Tech
Asst. Prof.
Reynold Jose
M. Tech
Asst. Prof.
Binu Thomas
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
Toms Philip
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
Amal Sajikumar
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
Bini Koshy
Varghese
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
Yelana Thomas
MA B. Ed
Asst. Prof.
Meby Mathew
ME
Asst. Prof.
Dr Sebastian
Narively
MA Ph. D
HOD
MN
Muraleedharan
BSc. Engg. Asst. Prof.
Mathew J Joseph M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
M. Sc., M.
Phil
Lisa Rani Alex
B. Ed
Asst. Prof.
V.I.Cherian
M.E.
Professor
Neenu Rose Antony M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
Shamini James
MBA
Asst. Prof.
Jasmine Mathew
MSc
Asst. Prof.
K P Sundareswaran M Tech
Professor
Jency Sara Kurian M Tech
Asst. Prof.
Joffie Jacob
M Tech
Asst. Prof.
Dr. Sajith Kurian Ph. D
Assoc. Prof.

Page 126

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Anumod D M
Rose Jacob
Jose Dominic
Joseph
Sherin Thampi
Tom Sunny
Sangeeta S
Rohitha Joseph
Saju Sebastian
Vishnu Prasad

M Tech
Asst. Prof.
M. Sc., M.
Phil
Asst. Prof.
MTM, BSc,
B. Ed
Asst. Prof.
ME
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech
Asst. Prof.
M.A. , B.Ed. ,
SET
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.
ME
Asst. Prof.
M. Tech.
Asst. Prof.

07-03-2014

EEE

13.77

79.03

14.20

08-08-2012

DBS

100.00

0.00

0.00

07-04-2013
07-01-2014
15-1-2014

HUM
ME
ME

6.25
50.00
50.00

81.25
50.00
50.00

12.50
0.00
0.00

07-04-2013
07-01-2014
01-01-2015
07-02-2014

HUM
CE
ME
AUE

5.72
53.84
31.25
50.00

91.50
46.16
68.75
50.00

2.78
0.00
0.00
0

7.1. Academic Support Units (35)


7.1.1. Assessment of First Year Student Teacher Ratio (FYSTR) (10)
Data for first year courses to calculate the FYSTR:
Year

Number of students Number of faculty FYSTR


Assessment =
(approved intake
members
(10 5)/FYSTR
strength)
(considering
(Max. is 10)
fractional load)
690
780
780

CAYm2
CAYm1
CAY

27.45
30.78
30.27

25.14
25.34
25.77
Average

5.97
5.92
5.82
5.90

7.1.2. Assessment of Faculty Qualification Teaching First Year Common Courses (15)
Assessment of qualification = 3 (5x + 3 y + 2z0)/N, where x + y + z0 N and z0 Z
x = Number of faculty members with PhD
y = Number of faculty members with ME/M. Tech/NETz = Number of faculty members with BE/B. Tech/MSc/MCA/MA
N = Number of faculty members needed
for FYSTR of 25
Assessment of faculty
Year
x y
z
N
qualification
CAYm2 2012-13
3
34
24
27.6
9.65
CAYm1 2013-14

48

18

31.2

9.77

CAY 2014-15

64

31.2

9.77

Average assessment of faculty qualification


Page 127

9.73

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

7.1.3. Basic science/engineering laboratories (adequacy of space, number of students per


batch, quality and availability of measuring instruments, laboratory manuals, list of
experiments) (8)
(Instruction: The institution needs to mention the details for the basic science/engineering
laboratories for the first year courses. The descriptors as listed here are only suggestive in
nature, not exhaustive. )
Laboratory
Description

Space
Sq. mtr

No. of
Students

Software
used

Foundry

44

20

Nil

Smithy

143

20

Nil

Carpentry

47

20

Nil

Fitting

143

20

Nil

Surveying

73.5

22

Nil

Plumbing

73.5

22

Nil

Masonry
Electrical
Workshop

30
114

45
45

Nil
Nil

Type of Experiments
Preparation of sand
mould
Making square and
hexagonal prisms.
Plaining, Cross halved
joined
Filing, making rectangle,
making step joint.
Chain surveying,
Compass surveying,
Levelling, Study of
instruments like
theodolite, plane table,
total station and other
minor instruments.
Threading, Jointing,
Sanitary fittings, Pipe
fittings
English bond, Flemish
Bond, Arch setting
1. Wiring of 1 lamp
controlled by a switch,
2. Wiring of two lamps
and a 3-pin plug socket
controlled by 3 switches,
3. Stair case wiring,
4. Hospital wiring,
5. Godown wiring,
6. Tunnel wiring,
7. Wiring of distribution
board using MCB &
ELCB,
8. Study of measuring
earth resistance and
insulation resistance
using megger,
9. Wiring of fluorescent
tube,
10. Soldering practice,
Page 128

Quality of
Experiments

Laboratory
Manual

Medium

Available

Medium

Available

Medium

Available

Medium

Available.

Medium

Available

Medium

Available

Medium
High

Available
Available

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

11. Study of compact


fluorescent lamp,
12.Home wiring training
system,
13.Electrical safety
training system
7.1.4. Language laboratory (2)
(Instruction: The institution may provide the details of the language laboratory. The
descriptors listed here are s ug g e s ti v e i n na t u r e, not exhaustive.)
Language
laboratory

Space, number
of students

Software
used

A maximum of Orel
66 students can Software
be
accommodated.

Type of
experiments

Quality of
instruments

Students are Good


trained on
their Reading,
Listening,
Speaking and
Writing skills

Guidance

Two faculty
members are
involved in
helping
students use the
lab .Apart from
the guidance
given in the
subject there
are two lab
instructors to
take care of the
technical aspect
of the lab.

7.2. Teaching Learning Process (40)


7.2.1. Tutorial classes to address student questions: size of tutorial classes, hours per
subject given in timetable (5)
(Instruction: The institution may report the details of the tutorial classes that are being
conducted on various subjects and state the impact of such tutorial classes here.)
Provision of tutorial classes in timetable: YES
Tutorial sheets provided: YES
Tutorial classes taken by faculty / teaching assistants / senior students /others: Faculty
Number of tutorial classes per subject per week: One
Number of students per tutorial class: 20 to 30
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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Number of subjects with tutorials: 1st year.....9..... 2nd year....6....... 3rd year.....6.....
4th year.......5.......
These tutorials help students secure better marks in the examinations, internal as well as
university examinations. Moreover tutorials help the students to gain confidence in their
studies
7.2.2. Mentoring system to help at individual levels (5)
(Instruction: The institution may report the details of the mentoring system that has been
developed for the students for various purposes and also state the efficacy of such system
here.)
Type of mentoring: Professional guidance / career advancement / course work specific /
laboratory specific / total development
Mentoring is provided for total development of the students. Mentoring is provided after
analyzing the problems, if any, faced by each student. Mentoring helps students to get over
their difficulties with their studies (course work as well as laboratories). All students are
periodically counselled by three full-time counsellors. Career guidance is also given to the
students.
Number of Faculty mentors: 152
Number of students per mentor: 20 or less
Frequency of meeting: Minimum twice in a Semester
Each student has to fill up and maintain a Student diary with details of parents/guardian,
addresses, contact numbers and an academic history of student marks in all public
examinations and class tests in the Engineering courses. Any personal difficulties of the
student will also be discussed and the student will be directed to professional counselors,
if required. The parents shall always be informed regarding the progress as well as
problems, if any, of the students. Mentor shall also keep a track of the academic journal
prepared by the student detailing what he/she has learnt in every period. Students
participation in arts and sports items and his personality and character will also be graded
by the mentor which can be viewed by the HOD and Principal. Corrective advice is
given, if necessary.
Three full time counsellors are available in the college. The students are at liberty to
approach any of them for help and guidance.
It is found that the mentoring system in the College is very effective for the development
of the students.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

7.2.3. Feedback analysis and reward / corrective measures taken, if any (5)
(Instruction: The institution needs to design an effective feedback que s t i onna i r e . It
needs to justify that the feedback mechanism developed by the institution really helps to
evaluate teaching, and finally, contributes to the quality of teaching).
Feedback collected for all courses: YES
Specify the feedback collection process: The students of each class are guided to the
Central Computing Facility as per a pre- planned schedule. The students are given 14
questions concerning the faculty who are dealing with theory papers and 9 questions for
faculty and staff dealing with Laboratories or workshops. The questionnaire is designed to
enable them to give their opinion as Excellent, Very Good, Satisfactory or Poor. Using a
computer program the score of each faculty is computed and shall be forwarded to the
Principal. The students are also allowed to write whatever comments they want to make
about the teachers which will be finally checked by Principal and HOD and forwarded to
the faculty concerned.
Percentage of students who participated: More than 90 percent.
Specify the feedback analysis process: The feedback collected from students are first
analyzed at the level of HOD and then at the level of faculty appraisal committee, headed
by the Principal. The contents of the feedback will be shared with each faculty member
individually. The feedback system works as an eye opener for the faculty.
Basis of reward/corrective measures, if any: Best faculty award is given based on students
feedback, HODs evaluation, the facultys self-appraisal report and the marks given by
Faculty appraisal committee, headed by Principal. The increments and promotions are
also bear some effect on these scores. Those with very poor marks and with bad
comments from many students will be asked to show- cause why they should be
allowed to continue in this College.
Number of corrective actions taken in the last three years: 3 faculty members were warned
during last three years. The warning led to improvements in their performance and quality
of teaching.
7.2.4. Scope for self-learning (5)
(Instruction: The institution needs to specify the scope for self- learning / learning beyond
syllabus and creation of facilities for self-learning / learning beyond syllabus.)

Page 131

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

In tune with AJCEs vision of being a transformational leader in education, conscious efforts
are taken in the academic and allied activities of the college to nurture critical thinking, selflearning, creativity and scientific temper among students.
The college believes that self-learning and learning beyond syllabus have a great scope in the
development of the career of an engineer. Everything in engineering cannot be taught in the
class room or laboratories. The explosion in knowledge related to applied science and
engineering during the last century has been so much that four years is too short a period even
to cover one branch of engineering. This fact calls for the relevance for self-learning for
young engineers. What an institution should do is to provide adequate facilities for selflearning to students so that they get motivated to learn more and more and ultimately become
life-long learners and innovators.
Motivation for self-learning should be provided in the classrooms. A teacher has a great role
to play in this. Discussing subject beyond the syllabus, providing exposure to exciting
developments in science and technology around the globe, attempting solutions to problems
in daily life etc. are the ways to motivate students for self-learning. They should also be
motivated to do things themselves so that they gain confidence to try anything with their own
hands. An intuition should provide ample opportunities and facilities for these to students.
Amal Jyothi College of Engineering has been doing just this, as outlined below.
7.2.5. Generation of self-learning facilities, and availability of materials for learning
beyond syllabus (5)
(Instruction: The institution needs to specify the facilities for self- learning / learning
beyond syllabus.)
Amal Jyothi College of Engineering (AJCE) has provided the following facilities to students
for their self-learning and learning beyond syllabus
Infrastructure:
1.
2.
3.

24/7 internet access with Wi-Fi connectivity


Smart classrooms with audiovisual aids
AES Software, Language lab, Computer Labs etc.

Learning resources:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Committed faculty who motivate students in the process of their learning


Reputed Journals from IEEE, ACM, Springer, Wiley etc.
Online Databases and Digital Video
Licensed Soft wares

The institution supports teachers to make learning efficient. The college provides a central
library with all latest books and journals which the faculty can utilize effectively and provide
comprehensive latest information to students. Students are encouraged to use the library
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independently to enhance their skills and knowledge. Apart from this college provides
seminar halls where the students can participate in group discussions, debates, seminars etc.
The institution and faculty members support and encourage every student to make use of
Internet, computers and latest technologies available to upgrade themselves in their respective
field of studies.
Student projects:
Every student in AJCE does three projects during their course. Each student is assigned a
Micro project during third semester, a Mini project during fifth semester and a Main project
during seventh and eighth semesters. The students have the freedom to select projects of their
choice in consultation with teachers. Execution of these projects by themselves goes a long
way in developing independent thinking, organizing various elements of work in the project
and finding solutions to problems they face. These projects inculcate creativity and innovative
mind among students. AJCE thinks that execution of these projects will help to transform
students in to life-long learners and innovators.
Promotion of research among Students:
The institution has taken keen interest to promote research culture among students. The steps
taken in this regard at the college level are listed below:
1. Constitution of a Research Committee to mentor and monitor research among students
and to inculcate a scientific and research environment in the college
2. Research project for all students are carried out in the campus itself to make them more
research oriented.
3. Training programs at different levels are organized to introduce upcoming technologies
4. Seed money provided by the college for selected student research projects under a
scheme called Innovation Ideas Unleashed (I2U) (About a dozen I2 U projects are supported
every year). This project competition among students began in 2011.
5. Encourage research paper presentations in National and International Seminars
6. Personal mentoring and guidance by the research supervisor throughout the research
Process.
7. Scope for publishing eligible research results in the College Research journal, Amal
Jyothi Technical Report.
These activities initiated by the college for promotion of research motivate students to think
independently and go for self-learning and to learn their subjects of interest beyond syllabus
7.2.6. Career Guidance, Training, Placement, and Entrepreneurship Cell (5)
(Instruction: The institution may specify the facility and management to facilitate career
for
training/
guidance including counselling for higher studies, industry interaction

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internship/ placement, entrepreneurship cell and incubation facility and impact of such
systems.)
Career guidance and placement of students
The college has a placement cell with 3 full time staff members, including a full time
placement officer, to provide career guidance and placement training to students. The
placement cell organizes on-campus and off-campus recruitments and pre-placement training
programs in Aptitude test, Group Discussions, Interviews and presentation skills in
collaboration with the Department of Humanities and other core departments. Mock
interviews and GDs are conducted on a regular basis so as to equip final and pre-final
students to face the challenges of recruitment scenario. Close on the heels of placement
drives, the Placement Cell makes an evaluation of the performance of the students. This
objective appraisal enables the college to identify strengths and weakness of the candidates
and select strategies for improvement. Besides, there are intensive supportive measures for
low performing candidates.
Career Counseling
Career guidance and motivational lectures by Alumni, External guests and faculty are
organized frequently
Organizing coaching classes for competitive exams
The departments organize coaching classes for GATE examination. The placement cell
organizes seminars on Higher Studies and conduct aptitude training.
Foundation Course for Civil Services is offered for interested students by Amal Jyothi
Institute for Civil Services. Many books and periodicals are available in the library for the
students to prepare for these examinations.
Skill Developments (Spoken English, Computer literacy etc.)
Communicative English has been incorporated into the curriculum. The Language Lab with a
capacity of 66 consoles has been set up to compliment classroom teaching.
In addition to these, different departments conduct following add-on courses in their areas of
specialization.

Department

Add-on Courses

AUE

AutoCAD, Pro-E

CE

Revit architecture, Auto Cad, Primavera P3, STAAD Pro

CSE & CA

JAVA, PHP, Android, NS2, LATEX

ECE

Matlab, Embedded Lab (PIC and 89C51), Lab View, Placement


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opportunities, Aptitude training


EEE

CAD Training, MATLAB training

IT

Android, PHP, Java

ME

AUTOCAD, CATIA, ANSYS, PRO-E, ABAQUS TRAINING

A Question bank, containing close to 100000 questions, has been prepared by the faculty for
the benefit of students. The students can access the question bank and practice answering
them
Job-oriented skill development center, sponsored by Volvo-Eicher
In a first-of-its kind venture for an engineering college in Kerala, AJCE has signed up a MoU
with the globally-renowned Volvo- Eicher Commercial Vehicles Ltd (VECVL) to establish a
job-oriented skill development center.
Accordingly, the Amal Jyothi-Eicher Center for Automobile Technology, sponsored by
VECVL, has been established in the Amal Jyothi campus. This is the first heavy-duty
automobile training center in Kerala run by an engineering college in association with a
globally-reputed automobile manufacturer.
The skill development center will be a boon for the faculty and students to update themselves
on the latest developments in automobile technology and to have a hands-on experience in
best-of-its-class automobile technology in the world. It also offers a wonderful opportunity
for scores of unemployed youth with class 10/12 education to get trained in automobile
technology.
The Center will familiarize trainees in the most scientific way of repair, maintenance and
overhauling of commercial vehicles. The college has earmarked a space of 900 m2 to the
center for state-of-the-art classrooms, workshop and library.
VECVL will train the trainers and conduct regular follow-up programs to faculty to update
them on developments in the field of automobile technology. It will also provide study
materials and training equipment for the course.
The course will be a blend of theory and practical sessions for nine months and VECVL will
provide a 3-month internship at their plant and dealerships.
Innovation and Entrepreneurship Development Center (IEDC)
The Innovation and Entrepreneurship Development Center (IEDC) is an initiative of National
Science and Technology Entrepreneurship Development Board (NSTEDB) of the Department
of Science and Technology (DST), New Delhi. With an aim of develop institutional
mechanism to create entrepreneurial culture in academic institutions to foster growth of
innovation and entrepreneurship amongst the faculty and students.

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Every year this center is providing financial support to number of students for developing
innovative products. Up to one lakh rupees for each idea. Apart from this financial support we
are providing the mentoring and Infrastructural support for these projects.
Also this center is arranging so many classes and camps to promote technology based
innovation and entrepreneurship among the students.
Inspiration behind the starting IEDC:
1. Our long-term goal is to create an engineering city of three hundred acres in area,
owned by the management out of which the present campus occupies fifty acres and to
develop a technological center to uplift the rural community.
2. Many of our students have shown consistent interest to get more knowledge about
entrepreneurship to be competent in the modern world.
3. Our students and teachers have been proving their talent in developing innovative
products by winning several national level project contests and getting funds for
product development from various research and development institutes around the
nation.
4. There are no other centers in our district or neighboring districts for guidance in the
field of entrepreneurship.
5. The scope of rural technology development is very high because our college is located
in a rural setting with most people depending on traditional farming methods.
6. Our management and empowered faculty members are trying to provide technology
based solutions to the problems faced by the agrarian rural community and these
efforts have been streamlined through IEDC.

Activities of IEDC
1. Business skill development programme
Business Skill Development Programme (BSDP) is a training programme sponsored
and supported by Ministry of Micro, Small Medium Enterprises (MSME), New Delhi.
With an aim to encourage students to start self- employment ventures as Micro, Small
or Medium enterprises which is instrumental for employment generation.
2. Product development
In association with various Government agencies and by utilizing the technical
resources of Amal Jyothi College of Engineering, we have developed a good number
of new innovative socially useful products. A few of the examples are listed below:
1. Intelligent Light Dimmer: In this fast growing era a lot of accidents are reported due
to the temporary blindness created due to the High beam of the headlight of the
vehicles coming in the opposite direction. Amal Jyothi has taken this nationally
important problem as a challenge and developed an automatic light dimmer which will
actuate without the help of human interference. This project was supported and
sponsored by Government of Kerala.
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2. Automated Rubber tapping machine: Kerala is a state having vast areas of rubber
cultivation and all are facing huge labor shortage to tape the tree. To overcome this
crises Amal Jyothi is developing an Automated Rubber tapping machine in
association Rubber Research Institute of India (RRII)
3. Coconut Climbing Machine: Department of Industries and Commerce, Govt. of
Kerala has organized a national wide competition for developing Coconut Climbing
Machine, to avoid the acute labor shortage in this field. Form this competition eight
ideas were selected for product development, out of this two projects are for Amal
Jyothi College of Engineering. Those are 1. Mr John Jose Pattery, final year
Mechanical Engineering. 2. Mr. Zacharias Mathew, Chief Technical officer.
4. Robo for Bore Well Rescue: A robot for rescuing children from tube well has
developed by our students, this project is funded by Department of Science and
Technology (DST), New Delhi, Govt. of India.
5. Pedal Powered Inverter: We developed an inverter which use mechanical power to
charge the battery of the inverter, source of this mechanical power is pedaling of an
exercises cycle; this project is funded by Department of Science and Technology
(DST), New Delhi, Govt. of India.
6. Digital pre- paid energy meter: This is an energy meter which can charge like a prepaid mobile and can control number of energy meters from one central station. This
will help for energy conservation also. This project is funded by Department of
Science and Technology (DST), New Delhi Govt. of India.
7. Drivers Assistant: To make the drivers more alert about road sign boards our students
have developed new equipment. Which is funded by Department of Science and
Technology (DST), New Delhi, Govt. of India.
8. Internet Radio: With an aim of promoting internet communication our students has
started one internet radio which will be converted in to a technical knowledge source
within a short span of time. This programme is taking place in association with
Department of Science and Technology (DST), New Delhi, Govt. of India.

Technology-Business Incubator (TBI), sponsored by DST


A Technology-Business Incubator (TBI) has been established AJCE with the support of DST
in 2014-15, with the following objectives:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Creation of Technology based incubates on a continuous basis


Help to create value added jobs and services
Introduction of entrepreneurial culture among students.
Create effective networking for the development of technology based start-ups
Develop internationally accepted technologies
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6. Promote students to come up with commercially viable curriculum projects


7. Create student entrepreneurs
8. Create awareness about Technology Incubation and Commercialization of R & D
products and processes.
9. Promote small and medium industries.
An overriding objective of the venture is to achieve a transformation of minds of students
from being job-seekers to being entrepreneurs themselves, utilizing the theoretical and
practical knowledge they gained in the college.
The TBI will initiate a stronger industry-academia-consumer linkage where ideas can flow to
and fro through the three stakeholder groups so that everyone benefits. The industry will
benefit from technological developments initiated by the TBI as well as qualified students
who have an innovative mind to join their workforce. Academia will stand to gain from its
constant interaction with industry, and consumers will gain from the innovations that are
rolled out through the association.
The thrust areas identified for the functioning of TBI in AJCE are
1.
2.
3.
4.

Rural technology
Green Technology
Information Technology
Artificial Intelligence

Other entrepreneurial initiatives of AJCE


The college has identified entrepreneurship Development as the need of the hour in the
context of growing opportunities for enterprises in India. Developing entrepreneurial traits in
students is one of the graduate attributes. The following are some of the initiatives taken by
AJCE, in addition to IEDC, in this direction.
It organizes special trainings like Business Skill Development Program (BSDP), Intellectual
Property Rights Awareness, Entrepreneurship awareness Camps etc. in association with
Techno Park, Trivandrum, Kerala State Council for Science, Technology and Environment
(KSCSTE) and the Ministry of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME), Govt. of
Kerala. An IPR facilitation center supported by KSCSTE also functions in the college.
Two of the projects were shortlisted among the eight from Kerala and got funding of one lakh
each from the State Govt. for developing a coconut tree climbing machine.
Three student projects are approved for TePP funding for product development. A few patent
applications have been submitted through the Patent Information Center, KSCSTE, Govt. of
Kerala.
Projects that won top place in the all-India Innovation Hub project contest, organized jointly
by National Council of Science Museums and The Telegraph at Kolkata

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Project

Year

Prize

Password Security System

2007

First Prize

Electronic Wheel Chair

2008

First Prize

Computerized 2009

First Prize

Solar Power-based
Irrigation System
Robot Bore well Rescue

2010

Second Prize

Cocobot Coconut Plucking Robot

2011

Second Prize

E- diagnoser

2012

First Prize

Xerobot - A Multi-purpose Automation 2013


Robot

Second Prize

Virtual-I

2014

First Prize

Automatic Lemonade Machine

2014

Second Prize

Projects that won positions in the all-India Tech Top project contest
Project

Year

Prize

Pepper Separator

2011

First Prize

Helioped

2011

Special Prize

Advanced cardamom 2013


drier
Virtual- I
2014

Second prize
Special prize

Details of Amalites Entrepreneurs


Few of the alumni of AJCE who have initiated their own companies are listed below.
Entrepreneurship Initiatives

Batch

Dept

Name

Wedding Platter

2006

ECE

Sofia Anup

Emvigo Technologies

2007

ECE

Nitin Prabhakar

Emvigo Technologies

2008

ECE

Avinash Prabhakar

Zorus Technologies

2008

ECE

Syril Joseph

Dhuniya Al Jamali Group

2009

ECE

Hashim Jamal

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Engineers World

2009

ECE

Rogen Joseph

Zhooyi Communications

2010

ECE

Mittu Andrews Tigi

Synergen Consultants

2010

ECE

Bansan
George

Marigold Group

2011

ECE

Thomas Kiran

Developer of Fullforms.com

2006- 2010

EEE

Mithun Mathew

Electrical CAD

2006-2010

EEE

Sajin Babu

Thomas

Kanchi Signature
online store

Collections- 2006 - 2010

EEE

Sruthi Merin Ittiyavirah

Mayoora JewelsTerracotta Jewellery

Handmade 2007 - 2011

EEE

Archana R Nair

Construction Company

2008-2012

CE

Arun George, Roshan


E.E, Tigil thomas

Filanza

2011

CSE

Sarath S

Construction Company

2006-2010

CE

Jobit Joseph

Construction materials business

2010-2014

CE

Shon Jacob

7.2.7. Co-curricular and Extra-curricular Activities (5)


(Instruction: The institution may specify the co-curricular and extra-curricular activities,
e.g. NCC/NSS, cultural activities, etc.)
Promotion of Co-curricular and Extra-curricular Activities
The College views extracurricular and co-curricular activities as integral to the holistic
development of students. Opportunities are identified, created and opened to promote student
participation in them. Financial support as well as training and development support are
provided by the institution appropriately. The college helps the students in these activities in
the following ways.
1. Additional academic support and flexibility in examination times are provided.
2. Students are informed of Special dietary requirements, provided with sports uniform,
necessary materials and other relevant information
3. Students organize three days National Techno Cultural fest Azure, Arts day, College
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4.
5.

6.

7.
8.

day, Onam and Christmas celebrations.


A programme called Talent EVE is conducted on year wise basis every two weeks
to promote the talents of the students in campus.
All core departments have their own branch association. They organize seminars /
workshops / invited talks from industry/inter college and intra college technical and
cultural fest. Student chapters of various professional societies such as IEEE, CSI
etc. function in the college.
With a view to honing the technical and cultural skills and talents of students, and to
promote their aptitude for research and extension, the college offers both technical as
well as non-technical clubs.
Students are given duty leave to participate in technical and cultural activities
organized by the university or any other college.
For those who win the competition have been awarded the grace marks along with
the internal marks

National Service Scheme (NSS)


The motto of NSS Not Me, But You, reflects the essence of democratic living and upholds
the need for self-less service. NSS helps the students develop appreciation to other persons
points of view and also show consideration to other living beings. The philosophy of the NSS
is well reflected in this motto, which underlines on the belief that the welfare of an individual
is ultimately dependent on the welfare of the society on the whole and therefore, the NSS
volunteers shall strive for the well-being of the society.
M.G University has sanctioned one unit of NSS to our college. This is the first time that an
NSS unit has been sanctioned by the MG University to a self-financing engineering college.
The NSS unit of our college, with 200 volunteers, plays an active role in shaping our student
humane and responsible citizens. The overall aim of NSS is personality development of
students through community service. We conduct special camping programme of seven days
duration in adopted places and it provides unique opportunities to students for group living,
collective experience sharing, sharing responsibilities, addressing various developmental
issues of regional and national importance and close interaction with the community around.
Activities undertaken by the NSS unit of AJCE are listed below.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Road reconstruction
Yoga class
Class on self confidence
Cultural fest
Class on internal marks
Class on personality development
Debate Love marriage or arranged marriage
Blood group identification camp
Class for school students
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10. Trekking
11. Class on energy conservation
12. X Mas carol
13. Camp fire
14. Training on paper carry bag preparation
15. Visit to orphanage Baby Sadhan
16. Indoor games
Red Ribbon Club (RRC)
Red Ribbon Club Programme (RRCP) is a comprehensive promotional and preventive
intervention to enhance voluntary blood donation as well as mainstream HIV and AIDS
prevention, care and support and treatment impact, mitigation, stigma reduction, among the
youth in educational institutions. It will also prepare and promote youth peer educators within
and outside the campuses. An active RRC is functioning in Amal Jyothi College of
engineering.
The activities of RRC includes
1. Blood donation
2. Blood group identification camp
3. HIV awareness programs
Nature Club
A nature club is a group of young people, who spread conservation awareness in the society.
Since a club represents the collective will of its members, it can generate conservation
awareness in most effective manner. A Nature Club functions in our college, which does
everything possible (like organizing seminars) to spread awareness about conservation of
nature.
Amal Jyothi Driving Academy
Road safety is a key concern for both Government and people on Indian roads. Safe driving
today requires a higher level of confidence, competence and maturity, given the poor traffic
planning, increasing number of vehicles, and lack of professionalism in driving and untrained
drivers on road. In a bid to address these issues, Department of Automobile Engineering of
Amal Jyothi, has launched Amal Jyothi Driving Academy, an initiative for promoting safe
driving under the guidance and full support of Motor Vehicles Department. This Academy
not just imparts better driving skills but also tries to inculcate safe driving culture through
special theoretical sessions for behavioral training and road sense. The academy offers driving
lessons to students with two vehicles available with it.
The motto of the Academy is Smile while you drive.
A brief outline of co-curricular and extra-curricular activities for the past four years is given
below.
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2014 -15
All departments engage in activities like
Industrial visits
Invited lectures
Department Association Activities
Publication of department magazines / digests
Career guidance talks
Industry experts talks
Workshops
Gate / Placement Trainings etc.
A good number of students had appeared in technical festivals and project contests at state
and national levels.
5 projects from Amal Jyothi have been selected for Tech Top Competition held in
Trivandrum.
Team from Amal Jyothi secured first prize in Shristi National Level Technical Project
Contest in Saint Gits College, Kottayam, Kerala. Close to 10 teams were finalists.
2 teams from Amal Jyothi secured the first and second prizes at Infocom, Kolkatta
Amal Jyothi hosted Azure, a national level techno-cultural festival during 25-27 September.
Dining Etiquette Sessions were conducted for students.
Over a Cup of Tea An initiative of the Management Development Centre, noted
industrialists and technocrats were brought in to address students to motivate them
Under the Fig Tree A mini motivational / moral sessions led by the faculty of Amal Jyothi
addressing the students.
NSS camps Students attend the internally arranged camps and state and national camps
Community Service Students as part of curriculum specifications engage in community
services
College magazine is getting ready for publication
Amal Jyothi hosted Azure, a national level techno-cultural festival from September 25, 26
and 27
Onam 5th September 2014 saw the conduct of Onam Celebrations.
Christmas Celebrations The first year students hosted the Christmas Celebrations on 19th
December 2014.
Talent EVE 22nd August 2014 witnessed the conduct of Talent Eve a biweekly
programme conceptualized to promote the talents of the students.
Run Kerala Run - 20th January, Amal Jyothi joined the rest of Kerala in celebrating the
organization of National Games in the state by conducting a 1 km marathon around the
campus premises
Arts Day Celebrations Aarohan 2K15 was organized on 28th February which also saw
playback singer Najeem Arshad as the Chief Guest at the closing ceremony.
Alumni Induction Programme for graduating students on 20th May 2015
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Be Smart Dont Start Anti Addiction campaign was organized by the Jesus Youth in the
campus on 01, April 2015
Regular sports events in games and sports are conducted along the semester focusing on
Shuttle Badminton, Basketball, football, cricket and athletics
2013-14
All departments engage in
Industrial visits
Invited lectures
Department Association Activities
Publication of department magazines / digests
Career guidance talks
Industry expert talks
Workshops
Gate / Placement Trainings etc.
NSS camps Students attend the internally arranged camps and state and national camps
Be Smart Dont Start Anti Addiction campaign was organized by the Jesus Youth in
campus on April 1 2014
Community Service Students as part of curriculum specifications engage in community
services
Amal Jyothi hosted Azure, a national level techno-cultural festival from August 12, 13 & 14
Amal Jyothi hosted Arena, all Kerala Basketball tournament on 3-6 March 2014
Onam 13th September 2013 saw the conduct of Onam Celebrations.
Christmas Celebrations The first year students hosted the Christmas Celebrations Cake 13
on 13th December 2014.
Talent EVE 17-01-2014 & 31-01-2014 witnessed the conduct of Talent Eve a biweekly
programme conceptualized to promote the talents of the students.
Arts Day Celebrations on 4 & 5 March 2014, El-Arte provided a platform for students to
explore their talents and discover the artistic masteries. The event was inaugurated by Shri
Ajay Kumar aka Guinness Pakru.
Alumni Induction Programme & Common farewell for graduating students on 26/04/2014
Regular sports events in games and sports are conducted along the semester focusing on
Shuttle Badminton, Basketball, football, cricket and athletics
2012-13
All departments engage in
Industrial visits
Invited lectures
Department Association Activities
Publication of department magazines / digests
Career guidance talks
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Industry experts talks


Workshops
Gate / Placement Trainings etc.

A good number of students appeared in technical festivals and project contests at state and
national levels
The Onam celebration was conducted on 24th August 2012.
Freshers Day welcoming first years to campus was conducted on 11th October.
Arts Club Inauguration was held on 11th October and the guests for the day were Shri V T
Balram and Ratheesh Vega
Christmas Celebrations by the first years were held on 21-12-2012
Arena 2K13 fell on the dates 27th Feb to 2nd March and was inaugurated by Ms. Geethu Anna
Jose, former captain of Indian Womans Basketball Team
Arts Day Rang De was held on 15 and 16 March 2013
Department Fests: All departments conducted their department fests on 16th April 2013 to
make it a unique day of conglomeration of talents.
Regular sports events in games and sports are conducted along the semester focusing on
Shuttle Badminton, Basketball, football, cricket and athletics
College Magazine Page 33 was published.
2011-12
All departments engaged in
Industrial visits
Invited lectures
Department Association Activities
Publication of department magazines / digests
Career guidance talks
Industry experts talks
Workshops
Gate / Placement Trainings etc.
A good number of students had appeared in technical festivals and project contests at state
and national levels
The Onam celebration was conducted on 2nd September 2011.
Christmas Celebrations by the first years were held on 23-12-2011
Arts Day and College day were held on 16th and 17th January, 2012 with the Arts day
inauguration getting done by Ms. Sarayu (cine artist). College day inaugurated by Dr. J.
Prasad, Hon. Vice Chancellor, Sri Sankaracharya University, Kalady.
Arena and Azure: The year witness the prime events getting organized simultaneously from
26th to 28th January with Arena getting inaugurated by Mr. George Marness, Former
International Player and Azure getting inaugurated by the Chief guests Shri. Shibu Baby
John (Minister for Labour and food Supplies) and Shri. Sarath (Music Director).

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Annual Sports Meet was conducted along the dates 29th to 31st March 2012
College Magazine Page 33 was published.
7.2.8. Games and Sports, facilities, and qualified sports instructors (5)
(Instruction: The institution may specify the facilities available and the usage of the same
in brief.)
Sports and Games is an integral part of Amal Jyothi's total education programme. Amal
Jyothi has been maintaining high standards in almost all games among engineering colleges
in Kerala. We always have thrived hard to excel in the field of sports and games. Amal Jyothi
College holds a very proud tradition of encouraging athletes and sports personnel in different
fields. It has achieved the invincible track record in Sports and Games in M.G University.
AJCE bagged the M.G university Shuttle badminton Women championship for four years
continuously from 2003-04 to 2006-07. The Department is of Physical Education gives
systematic training and coaching for players in various games throughout the year. In order to
have competitive experience and exposures, Amal Jyothi teams participate in all the Inter
Collegiate Sports and Games Tournaments. With a rich tradition in Basketball from its
inception the college organizes ARENA, an All Kerala Intercollegiate tournament in
Basketball [men & women] regularly since 2007.
Facilities for sports and games
The college has established a Physical Education Department under a Director, who is
responsible for organizing various sports and games activities. The college has ample
facilities for all major games, indoor and combative activities etc. It also has a very well
furnished health club with excellent facilities for developing a fine and athletic body. The
Health Club is open to students throughout the year.
Activities of Physical Education Department includes admission under sports quota through
selection trials and Interview with certificate verification. It conducts coaching camp for each
game during mornings and evenings for a minimum period of two months before any
competition. The department fields Volleyball, Basketball, Football, Table Tennis (M & W),
Badminton (M & W), and Cricket, Chess, and Wrestling (M) teams at University,
Intercollegiate and State level competitions. Department seeks assistance from Kerala Sports
Council and M.G. University regarding assignment of coaches for each game. Regular
training is going on throughout the year for major games like Volleyball, Basketball, Football,
Table Tennis, Badminton and Cricket. Department provides sports equipments, kit, TA and
DA to the players participating in University and other inter-collegiate tournaments.
Department not only look after the welfare and sports development of student, but also
monitor their academic progress and moral. It also helps sports men and women to avail grace
marks from University, scholarships from Sports Council, University, SAI and other funding
agencies.
Conduct of Annual Sports Meet and Inter-Departmental Games competitions is another
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important activity of Physical Education Department.


The faculty of Physical education department provides necessary supervision and assistance
to students and staff in all their sports related activities. The department also organizes
matches between staff and students in Volleyball, Table Tennis, Basketball and Badminton.
The following facilities are available in the College for sports and games.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

400 Meter Track (Under Construction)


Athletics [200 meters Track with six lanes].
All equipment for field events like shot put, javelin throw, discuss throw and long
jump pit.
Cricket net practicing facility and cricket kit.
Mini Football court
Basketball courts (3 numbers) with gallery
Volleyball court
Indoor Badminton court and two Table Tennis Boards for boys and girls
Chess board and chessmen
Four Badminton Courts
Weight lifting set
Power lifting set
Physical fitness center with 14 fitness system set.

The College hires the services of qualified coaches for different games. The college has a
panel of coaches from where the Physical Education Department makes a selection of proper
coaches as and when necessary. All coaches in the panel have reputation at University and
State levels.
Student Achievements in Co-curricular, Extracurricular and cultural Activities
The details of major student achievements in co- curricular, extracurricular and cultural
activities at different levels: University / State / Zonal / National / International for the past
couple of years is listed below.
2013-2014
Achievements at National/Inter University Level
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Dennis John (ECE) received Young Innovators Award in Infocom NCSM


Abhilash Anandan (ECE) and team reached final round of Tech Top 2013
Sarath V Joy (S5 ME), selected to the MG University Table Tennis team.
Aswin Tom (S3 CSE), selected to the MG University Table Tennis team.
Rahul Binu Mathew (S1 S2 ME) selected to the MG University Table Tennis team.
Vishnu Surendran (S1S2 ME), represented MG University in the south Zone inter
University Chess Championship held at SRM University Chennai.

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Achievements at State Level


1. Abel Aby Kuriakose and team has won First for Best Choreography at St. GITs
2. Mathew M John has won first prize in Circuit Debugging at SaintGits
3. Arun Thomas and team has won first prize for Project Competitions at Carmel
College
4. Ajay P Joji and Bony M Jose has won second prize for Concept PPT at St. GITS
5. Denson K Shaji and team has won first prize at Robowar in SaintGits
6. Deepak Thomas won second prize in Asthra 2014 Arts fest at St. Joseph's
Engineering College, Pala
7. Nithin Biju won second prize in Asthra 2014 Arts fest at St. Josephs Engineering
College, Pala.
8. Harikrishna S. P won first prize in Cricket at St. Josephs Engineering College, Pala
(PACE 14)
9. Asha Mary Raju won first prize in the Technical Quiz Contest at Musaliar college of
Engineering
10. Jerin Babu won first prize in the Technical Quiz Contest at Musaliar college of
Engineering
11. Amal Jyothi bagged the Overall Championship in the PACE 14 All Kerala Inter
Collegiate Sports fest organized by St. Josephs college of Engineering, Pala
12. Amal Jyothi Volleyball team secured the First position in the PACE 14 All Kerala
Inter Collegiate Sports fest organized by St. Josephs college of Engineering, Pala
13. Amal Jyothi Cricket team secured the First position in the PACE 14 All Kerala
Inter Collegiate Sports fest organized by St. Josephs college of Engineering, Pala
14. Amal Jyothi Volleyball team secured the First position in the MBC Trophy 14, All
Kerala Inter Collegiate Volleyball tournament organized by Mar Baselious college of
Engineering, Peerumedu
15. Amal Jyothi Volleyball team secured the First position in the SMASH 14, All
Kerala Inter Collegiate Volleyball tournament organized by IHRD college of
Engineering, Kalluppara
16. Amal Jyothi Volleyball team secured the First position in the ASPIRE 2014 All
Kerala Inter Collegiate Volleyball tournament organized by Amal Jyothi college of
Engineering.
17. Amal Jyothi Basketball team secured the Second position in the ARENA 2014 All
Kerala Inter Collegiate Basketball tournament organized by Amal Jyothi college of
Engineering.
18. Amal Jyothi Table Tennis team secured the Second position in the All Kerala Inter
Collegiate Invitational Table Tennis Championship organized by St. Alberts College,
Ernakulam.
Achievements at University Level
1. Winners of MG University Table Tennis Tournament
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2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Runners Up of MG University Chess Tournament


Achievements at Zonal Level
Fourth position in MGU South Zone Cricket
Winner of MGU South Zone Chess
Winner of MGU South Zone Table Tennis
Third position in MGU South Zone Basketball

2012-2013
Achievements at National/Inter University Level
1. Sarath V Joy (S3 ME) selected to MG University Table Tennis team and participated
in the All India Inter University Championship held at Kannur University.
2. Achievements at State Level
3. Amal Jyothi Basketball team secured the Second position in the ARENA 2013 All
Kerala Inter Collegiate Basketball tournament organized by Amal Jyothi college of
Engineering
4. Amal Jyothi Chess team secured the First position in the All Kerala Inter Collegiate
Chess tournament organized by Saint Gits college of Engineering
5. Amal Jyothi Basketball team secured the second position in the Rajagiri
Trophy2012 All Kerala Inter Collegiate Basketball tournament organized by
Rajagiri College of Engineering, Ernakulam
6. Overall Champions in PACE 2013 Organized by SJCET, Pala
7. Football Champions in PACE 2013
8. Cricket Champions in PACE 2013
9. Basketball Champions in PACE 2013
10. Volleyball Runner Up in PACE 2013
11. Badminton Champions in PACE 2013
Achievements at University Level
1. Neenu Jose secured "A Grade" in MG university festival
2. Joel P Jacob participated in Mechanical Quiz Competition and won first place held at
Musaliar College of Engineering
3. Joel P Jacob participated in ROBOWARS and got first place in Musaliar college of
Engineering
4. Tojo K Jose participated in MG University youth festival in Daffmutt Competition
and won second place
5. Ajith A participated in duet singing at M A College of Engineering conducted in
connection with Sanskriti-2013; he was awarded Second prize for the same
6. Divine George Ninan Participated in MACHINE MAYAA- Robo war competition
at Govt. Engineering College Painavu, and got First prize
7. Second position in M.G University Chess Tournament
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8. Second position in M.G. University Table Tennis Tournament


9. Fourth position in M.G. University Inter Zone Basket Ball Tournament
Achievements at Zonal Level
1.
2.
3.
4.

Winner of MGU South Zone Chess tournament


Winner of MGU South Zone Table Tennis Tournament
Third position in South Zone Basketball tournament
Fourth position in South Zone Cricket tournament

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8. Governance, Institutional support and Financial


Resources (75)
8.1. Campus Infrastructure and Facility (10)
8.1.1. Maintenance of academic infrastructure and facilities (4)
(Instruction: Specify distinct features)
Amal Jyothi College of Engineering (AJCE), Kanjirappally is spread over an area of nearly
70 acres, with built up area around 1.5 Lakh sq. mtrs.
a) Facilities for Curricular and Co-curricular Activities
Class rooms
AJCE has over 80 class rooms spread over 6Blocks: Resource block, Central Complex,
Divisional Blocks A, B and C and Research square. All class rooms are ergonomically
designed to reinforce a student-centered style of instruction. The spacious, airy and wellfurnished class rooms provide the right atmosphere for developing proper study habits and
extending the attention span to the full session.
All the UG classrooms have a capacity to accommodate 70 students. All class rooms have
ceiling mount LCD projectors, Notice Boards, Lecture Stand, Uninterrupted Power Supply
from a centralized UPS, wooden tables, Centralized Public Announcement System, black
board, PAS system and wooden benches.
Technology enabled learning spaces
Wi-Fi campus
The College campus and student hostels have 24x7 Wi-Fi connectivity
Knowledge Center
The Knowledge Centre of AJCE is meant to equip students and staff to go beyond the limits
of class room learning. This imposing edifice of 5000 sq. mtr. Comprise of five floors, three
of which are dedicated for the Central Library. The Knowledge Centre affords technology
resources and academic support to students and staff for research activities, training sessions,
CAD laboratory, Language lab, Internet browsing, Software development etc. The rental
section occupies the ground floor of the Central Library. The first and second floors house the
reference section and reading rooms for UG and PG students, respectively.
A Central Computing Facility, established on the third floor of the Knowledge Center, is
divided into 5 labs and seminar halls. 250 workstations are provided for the net savvy.
Internet @100 mbps is provided through dedicated OFC cable.
The top floor of the Knowledge Center accommodates a multi-purpose Auditorium, seating
800, employing cutting edge audio-visual, videoconferencing and distance-learning facilities
for various purposes.
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Conference Halls
AJCE has state-of-the-art conference halls, set up in the Resource Block, Central Complex,
Divisional Blocks, Knowledge Centre and the Guest House, with following capacities.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Resource Block: 25 seats, air conditioned


Central Complex: 200 seats, air conditioned
Guest House: 15 seats and 50 seats, both air conditioned
Knowledge Centre: 50 seats, air conditioned
Divisional Block C: 120 seats, air conditioned
Divisional Block A: 70 seats, air conditioned
Divisional Block B: 120 seats, air conditioned
Research Square: 120 seats, air conditioned

Auditoria
There are 4 auditoriums on the campus with the following capacities
1. Resource Block: 750 seats
2. Knowledge Centre: 800 seats
3. Divisional Block C: 1200 seats + gallery
4. Open air theatre: 2000 seats + gallery
These are equipped with Dolby woofer sound system, stage curtains, accessories etc.
Laboratories
1. Auto Chassis Lab
2. Reconditioning Lab
3. Heat engines lab
4. Fuels and lubricants lab
5. Auto electrical and electronics lab
6. Survey lab
7. Materials testing lab
8. Geotechnical engineering lab
9. Concrete Laboratory
10. CAD Lab
11. Transportation Engineering Lab
12. Environmental engineering lab
13. Project Lab
14. Advanced Systems Lab
15. Programming Lab
16. Network Lab
17. M. Tech. Lab
18. DBMS Lab
19. Internet &Multimedia Lab
20. Programming Lab
21. Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Machines Lab
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22. Heat Transfer Lab


23. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory
24. Machine tool Laboratory
25. Advanced Machine tool Laboratory
26. Heat Engines Laboratory
27. Metrology & Mechanical Measurements Laboratory
28. Computer Labs MCA
29. Computer Labs IT
30. Electronics Labs ECE
31. Electrical Labs EEE
32. Electronics Labs EEE
33. Metallurgy Labs
34. Chemical Engg Labs
b) Facilities for ExtraCurricular Activities
Facilities for Athletics
Facilities for outdoor games
Facilities for indoor games
Gymnasium
Health Club
A Healthy mind in a Healthy body so goes the adage. The Health Club houses an ultramodern gymnasium, 2000 square feet in plinth area, catering to the needs of the fitness
enthusiasts. Staff and students are free to use the gymnasium after class hours under the
tutelage of professional trainers. State-of-the-art equipment available include bench press,
peck deck, bicep curl, lateral pulley and body twister machines.
Chapels
For a short withdrawal from the busy working life, far from the madding crowds ignoble
strife, for a moment of quiet reflection and prayer, there are chapels with a serene space of
elegant design, both at the College and at the two campus hostels.
Maintenance of academic infrastructure and facilities
An excellent system is in place at AJCE for the maintenance of its infrastructure facilities.
The management pays very serious attention to the maintenance of the campus and the
buildings. The college maintains a beautiful campus with wide internal roads and lawns.
Green litter-free campus: AJCE maintains a green campus with trees and plants all around.
The campus is litter free with dust bins provided at several locations. The staff and students
are in tune with the attitude of the management and take good care of the campus.
Plastic free campus: AJCE is proud to maintain a plastic free campus. Plastic waste is put in
dust bins which are cleared every day.
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The management also takes good care of the buildings in the campus, with periodic painting
and maintenance.

8.1.2. Hostel (boys and girls), transportation facility, and canteen (2)
One of the attractions of AJCE is the excellent hostel facility. The two campus hostels,
Santhom for gents and Amala for ladies, are taken care of by dedicated Catholic Priests and
Sisters. There is land telephone access to all rooms. However mobile phones are not permitted
for students in the college or hostels. Affectionate discipline, tasty food at moderate rates and
neat rooms with modern sanitation and professional laundry services are the hallmarks of the
Amal Jyothi hostels.
A long skywalk, nearly 0.5 km in length, takes girls from academic blocks to their hostel
directly. Another sky walk connects the third floor of Block C to fourth floor of boys hostel.
These skywalks save time for students, especially during lunch time.

Hostels
Hostel for Boys:
Hostel for Girls:

No. of rooms

No. of students

600

1200

600

1200

A few teachers are also provided single room accommodation in the hostels.
Since AJCE is envisaged as a residential institution with hostel facility provided to most of
the students, the college does not ply its buses regularly to bring in and take away students.
Moreover, the public transport facility is very good in the region. So the college does not
provide regular transport facility for students or staff. However, the college has two buses
which ply to Kanjirappally town in the mornings and evenings to bring in and take out staff
and students.
The college has an excellent canteen where needed students and staff can take food and
beverages. The canteen provides breakfast, lunch and dinner at defined timings. The canteen
possess modern food preparation facilities and is maintained very clean and tidy. The college
possesses a centralized kitchen where food is prepared for nearly 3000 inmates of the campus.
This central kitchen possesses all modern gadgets and amenities to prepare and cook food

8.1.3. Electricity, power backup, telecom facility, drinking water, and security (4)
(Instruction: Specify the details of installed capacity, quality, availability, etc.)
Electric power
Power availed from KESB Ltd at HT level (HT Service Connection.)
Contract Demand
: 350 kVA
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Recorded maximum demand : 290 k VA


KSEB substation functioning in the campus
Power back up
Backup Power sources

: DG Sets

Solar Photovoltaic Power plant

: 100kVA

(1) 380kVA
(2) 160 kVA
(3) 82.5 kVA

All the systems are performing well


Backup power sources are working on AMF Panel (Auto Mains Failure Panel)
Hence duration of power interruption on failure of the KSEB Ltd supply is only 30 seconds.
Telecom facility
Telephones of two service providers are available-BSNL and Reliance.
Intercom facility is available at all work stations and all senior faculty members
All the hostel rooms have telephone facility.
Drinking water
Purified clean drinking water is available at several locations in the campus. Purified (UV
irradiated and filtered) drinking water is collected in SS tanks provided with taps and tumbler.
The facility is provided in hostels as well.
Security
Security is available on a 24x7 basis in the campus. Two security officers are posted at the
two main gates of the college and are available all the time. Security is provided in hostels
also. The security arrangements make the campus very safe for students and staff, particularly
for women. Due to these arrangements no untoward incident of any kind has occurred in the
campus during the past 15 years of existence of the institution.

8.2. Organization, Governance, and Transparency (10)


8.2.1. Governing body, administrative setup, and functions of various bodies (2)
(Instruction: List the governing, senate, and all other academic and administrative
bodies; their memberships, functions, and responsibilities; frequency of the meetings;
and attendance therein, in a tabular form. A few sample minutes of the meetings and
action-taken reports should be annexed.)

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Amal Jyothi College of Engineering (AJCE) is governed by the Educational Trust under the
Catholic Diocese of Kanjirappally, Kottayam, Kerala with the Bishop of Kanjirappally
Diocese as the Patron. Major decisions on the functioning of the college are taken by the
Governing Body whose members are Patron, Vicar General, Finance Officer, Vicar of the
Kanjirappally Cathedral, a Chartered Accountant, Manager and Principal of the college and
other eminent personalities, nominated by the Bishop.
College activities and policy decisions regarding academic matters are taken by the Academic
Council of the college. Members of the Academic Council are Principal (Chairman), Dean
(Academic), Dean (Research), Dean (Administration), Heads of all Departments and Senior
Professors. Academic council meets every alternate Wednesday afternoons.
Manager of the college, who is a priest, is the representative of the patron and is responsible
for financial and resource planning.
8.2.2. Defined rules, procedures, recruitment, and promotional policies, etc. (2)
(Instruction: List the published rules, policies, and procedures; year of publications; and
state the extent of awareness among the employees/students. Also comment on its
availability on t h e internet, etc.)
Service rules, policies and procedures for the institution are in place and documented. They
are made known to all newly recruited staff members through an induction programme. It is
modified as and when the need arises. Important information are informed through circulars
and during staff meetings. Circulars are sent to all staff members through e-mails. Various
guidelines and procedures are shared among all staff members for information as a Google
document.
8.2.3. Decentralization in working, including delegation of financial power and
grievance redressal system (3)
(Instruction: List the names of the faculty members who are administrators/decision makers
for various responsibilities. Specify the mechanism and composition of grievance redressal
system, including faculty association, staff-union, if any.)
A well decentralized pattern of working is followed at AJCE. Though the Principal is the
academic head of the institution, many of his powers are delegated to Heads of Departments
and other officers for efficient functioning. There are three deans below the Principal who are
in charge of various activities as listed below. The Heads of Departments are in charge of
their departments. The delegation of power among various officers is as given below.
1. Dean (Academic) Academic matters, faculty appraisal, faculty recruitment,
verification of work registers, follow up of academic progress, course files,
monograms, student discipline, minutes of Academic Council, recommendation of
leave etc.
2. Dean (Research) Professional Clubs, Research projects, project contests,
correspondence with funding agencies, technical consultancy, business computing etc.
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3. Dean (Administration) Formulation of rules, policies and procedures, salary, pay


revision, circulars, staff recruitment, pay fixation, resource planning, purchase and
payments, new courses, mandatory disclosure, compliance report, issue of certificates,
stock verification, website up- dation, student diary, student journal etc.
4. HOD, AU In charge of Department of Automobile Engineering, Eicher ATC, CNC
Training, Driving Academy
5. HOD, CA - In charge of Department of Computer Applications, Academic Enterprise
solutions, hostel warden, admissions, career enhancement cell
6. HOD, CE - In charge of Department of Civil Engineering Secretary, Amal Jyothi
Educational and Charitable Society
7. HOD, CH - In charge of Department of Chemical Engineering
8. HOD, CSE In charge of Department of Computer Science & Engineering, Student
Admissions, College Brochure, Ekalavya e-Outreach programme
9. HOD, ECE In charge of Department of Electronics and Communication
Engineering, Alumni Association, IQAC
10. HOD, EEE- In charge of Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering,
Amalites Digest
11. HOD, IT - In charge of Department of Information Technology
12. HOD, ME - In charge of Department of Mechanical Engineering, Master Mind project
contest
13. HOD, MT - In charge of Department of Metallurgy, BRNS project, KEMPPI welding
training center
14. HOD, BS - In charge of Department of Basic Sciences (Mathematics, Physics and
Chemistry)
15. HOD, Humanities- In charge of Department of Humanities, College publications, Soft
Skill Development
16. Dr. Abin Manoj- First Year Coordinator, Exam cell and Staff Secretary
17. Prof. Sherin Sam Jose - Coordinator, IEDC, TBI, Science Excursion
18. Placement officer Placement, Soft Skill Development, Public Relations
19. Dr. Jacob Philip - Research Guide, NAAC/NBA accreditation coordinator, Projects
coordination
20. Dr. Job Kurian - TBI, Student training
21. Dr .K. Karunakaran Nair - Coordinator (PG Programmes), PTA
22. Mr. Joe Scaria - Management development centre, Orientation programs for staff and
students.
Departments are provided with Department Fund and Petty Cash a/c which can be utilized
for student welfare, facility maintenance and minor purchases.
Grievances can be directed to the Staff Secretary who will bring it to the notice of the
Academic council wherein it is discussed and suitable solutions arrived at. Complaints
regarding infrastructure can be registered through an online complaint register, job orders are
issued by Dean (Admin) to maintenance / construction staff. Suggestion box is kept outside
the office of the Principal, in which staff and students can deposit their grievances /
suggestions.
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8.2.4. Transparency and availability of correct/unambiguous information (3)


(Instruction: Availability and dissemination of information through the internet.
Provision of information in accordance with the Right to Information Act, 2005).
The college maintains transparency in all its operation and working. Information such as
Internal marks scored by students, Shortage of attendance, if any, Availability of scholarships,
Opportunities for students etc. are promptly displayed on Notice Boards.
At the end of every semester faculty has to give an individual Semester work report, which
helps faculty to evaluate their own performance during the period of the report. Criteria for
student scholarships, faculty awards etc. are informed well in advance so that equal
opportunity is given to all individuals concerned.
At the beginning of every academic year the college brings out a calendar, which contain all
the information, including Mobile numbers of all faculty members, required by a student to
carry out his/her studies in the college. Information about every activity in the college are sent
to all staff and students through e-mail. Other publications such as Amalites Digest are also
there to disseminate information about the college.
All the required information about the college are made available, as per directions of AICTE,
in the college website: www.amaljyothi.ac.in.
Information sought under RTI act is promptly furnished by the Principal/Manager.

8.3. Budget Allocation, Utilization, and Public Accounting (10)


Summary of current financial years budget and actual expenditure incurred (for the
institution exclusively) of the three previous financial years.
*All amount in Lakhs of Rupees
Item

Budgeted in Expenses in Expenses Expenses


CFY (2014- CFY (till in CFYm1 in CFYm2
31.12.2014) (2013-14) (2012-13)
15)

1000

631.14

2129.66

1542.40

Library

39.23

37.49

28.18

25.36

Laboratory equipment

210.77

117.36

194.33

146.28

6.00

7.68

4.98

4.79

1200.00

860.69

1046.88

847.45

Infrastructural built-up

Laboratory consumables
Teaching and non-teaching
staff salary

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R&D

9.00

6.43

9.31

8.47

Training and Travel

12.00

2.93

2.44

1.90

Other, specify

240.35

131.85

387.99

254.92

Total

2717.35

1795.57

3803.77

2831.57

(Instruction: The preceding list of items is not exhaustive. One may add other relevant
items, if applicable.)
8.3.1. Adequacy of budget allocation (4)
(Instruction: In this section, the institution needs to justify that the budget allocated over
the years was adequate.)
Budget requirements under recurring and non-recurring heads are collected from every
departments and sections before the commencement of the financial year. Allocations are
made as per the availability of funds. Spending is monitored by the accounts section.
Supplementary allocations are made in special cases. The institution carefully monitors the
expenses so that the necessities are met without affecting the smooth working of the
institution. The management has been very efficiently doing this over the past several years
that the institution never had any serious budget crunch that affected the functioning of the
college.
8.3.2. Utilization of allocated funds (5)
(Instruction: Here the institution needs to state how the budget was utilized during the last
three years.)
Funds are allocated by the Manager of the College. Department Heads / Section-in-charges
are intimated of the extent of funds allocated against their budget proposals.
Major works like construction, up-gradation of existing infrastructure, procurement and
maintenance of common utilities, house-keeping, procurement of furniture etc. are controlled
directly by the Manager.
Actions for procurement of lab equipment, up-gradation of existing lab facilities, purchase of
consumables etc. are initiated from the respective departments and the funds are released on a
case by case basis from the accounts office of the college on approval by the Manager.
During the last three years, the budget was utilized to meet expenses such as staff salary,
infrastructure development, purchase of equipment, expenses towards consumables and
contingencies, travel etc. Every year almost 75% of the budget is spent on staff salary, 10%
on infrastructure development, about 8% on purchase of equipment, about 5 % on library
development and the rest 2% on other expenses. This has been the general pattern of
utilization of budget for the last 5 years.

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8.3.3 Availability of the audited statements on the institutes website (1)


(Instruction: In this section, the institution needs to state whether the audited statements are
available on its website.)
As of now, the audited statements of accounts of the college are not made available on the
college website. However, this can be done with the permission of the Governing body and
the Manager of the college.

8.4. Programme Specific Budget Allocation, Utilization (10)


Summary of budget for the CFY and the actual expenditure incurred in CFYm1 and
CFYm2 (for this programme exclusively in the department):

Budgeted in CFY
2014-15

Actual expenses in
CFY 2014-15

Budgeted in
CFYm1
2013-14

Actual expenses
in CFYm1
2013-14

Budgeted in
CFYm2
2012-13

Actual expenses in
CFYm2 2012-13

*All amount in Lakhs of Rupees


Items

4.09

.52

5.00

2.94

3.00

16.55

3.00

2.97

3.00

3.69

Nil

Nil

.50

.30

1.00

Nil

1.50

.35

.50

.48

.50

.82

.75

.33

Training and
Travel

.05

.03

.07

.06

.06

.05

Miscellaneous
expenses for
academic
activities

.90

.42

1.00

.65

1.00

.55

Total

9.04

4.72

10.57

8.16

6.31

17.83

Laboratory
equipment
Software
R&D
Laboratory
consumables
Maintenance
and spares

8.4.1. Adequacy of budget allocation (5)


Budget requirements under recurring and non-recurring of the department are given to the
management before the commencement of the financial year. Allocations are made as per the
availability of funds, of the management. Spending is monitored by the accounts section. The
department carefully monitors the expenses so that the necessities are met without exceeding
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the allocated budget.


8.4.2. Utilization of allocated funds (5)
Funds are allocated by the Manager of the College. Department Heads / Section-in-charges
are intimated of the extent of funds allocated against their budget proposals.
Major works like construction, up-gradation of existing infrastructure, procurement and
maintenance of common utilities, house-keeping, procurement of furniture etc. are controlled
directly by the Manager.
Actions for procurement of lab equipment, up-gradation of existing lab facilities, purchase of
consumables etc. are initiated from the respective departments and the funds are released on a
case by case basis from the accounts office of the college on approval by the Manager.
During the last three years, the budget was utilized to meet expenses such as infrastructure
development, purchase of equipment, expenses towards consumables and contingencies,
travel etc.

8.5. Library (20)


8.5.1. Library space and ambience, timings and usage, availability of a qualified
librarian and other staff, library automation, online access, networking, etc. (5)
(Instruction: Provide information on the following items.).
Carpet area of library (in m2)

: 2973 Sq. m

Reading space (in m2)

: 744 Sq. m.

Number of seats in reading space

: 110

Number of users (issue book) per day: 150


Number of users (reading space) per day: 17
Timings:
Working days: 8.00 AM to 8.00 PM
Weekend: Saturday: 8.00 AM to 5.00 PM, Sunday: 10.00 AM to 4.00 PM
Vacation: 8.00 AM to 8.00 PM
Number of library staff: 7
Number of library staff with a degree in Library Management: 6
Computerization for search, indexing, issue/return records: YES
Bar coding used: YES
Library services on Intranet: Y E S

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INDEST or other similar membership archives: YES


8.5.2. Titles and volumes per title (4) (As on 20th February 2015)
Number of titles: 12837
Number of volumes: 31277 (Central Library)

Number of new
titles added

Number of new
editions added

Number of new
volumes added

CFYm2 (2012-13)

802

404

1254

CFYm1 (2013-14)

493

520

979

CFY (2014-15)

753

322

1039

8.5.3. Scholarly journal subscription (3)


Details
Science
As soft copy
As hard copy
Engg. and Tech. As soft copy
As hard copy
Pharmacy
As soft copy
As hard copy
Architecture
As soft copy
As hard copy
Hotel
As soft copy
Management

CFY

CFYm1

CFYm2

CFYm3

6
716
133

10
676
116

9
676
109

8
620
90

As hard copy
8.5.4. Digital Library (3)
Availability of digital library content: YES
If available, mention number of courses, number of e- books, etc.
Sly #
1
2
3
4
5

Digital Contents
NPTEL Video Lectures
Project Reports
Seminar Reports
STTP/Conference
Proceedings
University Question Papers

Page 162

# of Items
3397
46
108
128
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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Availability of an exclusive server: YES


Availability over Intranet/Internet: YES
Availability of exclusive space/room: YES
Number of users per day: 30
8.5.5. Library expenditure on books, magazines/journals, and miscellaneous content (5)
Year

Expenditure
Book

Magazines/journals Magazines/journals Misc.


(for soft copy
(for hard copy
Contents
subscription)
subscription)

CFYm2 866256

322783

1589707

372772

CFYm1 1310225

338184

1700860

20416

CFY

311860

3169596

472213

8.6.

1071602

Comments
,if any

Building,
Extension
Works etc.
not
included

Internet (5)

(Instruction: The institute may report the availability of internet in the campus and its
quality of service.)
Name of the Internet provider: Reliance and BSNL
Available bandwidth: Access speed: Reliance100 Mbps / BSNL 10 MBPS
Availability of internet in an exclusive lab: Exclusive Internet Lab with 200 systems
Availability in most computing labs: 17 Department labs with Internet facility.
Availability in departments and other units: Staff rooms are equipped with wired internet
and Corridors and lobbies are equipped with Wi-Fi connectivity.
Availability in faculty rooms: 1:1 computers are made available for faculty
Institutes own e-mail facility to faculty/students: Yes (@amaljyothi.ac.in for faculty
and @ajce.in for students)
Security/privacy to e-mail/internet users: Cyberoam 2500 ING
24hrs Wi-Fi internet is available inside the college campus.
Internet is available in Hostels from 4.00am to 7.15pm.

8.7. Safety Norms and Checks (5)


8.7.1. Checks for wiring and electrical installations for leakage and earthling (1)
The following procedures are in place for the safe functioning of electrical installations in the
college.
1. Reviews/Inspections are arranged periodically.
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2. All electrical equipment and components, are inspected and approved by competent
authority
3. Insist to observe codes, standards, and regulations.
4. Ground fault circuit interrupters are provided.
5. Formal training and awareness programs are arranged.
6. Working space around electrical equipment are maintained properly.
7. Means for identification of disconnection are provided.
8. Labeling of source, feeders and load are provided.
9. Work instructions and supervision are provided.
10. Electrical Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as rubber gloves, safety shoes,
hats etc. are provided.
8.7.2. Fire-fighting measurements:
(Instruction: Effective safety arrangements with emergency/multiple exits and ventilation/
exhausts in auditoriums and large classrooms/laboratories, fire-fighting equipment and
training, availability of water, and other such facilities.) (1)
Effective safety measures such as multiple exits and ventilation are provided in all class
rooms, laboratories and auditoria
Firefighting equipment such as fire buckets, carbon dioxide cylinders, foams etc. are
provided. Technical personnel in laboratories are made aware of the use these equipment.
Availability of water, in case of emergency, is ensured.
8.7.3. Safety of civil structure (1)
The following measures have been taken for the safety of civil structures.
1. Civil structure are constructed with adequate design features to bear all natural
calamities
2. Proper and periodical preventive maintenance are arranged.
3. Adequate water draining facility is provided.
4. Leak proofing and weather proofing measures are taken periodically.
5. Adequate lightning protection devices are installed.
6. Fire hydrants and fire extinguishers are provided in high rise buildings.
8.7.4. Handling of hazardous chemicals and other such activities (2)
(Instruction: The institution may provide evidence that it is taking enough measures for the
safety of the civil structures, fire, electrical installations, wiring, and safety of
handling and disposal of hazardous substances. Moreover, the institution needs to
show the effectiveness of the measures that it has developed to accomplish these
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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

tasks.)
The following safety precautions and measures have been taken for the safe handling of
hazardous chemicals, and for other activities requiring such measures.
1. While working in chemical laboratory always more than one person will be engaged.
2. Provided required personal protective equipment. Eye protection is very important
and provided
3. Labelling of all containers with chemical contents.
4. Awareness given to all concerned to keep hands and face clean whenever they leave
the lab.
5. Instructions given to avoid direct contact with any chemical and always wear a
laboratory coat.
6. Keep chemicals off hands of laboratory personnel, face and clothing, including shoes.
7. Never smell, intentionally inhale or taste a chemical.
8. Smoking, drinking, eating and application of cosmetics is forbidden in areas where
hazardous chemicals are used or stored.
9. Always use chemicals with adequate ventilation or in a chemical fume hood. Refer to
the MSDS and the Standard Operating Procedure to determine what type of
ventilation is needed.
10. Use hazardous chemicals only as directed and for their intended purpose.
11. Inspect equipment or apparatus for damage before adding a hazardous chemical. Do
not use damaged equipment.
12. Never use mouth suction to fill a pipette. Use a pipette bulb or other pipette-filling
devices.
13. Electrically ground containers using approved methods before transferring or
dispensing a flammable liquid from a large container.

8.8. Counseling and Emergency Medical Care and First - aid (5)
(Instruction: The institution needs to report the availability of the facilities discussed here.)
Availability of counselling facility (1)
Counselling facility is available for students at the following three levels
Academic Counseling:
Each faculty member is entrusted with 20 students to keep track of their progress and
performance. Class committee meetings are conducted frequently to know the problems of
students
Personal Counseling:
There are three professional counsellors in the College. Students are free to approach these
councilors for help and support. Also the students can contact their respective faculty
mentor for guidance on any issue affecting them.

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Career Counseling:
Career guidance and motivational programs by Alumni, External guest and faculty are
organized often. Career and placement cell of the college under the guidance of a Placement
officer offers career counseling.
Psycho-social Counseling:
Psycho- social counseling is provided through various programmes like retreat, social
service etc.
In order to equip the mentors for effective mentoring, AJCE has organized a Mentorship
Training Programme. Training was imparted to mentors by experts from outside.
Arrangement for emergency medical care (2)
Necessary medical facilities for emergency medical care are available.
A 30 bedded hospital (Holy Cross Hospital, Koovappally) is available very adjacent to the
campus. Full time doctors (2), nursing staff (4), pharmacist, X-ray technician, lab technician
and clerical staff man the facility. A modern hospital (Mary Queens Mission Hospital, 26th
mile, Kanjirapally) with all modern facilities like MRI and CT scan is just 4 km away. It has
most of the specialized departments manned with about 20 doctors and supporting staff.
Vehicle service is available 24hours at this hospital. This hospital is equipped with
Ambulance service.
Vehicles are available in the college to transport anybody to any of these nearby hospitals
Availability of first-aid unit (2)
First-aid units are made available in the central building (Resource block) as well as in
individual departments.

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9. Continuous Improvement (100)


This criterion essentially evaluates the improvement of the different indices that have
already been discussed in earlier criteria.
From 9.1 to 9.5 the assessment calculation can be done as follows.
a, b and c are the values of variables, which correspond to either LYGm2, LYGm1 and LYG
or CAYm2, CAYm1 and CAY respectively, after scaling down each of them to a maximum
value of 1.
For 9.1 and 9.2 the assessment can be made as, Assessment = (b-a) + (c-b) + (a + b + c) x
(5/3)

9.1 Improvement in Success Index of Students (5)


From 4. 1
a, b and c are the success indices which correspond to LYGm2, LYGm1 and LYG
respectively.

Items
Success index

LYG (c)

LYGm1 (b)

LYGm2 (a)

Assessment

0.56

0.64

0.88

3.15

9.2 Improvement in Academic Performance Index of Students (5)


From 4. 2
a, b and c are calculated respectively for LYGm2, LYGm1 and LYG by dividing the API
values, obtained from the criterion 4.2, by 10. The maximum value of a, b, and c should not
exceed one.

Items

LYG (c)

LYGm1 (b)

LYGm2 (a)

Assessment

API

0.726

0.693

0.708

3.56

For 9.3 to 9.5 the assessment can be made as,


Assessment = (b-a) + (c-b) + (a + b + c) x (10/3)

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9.3 Improvement in Student- Teacher Ratio (10)


From 5. 1
a, b and c are calculated respectively for CAYm2, CAYm1 and CAY by dividing the STR
values, obtained from the criterion 5.1, by 15. The maximum value of a, b, and c should not
exceed one.

Items

CAY (c)

CAYm1 (b)

CAYm2 (a)

Assessment

STR

10

9.4 Enhancement of Faculty Qualification Index (10)


From 5. 3
a, b and c are calculated respectively for CAYm2, CAYm1 and CAY by dividing the FQI
values, obtained from the criterion 5.3, by 10. The maximum value of a, b, and c should not
exceed one.

Items

FQI

CAY (c)

CAYm1 (b)

CAYm2 (a)

Assessment

10

9.5 Improvement in Faculty Research Publications, R&D Work and


Consultancy Work (20)
From 5.7
a, b and c are calculated respectively for CAYm2, CAYm1 and CAY by dividing the FRP
values, obtained from the criterion 5.7, by 20. The maximum value of a, b, and c should not
exceed one.

Items

CAY (c)

CAYm1 (b)

CAYm2 (a)

Assessment

FRP

0.294

0.323

0.298

3.05

From 5.9
a, b and c are calculated respectively for CAYm2, CAYm1 and CAY by dividing the FRDC
values, obtained from the criterion 5.9, by 20. The maximum value of a, b, and c should not
exceed one.
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Items

CAY (c)

CAYm1 (b)

CAYm2 (a)

Assessment

FRDC

0.262

0.051

0.159

1.68

9.6 Continuing Education (10)


In this criterion, the institution needs to specify the contributory efforts made by the
faculty members by developing course/laboratory modules, conducting short-term
courses/workshops, etc., for continuing education during the last three years.
Developed/ Duration
Module
Any other
description contributory organized by
institute
/industry

Resource
persons

Target
audience

Faculties and
UG/PG
students

2 days

Ms, Shiney
Thomas
Mr. Deepu
Benson

LateX

---

Ms. Sharon
Sunny and Ms
Merin Manoj

Aptitude
Training

-----

HOD

45 Hrs

Dept. Placement
Cell

Pre-final/
Final year
CSE Students

PHP

---

HOD

20 Hrs

Mr. Deepu
Benson

Pre-final year
CSE Students

Computer
Hardware
Assembling
and
Fundamentals
of Networking
Workshop

CSI

Community
Extension
Developmental
Cell, AJCE

3 Days

Prof. Manoj T
Joy, Resmipriya
M.G.,Manoj
Joseph, Arun
M.R.

Higher
Secondary
students

Aspire 15

---

Ms. Teenu
Therese Paul ,
CCE

5 Days

Academicians
from various
institute/Industry

PG Students

Ekalavya
Two weeks
ISTE
workshop on
Introduction
to Algorithms
May 2015

NMEICT-IIT
Bombay

Shiney
Thomas, Syam
Gopi

5 days

IIT-KGP

Faculties and
PG students

Page 169

Usage and
citation,
etc.

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Ekalavya
Two weeks
ISTE
workshop on
Pedagogy in
Engg.
education
Jan 2015
Ekalavya
Two weeks
ISTE
workshop on
Cyber
Security
July 2014
Ekalavya
Two weeks
ISTE
workshop on
Computer
networks
July 2014

NMEICT-IIT
Bombay

Syam Gopi

5 days

IIT-Bombay

Faculties and
PG students

NMEICT-IIT
Bombay

Prof.Manoj T
Joy, Syam
Gopi

10 days

IIT-Bombay

Faculties and
PG students

NMEICT-IIT
Bombay

Ms.
Resmipriya
M.G,
Syam Gopi

5 days

IIT-Bombay

Faculties and
PG students

10 days

IIT-Bombay

Faculties and
PG students

15 Hrs

Prof. Aurobinda
Routray
IIT-B

45 Pre-final
year CSE
Students
45 Pre-final
year CSE
Students

EkalavyaTwo weeks
ISTE
workshop on
Computer
Programming
July 2014

NMEICT-IIT
Bombay

QEEE
Digital Signal
Processing

IIT-M

Ms. Sruthi S,
Anu Abraham
Mathew

IIT-M

Ms. Sruthi S,
Jose Dominic

10 Hrs

Prof. Vineetha
Prasad
IIT-Delhi

QEEE DBMS

IIT-M

Ms. Sruthi
S,Tintu
Alphonsa
Thomas

15 Hrs

Prof. Janaki Ram


IIT-M

45 Pre-final
year CSE
Students

QEEE
Computer
Networks

IIT-M

Ms. Sruthi S,
Jerin Thomas

6 Hrs

Prof. Bhaskaran
Raman
IIT-Bombay

45 Pre-final
year CSE
Students

Aakash for
education

IIT-B

Prof. Manoj T.
Joy

2 days

IIT-B

Faculties

QEEE
Spoken
English

Santhosh
Kumar G.S,
Syam Gopi,

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Steps 2
Research
National eSeminar

ISTE and CSI

Mr. Syam Gopi

Spoken
Tutorial
Linux, LateX,
Python
2012-2013

MHRD
IIT_B

Mr.
Jayakrishna V

2 days

Academicians
from various
institute/Industry

Faculties and
PG students

30 Hrs

Talk to a teacher
project self
explanatory
video tutorials

UG/PG
Engineering
students

30 Hrs

Talk to a teacher
project self
explanatory
video tutorials

UG/PG
Engineering
students

Talk to a teacher
project self
explanatory
video tutorials

UG/PG
Engineering
students

Spoken
Tutorial
Linux, LateX,
Ubundu OS
Basics
2013-2014

MHRD
IIT_B

Mr.
Jayakrishna V

Spoken
Tutorial
Linux
2014-2015

MHRD
IIT_B

Mr.
Jayakrishna V

15 Hrs

Make an
Impact with
Research

CCE,AJCE

Ms. Teenu
Therese, Mr
Syam Gopi

1 day

Faculty/PG
students

CCE,AJCE

Ms. Teenu
Therese, Mr
Syam Gopi

1 day

Faculty/PG
students

The art of
research and
craft of
publication

Assessment =

9.7 New Facility Created (20)


Specify new facilities created during the last three years for strengthening the curriculum
and/or meeting the PO s.
Various new facilities which has been hitherto unavailable to the students have been created
for strengthening the curriculum and/or meeting the P.Os. The important ones have been
listed below
Industrial visits
Industrial visits give the students a firsthand understanding of how big industries work.
Industrial visit is mandatory for all students of the department at least once in a year. They
are exposed to the real work involved in big infrastructural projects. Also students are able
to reinforce the knowledge which they have gained through classroom lectures.
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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Industrial training
Students are encouraged to undergo industrial training during their semester break in some
industry of their choice. Also a report has to be submitted at the end of industrial training.
Industrial training provides an insight to students about what is happening in the real world
and also supplements their class room knowledge. Industrial training also helps students to
get practice in works in industry which will be of immense help to them later when they
join for jobs in industry after their course completion
Software training programmes
The advent of various software has made life of an engineer easy. So it is essential that
students are taught the nuances of various software which would help them in giving better
shape to their ideas as also give them an added advantage in their career prospects.
Workshops
Different workshops related to the curriculum taught are arranged throughout academic
year to enhance students knowledge in engineering subjects. Eminent personalities from
industry as well as academia are invited to deliver lectures during these workshops.
Students often find these sessions to be extremely useful which is evident from their
involvement as well as their interaction with the resource persons
Participation in paper presentations and technical competitions at the national and
international level
Students are encouraged to participate in paper presentations and technical competitions at
the national and international levels.

Projects ( in three levels):


Students have to carry out a project at micro level (second year) where they chose their
area of interest. Micro project mainly aims at familiarizing students with nuances of
literature review and an exposure on how to apply their class room knowledge to research.
Mini level projects (third year project) aims at exposing students to real world scenarios of
the theory they have studied in class in their area of interest. Main level (final year) project
aims at training them to find solutions to real world problems with their technical
knowhow. The partaking of students in micro, mini and main project have been found to be
very effective in their growth as engineers.
E- Learning: online Courses
Students are encouraged to use the vast repertoire of materials available online in the
relevant areas. Students are actively instructed and encouraged to refer courses of their
interest in NPTEL, QEEE [Quality Enhancement in Engineering Education programme is
sponsored by MHRD, Govt. of India through IIT Madras], GATE coaching etc
Aptitude training

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Aptitude Training is given to students during their 3rd and 4th year in order to make them
capable of attending all the competitive exams and interviews conducted by
industries.

9.8 Overall Improvement since last accreditation, if


since the commencement of the programme (20)

any, otherwise,

Comments, if any

List the PO(s),


which are
strengthened

Contributed by

brought in

Improvement

Specify the
strengths/
weakness

Specify the overall improvement:

Management / Department

S2. Promotion of research

a)Encouragement to
faculty to publish
research findings.
b)Management
rewards publications
in select journals
with monetary
benefits.
c)Students are
directed to take
seminar, based on
reputed Journals/
Transaction
d)Micro project
other than the usual
mini project and
main project was
incorporated to
increase students
interest towards
their core area.

Management / Faculty members

2 ,6, 7

a)Faculty have been


upgraded with
M.Tech
qualifications as on
Aug 2013.
b)Research tie-up
withVIT University,
Vellore to promote
Ph.D registration by
faculty

2,4,8

S1. Improvement in
Faculty quality index

Strengths

Page 173

Three faculties have registered for


their
PhD
under
different
universities.

It has been mandatory for both


B.Tech and M.Tech students to
publish their research findings in
National
and
International
conferences or Journals.

1,4,7,8
4,6, 8

Student evaluation based on


course delivery forms 25 % of
the score every semester

7, 8

Department, faculty
members
Principal / Students
Management, Faculty, Students

This has helped to propagate


technical topics of current
interest to students and peers.

4,5,6,8,9,10

S6. Outcome based TeachingLearning Process

a) Improvement in
course delivery by
the use of subjectwise statistical
factors such as the
assessment of
PEO,POs and CO
attainment.
b) Course plans are
made known to
students at the
beginning of the
semester.

Management, Faculty, Students

S3. Technical skill


development

a)Confidential
feedback is obtained
from the student
every semester, based
on which they are
encouraged to
improve their
performance.
b)Regular Class
Committee meetings
are held under the
supervision of the
HoD.
a)Reporting of
academic progress,
attendance
monitoring,
completion of course
files, etc. are being
performed using
systems, using
customized software
AES.
b) Purchase of
additional hardware,
as part of
modernization of labs

S5. Computerization in academics


and
Lab Up gradations

A faculty has to
attend at least one
Faculty Development
Program (FDP) or
Workshop of his/her
interest every
semester.

S4. Faculty improvement through


student feedback

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Page 174

The uploading of course files,


Students personality and conduct
evaluation, Peer evaluation, Staff
Leave management Systems are
relevant examples.

All
subjects
have
been
scrutinized in detail by the
faculty to establish vital links
between the PEO and the Course
Outcomes and such.
Faculty are thus personally
motivated by the continuous
improvement in their specific
course contents and classroom
delivery.

1,2,5,6,7,10

Management, Faculty, Students

The
Dept.
has
initiated
the
placement training
from 2013-14, in
addition to training
given
by
the
placement cell

1,2,3,10

New faculty are put


through a series of
Annual Induction
training sessions.
These are led by
senior faculty and
external resource
persons. Thus the
teaching-learning
process places the
students at an
advantage.

Faculty/Students

S8.Improvement in Placement

S7. Induction training for new faculty to


improve the teaching-learning process

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

In the absence of a formal mode


of pedagogical skill training to
new faculty, new faculty are
trained to provide generic
instruction
in
class
communication, lab interaction
with students and content
delivery

No. of students being placed


through campus interview has
increased by 2015.

Efforts have been


initiated to obtain
MOUs with
companies for
student centric
activities like
industry exposure,
internships, and
placements, add
on courses etc.

Faculty

A lot of progress have


yet to be made in this
aspect.

Though strenuous efforts have


been made by way of several
submissions to AICTE for
relevant schemes, we have not
made any headway.
Hence,
new strategies are to be
developed.

Industry, Management and


faculty

W2.Industry partnership

W1. Funded projects

Weaknesses

MoU with some IT industries in the


domain include TCS,Claveland.

Page 175

Efforts to provide
consultancy
services for
procuring
hardwares and
softwares for
automating the
various Cooperative
Banks were done.

Faculty

W3.Consultancy

CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

We have to make lot of effort in


this direction.

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CSE - UG Tier II - SAR

Declaration
The head of the institution needs to make a declaration as per the format given below:
This Self- Assessment Report (SAR) is prepared for the current academic year (2014-15)
and the current financial year (2014-2015) on behalf of the institution.
I certify that the information provided in this SAR is extracted from the records, and to the
best of my knowledge, is correct and complete.
I understand that any false statement/information of consequence may lead to rejection
of the application for the accreditation for a period of two or more years. I also
understand that the National Board of Accreditation (NBA) or its sub-committees will
have the right to decide on the basis of the submitted SAR whether the institution
should be considered for an accreditation visit.
If the information provided in the SAR is found to be wrong during the visit or
subsequent to grant of accreditation, the NBA has t h e right to withdraw the grant of
accreditation and no accreditation will be allowed for a period of next two years or
more, and the fee will be forfeited.
I undertake that the institution shall co-operate the visiting accreditation team,
shall provide all desired information during the visit and arrange for the meeting as
required for accreditation as per the NBAs provision.
I undertake that, the institution is well aware about the provisions in the NBAs
accreditation manual concerned for this application, rules, regulations and notifications in
force as on date and the institute shall fully abide to them

Place: Kanjirappally, Kottayam


Date: 15-09-2015

Signature, Name, and Designation of the


Head of the Institution with seal

Page 177

APPENDIX 1
Syllabi

M.G. University

EN010 101 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS I


Teaching Scheme

Credits: 5

2 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Objectives
To impart mathematical background for studying engineering subjects.
MODULE I (18 hours)

MATRIX

Elementary transformation echelon form rank using elementary transformation by


reducing in to echelon form solution of linear homogeneous and non homogeneous
equations using elementary transformation. Linear dependence and independence of
vectors eigen values and eigen vectors properties of eigen values and eigen
vectors(proof not expected) Linear transformation Orthogonal transformation
Diagonalisation Reduction of quadratic form into sum of squares using orthogonal
transformation Rank, index, signature of quadratic form nature of quadratic form
MODULE 2 (18 hours)

- PARTIAL DIFFERENTIATION

Partial differentiation : chain rules statement of Eulers theorem for homogeneous


functions Jacobian Application of Taylors series for function of two variables
maxima and minima of function of two variables (proof of results not expected)
MODULE 3 (18 hours)

- MULTIPLE INTEGRALS

Double integrals in cartesian and polar co-ordinates change of order of integrationarea using double integrals change of variables using Jacobian triple integrals in
cartesian, cylindrical and spherical co-ordinates volume using triple integrals change
of variables using Jacobian simple problems.
MODULE 4 (18 hours) - ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
Linear differential equation with constant coefficients- complimentary function and
particular integral Finding particular integral using method of variation of parameters
Euler Cauchy equations- Legenders equations
MODULE 5 (18 hours) - LAPLACE TRANSFORMS
Laplace Transforms shifting theorem differentiation and integration of transform
Laplace transforms of derivatives and integrals inverse transform application of
convolution property Laplace transform of unit step function second shifting
theorem(proof not expected) Laplace transform of unit impulse function and periodic
function solution of linear differential equation with constant coefficients using
Laplace Transform.

M.G. University

REFERENCES
1. Erwin Kreyszig ;Advanced Engineering Mathematics Wiley Eastern Ltd
2. Grewal B.S ;Higher Engineering Mathematics ,Khanna Publishers
3. N. P. Bali ;Engineering Mathematics ,Laxmi Publications Ltd
4. Goyal & Gupta ; Laplace and Fourier Transforms
5. Dr. M.K.Venkataraman ;Engineering Mathematics Vol. I,National Publishing Co.
6. Dr. M.K.Venkataraman Engineering Mathematics Vol. 2, National Publishing Co
7. T.Veerarajan ,Engineering Mathematics for first year, Mc Graw Hill
8. S.S.Sastry Engineering Mathematics Vol. I,Prentice Hall India
9. S.S.Sastry Engineering Mathematics Vol. 2, Prentice Hall India
10. B.V. Ramana Higher Engineering Mathematics, Mc Graw Hill

M.G.University

EN010 102 ENGINEERING PHYSICS


Teaching Scheme

Credits: 4

I hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Objectives
To provide students knowledge of physics of a problem and an overview of
physical phenomena.

MODULE I (12 hours) LASERS AND HOLOGRAPHY


Lasers- Principle of laser- Absorption- Spontaneous emission- Stimulated emissionCharacteristics of laser - Population inversion- Metastable states- Pumping- Pumping
Methods- Pumping Schemes- 3 level and 4 level pumping- Optical resonatorComponents of laser- Typical laser systems like Ruby laser- He-Ne laser- Semiconductor
laser- Applications of laserHolography- Basic principle -Recording and reconstruction- comparison with ordinary
photography-Applications of Hologram
MODULE II (12 hours) NANOTECHNOLOGY AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY
Introduction to nanoscale science and technology- nanostructures-nanoring, nanorod,
nanoparticle, nanoshells- Properties of nanoparticles- optical, electrical, magnetic,
mechanical properties and quantum confinement- Classification of nanomaterials- C60,
metallic nanocomposites and polymer nanocomposites- Applications of nanotechnology
B. Superconductivity- Introduction- Properties of super conductors- Zero electrical
resistance- Critical temperature- Critical current- Critical magnetic field- Meissner effectIsotope effect- Persistence of current- Flux quantization - Type I and Type II
superconductors- BCS Theory (Qualitative study) Josephson effect- D.C Josephson
effect- A.C Joseph son effect- Applications of superconductors.
MODULE III (12 hours) CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND MODERN
ENGINEERING MATERIALS
A. Crystallography Space lattice- Basis- Unit cell- Unit cell parameters- Crystal
systems- Bravais lattices- Three cubic lattices-sc, bcc, and fcc- Number of atoms per unit
cell- Co-ordination number- Atomic radius- Packing factor- Relation between density and
crystal lattice constants- Lattice planes and Miller indices-Separation between lattice
planes in sc- Braggs law- Braggs x-ray spectrometer- Crystal structure analysis.
Liquid crystals- Liquid crystals, display systems-merits and demerits- Metallic glassesTypes of metallic glasses (Metal-metalloid glasses, Metal-metal glasses) Properties of
metallic glasses (Structural, electrical, magnetic and chemical properties)
Shape memory alloys- Shape memory effect, pseudo elasticity

M.G.University

MODULE IV (12 hours) ULTRASONICS


A. Ultrasonics- Production of ultrasonics- Magnetostriction method Piezoelectric
method- Properties of ultrasonics- Non destructive testing- Applications
B. Spectroscopy- Rayleigh scattering (Qualitative) - Raman effect Quantum theory of
Raman effect- Experimental study of Raman effect and Raman spectrum- Applications of
Raman effect
C. Acoustics- Reverberation- Reverbaration time- Absorption of sound- Sabines
formula(no derivation)- Factors affecting acoustics properties

MODULE V (12 hours) FIBRE OPTICS


Principle and propagation of light in optical fibre- Step index (Single Mode and Multi
Mode fibre) and graded index fibre- N.A. and acceptance angleCharacteristics of
optical fibres (Pulse dispersion, attenuation, V-number, Bandwidth-distance product)
Applications of optical fibres- Fibre optic communication system (Block diagram)Optical fibre sensors (any five) Optical fibre bundle.

REFERENCES
1) A Text book of Engineering Physics M.N.Avadhanulu and P.G.Kshirsagar
S.Chand& Company Ltd.
2) Nanomaterials- A.K.Bandhopadyaya New Age International Publishers
3) Engineering Physics A. Marikani
4) Engineering materials V Rajendran and Marikani-Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing
Company Limited
5) Engineering physics- Dr. M Arumugam - Anuradha Agencies
6) Nano ; The Essentials- T. Pradeep
7) Material Science-M Arumugham- Anuradha Agencies
8) Lasers and Non-Linear optics By B.B Laud- New Age International (P) Limited

M G University

EN010 103 Engineering Chemistry & Environmental Studies


(Common to all branches)

Teaching scheme
Credits:4
1hr lecture and 1hr tutorial per week (total 60 hrs)
Objectives
To impart a scientific approach and to familiarize the applications of chemistry in the
field of technology
To create an awareness about the major environmental issues for a sustainable
development.

Module 1 Electrochemical Energy Systems (13 hrs)


Electrochemical cells - Galvanic cell - Daniel cell EMF - determination by potentiometric
method - Nernst equation derivation- Single electrode potential-Types of electrodesMetal/metal ion electrode, Metal/metal sparingly soluble salt electrode, Gas electrode and
Oxidation/reduction electrode - Reference electrodes - Standard hydrogen electrode and
Calomel electrode - Glass electrode Determination of pH using these electrodes Concentration cell Electrolytic concentration cell without transfer - Derivation of EMF
using Nernst equation for concentration cell - Cells and Batteries - Primary and secondary
cells - Lead acid accumulator, Ni-Cd cell, LithiumMnO2 cell and Rechargeable Lithium ion
cell Polarization Overvoltage - Decomposition potential - Numerical problems based on
Nernst equations and pH determination.

Module 2 Corrosion and Corrosion Control (10 hrs)


Introduction - Types of corrosion Chemical and Electrochemical corrosion Chemical
corrosion Oxidation corrosion, By other gases and Liquid metal corrosion PillingBedworth rule - Electrochemical corrosion Mechanism - absorption of O2 and evolution of
H2 - Types of electrochemical corrosion- Galvanic corrosion, Concentration cell corrosion,
Differential aeration corrosion, Pitting corrosion, Waterline corrosion and Stress corrosion Factors influencing the rate of corrosion - Nature of the metal and Nature of the environment
- Corrosion control methods Selection of metal and proper design, Cathodic protection
(Sacrificial anodic protection and Impressed current cathodic protection), Modifying the
environment, corrosion inhibitors and Protective coating - Metallic coating Anodic coating
and cathodic coating - Hot dipping (Galvanizing and Tinning), Electroplating, Electroless
plating, Metal spraying, Metal cladding Cementation- sheradizing - chromizing- calorizing
and Vacuum metallization - Non-metallic coating - Anodization

Module 3 Engineering Materials (13 hrs)


High polymers Introduction - Degree of polymerization Functionality Tacticity - Types
of polymerization (mechanisms not required)
Addition, Condensation and
Copolymerization - Glass transition temperature-(Tg) Definition only, Compounding and
moulding of plastics - Compression, Injection, Extrusion, Transfer and Blow moulding.
Fiber Reinforced Plastics - Glass reinforced plastics (GRP) - Manufacturing methods Hand lay up, Spray up and Filament winding - properties and uses.
Conducting Polymers Polyacetylene and Polyaniline - Applications (mechanism not
required)
Rubber - Natural rubber Properties Vulcanization - Synthetic rubber - Preparation,
properties and uses of Polyurethane rubber, NBR and Silicone rubber.

M G University

Carbon Nanotubes - Single walled (SWCNT) and Multi walled (MWCNT) - Properties and
uses.

Module 4 Environmental Pollution (12 hrs)


Pollution - Types of pollution a brief study of the various types of pollution - Air pollution Sources and effects of major air pollutants Gases - Oxides of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur
Hydrocarbons Particulates -Control of air pollution - Different methods - Water pollution Sources and effects of major pollutants - Inorganic pollutants- heavy metals cadmium , lead,
mercury - Ammonia, Fertilizers and Sediments (silt) - Organic pollutants Detergents,
pesticides, food waste, - Radioactive materials - Thermal pollutants - Control of water
pollution - General methods
Eutrophication - Definition and harmful effects
Desalination of water - Reverse osmosis and Electrodialysis

Module 5 Environmental Issues (12 hrs)


An overview of the major environmental issues - Acid rain Smog - Photochemical smog Green house effect - Global warming and climate change - Ozone layer depletion
Deforestation - Causes and effects - Wet land depletion Consequences, Biodiversity
importance and threats, Soil erosion - Causes and effects, Solid waste disposal -Methods of
disposal - Composting, Landfill, and Incineration, E-Waste disposal - Methods of disposal
recycle( recovery) and reuse
Renewable energy sources - Solar cells Importance - Photo voltaic cell - a brief
introduction
Bio fuels - Bio diesel and Power alcohol.
Note: This course should be handled and examination scripts should be evaluated by the
faculty members of Chemistry
Text Books
1.
2.
3.
4.

A text book of Engineering Chemistry - Shashi Chawla, Dhanpat Rai and Co.
A text book of Engineering Chemistry - Jain & Jain 15th edition .
A text book of Engineering Chemistry S. S. Dhara.
Modern Engineering Chemistry Dr. Kochu Baby Manjooran. S.

References
1. Chemistry - John E. McMurry and Robert C. Fay, Pearson Education.
2. Polymer science V. R. Gowariker, New Age International Ltd.
3. A text book of polymer - M. S. Bhatnagar Vol I, II,& III, S. Chand publications.
4. Nano materials B. Viswanathan, Narosa publications.
5. Nano science & Technology V. S. Muralidharan and A. Subramania, Ane Books
Pvt. Ltd.
6. Nanotechnology - Er. Rakesh Rathi, S. Chand & Company Ltd.
7. Environmental Studies - Benny Joseph (2nd edition), Tata Mc Graw Hill companies.
8. Environmental Chemistry - Dr. B. K. Sharma, Goel publishers.
9. Environmental Chemistry A. K. De, New age International Ltd.
10. Industrial Chemistry B. K. Sharma, Goel publishers.
11. Engineering Chemistry O. G. Palanna, Tata Mc Graw Hill Education Pvt. Ltd.

M.G. University

EN010 104 ENGINEERING MECHANICS


(Common to all branches)

Teaching Scheme

Credits: 6

3 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Objective:
To develop analytical skills to formulate and solve engineering problems.
Module I ( 23 hrs)
Introduction to Mechanics Basic Dimensions and Units Idealization of Mechanics Rigid
Body Continuum Point force Particle Vector and Scalar quantities.
Principles of Statics Force Systems Coplanar, Collinear, Concurrent and Parallel Free
body diagrams Resolution of forces Moment of a Force Varignons Theorem Couple
Resolution of a force into force couple system Conditions of static equilibrium of Rigid
bodies Solutions of problems using scalar approach
Force Systems in Space Introduction to Vector approach Elements of Vector algebra
Position vector Moment of a Force about a Point and Axis Resultant of Forces
Equilibrium of forces in space using vector approach
Module II (23 hrs)
Principle of Virtual work Elementary treatment only application of virtual work in beams,
ladders
Centroid of Lines, Areas and Volumes Pappus Guldinus Theorems
Moment of Inertia of laminas Transfer theorems radius of Gyration problems
Centre of Gravity Mass moment of Inertia of circular and rectangular plates solid
rectangular prisms Cylinders Cones
Module III (23 hrs)
Friction Laws of friction Contact friction problems ladder friction Wedge friction
Screw friction.
Introduction to Structural Mechanics Types of Supports, loads, frames Static
Indeterminacy Support reactions of beams Analysis of perfect trusses by method of joints,
method of sections.
Module IV (28hrs)
Kinematics Rectilinear motion of a particle under Variable Acceleration
Relative Velocity - problems
Circular motion with Uniform and Variable Acceleration Relations between Angular and
Rectilinear motion Normal and Tangential accelerations
Combined motion of Rotation and Translation Instantaneous centre of zero velocity
Wheels rolling without slipping
Introduction to Mechanical Vibrations Free vibrations Simple Harmonic motion
Module IV (23 hrs)
Kinetics of particles Newtons laws of Motion of Translation DAlemberts Principle
Motion of connected bodies Work Energy Principle Principle of Momentum and Impulse
Collision of Elastic bodies
Newtons laws of Rotational motion Angular Impulse and Torque Conservation of
Angular Momentum Centrifugal and Centripetal forces Applications Work done and
Power by Torque and Couple.

M.G. University

References:
1. Engineering Mechanics S. Timoshenko, D.H. Young Mc Graw Hill International
Edition
2. Engineering Mechanics Statics and Dynamics Irving H Shames, G Krishna
Mohana Rao Pearson Edutcation
3. S. Rajasekararn & G.Sankarasubramanian, Engineering Mechanics, Vikas Publishing
Co.
4. Engineering Mechanics Prof.J.Benjamin
5. Engineering Mechanics G.S. Sawheney PHI Learning Pvt.Ltd, New Delhi
6. Engineering Mechanics K. L. Kumar, Tata Mc Graw Hill, New Delhi

M.G. University

EN010 105: ENGINEERING GRAPHICS


Teaching Scheme

Credits: 6

I hour lecture and 3 hour drawing per week


Objectives
To provide students of all branches of engineering with fundamental knowledge of
engineering drawing
To impart drawing skills to students

MODULE 1 (24 hours)


Introduction to Engineering Graphics: Drawing instruments and their uses-familiarization
with current BIS code of practice for general engineering drawing.
Scales-Plain scales-Diagonal Scales-Forward and Backward Vernier Scales.
Conic Sections:-Construction of conics when eccentricity and distance from directrix are
given .Construction of ellipse (1) given major axis and foci (2) given major axis and
minor axis (3)given a pair of conjugate diameters (4) by the four centre method.
Construction of parabola given the axis and base. Construction of hyperbola-(1) given the
asymptotes and a point on the curve. (2) Given ordinate, abscissa and transverse axis.
Construction of rectangular hyperbola. Construction of tangents and normals at points on
these curves.
Miscellaneous curves:-Cycloids, Inferior and superior Trochoids-EpicycloidHypocycloid-Involute of circle and plain figures-Archimedian Spiral and Logarithmic
Spiral- Tangents and normals at points on these curves.
MODULE 2 (24 hours)
Orthographic projections of points and lines:-Projections of points in different quadrantsProjections of straight lines parallel to one plane and inclined to the other plane-straight
lines inclined to both the planes-true length and inclination of lines with reference planes
using line rotation and plane rotation methods Traces of lines.
Orthographic projections of planes-Polygonal surfaces and circular lamina.
MODULE 3 (24 hours)
Orthographic projections of solids:-Projections of prisms , cones ,cylinders ,pyramids
,tetrahedron ,octahedron and spheres with axis parallel to one plane and parallel or
perpendicular to the other plane-the above solids with their axes parallel to one plane and
inclined to the other plane axis inclined to both the reference planes-use change of
position method OR auxiliary method.
Sections of solids:-Sections of prisms ,cones , cylinders ,pyramids ,tetrahedron and
octahedron with axis parallel to one plane and parallel or perpendicular or inclined to the
other plane with section planes perpendicular to one plane and parallel , perpendicular or
inclined to the other plane True shapes of sections.
MODULE 4 (24 hours)
Developments of surfaces of (1)simple solids like prisms ,pyramids , cylinder and cone
(2) sectioned regular solids (3)above solids with circular or square holes with their axes
intersecting at right angles.-Developments of funnels and pipe elbows.
Isometric Projections:-Isometric Scales-Isometric views and projections of plane
figures,simple&truncated solids such as prisms, pyramids, cylinder, cone, sphere,
hemisphere and their combinations with axis parallel to one the planes and parallel or
perpendicular to the other plane.

M.G. University

MODULE 5 (24 hours)


Perspective projections:-Perspective projections of prisms,pyramids,cylinder and cone
with axis parallel to one plane and parallel or perpendicular or inclined to the other plane
by visual ray method OR vanishing point method
Intersection of surfaces:-Intersection of prism in prism &cylinder in cylinder-Axis at
right angles only.
REFERENCES
1. Engineering Graphics-Unique Methods easy solutions-K.N Anilkumar
2. Engineering Graphics-P I Varghese.
3. Engineering Drawing-N D Bhatt
4. Engineering Graphics-P S Gill
5. Engineering Graphics-T S Jeyapoovan.

M.G.University

EN010 106: BASIC CIVIL ENGINEERING


(Common to all branches)

Teaching scheme:
1 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week
Objective:
To familiarize all engineering students with the basic concepts of civil
that they can perform better in this great profession Engineering.

Credits: 4

engineering so

Module 1 (12 hours)


Introduction to civil engineering : various fields of civil engineering- Engineering
materials: Cement Bogues compounds, manufacture of Portland cement-wet and dry
process, grades of cement, types of cement and its uses steel types of steel for
reinforcement bars ,structural steel sections,built-up sections,light gauge sections.
Aggregates: Fine aggregate:- pitsand, riversand, M- sand--Coarse aggregate: natural and
artificial , requirements of good aggregates. Timber: varieties found in Kerala
seasoning and preservation. Bricks: classification, requirements, tests on bricks.
Module 2 (12 hours)
Cement mortar- preparation and its uses concrete ingredients, grades of concrete
water cement ratio, workability, curing, ready mix concrete. Roofs - roofing materials -A.
C, aluminium, GI, fibre, tile, reinforced concrete (brief description only)- reinforcement
details of a one way slab, two way slab and simply supported beams.
Module 3 (12 hours)
Building Components: Foundation: Bearing capacity and settlement - definitions onlyfootings- isolated footing , combined footing - rafts, piles and well foundation , machine
foundation (Brief description only).
Superstructure: Walls - brick masonry types of bonds , English bond for one brick stone masonry-Random Rubble masonry.
Module 4 (12 hours)
Surveying: Classification principles of surveying- chain triangulation- instruments used,
field work bearing of survey lines WCB and reduced bearing -Leveling: field work reduction of levels - height of instrument method.
Introduction to total station- basic principles of remote sensing, GPS and GIS.
Module 5 (12 hours)
Site plan preparation for buildings (Sketch only) Kerala Municipal Building Rules
(1999)-general provisions regarding site and building requirements coverage and floor
area ratio basic concepts of intelligent buildings and green buildings- disposal of
domestic waste water through septic tank and soak pit. Classification of roads- basics of
traffic engineering road markings , signs, signals and islands, road safety-accidents,
causes and remedies (brief description only)

M.G.University

Internal Continuous Assessment (Maximum Marks-50)


60% - Tests (minimum 2)
20% - Assignments (minimum 2) such as home work, problem solving, group
discussions, quiz, literature survey, seminar, term-project, software exercises, etc.
20% - Regularity in the class

References
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Jha and Sinha, Construction and foundation Engineering, Khanna Publishers


Punmia B. C., Surveying Vol I, Laxmi Publications
Rangwala, Building Materials, Charotar Book stall
K. Khanna ,C. E. G. Justo., Highway Engineering, Khanna Publishers
Nevile., Properties of Concrete, Mc Graw Hill
B C Punmia.,Basic Civil Engineering, Khanna Publishers
Kerala Municipal Building Rules 1999

M G University

EN010 107 BASIC MECHANICAL ENGINEERING


(Common to all branches)

Teaching scheme

Credits- 4

1hour lecture and1hour tutorial per week


Objective
To impart basic knowledge in mechanical engineering
Module 1(12 hours)
Thermodynamics: Basic concepts and definitions, Gas laws, specific heat Universal gas
constant- Isothermal, adiabatic and polytrophic processes, work done, heat transferred,
internal energy and entropy - Cycles: Carnot, Otto and Diesel- Air standard efficiency.
Basic laws of heat transfer (Fouriers law of heat conduction, Newtons law of cooling
Steffen Boltzmanns law)
Module 2 (12 hours)
I.C. Engines: Classification of I.C Engines, Different parts of I.C engines, Working of two
stroke and four stroke engines-petrol and diesel engines-air intake system, exhaust system,
fuel supply system, ignition system, lubrication system, cooling system and engine starting
system-Performance of I.C. engines, advantage of MPFI and CRDI over conventional
system.
Refrigeration: Unit of refrigeration, COP, Block diagram and general descriptions of air
refrigeration system, vapour compression and vapour absorption systems- Required
properties of a refrigerant, important refrigerants Domestic refrigerator- Ice plant.
Air conditioning system: Concept of Air conditioning, psychometry, psychometric properties,
psychometric chart, psychometric processes, human comfort winter and summer air
conditioning systems (general description), air conditioning application.
Module 3 (12 hours)
Power transmission elements: Belt Drive - velocity ratio of belt drive, length of belt, slip in
belt- simple problems Power transmitted Ratio of tensions Centrifugal tension Initial
tension Rope drive, chain drive and gear drive-Types of gear trains (simple descriptions
only)
Module 4 (12 hours)
Power plants: General layout of hydraulic, diesel, thermal and nuclear power plantsnonconventional energy sources (general description only).
Hydraulic turbines and pumps : Classifications of hydraulic turbines types of hydraulic
turbines runaway speed, specific speed, draft tube, cavitations, selection of hydraulic
turbines .Classification of pumps positive displacement and rotodynamic pumps (description
only)- applications
Steam turbines: Classification of steam turbines, description of common types of steam
turbines: Impulse and reaction, compounding methods.
Module 5 (12 hours)
Simple description of general purpose machines like lathe, shaping machines, drilling
machines, grinding machines and milling machines, Basic concepts of CNC, DNC, CIM and
CAD/CAM
Manufacturing Processes: Moulding and casting, forging, rolling, welding- arc welding-gas
welding (fundamentals and simple descriptions only)

M G University

Internal continues assessment ( Maximum Marks 50)


60% Test (minimum2)
20% Assignments (minimum 2) such as home work, quiz, seminar.
20% regulatory in class
Text book
1 P.L. Bellany, Thermal Engineering, Khnna Publishes
2 Benjamin J., Basic Mechanical Engineering, Pentx
Reference Books
1 R.C.Patal, Elements of heat engines, Acharya Publishers
2 G.R Nagapal, Power plant engineering, Khnna publishes
3 P.K.Nag, Engineering Thermodynamics, McGraw Hill
4 Dr.P.R Modi &Dr.M.S. Seth, Hydraulics & Fluid Mechanics including Hydraulic
Machines, Standard Book House

M.G. University

EN010 108: Basic Electrical Engineering


(Common to all branches)

Teaching Scheme
I hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives
To provide students of all branches of engineering with an overview of all the fields of
electrical engineering
To prepare students for learning advanced topics in electrical engineering
Module I (10 hours)
Kirchhoffs Laws Formation of network equations by mesh current method Matrix representation
Solution of network equations by matrix method Star delta conversion.
Magnetic circuits mmf, field strength, flux density, reluctance, permeability comparison of
electric and magnetic circuits force on current carrying conductor in magnetic filed.
Module II (12 hours)
Electromagnetic Induction Faradays laws lenzs law statically and dynamically induced emf
self and mutual inductance coupling coefficient.
Alternating current fundamentals generation of AC frequency, period, average and r m s value,
form factor, peak factor, phasor representation j operator power and power factor solution of
RLC series and parallel circuits.
Module III (13 hours)
DC machine principle of operation of DC generator constructional details e m f equation
types of generators.
DC motor principle of operation of DC motor back emf need for starter losses and efficiency
types of motors applications simple problems.
Transformer principle of operation e m f equation Constructional details of single phase and
three phase transformer losses and efficiency application of power transformer, distribution
transformer, current transformer and potential transformer.
Module IV (13 hours)
Three phase system generation of three phase voltage star and delta system relation between
line and phase voltages and currents phasor representation of three phase system - balanced delta
connected system three wire and four wire system simple problems. Three phase power
measurement Single wattmeter, two wattmeter and three wattmeter methods.
Induction motors principle of operation of three phase induction motors applications of cage and
slip ring induction motor single phase induction motors capacitor start / run, shaded pole
universal motors - Applications.
Synchronous generator (Alternator) principles of operation and types.
Module V (12 hours)
Generation of electric power types of generation hydroelectric, thermal and nuclear (Block
schematic and layout only) - Non conventional energy sources solar, wind, tidal, wave and
geothermal.
Transmission need for high voltage transmission Transmission voltage Distribution
Underground versus overhead Feeder Distributor Service mains conductor materials one
line diagram of typical power system.

M.G. University

Requirements of good lighting system working principle of incandescent lamp, Fluorescent lamp
and mercury vapour lamp-energy efficient lamps (CFL,LED lights) need for energy management
and power quality home energy management.
Text Books
1. D.P. Kothari & I.J. Nagrath Basic Electrical Engineering Tata McGraw Hill
2. D.C. Kulshreshta Basic Electrical Engineering - Tata McGraw Hill
3. Hughes Electrical and Electronic Technology Pearson Education
Reference Books
1. R.V. Srinivasa Murthy Basic Electrical Engineering Sunguine Technical
2. J.B.Gupta Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering & Electronics S.K.Kataria
3. V.K. Mehta, Rohit Mehta Basic Electrical Engineering S.Chand.
4. Bureau of Engineering Efficiency Guide book for national certification examination for
energy managers and auditors.
5. Rajendra Prasad Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering, Prentice Hall India.
6. Soni, Gupta, Bhatnagar & Chackrabarty A text book on power system engineering
Dhanapt Rai
7. Electrical Engineering Fundamentals Vincent Del Toro, Pearson Education.

M.G. University

EN010 109: Basic Electronics Engineering and Information Technology


(Common to all branches)

Teaching Scheme

Credits: 5

2 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week


Objectives
To provide students of all branches of engineering with an overview of all the fields of electronics
engineering and information technology

MODULE 1 (18 hours): Basic Circuit Components: Diode: Germanium, Silicon, Zener,
LEDs (working principle only). Forward and reverse characteristics. [2hr.] Rectifiers: Half
wave, fullwave , Bridge circuits, DC Power supply: Capacitor filter, Zener regulator. [3hrs.]
Transistors :Different configurations - CE characteristics- and , concept of Amplifiers:
Common emitter RC coupled amplifier, Frequency response, Bandwidth.(No analysis
required)
Comparison of BJT,FET,MOSFET, IGBT. [2hr.]. Integrated circuits: Advantages,
classification of Linear and Digital ICs. Basics of Op-amps, inverting and non-inverting
amplifiers.Family of ICs(Function diagram of 7400 & CD4011) [4hrs.] .Specifications of TTL
and CMOS.[] Comparison.
MODULE 2 (18 hours): Basic communication Engineering:Communication: Frequency
bands: RF, VHF, UHF, x, ku, ka, c. Modulation need for modulation, basic principles of
amplitude, frequency and pulse modulation. [6hrs.]. Block schematic of AM transmitter ,
Super-hetrodyne receiver, FM receiver.-function of each block.[3hrs.] .Wireless
communication: Satellite Communication-Earth station, transponder and receiver.Mobile
Communication: GSM-BSC, Cell structure, frequency re-use, hands-of, establishing a call.
MODULE 3 (18 hours):Basic instrumentation and Consumer electronics: Electronic
instrumentation: Transducers: Basic principles of Strain guage, LVDT, Thermistor,
Photodiode, Typical moving coil microphones and Loud speaker.Block diagram of Digital
Multimeter .[8hrs].CONSUMER ELECTRONICS: Basic principles of TV Interlaced
Scanning-Block Diagram of PAL TV receiver(color).Basic principles of DTH, brief
descriptions of MP3,multichannel audio 5.1,7.1.
MODULE 4 (18 hours):Introduction: Definition and Scope of IT-Digital Computer, Von
Neumann Architecture-Basic Operational Concepts-CPU-single Bus and Multi Bus
Organization, A typical Instruction set, Execution of Instructions. Memory and I/O-Main
Memory, Virtual Memory-Cache memory-Secondary Memories-Printers, Plotters, Displays
,Key board, Mouse, OMR and OCR-Device Interface-I/O Processor-I/O Channel
MODULE 5 (18 hours) :Computer software-System Software and Application SoftwareMachine Language-Assembly Language-High Level Language-Language TranslatorsOperating System, Procedural Programming and Object Oriented Programming.Computer

M.G. University

Networks-Concepts of Networking-Network Topologies-WAN-LAN-MAN, ProtocolInternet-working concept, Internet Architecture, IP addresses, Routing, Domain Name
System(Basic concepts only)
References
1.Basic Electronics Devices, Circuits and IT fundamentals.Santiram Kal,PHI( Module 1to 5)
2. Basic Electronics: Bernad Grob, Mc Graw Hill Publication(Module 1)
3. Electronic Devices: Floyd, Pearson Education (Module 1)
4. Electronic Devices and Circuits: J.B. Gupta,S.K.Kataria & Sons (Module 1 , 2,3)
5. Digital Principles: Malvino & Leach, Mc Graw Hill Publication(Module 1)
6. Electronic Instrumentation: H.S Kalsi, Mc Graw Hill Publication(Module 2)
7. Communication Systems: Sanjay Sharma, S.K.Kataria & Sons (Module 2)
8. Satellite Comunication : Robert M.Gagliardi,CBS Publishers & Distributors.(Module 2)
9.Basic Radio and TV; S.P. Sharma,Tata McGrawhill(Module 2 &3)
10.Wireless Communication; T.S. Rappaport, Pearson(Module 3)
11.Computer Organization, Hamacher, Vranesic and Zaky, Mc Graw Hill (Module 4)
12.Systems Programming, JJ Donovan ,Mc Graw Hill (Module 5)
13.Computer Networks,Andrew.S Tanenbaum,Pearson Education(Module 5)

M G University

EN010 110: Mechanical Workshop


(Common to all branches)
Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per week

Credits: 1

Objectives
To provide students of all branches of engineering in house experience of basic
mechanical instruments and activities

Carpentry

Planing cutting chiselling, marking sawing cross and tee joints


dovetail joints engineering application, Seasoning, Preservation
Plywood and ply boards.

Fitting

Practice in chipping filing cutting male and female joints.

Smithy

Forging of square and hexagonal prism. Study of forging principles,


materials and operations.

Foundry

Preparation of simple sand moulds moulding sand characteristics,


materials, gate, runner, riser, core, chaplets and casting defects.

Demonstration and study of machine tools lathe, drilling, boring, slotting, shaping, milling
and grinding machines, CNC machines and machining centers.
Demonstration and study of arc and gas welding techniques.
Note:

1. The minimum mark for a pass for EN010 110Mechanical workshop is 25 out of 50 in
internal assessments.
2. If the student fails in securing minimum mark for pass mentioned above will be
considered as failed in the respective workshop.
The candidate not satisfying the above mentioned condition may be given U grade in the
grade card. For the purpose of fixing grade, the marks are hypothetically escalated to 150.
Other grades may be given as specified for other subjects.
The failed candidate has to attend the respective workshop classes in the subsequent
semesters. The internal assessment will be made by repeating all workshop activities. The
student has to register for EN010 110 Mechanical Workshop in the college by paying the fees
prescribed by the college.
HOD in charge of workshop will allot a staff member to monitor the activities and awarding
the internal marks. The internal marks should be submitted to the university.

M G University

EN010 111: Electrical and Civil Workshops


(Common to all branches)

Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per 2 weeks for each

Credits: 1

Objectives
To provide students of all branches of engineering in house experience of basic
electrical and civil instruments and activities
Electrical Workshop
1. Wiring and estimation of one lamp and one plug, Control of two lamps in series and in
parallel.
2. Staircase wiring.
3. Godown wiring.
4. Insulation megger - earth megger , measurement of insulation resistance and earth
resistance .Study of volt meter, ammeter , watt meter and energy meter.
5. Working principle and wiring of Fluorescent , CFL and Mercury vapour lamp .
6. Study and wiring of distribution board including power plug using isolator, MCB and
ELCB Estimation of a typical 1BHK house wiring system.
7. Familiarization , soldering, testing and observing the wave forms on a CRO of a HW and
FW Uncontrolled Rectifier (using diodes) with capacitor filter.
8. Observing the wave forms on a CRO of Experiment 7 without capacitor filter and find
the average and RMS value of the voltage waveform.
9. Visit your college substation and familiarize the supply system, Transformer, HT Panel
and Distribution etc.
Civil Workshop
Masonry : English bond Flemish bond wall junction one brick one and a half brick
two brick and two and a half brick Arch setting.
Plumbing: Study of water supply and sanitary fittings water supply pipe fitting tap
connections sanitary fittings urinal, wash basin closet (European and
Indian), Manholes.
Surveying: Study of surveying instruments chain compass plane table levelling
minor instruments. Demonstration of Theodolite and Total Station.
Familiarization of latest building materials : Flooring materials Roofing materials
Paneling boards.

M G University

Note:
1. The minimum mark for a pass for EN010 111 Electrical and Civil workshop is 50 out
of 100 in internal assessments.
2. If the student fails in securing minimum mark for pass mentioned above will be
considered as failed in the respective workshop.
The candidate not satisfying the above mentioned condition may be given U grade in the
grade card. For the purpose of fixing grade, the marks are hypothetically escalated to 150.
Other grades may be given as specified for other subjects.
The failed candidate has to attend the respective workshop classes in the subsequent
semesters. The internal assessment will be made by repeating all workshop activities. The
student has to register for EN010 111 Electrical and Civil Workshop in the college by paying
the fees prescribed by the college.
HOD in charge of workshop will allot a staff member to monitor the activities and awarding
the internal marks. The internal marks should be submitted to the university.

EN010301 B

Engineering Mathematics II
(CS, IT)

Teaching scheme

Credits: 4

2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week


Objectives

To know the importance of learning theories and strategies in Mathematics and graphs.

MODULE 1

Mathematical logic

(12 hours)

Basic concept of statement , logical connectives, Tautology and logical equivalence


Laws of algebra of propositions equivalence formulas Tautological implications (proof not expected
for the above laws , formulas and implications). Theory of inference for statements Predicate calculus
quantifiers valid formulas and equivalences free and bound variables inference theory of predicate
calculus
MODULE 2

Number theory and functions

(12 hours)

Fundamental concepts Divisibility Prime numbers- relatively prime numbers


fundamental theorem of arithmetic g.c.d Euclidean algorithm - properties of gcd (no proof) l c
m Modular Arithmetic congruence properties congruence class modulo n Fermats theorem
Eulers Totient functions - Eulers theorem - Discrete logarithm
Function types of functions composite functions inverse of a function pigeon hole principles
MODULE 3

Relations

(10 hours)

Relations binary relation types of relations equivalence relation partition


equivalence classes partial ordering relation Hasse diagram - poset
MODULE 4

Lattice (14 hours)

Lattice as a poset some properties of lattice (no proof) Algebraic system general
properties lattice as algebraic system sublattices complete lattice Bounded Lattice complemented Lattice distributive lattice homomorphism - direct product
MODULE 5

Graph Theory

(12 hours)

Basic concept of graph simple graph multigraph directed graph- Basic theorems (no
proof) . Definition of complete graph , regular graph, Bipartite graph, weighted graph subgraph
Isomorphic graph path cycles connected graph.- Basic concept of Eulergraph and Hamiltonian
circuit trees properties of tree (no proof) - length of tree spanning three sub tree Minimal
spanning tree (Basic ideas only . Proof not excepted for theorems)

References
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

S.Lipschutz, M.L.Lipson Discrete mathematics Schaums outlines Mc Graw Hill


B.Satyanarayana and K.S. Prasad Discrete mathematics & graph theory PHI
Kenneth H Rosen - Discrete mathematics & its Application - Mc Graw Hill
H. Mittal , V.K.Goyal, D.K. Goyal Text book of Discrete Mathematics - I.K. International
Publication
T. Veerarajan - Discrete mathematics with graph theory and combinatorics - Mc Graw Hill
C.L.Lieu - Elements of Discrete Mathematics - Mc Graw Hill
J.P.Trembly,R.Manohar - Discrete mathematical structures with application to computer
science - Mc Graw Hill
B.Kolman , R.C.Bushy, S.C.Ross - Discrete mathematical structures- PHI
R.Johnsonbough - Discrete mathematics Pearson Edn Asia

EN010 302 Economics and Communication Skills


(Common to all branches)
Teaching scheme
2hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week
Credits: 4(3+1)
Objectives
To impart a sound knowledge of the fundamentals of Economics.

Economics
Module I (7 hours)
Reserve Bank of India-functions-credit control-quantitative and qualitative techniques
Commercial banks-functions- Role of Small Industries Development Bank of India and
National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development
The stock market-functions-problems faced by the stock market in India-mutual funds
Module II (6 hours)
Multinational corporations in India-impact of MNCs in the Indian economy
Globalisation-necessity-consequences
Privatisation-reasons-disinvestment of public sector undertakings
The information technology industry in India-future prospects
Module III (6 hours)
Direct and indirect taxes- impact and incidence- merits of direct and indirect taxesprogressive and regressive taxes-canons of taxation-functions of tax systemtax evasion-reasons for tax evasion in India-consequences-steps to control tax evasion
Deficit financing-role-problems associated with deficit financing
Module IV (5 hours)
National income-concepts-GNP, NNP, NI, PI and DPI-methods of estimating national
income-difficulties in estimating national income
Inflation-demand pull and cost push-effects of inflation-government measures to control
inflation
Module V (6 hours)
International trade-case for free trade-case for protectionism
Balance of payments-causes of disequilibrium in Indias BOP-General Agreement on
Tariffs and Trade-effect of TRIPS and TRIMS in the Indian economy-impact of WTO
decisions on Indian industry
Text Books
1. Ruddar Datt, Indian Economy, S.Chand and Company Ltd.
2. K.K.Dewett, Modern Economic Theory, S.Chand and Company Ltd.
References
1. Paul Samuelson, Economics, Tata McGraw Hill
2. Terence Byres, The Indian Economy, Oxford University Press
3. S.K.Ray, The Indian economy, Prentice Hall of India
4. Campbell McConnel, Economics, Tata McGraw Hill

Communication Skills
Objectives
To improve Language Proficiency of the Engineering students
To enable them to express themselves fluently and appropriately in social
and professional contexts
To equip them with the components of different forms of writing
MODULE 1 (15 hours)
INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION
Communication nature and process, Types of communication - Verbal and Non verbal,
Communication Flow-Upward, Downward and Horizontal, Importance of
communication skills in society, Listening skills, Reading comprehension, Presentation
Techniques, Group Discussion, Interview skills, Soft skills
MODULE II (15 hours)
TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION
Technical writing skills- Vocabulary enhancement-synonyms, Word Formation-suffix,
affix, prefix, Business letters, Emails, Job Application, Curriculum Vitae, Report writingTypes of reports
Note: No university examination for communication skills. There will be internal
evaluation for 1 credit.
REFERENCES
1. The functional aspects of communication skills, P.Prasad and Rajendra K.
Sharma, S.K. Kataria and sons, 2007
2. Communication skills for Engineers and Scientists, Sangeeta Sharma and Binod
Mishra, PHI Learning private limited, 2010
3. Professional Communication, Kumkum Bhardwaj, I.K. International (P) House
limited, 2008
4. English for technical Communication, Aysha Viswamohan, Tata Mc Graw
Publishing company limited, 2008

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 303: Problem Solving and Computer Programming


(Common with IT010 306)
Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the basic concepts of problem solving using a computer.

To learn about the structure of C programming language.


Module I ( 10 hours)
Problem solving: Steps in Computer programming Features of a good program
Problem solving using Algorithms and Flowcharts.
C fundamentals: Character set, Constants, Identifiers, keywords, basic data types,
Variables, Operators, Expressions, Statements, Input and Output statements Structure of a C
program simple programs.
Module II ( 13 hours)
Control statements: if, if-else, nested if switch while do-while for break &
continue nested loops.
Single dimensional arrays defining an array, array initialisation, accessing array
elements Programs for sequential search, bubble sort, binary search.
Multidimensional arrays defining a two dimensional array, array initialisation,
accessing elements Programs for matrix processing.
Module III ( 12 hours)
Strings: declaring a string variable, reading and displaying strings, string related
library functions Programs for string matching and sorting.
Functions: Function definition, function call, function prototype, parameter passing,
void function Recursion Passing array to function.
Macros: Defining and calling macros Difference between macro & function.
Module IV ( 13 hours)
Structures: defining a structure variable, accessing members, array of structures,
passing structure to function.
Unions: difference with structure, defining union variable, accessing members.
Pointers: declaration, operations on pointers, passing pointer to a function, accessing
array elements using pointers, processing strings using pointers, pointer to pointer, array of
pointers, pointer to array, pointer to function, pointer to structure, self referential structure.
Module V ( 12 hours)
Files: Different types of files in C Opening & Closing a file Writing to and
Reading from a file Processing files Library functions related to file fseek(), ftell(),
ungetc(), fread(), fwrite() Dynamic memory allocation.
Storage Class associated with variables: automatic, static, external and register.
Additional features: Enumerated data type, bitwise operators, typedef.
References
1. Programming with C - Byron S. Gottfried, Tata McGraw Hill.
2. Computer Programming in C - Kerninghan & Ritchie, PHI .
3. Programming in C - Stephen C. Kochan, CBS publishers.
4. Programming in C (5e) E. Balaguruswamy , Mc Graw Hill
5. Let us C Yashwant Kanetkar, BPB.
6. A Book on C Al Kelley and Ira Pohl, Addison-Wesley

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

Mahatma Gandhi University

7. Mastering Turbo C - Stan Kelly Bootle, BPB Publications.


8. Programming and Problem Solving with PASCAL - Micheal Schneider, Wiley
Eastern Ltd. ( Module 1)
9. Pointers in C - Yashwant Kanetkar, BPB
10. The Spirit of C- by Munish cooper, Jaico Books.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 304: Computer Organization


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To develop a good understanding of a complete computer system through an


integrated approach to hardware, software and processor design.

To emphasise on both background theory and actual design.


Module I (10 hours)
CPU - Arithmetic: Signed addition and subtraction BCD adder Multiplication
Array multiplier Booths Algorithm, Division Restoring and non-restoring
division.
Module II (12 hours)
Floating-point arithmetic- addition, subtraction, multiplication, division. Decimal
arithmetic- addition subtraction, multiplication, division. ALU - design of arithmetic,
logical, arithmetic logical unit
Module III (14 hours)
Control Logic Design Control Organization Hardware control, Microprogram
control (design for specific problems) Microprogram sequencer, Horizontal and
vertical micro instructions.
Module IV (12 hours)
Memory: - Memory hierarchy Principle of inclusion-memory interleaving
techniques. Disk memory - Data organisation on disk-Disk performance Disk
caching. Main memory-SRAM, DRAM, ROM Associative memory, Scratchpad
memory-Cache memory Levels of Cache-Mapping techniques, Associative, Direct,
and Set Associative-Main memory update policies.
Module V (12 hours)
Virtual Memory:-Overlay-Need for virtual memory-Address translation-Translation
Look Aside Buffer-Relocation techniques-static, dynamic-Paged memory-Page table,
Page frame data table-Segmented memory-Paged segments.

Reference Books
1. M.Morris Mano- Computer System Architecture- PHI- Third Edition-2006
2. M.Morris Mano Digital Logic and Computer Design - PHI -2004
3. Carl Hamacher, Zvonko Vranesic, Safwat Computer Organization-McGrawHillFifth Edition
4. David A.Patterson,John L.Hennessy-Computer Organization and Design-MKArm Edition
5. V.Carl Hamacher,Zvonko G. vranesic,Safwat G.Zaky-Computer OrganizationMcGrawHill-Fourth Edition
6. Behrooz parhami-Computer Architecture-Oxford University Press
7. Naresh Jotwani-Computer System Organisation- McGrawHill

Syllabus - B.Tech Compter Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 305 SWITCHING THEORY AND LOGIC DESIGN


(Common with IT010 304)
Teaching scheme

Credits: 4

3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Objectives:To introduce the principles of Logic Systems and Circuits, thereby enabling the
student to obtain the platform for studying Computer Architecture and Design.
Module 1: (14 Hrs)
Number Systems and Codes:- Decimal, Binary, Octal and Hexadecimal Number systems, Codes- BCD,
Gray Code, Excess-3 Code, ASCII, EBCDIC, Conversion between various Codes.
Switching Theory:- Boolean Algebra- Postulates and Theorems, De Morgans Theorem, Switching
Functions- Canonical Forms- Simplification of Switching Functions- Karnaugh Map and Quine McClusky Methods.

Module 2: (12 Hrs)


Combinational Logic Circuits:- Review of Basic Gates- Universal Gates,Adders, Subtractors, Serial
Adder, Parallel Adder- Carry Propagate Adder, Carry Lookahead Adder, Carry Save Adder, Comparators,
Parity Generators, Decoder and Encoder, Multiplexer and Demultiplexer, PLA and PAL.

Module 3(12 Hrs)


Sequential Logic Circuits:- Latches and Flip Flops- SR, JK, D, T and MS Flip Flops, Asynchronous
Inputs.
Clocked Sequential Circuits:- State Tables State Equations and State Diagrams, State Reduction and
State Assignment, Design of Clocked Sequential Circuits using State Equations.

Module 4: (10 Hrs)


Counters and Shift Registers:- Design of Synchronous and Asynchronous Counters:- Binary, BCD,
Decade and Up/Down Counters , Shift Registers, Types of Shift Registers, Counters using Shift
Registers- Ring Counter and Johnson Counter.

Module 5(12 Hrs)


Fault Tolerance and Diagnosis : Concepts of Fault and Hazards- Fault Tolerance in Combinational
Circuits- Fault Table, Fault Detection methods-Boolean Difference and Path Sensitizing MethodsDigital ICs- Digital Logic Families- Characteristics- Introduction to RTL, TTL,ECL, MOS and CMOS
Logics.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books
1. Zvi Kohavi Switching and Finite Automat theory, Tata McGrwHill
2. Morris Mano Digital Logic and Computer Design ,Prentice Hall of India
Floyd T.L. Digital Fundamentals , Universal Bookstall
Biswas N.N. Logic System Theory Prentice Hall of Inia
Leach D. Malvino A.P. & Saha Digital Principles and Applications- Tata McGraw
Hill
6. Tau b ,Helbert abd Schilling, Digital Integrated Electronics TMH
3.
4.
5.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 306(EC): Electronics Devices and Circuits


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives
_ To impart the basic concepts of discrete integrated electronics
_ To develop understanding about the working and operation of various circuits using
discrete and integrated components
.
Module I (12hours)
Power supplies: Half wave, full wave and bridge rectifiers- L, C, LC and _ filters (working
only)- Zener voltage regulator, transistor series and shunt voltage regulator, voltage regulator
ICs, 78XX and 79XX series
Module II (12hours)
Transistor Amplifiers: Bipolar transistor models and characteristics, current and voltage
characteristics, BJT as a switch, BJT circuits at DC, Need for biasing, Q point selection,
Concepts of load line, Bias stability, Biasing in BJT amplifier circuits, Small signal operation
and model, transconductance, single stage BJT amplifiers.
Module III (12hours)
Integrated Circuits: Operational Amplifier, Simplified model, Ideal OP-Amp approximation
and characteristics, Non inverting amplifier, Inverting amplifier, OP-Amp characteristics,
Voltage follower, Difference Amplifier, Instrumentation amplifier, Summation amplifier.
Module IV (12hours)
Feedback: Concept of feedback, positive and negative feedback, types of feedback, Effect of
feedback on amplifier performance, Stability of feedback circuits.
Oscillators: Condition for oscillators, General form of oscillator circuit, RC phase shift
oscillators, Wein bridge oscillator using OP-Amp, Working of Hartley, Colpitts and crystal
oscillators
Module V (12hours)
RC circuits: Response of high pass and low pass RC circuits to sine, step, pulse and square
inputs, clipping and clamping circuits, RC integrator and differentiator, Working of astable,
mono-stable and bi-stable multivibraors using OP-Amp, Working of Schmitt trigger, 555
timer and its application.
Reference Books
1. Integrated Electronics Milman , Halkias TMH
2. Microelectronic circuits Sedra , Smith Oxford university press
3. Fundamentals of microelectronics B Razavi - Wiley
4. Design with Op-Amp and analog integrated circuits S Franco TMH
5. Pulse, digital and switching waveforms Milman, Taub - TMH

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 307(P): Programming Lab


Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per week

Credits: 2

Objectives

To acquaint the students with the fundamentals of programming.

To provide the students with good knowledge in C programming and


develop problem solving skills.

1. Familiarisation with computer system compliers, editors and operating systems etc.
2. Familiarisation with office packages
3. Programming experiments in C to cover input output statements, control statements,
functions, string, arrays, Structures, pointers and files.
4. Programes to find factorial, Fibonacci series, palindrome, matrix operations, sort a set of

names, search etc.


Any experiment according to the syllabus of CS010 303 can be substituted.

Syllabus B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

CS010 308 LOGIC DESIGN LAB


Teaching scheme

Credits: 2

3 hours Practical per week

Objectives:To provide an introduction to Logic Systems Design thereby giving a hands on


experience on working with digital ICS ,which enable the study Computer System Architecture.
1. Familiarization of Logic Gates and Realization of Logic Circuits using basic Gates.
2. Design and implementation of Arithmetic Circuits:- Half Adder, Full Adder, n bit Ripple Carry
Adder, Carry Look ahead Adder, BCD Adder
3. Study of Flip Flops:- implementation of RS, JK, D, T and MS Flip Flops
4. Design and implementation of Synchronous and Asynchronous Counters, UP/DOWN Counters
5. Design and Implementation of Shift Registers, Counters using Shift Registers Ring Counter and
Johnson Counter
6. Study of Multiplexers , Demultiplexers, Encoder and Decoder
7. Design of Comparators and Parity Generators.

EN010401 Engineering Mathematics III


(Common to all branches)

Teaching scheme

Credits: 4

2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week


Objectives: Apply standard methods of mathematical &statistical analysis

MODULE 1

Fourier series

( 12 hours)

Dirichlet conditions Fourier series with period 2 and 2l Half range sine and cosine series
Harmonic Analysis r.m.s Value
MODULE 2

Fourier Transform

( 12 hours)

Statement of Fourier integral theorem Fourier transforms derivative of transforms- convolution


theorem (no proof) Parsevals identity
MODULE 3

Partial differential equations

( 12 hours)

Formation by eliminating arbitrary constants and arbitrary functions solution of Lagranges equation
Charpits method solution of Homogeneous partical differential equations with constant coefficients
MODULE 4

Probability distribution

( 12 hours)

Concept of random variable , probability distribution Bernoullis trial Discrete distribution Binomial
distribution its mean and variance- fitting of Binominal distribution Poisson distribution as a limiting
case of Binominal distribution its mean and variance fitting of Poisson distribution continuous
distribution- Uniform distribution exponential distribution its mean and variance Normal
distribution Standard normal curve- its properties
MODULE 5

Testing of hypothesis

( 12 hours)

Populations and Samples Hypothesis level of significance type I and type II error Large samples
tests test of significance for single proportion, difference of proportion, single mean, difference of mean
chi square test for variance- F test for equality of variances for small samples
References
1. Bali& Iyengar A text books of Engg. Mathematics Laxmi Publications Ltd.
2. M.K. Venkataraman Engg. Mathematics vol II 3rd year part A & B National Publishing
Co.
3. I.N. Sneddon Elements of partial differential equations Mc Graw Hill
4. B.V. Ramana Higher Engg. Mathematics Mc Graw Hill
5. Richard A Johnson Miller Freads probability & Statistics for Engineers- Pearson/ PHI

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

T. Veerarajan Engg. Mathematics Mc Graw Hill


G. Haribaskaran Probability, Queueing theory and reliability Engg. Laxmi Publications
V. Sundarapandian - probability ,Statistics and Queueing theory PHI
H.C.Taneja Advanced Engg. Mathematics Vol II I.K.International
A.K.Mukhopadhyay-Mathematical Methods For Engineers and Physicists-I.K.International

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 402: Object Oriented Programming


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the basic concepts of object oriented programming in C++.

To provide sufficient knowledge about developing real world projects with object
oriented concepts.
Module I (8 hours)
Introduction to OOP - Evolution of object oriented languages - Need of Objects - Definition
of Object-Oriented Language Classes and Objects Creating and Using Classes and objects
Member functions and variables Constructors multiple and parameterized constructorscopy constructors constructors with default arguments- Destructors.
Module II (13 hours)
Inheritance and Access Control - Member access control in classes Friend functions and
classes Extending classes - Public Private and Protected Inheritance Classification of
Inheritance Single Multiple Multilevel Hierarchical Hybrid.
Module III (14 hours)
Polymorphism Runtime and compile time polymorphism overloading functions and
operators selecting friend member function for operator overloading - Virtual methods
pure virtual methods Abstract classes - applications of abstract classes.
Module IV (13 hours)
Virtual Destructors Virtual Base Classes - Template- class templates and function
templates- Creating and using templates Namespaces-Dynamic Objects - Dynamic object
allocation - Inline functions. Exception Handling-basics of exception handling-exception
handling mechanism- Throwing and Catching Mechanism-Rethrowing and Specifying
exceptions.
Module V (12 hours)
Data file operations opening and closing files-reading and writing from file-Classes and file
operations-Other object oriented languages Java Object oriented features in Java
Comparison with C++-Object oriented system development-object oriented notations and
graphs-object oriented analysis-object oriented design.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books

1.. Robert Lafore :Object Oriented Programming in C ++, 3rd Edition, Galgotia Pub, New Delhi
2. E. Balaguruswamy : Object oriented Programming with C++,2nd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill,
New Delhi, 2004
3. Dilkeshwar Pandey,Upendra K Tiwari, Object Oriented Programming with Java, Acme
Learning (Module V), New Delhi ,2010
4. D Ravichandran: Programming with C++ , 3rd Edition ,Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi
5. Bjarne Stroustrup , The C++ Programming Language, 3rd Edition..,
6. Randal Albert, Todd Breedlove: C++ ,An Active Learning Approach, Jones And Bartlett
Publishers, New Delhi ,2010
7. Deitel & Deitel, C++ How To Program, Introducing Object-Oriented Design with the UML, 3rd
Edition Pearson
8. Matt Weisfeld: The Object Oriented Thought Process ,3rd Edition,Pearson Education, New
Delhi ,2009
9. Jyoti Singh: Object Oriented Systems & Concepts of C++; Acme Learning, New Delhi,2010
10. Poornachandra Sarang: Object Oriented Programming with C++, 2nd Edition, PHI, New
Delhi,2009
11. R. Rajaram, Object Oriented Programming and C++,2nd Edition,,New Age International
Publishers, New Delhi,2007
12. E. Balaguruswamy, Programming with Java, 2nd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi
13. Bhushan Trivedi, Programming with Ansi C++ ,Oxford Higher Education, New Delhi,2007

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 403: Data Structures and Algorithms


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the basic concepts of data structures and algorithms

To develop understanding about writing algorithms and step by step approach in


solving problems with the help of fundamental data structures.

Module I (10 hours)

Principles of programming System Life Cycle - Performance Analysis and


Measurements- Time and Space complexity-Complexity calculation of simple
algorithms. Hashing:- Static Hashing-Hash Tables-Different Hash Functions-Mid SquareDivision-Folding-Digit Analysis, Collision-Collision Resolution Techniques.
Module II (12hours)

Study of basic data structures Arrays- Structures-Sparse matrix Stacks QueuesCircular queues- Priority queues - Dqueues. Evaluation of expressions Polynomial
representation using arrays.
Module III (12hours)

Linked Lists - Linked stacks and queues - Doubly linked lists Polynomial
representation using linked lists, Garbage collection and Compaction.
Module IV (14 hours)

Trees - Binary Trees Tree Traversal Inorder - Preorder and Postorder,


Search trees - AVL Trees, height balanced trees, Multiway search Trees- B Trees-B+ Trees.

Graphs Depth first and breadth first search.


Module V (12 hours)

Sorting methods: Selection sort, Bubble sort, Insertion sort, Merge sort, Quick sort,
Heap sort, Radix sort, External sorting methods.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

Horowitz ,Sahni & Anderson Freed, Fundamentals of Data Structures in C, 2nd ed.,
Universities Press, Hyderabad, 2009
Rajesh K Shukla, Data Structures Using C & C++ ,Wiley India, New Delhi, 2009
Yedidyah Langsam, Moshe J Augenstein, Aron M Tenenbaum, Data Stuctures using C and
C++, 2nd ed., PHI Learning Private Limited, New Delhi, 1996
G. A. V Pai, Data Structures and Algorithms Concepts, Techniques and Applications, Tata
McGraw Hill , New Delhi, 2008
G. S Baluja, Data Structures Through C, Dhanpat Rai & Co. , New Delhi, 2009
Sartaj Sahni , Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++ , 2nd ed., Universities Press,
Hyderabad, 2009
Michael T Goodrich, Roberto Tamassia, David Mount, Data Structures and Algorithms in C++,
Wiley India Edition, New Delhi, 2009
B.M. Harwani, Data Structures and Algorithms in C++, Dreamtech Press, New Delhi, 2010
Brijendra Kumar Joshi, Data Structures and Algorithms in C, McGraw Hill , New Delhi, 2010
K R Venugopal, K G Srinivasa, P M Krishnaraj, File Structures using C++, McGraw Hill ,
New Delhi, 2009
ISRD Group, Data Structures using C, McGraw Hill , New Delhi, 2010
Sudipta Mukherjee, , Data Structures using C 1000 Problems and Solutions, Tata McGraw Hill
, New Delhi, 2010
Seymour Lipschutz, Data Structures with C, Schaums Outlines, McGraw Hill , New Delhi,
2010
R Krishnamoorthy & G Indirani Kumaravel, Data Structures using C, McGraw Hill , New
Delhi, 2008
John R Hubbard, Data Structures with C++, Schaums Outlines, Tata McGraw Hill , New
Delhi, 2010
Jean Paul Tremblay & Paul G Sorenson, An Introduction to Data Structures with Applications,
2nd ed., Tata McGraw Hill , New Delhi, 2010
Seymour Lipschutz, Data Structures , Schaums Outlines, Tata McGraw Hill , New Delhi,
2006

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

CS010 404 SIGNALS AND COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

Teaching scheme

Credits: 4

3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Objectives:To introduce the fundamentals of Analog and Digital Signals ,their properties and
introduce the relevant transforms used in Communication.
To familiarize the core ideas of Communication Engineering which in turn adds to
the study of Computer Communication.
Module 1 (15 hrs):Introduction to Signals:- Continuous Time Signals- Discrete Time Signals- Signal
Operations- Properties of Signals(Periodicity and Symmetry), Frequency Domain Representation
of Continuous Time Signals-Continuous Time Fourier Series(CTFS)- Definition- propertiesExamples, Continuous Time Fourier Transform(CTFT)- Definition- Properties ExamplesConcept of Frequency Spectrum, Sampling- The Sampling Theorem(proof not required)Quantisation
Module 2 (12 hrs):Communication Systems:- Architecture of a Typical Communication System Basic
problems in Signal Transmission - Noise Types of Noise- Internal and External Noise, Cross
Talk- Typical parameters of Communication Systems- Signal propagation Delay, Signal to Noise
Ratio, Attenuation, Bandwidth
Communication Channels:- Twisted Pairs- Coaxial Cables- Fiber Optic Cables- Capacity
of a Noisy Channel- Shannon Hartley Theorem
Module 3: (15 Hrs)
Modulation- Need for Modulation
Analog Modulation- Types of analog modulation- Amplitude Modulation, Frequency
modulation, Phase modulation, Pulse Modulation Schemes- Pulse Amplitude modulation(PAM),
Pulse Width Modulation(PWM), Pulse Position Modulation(PPM), Pulse Code
Modulation(PCM),Delta modulation, Sample problems based on different modulation methods.
Digital modulation;- Amplitude Shift Keying(ASK), Frequency Shift keying(FSK),Phase
Shift Keying(PSK), Quadrature Amplitude modulation (QAM), Differential Phase Shift
Keying(DPSK)
Module 4: (8 Hrs)

Multiplexing:-Time
Division
Multiplexing(TDM)Multiplexing(FDM)- Wavelength Division multiplexing(WDM)

Frequency

Division

Switching:- Circuit, Packet and Message Switching Schemes, Case Study:- SONET(
Basic ideas only)- Datagrams and virtual Circuits
Digital Transmission:- Analog to Digital Converter(ADC), Serial and parallel
Transmission- Simplex, Half Duplex and Full Duplex Transmissions.
Module 5: (10 Hrs)
Error Correction and Detection;- Line Coding Schemes- Block Coding- Convolution
Coding- Hamming Codes
Transmission Codes:- Different Character Codes- ASCII, EBCDIC, Baudot Code, Bar
Coding, Parity Coding
Reference Books
1.

S.Haykin and B. V. Veen, Signals and Systems, John Wiley & Sons, N. Y., 2002

2. George Kennedy, Bernard Davis - Electronic Communication Systems-Tata McGraw


Hill
3. Behrouz Forouzan- Data Communication and Networking- Tata McGraw Hill
4. Michael J Roberts, Govind Sharma- Fundamentals of Signals and Systems-Tata
McGraw Hill
5. William Stallings- Data and Computer Communications- Prentice Hall of India
6. Fred Halsall- Digital Communication, Computer Networks and Open Systems
Pearson Education
7. Taub and Schilling Principles of Communication Systems- Tata McGraw Hill
8. Kolimbiris H.- Digital Communication Systems- Pearson Education

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010405: Microprocessor Systems


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the basic concepts of microprocessors and interfacing concepts.

To develop an understanding about the assembly level programming.


Module I (10 hours)
Architecture of 8085 Registers. Instruction set of 8085 - Instruction Types
Arithmetic Logic data transfer, Branch, Stack, I/O and Machine Control instructions
- Addressing Modes - Direct and Indirect Addressing - Immediate Addressing Implicit Addressing.
Module II (12 hours)
Subroutines - Stack Operations - Call Return sequence- Programming Examples.
Timing and control unit The fetch operation Machine cycle and T- State
instruction and data flow. Address space partitioning - Memory mapped I/O - I/O
mapped I/O.
Module III (14 hours)
Interrupts of 8085 - Hardware & Software Interrupts Enabling, Disabling and
masking of interrupts Polling HALT & HOLD states Programmable interrupt
controller 8259.
Module IV (12 hours)
Data transfer schemes - Programmed data transfer - synchronous and asynchronous
transfer - interrupt driven data transfer DMA data transfer. Study of Interfacing ICs
8257,8255 programmable peripheral interface (compare it with 8155).
Module V (12 hours)
Programmable interval timer 8253, 8251 -,Interfacing Keyboard and display devices,
Hardware and Software approach USART 8251. (interfacing chips functions and
internal block diagram only).

Reference Books

1. Gaonkar -Microprocessor Architecture, Programming and Applications with the 8085


- New Age International
2. Renu Singh, B. P. Singh -Microprocessors, interfacing and Applications
New Age International-Third Edition
3. N K Srinath -8085 Microprocessors programming and interfacing - PHI
4. Adithya P. Mathur -Introduction to Microprocessors Systems - PHI
5. KK Tripathi, Rajesh K Gangwar -Microprocessorand its Applications -Acme learning
6. R.Theagarajan,S.Dhanasekaran,S.Dhanapal Microprocessor and ITS Applications
New Age International
7. N Senthil Kumar,M saravanan,s.jeevananthan-Microprocessor and microcontrollers
-Oxford higher education

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS 010 406: Theory of Computation


(Common with IT010 404)
Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the basic concepts of theory of automata ,languages and computation.

To develop understanding about machines for sequential computation, formal


languages and grammars , and classification of feasible and intractable problems.
Module I (10 hours)
Proving techniques-Mathematical induction -Diagonalization principle Pigeonhole principleFunctions Primitive recursive and partial recursive functions Computable and non
computable functions-Formal representation of languages Chomsky Classification.
Module II (13 hours)
Introduction to Automata theory Definition of Automation Finite Automata Language
acceptability by Finite Automata Deterministic and Nondeterministic finite automationRegular Expressions Finite Automation with -Transitions Conversion of NFA to DFA Minimisation of DFA-DFA to Regular Expressions conversion-pumping lemma for regular
languages Applications of finite automata-NFA with o/p ( moore /mealy)
Module III (12 hours)
Context Free Grammar Simplification of CFG-Normal forms-Chomsky Normal form and
Greibach Normal form- pumping lemma for Context free languages- Applications of PDA Pushdown Automata Formal definition Language acceptability by PDA through empty
stack and final state Deterministic and nondeterministic PDA designing of PDAModule IV (13 hours)
Turing Machines Formal definition Language acceptability by TM TM as acceptors,
Transducers - designing of TM- Two way infinite TM- Multi tape TM - Universal Turing
Machines- Churchs Thesis-Godelization.- - Time complexity of TM - Halting Problem -

Rice theorem - Post correspondence problem-Linear Bounded Automata.


Module V (12 hours)

Complexity classes- Tractable problems Class P P Complete-Reduction problemContext grammar nonempty-Intractable problems- Class NP NP Complete- Cooks
theorem-Reduction problems-SAT-Clique-Hamiltonian-TSP-Vertex Cover-NP Hard
problems.
.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books

1. K.L.P. Mishra, N. Chandrashekharan , Theory of Computer Science , Prentice Hall


of India
2. Michael Sipser, Introduction to the Theory of Computation, Cengage
Learning,New Delhi,2007
3. Harry R Lewis, Christos H Papadimitriou, Elements of the theory of computation,
Pearson Education Asia,
4. Rajendra Kumar,Theory of Automata Language & Computation,Tata McGraw
Hill,New Delhi,2010
5. Wayne Goddard, Introducing Theory of Computation, Jones & Bartlett India,New
Delhi2010
6. Bernard M Moret: The Theory of Computation, Pearson Education
7. John Hopcroft, Rajeev Motwani & Jeffry Ullman: Introduction to Automata
Theory Languages & Computation , Pearson Edn
8. Raymond Greenlaw,H. James Hoover, Fundamentals of Theory of
Computation,Elsevier,Gurgaon,Haryana,2009
9. John C Martin, Introducing to languages and The Theory of Computation, 3rd
Edition, Tata McGraw Hill,New Delhi,2010
10. Kamala Krithivasan, Rama R, Introduction to Formal Languages,Automata
Theory and Computation, Pearson Education Asia,2009
11. Rajesh K. Shukla, Theory of Computation, Cengage Learning, New Delhi,2009
12. K V N Sunitha, N Kalyani: Formal Languages and Automata Theory, Tata
McGraw Hill,New Delhi,2010
13. S. P. Eugene Xavier, Theory of Automata Formal Language & Computation,New
Age International, New Delhi ,2004

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 407: Data Structures Lab


Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per week

Credits: 2

Objectives

To provide experience on design, testing, and analysis of Algorithms and Data


Structures.

To acquaint the students with the Data Structures used in the Computer
Science field.
1) Representation of Polynomials using Arrays and Linked List and the
different operations that can be performed on Polynomials
2) Representation of Sparse Matrix using Arrays and Linked List and the
different operations that can be performed on Sparse Matrices
3) Representation of Stacks using Arrays and Linked List and the
different operations that can be performed on Stacks
4) Representation of Queues using Arrays and Linked List and the
different operations that can be performed on Queues
5) Representation of Double Ended Queue using Arrays and Linked List
and the different operations that can be performed on Double Ended
Queue
6) Representation of Priority Queues using Arrays and Linked List and
the different operations that can be performed on Priority Queues
7) Representation of Binary Trees using Arrays and Linked List and the
different operations that can be performed on Binary Trees
8) Representation of Graphs using Arrays and Linked List and the
different operations that can be performed on Graphs
9) Infix, Postfix and Prefix conversions.
10) Different Sorting and Searching methods.
11) String representation using Arrays and Linked List and different
pattern matching algorithms
12) Implementation and operations on B-Tree and B+Tree
Any experiment according to the syllabus of CS010 403 can be substituted.

Syllabus B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

CS010 408(EC) ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS AND COMMUNICATION LAB


Teaching scheme

Credits: 2

3 hours Practical per week

Objectives:To provide an introduction to Electronic Circuits Design thereby giving a hands on


experience on working with various Electronic Components, and Devices
PART 1 (Electronic Circuits):1. Design of Two Stage RC Coupled Amplifiers
2. Design of FET Amplifiers
3. Design of Bootstrap Sweep Generators
4. Design of Astable, Monostable, and Bistable Multivibrators ( 3 experiments)
5. Design of Oscillators(RC Phase Shift Oscillator, Hartley Oscillator, Colpitts Oscillator 3
experiments)

PART 2 (Communication Engineering):1. Amplitude Modulation


2. Frequency Modulation
3. Delta Modulation
4. Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM)
5. Pulse Width Modulation (PWM)
6. Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK)
7. Phase Shift Keying (PSK)
Note: - A minimum of 5 experiments from each part must be done.
Reference Books:-

1. Boylestead and Nashelky- Electronic Devices and Circuits- Prentice Hall of


India
2. George Kennedy - Electronic Communication Systems - TMH

EN010501 B

Engineering Mathematics IV

(CS, IT)

Teaching scheme

Credits: 4

2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week


Objectives: To use basic numerical techniques for solving problems and to know the importance of
learning theories in mathmatics and in queueing system.
MODULE 1

(12 hours)

Finite differences

Finite difference operators

- interpolation using Newtons forward and backward formula

Newtons divided difference formula - Numerical differentiation using Newtons forward and backward
formula Numerical integration Trapezoidal rule Simpsons 1/3rd and 3/8th rule
MODULE 2

(12 hours)

Z transforms

Definition of Z transforms transform of polynomial function and trignometric functions shifting


property , convolution property - inverse transformation solution of 1st and 2nd order difference
equations with constant coifficients using Z transforms.
MODULE 3

(12 hours)

Discrete numeric functions

Discrete numeric functions Manipulations of numeric functions- generating functions


Recurrence relations Linear recurrence relations with constant coefficients Homogeneous
solutions Particular solutions Total solution solution by the method of generating functions.
MODULE 4

Complex integration

(12 hours)

Functions of complex variable analytic function - Line integral Cauchys integral theorem
Cauchys integral formula Taylors series- Laurents series Zeros and singularities types
of singularities Residues Residue theorem evaluation of real integrals in unit circle
contour integral in semi circle when poles lie on imaginary axis.
MODULE 5 Queueing Theory

(12 hours)

General concepts Arrival pattern service pattern Queue disciplines The Markovian model
M/M/1/ , M/M/1/N steady state solutions Littles formula.

References
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

C.L.Liu and D.P. Mohapatra Elements of Discrete Mathematics - Mc Graw Hill


S.Lipschutz, M.L.Lipson Discrete mathematics Schaums outlines Mc Graw Hill
B.V. Ramana - Higher Engg. Mathematics McGraw Hill
Babu Ram Engg. Mathematics -Pearson.
K Venkataraman- Numerical methods in science and Engg -National publishing co

6. V. Sundarapandian - probability ,Statistics and Queueing theory - PHI


7. S.Bathul text book of Engg.Mathematics Special functions and complex variables PHI
8. H. Weif HSU probability, random variables & Random processes Schaums out lines Mc Graw Hill
9. T.Veerarajan - probability ,Statistics & Random processes - Mc Graw Hill
10. H.C.Taneja Advanced Engg. Mathematics Vol II I.K.International

Mahatma Gandhi University

EN010 502(ME): Principles of Management


(Common with EN010 402(ME))
Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week
Objectives

Credits: 4

To develop an understanding of different functional areas of management.


To understand the functions and duties an individual should perform in an
organisation.

Module I (12 hours)


Management Concepts: Vision, Mission, Goals and Objectives of management-MBOScientific management- Functions of management- Planning- Organizing- StaffingDirecting- Motivating- Communicating- Coordinating- Controlling- Authority and
Responsibility- Delegation- Span of control- Organizational structure- Line, Line and staff
and Functional relationship.
Module II (12 hours)
Personnel Management: Definition and concept- Objectives of personnel managementManpower planning- Recruitment and Selection of manpower- Training and development of
manpower- Labour welfare- Labour turnover- Quality circle- Industrial fatigue- Industrial
disputes-Method of settling disputes- Trade unions.
Module III (12 hours)
Production management: Objectives and scope of production management- Functions of
production department- production management frame work- product life cycle-Types of
production- Production procedure- Project planning with CPM and PERT- Basic concepts in
network.
Module IV (12 hours)
Financial Management: Objectives and Functions of Financial Management- Types of
Capital- Factors affecting working capital- Methods of financing.
Cost Management: Elements of cost- Components of cost- Selling Price of a product.
Module V (12 hours)
Sales and Marketing Management: Sales management- Concept- Functions of sales
department- Duties of sales engineer- Selling concept and Marketing concept- MarketingDefinition and principles of marketing- Marketing management and its functions- Sales
forecasting- Pricing- Advertising- Sales promotion- Channels of distribution- Market
research.
Text Books
1. Koontz and Weihrich, Essentials of Management, Tata McGraw Hill.
2. Mahajan M., Industrial Engineering and Production Management, Dhanpat Rai and Co.
3. Kemthose and Deepak, Industrial Engineering an Management, Prentice Hall of India.
Reference Books
1. Martand Telsang, Industrial Engineering and Production Management.
2. Khanna O.P., Industrial Engineering and Management, Dhanpat Rai and Co.
3. Philip Kotler, Marketing Management, Prentice Hall of India.
4. Sharma S. C. & Banga T. R., Industrial Organisation and Engineering Economics,
Khanna Publishers.
5. Prasanna Chandra, Financial Management, Tata McGraw Hill.
Syllabus - B.Tech. Mechanical Engineering

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 503: Database Management Systems


(Common with IT010 506)
Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart an introduction to the theory and practice of database systems.

To develop basic knowledge on data modelling and design of efficient relations.

To provide exposure to oracle database programming.


Module I
(10 hours)
Basic Concepts - Purpose of Database Systems- 3 Schema Architecture and Data
Independence- Components of DBMS Data Models, Schemas and Instances-Data Modeling
using the Entity Relationship Model-Entity types, Relationship Types, Weak Entity Types .
Module II
(14 hours)
Relational Model Concepts Constraints Entity Integrity and Referential Integrity,
Relational Algebra -Select, Project, Operations from Set Theory, Join, OuterJoin and Division
- Tuple Relational Calculus.
SQL- Data Definition with SQL - Insert, Delete and Update Statements in SQL, Defining
Domains, Schemas and Constraints, Constraint Violations - Basic Queries in SQL - Select
Statement, Use of Aggregate functions and Group Retrieval, Nested Queries, Correlated
Queries Views.
Module III
(12 hours)
Oracle Case Study : The Basic Structure of the Oracle System Database Structure and its
Manipulation in Oracle- Storage Organization in Oracle.- Programming in PL/SQL- Cursor in
PL/SQL - Assertions Triggers.
Indexing and Hashing Concepts -: Ordered Indices, Hash Indices, Dense and Sparse Indices,
Multi Level Indices, Cluster Index, Dynamic Hashing.
Module IV
(11 hours)
Database Design Design Guidelines Relational Database Design Functional
Dependency- Determination of Candidate Keys, Super Key, Foreign Key, Normalization
using Functional Dependencies, Normal Forms based on Primary keys- General Definitions
of First, Second and Third Normal Forms. Boyce Codd Normal Form Multi-valued
Dependencies and Forth Normal Form Join Dependencies and Fifth Normal Form Pitfalls
in Relational Database Design.
Module V
(13 hours)
Introduction to Transaction Processing- Transactions- ACID Properties of TransactionsSchedules- Serializability of Schedules- Precedence Graph- Concurrency Control Locks and
Timestamps-Database Recovery
Query processing and Optimization- Translating SQL Queries into a Relational Algebra
Computing Select, Project and Join
Object Relational Databases-Distributed Databases-Different Types-Fragmentation and
Replication Techniques-Functions of DDBMS.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books
1. Elmsari and Navathe, Fundamentals of Database System, Pearson Education Asia,
5th Edition, New Delhi, 2008.
2. Henry F Korth, Abraham Silbershatz , Database System Concepts, Mc Graw Hill

6td Edition, Singapore, 2011.


3. Elmsari and Navathe, Fundamentals of Database System, Pearson Education Asia,
3rd Edition, New Delhi,2005, for oracle
4. Alexis Leon and Mathews Leon, Database Management Systems, Leon vikas
Publishers, New Delhi.
5. Narayanan S, Umanath and Richard W.Scamell, Data Modelling and Database
Design,Cengage Learning, New Delhi, 2009.
6. S.K Singh,Database Systems Concepts,Design and Applications, Pearson Education
Asia, New Delhi, 2006.
7. Pranab Kumar Das Gupta, Datbase management System Oracle SQL And
PL/SQL, Easter Economy Edition, New Delhi, 2009
8.

C.J.Date , An Introduction to Database Systems, Pearson Education Asia, 7th Edition, New
Delhi.

9. Rajesh Narang, Database Management Systems, Asoke K ghosh , PHI Learning, New
Delhi, 2009.
10. Ramakrishnan and Gehrke, Database Management Systems, Mc Graw Hill, 3rd Edition ,
2003.
11. Peter Rob and Carlos Coronel, Database Systems, Thomson Course Technology,
7th Edition, 2007.
12. Satinder Bal Guptha and Adithya Mittal, Introduction to Database Management
System, University Science Publishers, New Delhi, 2010.
13. Patrick ONeil and Elizabeth ONeil, Database Principles, Programming and
Performance, Morgan Kaufmann, 2nd Edition, New Delhi,2010 .
14. Ramon A Mata-Toledo and Pauline K Cushman, Schaums OUTlines Database
Management Systems, Tata Mc Graw Hill , New Delhi, 2007.
15. Michel Kifer, Philip M. Lewis, Prabin K .Panigrahi and Arthur Bernstein, Database
Systems An Application Oriented Approach, Pearson Education Asia, 2nd Edition,
New Delhi, 2008.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 504(EC) DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives:- To introduce the principles and core areas of Signal Processing, in a


programmatic approach and explore the basic ideas on the applications of DSP in various fields
of Science and Technology.
Module 1: (12 Hrs)
Introduction to Signals & Systems:- Continuous Time Signals and Discrete Time SignalsGeneration of Discrete Time Signals Sampling, Elementary Discrete Time Signals- Operations
on Discrete Time Signals- Convolution- Discrete Time Systems -Properties of Discrete Time
Systems-Linearity, Time invariance-Causality-Stability- Linear Time Invariant (LTI) Systems
Difference Equation representation of LTI Systems -The Z transform-Properties of Z transformInverse Z transform-System Transfer function.
Module 2: (12 Hrs)
Frequency Domain Representation of Discrete Time Signals:- Discrete Time Fourier
Transform (DTFT) properties, Discrete Fourier Transform(DFT) properties& Fast Fourier
Transform( FFT) Decimation in Time &Decimation in Frequency algorithms.
Module 3(13Hrs)
Finite Impulse Response Filter:- FIR Filters with Linear Phase, Need of Linear Phase, FIR Filter
Design Methods- Fourier Series Method Window Method- Design of FIR Filters using Rectangular,
Triangular,Hamming, Hanning, Blackmann and Kaiser Windows. Realization of FIR Filter- Direct,
Linear Phase and Cascade Realizations.

Module 4: (13 Hrs)


Infinite Impulse Response Filters:- Steps in IIR Filter Design, Conversion of Analog Filter to Digital
Filter- Impulse Invariant and Bilinear Transformations, Analog Filter Design ApproximationsButterworth and Chebyshev Approximations., Realization of IIR Filter- Direct, Cascade and Parallel
Realizations.

Module 5(10 Hrs)


Introduction to DSP Chips: - Basic Architecture of a DSP chip, Case Study: TMS 320, TigerSHARC
Processors (Overview of Architecture and Features)
Applications of DSP:- Audio Signal Processing and Compression, Image Processing- JPEG
Compression, Video Compression, Speech Processing and Recognition, Weather Forecasting, RADAR,
(Brief idea only)

Text Books

1. Oppenheim A. V., Schafer R. W., Discrete-Time Signal Processing- PrenticeHall/Pearson.

2. Andreas Antoniou Digital Signal Processing Tata McGrawHill

Reference Books
1.
2.

S.K. Mithra Digital Signal Processing , A Computer Based Approach TataMcGraw Hill
John G. Proakis, Dimitris G. Manolakis, Digital Signal Processing: Principles, Algorithms
and Applications, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., 1997

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 505: Operating Systems


(Common with IT010 504)
Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To understand the fundamental concepts and techniques of Operating Systems.


To study the basic structure of Linux system.

Module I (8 hours)
Introduction: Operating System Batch, Multiprogrammed, Time-sharing and Real time
systems Operating system structure Operating system operations
System Structures: Operating system service System calls System Programs System
structure Simple structure, Layered approach Kernel, Shell.
Module II (12 hours)
Process Management: Process concept Process state, PCB Process scheduling
Operations on processes Interprocess communication Multithreading Benefits, Models
Process Scheduling: Basic concepts Preemptive scheduling, Dispatcher Scheduling
criteria Scheduling algorithms Multiple-processor scheduling.
Module III (16 hours)
Process Synchronization: The Critical-Section problem Petersons solution
Synchronization Hardware Semaphores Classic problems of synchronization Monitors
Deadlocks: System model Deadlock characterization Methods for handling deadlocks
Prevention, Avoidance and Detection Recovery from deadlock.
Module IV (14 hours)
Memory Management: Resident Monitor Dynamic loading Swapping Contiguous
memory allocation Paging Basic, Multi-level Paging Segmentation
Virtual Memory Demand Paging Page Replacement algorithms Allocation of Frames
Thrashing Cause of thrashing.
Module V (10 hours)
File System: File concept Access methods Directory structure Directory
implementation Linear list, Hash table Disk scheduling
Case study: Linux system.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books
1. Abraham Silberschatz, Peter B.Galvin and Greg Gagne, Operating System Concepts, John
Wiley & Sons Inc, 8th Edition 2010.
2. D M Dhamdhere, Operating Systems A Concept-based Approach, Tata McGraw Hill, New
Delhi, 2nd Edition, 2010.
3. Achyut S Godbole, Operating Systems, Tata McGraw Hill , New Delhi, 2nd Edition, 2009.
4. Elmasri, Carrick, Levine, Operating Systems A Spiral Approach, Tata McGraw Hill, New
Delhi, First Edition 2010.
5. Gary Nutt, Operating Systems, Second Edition, Addison Wesley, 2003.
6. Andew S. Tanenbaum, Modern Operating, Pearson Education, Second Edition, 2001.
7. Promod Chandra P.Bhatt, An introduction to Operating Systems Concepts and Practice, PHI,
New Delhi, Third Edition, 2010
8. B Prasanalakshmi, Computer Operating System, CBS Publishers, New Delhi, First Edition,
2010
9. D P Sharma, Foundation of Operating Systems, EXCEL BOOKS, New Delhi, First Edition
2008
10. Brian L Stuart, Operating Systems Principles, Design and Applications, Cengage Learning,
New Delhi, First Edition 2009.
11. Charles Crowley, Operating Systems A Design Oriented Approach, Tata McGraw Hill, New
Delhi, First Edition 2009.
12. Pabitra Pal Choudhaury, Operating Systems Principles and, Design, PHI, New Delhi, First
Edition, 2009

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 506: Advanced Microprocessors & Peripherals


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To understand the concepts related to advanced microprocessors.

To study the basic technology of various peripherals.

To have an overview of different types of communication buses and ports.


Module I (15 hours)
8086 Architecture, Block diagram Addressing modes Instructions set of 8086 data
transfer arithmetic branch loop flag manipulation shift & rotate string instructions
writing simple program in 8086.
Module II (9 hours)
Additional features of 80286 protected mode memory addressing Additional features of
80386 Paging mechanism (Flat memory model) Additional features of Pentium
Processors Brief study of latest processors of Intel & AMD Dual core processor(Brief idea
only) .
Note: Architecture not required for the processors discussed in this module.
Module III: Peripherals (11 hours)
Study of motherboards Different types of ports, slots and connectors Processor Bus, AGP,
PCI Add-on cards USB Hard Disk Interfaces IDE, ATA, Power supply SMPS
function & operations.
Module IV: Storage Devices (15 hours)
Magnetic data storage: Principles Hard disks Cylinders Clusters Tracks and Sectors
Disk formatting Partitioning Hard disk drive operation Data Transfer rates Data
addressing CHS addressing Logical Block Addressing.
Optical storage: CD Technology, CD ROM, CD-R, CD-RW, Interface Magneto optical
drives DVD RAID Blu-ray disc.
Module V (10 hours)
Memory: Parity ECC Memory Addressing 640 KB barrier Extended and Expanded
memory HMA Video memory Flash Memory Pen drive Advanced memory
technologies.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books
1. A K Ray, K M Bhurchandi, Advanced Microprocessors and Peripherals, Tata McGraw Hill,
New Delhi, 2nd Edition, 2010.
2. Craig Zacker & John Rourke, PC Hardware: The Complete Reference, Tata McGraw
Hill, New Delhi, First Edition, 2001.
3. Barry B.Brey, The Intel Microprocessors, PHI, New Delhi, Sixth Edition, 2004.
4. Nilesh B. Bahadure, Microprocessors, PHI, New Delhi, First Edition, 2010.
5. K.K Tripathi, Rajesh K Gangwar, Microprocessor and Its Application, Acme Learning,2010
6. Douglas V Hall, Microprocessors and Interfacing, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2nd
Edition, 2006
7. Scott Mueller, Upgrading and Repairing PCs, Pearson Education, 17th Edition, 2006
8. Stephen J.Bigelow, Troubleshooting, Maintaining and Repairing PCs, Tata McGraw Hill,
New Delhi, 5th Edition, 2001

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 507 Database Lab


Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per week

Credits: 2

Objectives

To acquaint the students with the implementation and fundamental algorithms of


database systems.
To provide experience on design, querying, and processing of data in a relational
database.

I. Experiments to implement the following


1.
2.
3.
4.

Relational algebra operations select, project and join.


Determination of Attribute Closure, Candidate Key, Functional Dependency.
Checking Serializability of a Schedule.
Dynamic Hashing.

II. Experiments in any relational database for the following


1. Creation, Insertion, Updation, Deletion of Tables, Indexes, Views.
2. Simple Queries, Nested Queries, Use of Arithmetic and String Functions.
3. Simple PL/SQL Programs, Use of Exceptions, Cursor, Procedure, Function, Trigger,
Sequence.
4. Report Generation
5. ODBC/JDBC Interface.
Any experiment according to the syllabus of CS010 503 can be substituted.
Resources:
1 SQL,PL/SQLIvan Bayross, BPB Publication 3rd Ed.

Syllabus B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 508: Hardware and Microprocessors Lab


Teaching scheme
3 hours
(i) practical per week
(ii)
Objectives

Credits: 2

To acquaint the students with the implementation and fundamental algorithms of database
systems.
To provide experience on design, querying, and processing of data in a relational
database.
To familiarise the students with 8085,8086,masm programming and various PC hardware

components

To provide experience on design, querying, and processing of data in a relational


database.

Phase I
1. Familiarization of 8085 training Kit.
2. Simple programs using 8085 Kit.
Phase II
3.Study of MASM Programming.
4.Simple programs in 8086 using MASM.
Phase III.
5.Familiarisation with PC Components.
6.Experiments based on various hardware components.
7.Experiments for communication with peripheral devices using C and MASM
NB: Students should do the experiments in all the phases. External examiner can conduct University
Examinations on any of these phases.

Syllabus B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 601: Design And Analysis Of Algorithms


(Common with IT010 605)
Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives
To develop an understanding about basic algorithms and different problem solving
strategies.
To improve creativeness and the confidence to solve non-conventional problems and
expertise for analysing existing solutions.
Module I
(13 hours)
Introduction and Complexity
What is an algorithm Properties of an Algorithm, Development of an algorithm, Pseudocode Conventions, Recursive Algorithms Performance Analysis - Space and Time
Complexity Asymptotic Notations Oh, Omega, Theta, Worst, Best and Average Case
Complexity, Running Time Comparison, Common Complexity Functions -Recurrence
Relations Solving Recurrences using Iteration and Recurrence Trees Example Problems
Profiling - Amortized Complexity.
Module II
(11 hours)
Divide and Conquer - Control Abstraction, Finding Maximum and Minimum, Costs
associated element comparisons and index comparisons, Binary Search, Divide and Conquer
Matrix Multiplication, Stressens Matrix Multiplication, Quick Sort, Merge Sort.
Refinements.
Module III
(14 hours)
Greedy Strategy - Control Abstraction, General Knapsack Problem, Minimum Cost
Spanning Trees PRIMs Algorithm, Kruskals Algorithm, Job sequencing with deadlines.
Dynamic Programming - Principle of Optimality, Multistage Graph Problem, Forward
Approach, Backward Approach, All-Pairs Shortest Paths, Traveling Salesman Problem.
Module IV
(11 hours)
Backtracking State Space Tree - Fixed Tuple and Variable Tuple Formulation - Control
Abstraction Generating Function and Bounding Function - Efficiency of the method Monte Carlo Method N-Queens Problem, Sum of Subsets.
Branch and Bound Techniques FIFO, LIFO, and LC Control Abstractions, 15-puzzle.
Module V
(11 hours)
Sophisticated Algorithms - Approximation Algorithms Planar Graph Coloring, Vertex
cover - String Matching Algorithms Rabin Karp algorithm - Topological Sort Deterministic and Non-Deterministic Algorithms.
Lower Bound Theory - Comparison Trees for Searching and Sorting, lower bound on
comparison based algorithms, Sorting, Selection & Merging; Oracles and Adversary
Arguments Merging,Basic concepts of randomized algorithm-Las Vagas algorithm for
search.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books
1. Ellis Horowitz and Sartaj Sahni, Sanguthevar Rajasekaran, Fundamentals of Computer
Algorithms,Universities Press, 2nd Edition, Hyderabad .
2. Thomas Coremen, Charles, Ronald Rives, Introduction to algorithm, PHI Learning
3. Sara Baase & Allen Van Gelder , Computer Algorithms Introduction to Design and
Analysis, Pearson Education..
4. Anany Levitin, Introduction to The Design & Analysis of Algorithms, Pearson
Education, 2nd Edition, New Delhi, 2008.
5. Berman and Paul, Algorithms, Cenage Learning India Edition, New Delhi, 2008.
6. S.K.Basu , Design Methods And Analysis Of Algorithms ,PHI Learning Private Limited,
New Delhi,2008.
7. Jon Kleinberg and Eva Tardos, Algorithm Design, Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2006.
8. Hari Mohan Pandey, Design Analysis And Algorithms, University Science Press, 2008.
9. R. Panneerselvam, Design and Analysis of Algorithms, PHI Learning Private Limited, New
Delhi, 2009.
10. Udit Agarwal, Algorithms Design And Analysis, Dhanapat Rai & Co, New Delhi, 2009.
11. Aho, Hopcroft and ullman, The Design And Analysis of Computer Algorithms, Pearson
Education, New Delhi, 2007.
12. S.E.Goodman and S. T. Hedetmiemi, Introduction To The Design And Analysis Of
Algorithms, McGraw-Hill International Editions, Singapore 2000.
13. Richard Neapolitan, Kumarss N, Foundations of Algorithms, DC Hearth &company.
14. Sanjay Dasgupta, Christos Papadimitriou, Umesh Vazirani, Algorithms, Tata McGraw-Hill
Edition.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 602: Internet Computing


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the basic concepts of Internet Computing and Java Programming

To develop understanding about Internet Computing with the help of Java


Platform and establishing network connections using Socket Programming

Module I (10hours)

Introduction to Java- Genesis of Java- Features of Java Data Types-Variables and


Arrays-Operators- Control Statements Selection Statements Iteration StatementsJump Statements.
Module II (12 hours)

Creating & using classes in Java Methods and Classes Inheritance Super Class
Method Overriding Packages and Interfaces Implementing Interfaces- Exception
Handling Exception Types, Threads-Multithreaded programs, Thread Priorities and
Thread synchronization.
Module III (14hours)

I/O I/O Basics Byte Streams and Character Streams, Reading Console Input,
Collections Framework, Applets & Applet Architecture-Applet Skelton- Passing
Parameters to Applet, Event Handling-Event Model- Event Classes Event Listener
Interfaces, AWT AWT Classes AWT Controls Layout Managers and Menus.
Swing- JApplet Jbuttons - JTables.
Module IV (13 hours)

Network Programming with Java Socket Programming in Java-Client SocketsServer Sockets- Secure Server Sockets- TCP/IP Programming with Java Datagrams,
IP multicasting, Remote Method Invocation.
Module V (11 hours)

Advanced Java Programming Accessing Databases with JDBC, Servlets, Image


processing using Java Image Filter Web Application development using Java
Technolgies- Java Server Faces.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books

1) Herbert Schildt, Java 2 Complete reference, 5th ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi,
2010
2) Deitel & Deitel Java How To Program 7th ed., Pearson Education ,New Delhi, 2008
3) Cay Horstmann Big Java 3rd ed., Wiley India Edition, New Delhi, 2009
4) Y Daniel Liang Introduction to Java Programming 7th ed., Pearson Education ,New
Delhi, 2010
5) R Krishnamoorthy, S Prabhu Internet & Java Programming, New Age International
Publishers, New Delhi, 2008
6) Rajkumar Buyya, S Thamarai Selvi, Xingchen Chu, Object Oriented Programming
with Java, McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2009
7) P Radha Krishna, Object Oriented Programming through Java Universities Press,
Hyderabad2008
8) Debasish Jana, Java and Object Oriented Programming Paradigm, Prentice Hall of
India, New Delhi, 2005
9) G Thomas Wu, An Introduction to Object Oriented Programming with Java,4th ed.,
Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2010
10) E Balagurusamy, Programming with Java A Primer, 4th ed., McGraw Hill, New
Delhi, 2010
11) John R Hubbard, Programming with Java, 2nd ed., Schaums Outlines, Tata
McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2004

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University


CS010 603 SYSTEM SOFTWARE
Teaching scheme

Credits: 4

3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Objectives:To introduce the techniques adopted in the design and implementation of System
Software.
Module I (12 Hrs)
Introduction:System Software Vs. Application Software, Different System Software, Macro
Processor, Assembler, Linker, Loader, Text Editor, Debugger, Device Driver, Compiler,
Interpreter[1] Database Management System, Operating System,[2]
Macro Preprocessor
Macro Instruction Definition and Invocation. Types of Macros Parameterised
macros, Nested macros, Recursive macros. Basic functions of Macro Preprocessor Macro
expansion, Generation of unique labels. Macro preprocessor design and Algorithm - Handling
conditional Macro calls, Nested Macro calls and Recursive Macro calls.[Reference (1)] Case Study :
The C Preprocessor [Web- Reference (1) ]
Module - II (15 Hrs)
Assembler
Assembly Language Concepts Mnemonic Instructions, Assembler Directives and
Literals. Instruction formats and Addressing modes. Program Blocks and Control Sections. Basic
Functions of Assembler. Assembler output format Header, Text and End Records. Assembler
Design 2 Pass Assembler Necessity of two passes and Forward reference. Algorithm for the two
passes. Single Pass Assembler Algorithm for Single Pass assembler. Handling External references
usage of Define and Refer records. Multi pass Assembler, Macro Assembler.[Reference (1)] Case
Study : Microsoft Macro Assembler for MS-DOS [Reference (1), (5)] - Microsoft OBJ file format
(Basic Structure and Important Records Only) [ Reference(2)].
Module - III (12 Hrs)
Linker and Loader
Need for Linking and Loading : The absolute loader, Program Relocation, Relocating
Loader, Linking external symbols. Algorithms for the two passes of a Linking Loader.[References
(2),(3)] Variants of the basic model Automatic Library Search, Linkage Editor, Dynamic Linking.
[Reference(1)] Case study : UNIX ELF and Microsoft DLL (basic structure only).
Module - IV (11 Hrs)
Text Editors : Overview of Editing, User Interface, Editor Structure. [Reference (1)]
Case Study : VI Editor (Basic ideas only)[ Reference (1)]
Debuggers : Debugging Functions and Capabilities, Relationship with other parts of the
system, Debugging Methods- By Induction, Deduction and Backtracking, . [Reference (1) ,(8)] Case
Study : gdb (Basic ideas only)

Mahatma Gandhi University


Module - V (10 Hrs)
Device Driver : Device Characteristics ,Design and anatomy, Types of device driver,
General Design Character Devices and character device drivers, Block Devices and Block device
drivers. Case Study: Device Driver for the PC Speaker [References(4), (6),(7)]

REFERENCES:
1. System Software: An Introduction to Systems Programming Leland L. Beck, Pearson
Education Asia 3rd Edition.
2. Systems Programming and Operating Systems D.M. Dhamdhere, Tata McGraw Hill
Second Revised Edition.
3. Systems Programming John J. Donovan, Tata McGraw Hill Edition 1991.
4. Writing UNIX device drivers - George Pajari -Pearson Education Asia.
5.

IBM PC Assembly Language and Programming - Peter Abel Third Edition Prentice
Hall of India

6. Linux Device Drivers - Jonathan Corbet, Alessandro Rubini, Greg Kroah-Hartman


Third Edition - O.Reilly Books
7. Linux Kernel Internals- M. Beck, H. Bohme, M .Dziadzka, et al Second Edition
Addison Wesley
8. System Software J Nithyashri Second Edition- Tata McGraw Hill
WEB REFERENCE:
1. http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-2.95.3/cpp_1.html The C Preprocessor

Note: separate subjects are provided in the syllabus in the Seventh and Fifth Semesters for the
detailed discussion of the subjects marked [1] and [2] respectively.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 604: Computer Networks


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives
To develop basic knowledge on the mode of operation of different types of computer
networks that are used to interconnect a distributed community of computers and
various interfacing standards and protocols.
Module I (8 hours)

Network requirements, Network Architecture layering and protocol, OSI


Architecture, Internet Architecture, Performance-bandwidth and latency , Delay x
bandwidth product, high speed networks .
Module II (10 hours)
Direct Link Network, Hardware Building Block, Framing-Byte Oriented Protocol,
Bit Oriented Protocol , Clock Based Framing, Reliable Transmission-Stop and Wait,
Sliding Window, Ethernet(802.3)-Physical properties, Access protocol, WirelessBluetooth, WiFi, Wimax
Module III (12 hours)

Packet Switching-Switching and Forwarding- Datagram, virtual circuit switching,


Source routing Bridges and LAN Switches-Learning Bridges, Spanning tree
Algorithms ,Broadcast and Multicast, Limitations of bridges, Simple InternetworkingService Model, Global Address, Datagram Forwarding in IP, address translation,
Routing-network as graph, distance vector, link state, matrix
Module IV (16 hours)

End to End Protocol, Simple de-multiplexer, Reliable Byte stream, TCP-Issues,


segment format, connection establishment and termination sliding window revisited,
triggering transmission, adaptive retransmission, RPC-fundamentals ,TCP Congestion
control additive increase, slow start, fast retransmit and fast recovery, congestion
avoidance mechanism, DEC bit, Random Early Detection bit, Source Based
Congestion avoidance
Module V (14 hours)

Applications -WWW, E-mail, Name Service, Network Management, Web Services


Custom Application protocol, Generic Application Protocol ,Overlay Networks-Peer
to Peer Networks.
Reference Books

1.Computer Networks A Systems Approach-Larry L.Peterson and Bruce S.Davie,4th


Edition .Morgan Kaufman
2. Introduction to data communication and networking Behrouz Forozan TMH.
3 .Computer networks ,Andrew S Tanenbaum ,PHI
4.Data communication, computer networks and open systems, Halsall F ,Addison Wesley.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 605 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING


Teaching scheme

Credits: 4

3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Objectives:To familiarize the steps in designing a Computer Software System following the
conventions in Engineering Design.
To introduce the fundamentals of Structured and Object Oriented Designs and
Design Tools.
Module I (12 Hrs)
The Evolving role of Software Software The changing Nature of Software Legacy
software ,Introduction to CASE tools, A generic view of process A layered Technology A Process
Framework The Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Process Assessment Personal
and Team Process Models. Product and Process. Process Models The Waterfall Model
Incremental Process Models Incremental Model The RAD Model Evolutionary Process Models
Prototyping The Spiral Model The Concurrent Development Model Specialized Process
Models the Unified Process.
Module - II (12 Hrs)
Management: Functions - Project planning - Software productivity - Productivity metrics Cost estimation - COCOMO & COCOMO II - Project control - Work breakdown structures, Gantt
charts, PERT charts - Dealing with deviations - Team organization - centralized, de-centralized,
mixed - An assessment of organizations - Risk management Configuration Management.
Introduction to project management and planning CASE tools.
Module - III (12 Hrs)
Requirements Engineering : Requirements Engineering tasks Initiating the requirements
Engineering Process-Eliciting Requirements Developing Use cases Building the Analysis Models
Elements of the Analysis Model Analysis pattern Negotiating Requirements Validating
Requirements. SRS Document.
Module - IV (12 Hrs)
Design activity & its objectives Function Oriented and Object Oriented DesignModularization techniques - module structure and its representation, interface and information
hiding, categories, specific techniques to accommodate change, stepwise refinement, top-down and
bottom-up design - Handling anomalies. Case Study with UML and CASE Tool support.
Module - V (12 Hrs)
Implementation Techniques - Programming principles and guidelines Structured
Programming. Software Testing Fundamentals-Test Case Design-White-Box Testing-Basis Path
Testing-Control Structure Testing- Black-Box Testing- Various levels of Testing : Modules to
System. Case study : Test case design and Testlog preperation

Mahatma Gandhi University

References
1. Roger S.Pressman, Software Engineering: A Practitioners Approach, McGraw Hill
International edition, Seventh edition.
2. Ian Sommerville, Software Engineering, 8th Edition, Pearson Education, 2008
(UNIT V)
3. Stephan Schach, Software Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill, 2007
4. Pfleeger and Lawrence Software Engineering: Theory and Practice, Pearson
Education, second edition, 2001

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 606L01: DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart an introduction to distributed systems and distributed computing.

To develop basic knowledge on distribution of data and file systems in distributed


environment.

To provide exposure to distributed database concepts.


Module I
(10 hours)
Introduction to Distributed Systems, evolution, characteristics, design issues, user
requirements, Distributed computing models-workstation model, workstation-server model,
processorpool model. Protocols for distributed systems -VMTP and FLIP.
Module II
(12 hours)
Client server communication, Group communication, IPC - Message passing features.
RPC model, implementation, stub generation, RPC messages, communication protocols
marshalling.
Distributed shared memory Architecture, design issues, thrashing, replacement strategy.
Synchronization clock synchronization, event ordering, mutual exclusion.
Module III
(14 hours)
Distributed file system: Components of DFS, design issues, interfaces, implementation, File
Caching and Replication. Sun Network File System architecture and implementation,
Google File System. Naming- Namespace and contexts and name resolution.
Module IV
(12 hours)
Distributed system management: Features of scheduling algorithms, Task assignment
approach, load balancing, load sharing, Process migration mechanisms, Threads design
issues, Fault tolerance failures, Byzantine failures.
Module V
(12 hours)
Distributed Databases: Distributed DBMS architecture, distributed query processing,
transactions, concurrency control, deadlock management and Distributed Database Recovery
protocols-2PC, Network Partitioning.
Reference Books
1. Sunita Mahajan, Seema shah, Distributed Computing ,Oxford University Press, first
edition, 2010
2. George
Coulouris, Jean Dellimore and Tim Kindberg, Distributed Systems
Concepts and designing, Pearson Education Asia, fourth Edition 2006, New Delhi.
3. Pradeep. K, Sinha, Distributed Operating Systems ,PHI Edition, first Edition,1997.
4. Andrew S Tenenbaum, Distributed Operating Systems, Pearson Education Asia

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 606L02

Micro controller Based Systems

(Common with EE010 503 and EC010 502)


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the basic concepts of microcontrollers and their programming in


assembly language and in C.

It also focused on the 8051 microcontroller which is a widely used microcontroller.


Pre-requisites: Microprocessor systems, Advanced microprocessor and peripherals
Module I (10 hours)
Microcontroller - Features of 8051-Arcchitecture of 8051-Pin diagram of 8051-memory
organization-External memory interfacing-stacks- addressing modes-instruction set.
Module II (12 hours)
8051 programming in C-data types and time delay I/O programming logical operation
data conversation program basics of serial communication connection to RS232- serial port
programming in assembly and C.
Module III (14 hours)
Basics of interrupts,-interrupt sources- interrupt enable register-interrupt priority-interrupt
control system-interrupt handling-single step operation- port bit latches and buffers-port
structures and operation- accessing external memory.
Module IV (12 hours) Timer 0& -Timer1- T MOD SFR-mode0,mode 1,mode2,mode3TCON SFR-serial interface-SCON SFR-mode0,mode 1,mode 2,mode3-block schematicsbaud rates-power on reset circuit-ONCE mode-on chip oscillator-external program & data
memory timing diagrams.
Module V (12 hours)
PIC microcontrollers: Overview and features-PIC16C6X/7X FSR-Reset action-PIC memory
organization-instructions-addressing modes.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Muhammad Ali mazidi, Janice Gillispie Mazidi, Rolin D Mc kinlay , The 8051 microcontroller
and embedded systems,person, second edition., 2006
V Udayashankara,M S Mallikarjunaswamy ,8051 Microcontroller hardware &software
application,TMH
Ajay V Deshmukh,Microcontrollers, theory and applications,TMH
Kennath J Ayala, The 8051 microcontroller., Penram International
1 Satish Shah,8051 microcontrollers MCS 51 family and its variants ,Oxford higher
education

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 606L03: User Interface Design


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the basic concepts of User Interface Design.

To develop understanding about human computer interaction methods that utilize


more general, widespread and easier-to-learn capabilities.
Module I (8 hours)
Introduction: Importance of user interface definition, importance of good design, brief
history Graphical User Interface Web User Interface Theories, Principles and Guidelines
of User interface design
Module II (10 hours)
Design Process: Obstacles in development path deigning for people-Understanding Human
Interaction with computers, Importance of Human Characteristics, Human consideration,
Human Interaction speeds Understanding Business function
Module III (15 hours)
Screen Designing: Design goals - screen meaning and purpose, organizing screen elementsordering of screen data and content screen navigation and flow visually pleasing
composition amount of information focus and emphasis presenting information simply
and meaningfully information retrieval on web Statistical graphics Technological
considerations in Interface Design.
Module IV (15 hours)
Menus and navigation schemes-structures of menus-functions of menus- contents of menus
- formatting of menus phrasing the menu- selecting menu choices-navigating menus-kinds
of graphical menus- Selection of windows-Window characteristics-components of windowwindow presentation styles-types of windows-window management-organising window
functions-window operations-Selection of device based and screen based controls - text and
messages icons and images Multimedia colours- uses, problems, choosing colours.
Module V (12 hours)
Distributed and Collaborative Interaction-Device consistency-distribution of the user
interface-event distribution-graphical package layer-programmable API-Model semantics
distribution-data layer distribution-asynchronous collaboration-Software tools-specification
methods- interface building tools evaluation and critiquing tools-Interaction deviceskeyboard and function keys - pointing devices- speech recognition, digitization and
generation image and video displays printers.

Reference Books
1. Wilbert O. Galitz,The Essential
Guide to User Interface Design, 2nd Edn., Wiley
Dreamtech,Delhi,2002
2. Ben Shneiderman, Designing the User Interface ,3rd Edn., Pearson Education Asia,Delhi,2002
3. Dan R. Olsen, Human Computer Interaction,Cengage,New Delhi,2009
4. John M. Carroll,Human Computer Interaction, Pearson Education Asia, Delhi,2002
5. Alan Cooper, The Essentials of User Interface Design , Wiley Dreamtech, Delhi,2002
Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science and Engineering

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 606L04 : UNIX Shell Programming


(Common with IT010 606L03)
Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To provide a fair knowledge of Unix concepts and gain sharp skills in Unix Shell
programming

Module 1. (8 hours)
Introduction to Unix:- Architecture of Unix, Features of Unix , Basic Unix Commands - Unix
Utilities:- Introduction to unix file system, vi editor, file handling utilities, security by
file permissions, process utilities, disk utilities, networking commands - Text
processing utilities and backup
Module 2. (13 hours)
Introduction to Shells:-Unix Session, Standard Streams, Redirection, Pipes, tee Command,
Command Execution, Command-Line Editing, Quotes, Command Substitution, Job
Control, Aliases, Variables, Predefined Variables, Options, Shell/Environment
Customization. Regular expressions, Filters and Pipes, Concatenating files, Display
Beginning and End of files, Cut and Paste, Sorting, Translating Characters, Files with
Duplicate Lines, Count characters, words or lines, Comparing Files.
Module 3. (12 hours)
grep:-Operation,
grep
Family,
Searching
for
File
Content.
sed:-Scripts, Operation, Addresses, commands, Applications, grep and sed.
awk:-Execution, Fields and Records, Scripts, Operations, Patterns, Actions,
Associative Arrays, String Functions, Mathematical Functions, User Defined
Functions, Using System commands in awk, Applications of awk, grep and sed
Module 4. (15 hours)
Interactive Shells - Korn Shell, C Shell and BASH - Shell Features, Special Files, Variables,
Output, Input, Exit Status of a Command, eval Command, Environmental Variables,
Options, Startup Scripts, Command History, Command Execution Process.
Shell Programming - Korn Shell, C Shell and BASH Basic Script concepts, Expressions, Decisions: Making Selections, Repetition, special
Parameters and Variables, changing Positional Parameters, Argument Validation,
Debugging Scripts, Script Examples.
Module 5. (12 hours)
Process management:- Creation, Hierarchies, Sending signals to processes, exec, termination,
Zombie, waitpid etc - Network management:- tools, Client server mechanism, address
resolution, ping, telnet, ftp, dns and squid X Window System:- Overview,
Architecture, starting and stopping X, X clients and display

Syllabus - B.Tech. Information Technology

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books

Behrouz A. Forouzan, Richard F. Gilberg, Unix and shell Programming., Cengage


Learning
2. Sumitabha Das , Unix the ultimate guide, TMH. 2nd Edition.
3. Kernighan and Pike, Unix programming environment, PHI. / Pearson Education
4. Graham Glass, King Ables, Unix for programmers and users, 3rd edition, Pearson
Education
5. Maurice J. Bach, The Design of the Unix Operating System, First Edition,
Pearson Education, 1999
1.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Information Technology

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 606L05: Embedded Systems


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the basic concepts of Embedded System and its applications

To develop understanding about micro controllers and programming the micro


controller for the development of Embedded systems.

Module I (-12 hours)


Introduction to Embedded Systems-Classification of Embedded Systems-Application areas of
Embedded Systems, Typical Embedded System- Memory-Sensors and Actuators-Embedded
Firmware - Characteristics and Quality Attributes of Embedded Systems
Module II (13 hours)
Application Specific Embedded System Domain Specific Embedded System, Designing
Embedded Systems with 8bit Microcontrollers- Factors to be considered in selecting a
Controller- Designing with 8051 microcontroller- 8052 microcontroller, Programming the
8051 microcontroller Addressing modes of 8051 the 8051 Instruction set
Module III ( 13 hours)
Hardware Software Co-Design and Program Modeling Computational models in Embedded
Design, Embedded Hardware Design and development Electronic Design Automation
Tools, Embedded Firmware Design and Development - Embedded Firmware Design
Approaches - Embedded Firmware Development Languages Programming in Embedded C.
Module IV (12 hours)
Real Time Operating System based Embedded System Design Operating System Basics
Types of Operating Systems Tasks- Process- Threads Multiprocessing and Multitasking
Task Scheduling Task Communication Task Synchronization Introduction to Vx Works
and Micro C/OS-II RTOS
Module V (10 hours)
The Embedded System Development Environment Integrated Development Environment ,
The Embedded Product Development Life Cycle EDLC- Objectives of EDLC Different
phases of EDLC Modeling the EDLC

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books
1. Shibu K V, Introduction to Embedded Systems, McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2009
2. Raj Kamal, Embedded Systems Architecture, Programming and Design, 2nd ed., Tata
McGraw Hill , New Delhi, 2008
3. Frank Vahid & Tony Givargis, Embedded System Design A Unified Hardware/Software
Introduction, Wiley - India Edition, New Delhi, 2010
4. Wayne Wolf , Computers as Components Principles of Embedded Computing System
Design, , 2nd ed., Elsevier, Gurgaon, 2009
5. Steven F Barrett & Daniel J Pack , Embedded Systems Design and Applications with the
68HC12 and HCS12, Pearson Education, Delhi, 2008.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 606L06: Advanced Software Environments


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the basic concepts of Windows programming..

To develop understanding about the new software environment


software to meet the growing demand of the industry.

and develop of

Pre-requisites: Knowledge required to study this subject (OOP concepts))


Module I (10 hours)
Windows Programming Components of Windows API- Distinction with ordinary programs
Event Driven Programming WinMain Function Creating Windows Message loop
Window procedures - Menus & Buttons Drawing on Windows, Advanced User Interface
concepts, Developing application issues and solutions.
Module II (10 hours)
MFC Features & Advantages MFC Classes Life cycle of an MFC application The
CWinApp Classes Creating windows Message maps and event handling Menus &
Buttons - Drawing on MFC windows Handling mouse & Keyboard events.
Module III (13 hours)
X-Windows Clients & Servers - Basic Architecture of X-Windows systems Layers in
XWindows Architecture XWindows Programming Simple Hello World Application in X.
Command line options and resources connecting to X-Display creating windows and
graphics context Handling events creating child windows.
Module IV (13 hours)
CORBA Introduction Features Fundamental concepts in Distributed objects CORBA
IDL stub & Skeleton - implementing a simple CORBA server and CORBA client with C++.
Module V (14 hours)
CORBA object reference Managing references at server CORBA factories CORBA
object creation in C++ & JAVA CORBA Exceptions Destroying CORBA objects comparison of CORBA & DCOM Architectures.

Reference Books
1. Yashwanth Kanetkar , Visual C++ Programming ,BPB Publications ,New Delhi, 2005.
th
2. Mike Blaszczals, Professional MFC with Visual C++ 6, 4 Edition, Shroff publishers &

Distributors Private Limited, New Delhi, 2003.


nd

3. Nabajyoti Bakakati, X Window System programming , 2

Edition, Prentice-Hall of India

Private Limited,New Delhi, 2001.


4. Jason Pritchard ,COM & CORBA side by side , Pearson Edition New Delhi, 2000.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science and Engineering

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 607: Operating Systems Lab


Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per week

Credits: 2

Objectives

To provide a practical exposure of all algorithms and behaviour of processes in the


system with respect to all its timings.

This lab also explains the allocation of process in the memory with some memory
management techniques.
(Implement the following on LINUX platform. Use C for high level language implementation)
1. Basic UNIX commands
2. Shell programming
- Command syntax
- Write simple functions with basic tests, loops, patterns
3. Write programs using the following system calls of UNIX operating system:
fork, exec, getpid, exit, wait, close, stat, opendir, readdir
4. Write programs using the I/O system calls of UNIX operating system (open, read, write, etc)
5. Write C programs to simulate UNIX commands like ls, grep, etc.
6. Given the list of processes, their CPU burst times and arrival times, display/print the Gantt
chart for FCFS and SJF. For each of the scheduling policies, compute and print the average
waiting time and average turnaround time
7. Given the list of processes, their CPU burst times and arrival times, display/print the Gantt
chart for Priority and Round robin. For each of the scheduling policies, compute and print the
average waiting time and average turnaround time
8. Implement the Producer Consumer problem using semaphores.
9. Implement inter-process communication using shared memory.
10. Implement some memory management schemes
Example for expt 10:
Free space is maintained as a linked list of nodes with each node having the starting byte
address and the ending byte address of a free block. Each memory request consists of the
process-id and the amount of storage space required in bytes. Allocated memory space is
again maintained as a linked list of nodes with each node having the process-id, starting byte
address and the ending byte address of the allocated space.
When a process finishes (taken as input) the appropriate node from the allocated list should be
deleted and this free disk space should be added to the free space list. [Care should be taken to
merge contiguous free blocks into one single block. This results in deleting more than one
node from the free space list and changing the start and end address in the appropriate node].
For allocation use first fit, worst fit and best fit.

Syllabus B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

CS010 608 Mini Project


Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per week

Credits: 2

Objectives

To estimate the ability of the student in transforming the theoretical knowledge


studied so far into application software.

For enabling the students to gain experience in organisation and implementation of a


small project and thus acquire the necessary confidence to carry out main project in
the final year.

To understand and gain the knowledge of software engineering practices, so as to


participate and manage large software engineering projects in future.

In this practical course, each group consisting of two/three members (four in special cases) is
expected to design and develop practical solutions to real life problems related to industry, institutions and
computer science research. Software life cycle should be followed during the development. The theoretical
knowledge, principles and practices gained from various subjects should be applied to develop effective
solutions to various computing problems. The knowledge gained during various practical subjects to work
with various software tools, Designing tools, programming languages, operating systems, etc. should be
utilized in various stages of development. Structured/ Object Oriented design techniques may be used for
the project. Software Requirements Specification (SRS), Modeling Techniques, Design and Testing
strategies should be documented properly.
A committee consisting of minimum three faculty members will perform the internal assessment
of the mini project. A report on mini project should be submitted for evaluation and project work should be
presented and demonstrated before the panel of examiners.

Internal Continuous Assessment (50 marks)


40% - Design and development (30% by guide and 10% by committee)
30% - Final result and Demonstration (15% by guide and 15% by committee)
20% - Report (10% by guide and 10% by committee)
10% - Regularity in the class (by guide)
End Semester Examination (Maximum Marks-100)
20% 50% 20% 10% -

Demonstration of mini project


Practical test connected with mini project
Viva voce
Project report

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 701: Web Technologies


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart the new concepts in Web Technologies


To develop understanding about the different technologies used in the World Wide Web
including XML, Perl,
Module I (15hours)

XHTML

Evolution of HTML and XHTML- Standard XHTML Document Structure- Basic


Text Markup- Images-Hypertext Links-Lists- Tables- Forms- Frames.
Cascading Style Sheets
Introduction to CSS Levels of Style Sheets- Style Specification Formats- Selector
Forms- Property Value Forms Font Properties- List Properties Color- Alignment
of Text Background Images- Span and Div Tags.
Module II (12 hours)

XML

Introduction to SGML features of XML - XML as a subset of SGML XML Vs


HTML Views of an XML document - Syntax of XML- XML Document Structure
Namespaces- XML Schemas- simple XML documents Different forms of markup
that can occur in XML documents - Document Type declarations Creating XML
DTDs Displaying XML Data in HTML browser Converting XML to HTML with
XSL minimalist XSL style sheets XML applications
Module III (12hours)

Perl

Origin and Use of Perl- Scalars and their Operations Assignment Statements and
Simple Input and Output Control Statements- Fundamentals of Arrays HashesReferences- Functions- Pattern Matching File Input and Output Simple programs
in Perl -Using Perl for CGI Programming.
Module IV (12 hours)
PHP

Origin and Use of PHP- Overview of PHP- General Syntactic CharacteristicsOperations and Expressions- Control Statements- Arrays- Functions-Pattern
Matching- Form Handling- Files-Cookies-Session Tracking - Simple programs in
PHP.
Module V (9 hours)

Rails
Overview of Rails- Document Requests- Processing Forms- Rails Application with
Databases Layouts.
Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Ajax
Overview of Ajax Basics of Ajax Rails with Ajax.
Reference Books

1) Robert W Sebesta, Programming with World Wide Web , 4th ed., Pearson Education
,New Delhi, 2009
2) Deitel & Deitel Internet & World Wide Web How To Program 4th ed., Pearson
International Edition Education ,New Delhi, 2009
3) Deitel & Deitel, Nieto, Lin, Sadhu, XML How to Program, Pearson Education ,New
Delhi, 2011
4) Kogent Learning Solutions Inc, Web Technologies Black Book, Dreamtech Press,
New Delhi, 2009
5) Chris Bates, Web Programming Building Internet Applications 3rd ed., Wiley India
Edition, New Delhi, 2009
6) Phil Ballard, Michael Moncur, Sams Teach Yourself Ajax, JavaScript and PHP,
Pearson Education ,New Delhi, 2009.
7) Achyut S Godbole , Atul Kahate, Web Technologies TCP/IP Architecture and Java
Programming, 2nd ed., Tata McGraw Hill Education Private Limited, New Delhi,
2010
8) Pankaj Sharma, Introduction to Web Technology, Katson Books, New Delhi, 2008
9) Bankim Patel, Lal Bihari Barik, Introduction to Web Technology & Internet, Acme
Learning Private Limited, New Delhi, 2009

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 702: COMPILER CONSTRUCTION


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

1.) To introduce the various techniques involved in the translation of source programs into
object programs by a compiler.
2.) To understand the inner working of a compiler using the various data structures used in the
translation process.

Module 1 (12Hrs)
Introduction to compilers:-Phases of a compiler-Analysis and synthesis phases-Lexical
analysis and its role-Review of finite automation and Regular Expressions-Specification of
tokens using regular expressions-Implementing lexical analyzer using finite automationDesign of lexical analyzer using LEX
Module 2 (12 Hrs)
Syntax analyzer-Role of syntax analyzer-Review of context free grammar-derivation and
parse trees-Basic parsing approaches-Top down parsing-Recursive Descent parsing LL(1)
parsing-Bottom up parsing-Shift reduce parsing-Operator precedence parsing-LR parsingSimple LR, Canonical LR and LALR parsers- Design of syntax analyzer using YACC
Module 3 (12 Hrs)
Semantic analysis-Need for semantic analysis-Syntax directed definitions-S attributed
definitions- L- attributed definitions-Translation schemes-Type system and Type checkingDesign of a simple type checker
Storage Management:-Memory allocation strategies (static, stack and heap allocations)Memory allocation in block structured languages-Accessing local and non local data-Array
allocation and access-Procedure calls-Parameter passing methods-Runtime stack and
storage management
Module 4(12 Hrs)
Synthesis phase:-Intermediate Code Generation (ICG)-Need for ICG-IC Formats-3 Address
code-Triples and quadruples
Code optimization:-Need for code optimizer-Basic blocks and program flow graphMachne dependent and machine independent optimizations-Optimization transformationsLocal and global optimizations
Module 5(12 Hrs)
Code Generation-Basic issues in code generation-Data descriptors-Expression treesGenerating target code from expression trees-Symbol table handling-Symbol table
requirements and organization. Error handling-Types of errors-Compile time errors and
recovery-Runtime errors-Runtime Error Handling ,Cross Compilers and Incremental
Compilers(Brief idea only)
Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books

1.) .Aho A Ravi Sethi and J D Ullman, Compilers Principles Techniques and Tools,Addison Wesley
2.) Kenneth C Louden, Compiler Construction Principles and Practice, Cenage Learning
Indian Edition
3.) D M Dhamdhare, System programming and operating system, Tata McGraw Hill & Company
4.) Tremblay and Sorenson, The Theory and Practice of Compiler Writing - Tata McGraw Hill &
Company

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 703: COMPUTER GRAPHICS


Teaching
scheme

Credits: 3

2 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Objectives:To understand the basic concepts of Computer Graphics & display techniques.
Module I ( 3 Hrs)
Introduction: Applications of Computer Graphics, Raster scan and Random scan displays [1]
Video Display Devices, Display files graphical input & output devices-Flat panel displays,
Hardcopy Output Devices, Physical Interactive Devices , Data generation devices.[2]
Module II ( 10 Hrs)
2D Graphics: Output primitives-Line drawing algorithms DDA, Bresenhams Bresenhams
Circle drawing algorithm Other curves,polynomials and spline curves-2D viewing
transformation-clipping-Cohen-Sutherland
line
clipping
polygon
clipping-2D
Transformations[1]
Module III ( 12 Hrs)
3D Graphics: 3D Transformations, 3D display methods, 3D Object Representation Polygon
Surfaces Curved lines and surfaces-Quadric surfaces Spline Representations Cubic Spline
Interpolation Methods-Bezier Curves and Surfaces B-Spline Curves and Surfaces, Sweep
representation,Octrees.[1]

Module IV ( 10 Hrs)
3D Rendering: Three-Dimensional Viewing Projections [3], Visible Surface Detection
Classification of Visible surface detection algorithms Back-face Detection, Depth- Buffer
Method, Scan-line Method. [1,3]

Module V ( 10 Hrs)
Rendering: Surface Rendering Methods- Basic illumination Models Polygonrendering
Methods,Interpolative shading methods-Constant shading, Gouraud shading,Phong shading,
Texture Mapping.[3]
Fractal Geometry Methods Classification of Fractals Self-Squaring Fractals, Ray Tracing and
Ray Casting.[1]

Mahatma Gandhi University


REFERENCES:

1.
Computer Graphics (C version) - Donald Hearn & Pauline Baker (Pearson Education
Asia)

2.
Procedural Elements for Computer Graphics David F. Rogers, TATA McGraw Hill
edition-second edition.

3.
Computer Graphics - Zhigang Xiang & Roy A Plastack, Schaums Series McGraw
Hill edition.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 704 : Object Oriented Modeling and Design


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week
Objective

Credits: 3

To impart ideas on building systems through the object oriented modelling


approach using the Unified Modelling Language.

Module 1
(10 hours)
Introduction: object oriented development-modeling concepts object oriented
methodology models object oriented themes-Object Modeling links and associations
advanced links and association concepts generalization and inheritance - grouping
constructs a sample object model
Advanced Object Modeling: aggregation abstract classes generalization as extension
and restriction multiple inheritance metadata candidate keys constraints.
Module 2
(10 hours)
Dynamic modeling: Events and states Operations Nested state diagrams
Concurrency Advanced dynamic modeling concepts A sample dynamic model
Relationship of Object and Dynamic models.
Functional modeling: Functional models Data Flow Diagrams - Specifying operations
Constraints A sample functional model Relation of functional to Object and
Dynamic models.
Module 3
(10 hours)
Analysis: Analysis in object modeling, dynamic modeling and functional modeling,
Adding operations- Iterating the analysis
System Design: Breaking system into subsystems - Identifying concurrency-allocating
subsystems to processors and tasks, managing of data stores. Handling of global
resources- handling boundary conditions-Common Architectural Frameworks
Module 4
(8 hours)
Object Design: Overview of Object design Combining the three models Designing
algorithms Design optimization Implementation of control Adjustment of
inheritance - Design of association Object representation Physical packaging
Documenting design decisions-Comparison of methodologies
Module 5
(7 hours)
Unified Modeling language: Introduction, UML Diagrams Class diagrams, Sequence
diagrams, Object diagrams, Deployment diagrams, Use case diagrams, State diagrams,
Activity diagram, Component diagrams Case Study.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Book
1. Object Oriented Modeling and Design -James Rumbaugh, Prentice Hall India
2. UML Distilled Martin Fowler, Addison Wesley
3. Object- oriented Systems analysis and design using UML- 4th ed., Simon Bennet,Stephen
McRobb, Ray Farmer. TMH.
4. Object Oriented Analysis and Design with Applications - Grady Booch, Pearson Education
Asia

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

MahatmaGandhiUniversity

CS010 705: PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES


Teaching scheme

Credits: 3

2 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week.


Objectives

To provide an overview of the key paradigms used in developing modern programming languages.
To explore the implementation details of languages to provide an understanding of the source
program and its execution behavior.

Module I (9 Hours)
Introduction Role of programming languages - Programming domains - Language evaluation
criteria - Influence on language design - Implementation methods - Virtual computers - Bindings Concept of binding.
Module II (9 Hours)
Data types - Implementation of data types - Primitive, User defined Names Variables - Type
checking - Strong Typing - Type compatibility -Scope Lifetime - Referencing environments Named constants Virtualization - Heap management.
Module III (8 Hours)
Expressions , Assignments and Control Structures Arithmetic expressions Assignment
statements-Compound statements - Selection statements - Iterative statements Unconditional
branching Guarded commands.
Module IV (10 Hours)
Subprograms-Fundamentals-Design issues-Local Referencing Environment-Parameter passing
methods Subprogram names as parameters Overloaded Subprograms Generic Subprograms
Separate & independent compilation Design issues for functions Accessing non-local
environments User defined overloaded operators Co-routines.
Module V (9 Hours)
Implementation of Subprograms General semantics of calls & returns- Activation Records
Blocks Recursion
Exceptions and Programming Paradigms - Exception handling in C++, Java, PL/I, Ada ,
Fundamentals of Functional programming language Examples LISP Interpreter -Overview of
Logic programming - Basic elements of Prolog.

SyllabusB.Tech.ComputerScience&Engg.

MahatmaGandhiUniversity

q References
1. Robert W. Sebesta , Concepts of Programming Languages 4th Ed,2001.
2. Ravi Sethi Programming Languages-concepts and constructs, Addison Wesley, 2nd
Ed,1996.
3. Terrence W. Pratt , Programming Languages , Prentice Hall, 9th Ed,1996.
4. Michael L. Scott, Programming Language Pragmatics ,Elsevier, New Delhi,2009.
5. Thomson Learning, Kenneth .C. Louden, Programming Languages: Principles And Practices
, 2nd Ed,2011.
6. Bjarne StroutStrup ,Design and Evolution of C++, Addison Wesley,1991.
7. James Gosling, Java Programming Language , Addison Wesley,2000.

SyllabusB.Tech.ComputerScience&Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 706L01 : Real Time Systems


( Common to IT010 706L04 Real Time Systems)
Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

to learn , real-time operating systems, task scheduling, communication, fault


tolerant techniques and , programming languages

Module 1 (12 hours)


Introduction to Real Time Systems: Structure of real time systems, real time
computer, task classes Periodic, Aperiodic, critical, Non-critical, definition of real
time systems real time systems, embedded systems - Hard real time systems, soft
real time systems, real time design issues.
Module 2 (12 hours)
Task Assignment and Scheduling: Uniprocessor scheduling algorithms Rate
monotonic Scheduling, Preemptive Earliest Deadline First (EDF), IRIS Tasks.
Scheduling Aperiodic and Sporadic jobs in Priority Driven Sytems, Task AssignmentUtilization Balancing algorithm, Next Fit Algorithm for RM scheduling, Bin Packing
for EDF, Myopic Offline Scheduling(MOS), Focused Addressing and Bidding, Buddy
strategy. Fault Tolerant scheduling.
Module 3 (12 hours)
Communication Communication Media and message sending topologies, network
architecture issues, protocols contention based, token - based, stop and go multi
loop, polled bus, hierarchal round robin, fault tolerant routing clocks and
synchronization fault tolerant synchronization in hardware, synchronization in
software.
Module 4 (12 hours)
Fault tolerance definition, cause of failure, fault types, fault detection and
containment, redundancy hardware, software, time, information, integrated failure
handling. Reliability Evaluation techniques- Obtaining parameter values, Reliability
models for Hardware redundancy, software error models.
Module 5 (12 hours)
Programming Languages and Real Time databases Desired language
characteristics, Data Typing, Control Structures. Real time databases, characteristics,
main memory databases, Transaction, Disk schedule algorithms, Databases for hard
real time systems, maintaining serialization constituency.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

References
1. Real Time Systems - C.M Krishna, Kang G. Shini (Tata McGraw Hill)
2. Real Time Systems- Jane W.S. Liu(Pearson)

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 706L02: DATA MINING AND DATA WAREHOUSING


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart an introduction to Data Mining.

To develop basic knowledge of how data is transformed to Data Warehouses .


Module I (12 hours)
Data Mining- Data Mining Funtionalities-Classification of Data Mining Systems-Data
Mining Task Primitives- Major Issues in Data Mining
Data Preprocessing- Descriptive Data Summarization- Data Cleaning- Data Integration and
Transformation- Data Reduction- Data Discretization and Concept Hierarchy Generation
Module II

(14 hours)

Data Warehouse- A Multidimensional Data Model- Data Warehouse Architecture- Data


Warehouse Implementation
Data Cube Computation and Data Generalization- Efficient methods for Data Cube
Computation- Data Cube and OLAP Technology- Attribute Oriented Induction
Module III

(10 hours)

Mining Frequent Patterns-Associations- Correlations-Basic Concepts-Efficient and


Scalable Frequent Itemset Mining methods- Mining various kinds of Association Rules- From
Association Mining to Correlation Analysis- Constraint Based Association Mining.
Module IV

(12 hours)

Classification and Prediction- Issues regarding Classification and Prediction- Classification


by Decision Tree Induction- Bayesian Classification Rule Based ClassificationClassification by Backpropagation- Support Vector Machines- Classification by Association
Rule Analysis- Learning from Neighbors- Prediction- Accuracy and Error measuresEvaluating the accuracy of a Predictor- Ensemble methods- Model Selection.
Module V

(12 hours)

Cluster Analysis- Types of Data in Cluster Analysis- Catagorization of Major Clustering


methods- Partitioning methods- Hierarchical methods- Density based methods- Grid based
methods- Model based Clustering methods- Clustering High Dimensional Data- Constraint
based Cluster Analysis- Outlier analysis
Reference Books
1) Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber, Data Mining Concepts and Techniques, 2nd edtn. , Elsevier
New Delhi 2010

2) Alex Berson, Stephen J. Smith, Data Warehousing, Data Mining & OLAP Tata
McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi, 2008
3) Pieter Adriaans, Dolf Zantinge, Data Mining, Pearson Education Ltd., New Delhi,
2008
4) Thomas W Miller, Data and Text Mining, A Business Applications Approach,
Pearson Education Ltd., New Delhi, 2008
5) Galit Shmueli, Nitin R. Patel, Peter C. Bruce, Data Mining for Business Intelligence,
Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.,New Delhi 2009.
Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 706L03: Operating System Kernel Design


( common to IT010 706L05 Operating System Kernel Design )
Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To provide knowledge about the operating system working principles.

To discuss most of the significant data structures and algorithms used in the kernel.
Module I (13 hours)
Basic Operating System Concepts Kernel Types: monolithic, microkernel An Overview
of Unix Kernels-The Process/Kernel Model, Reentrant Kernels Signals sending and
receiving System calls System Call Handler and Service Routines - Interrupts and
Exceptions - Interrupt Handling - The Timer Interrupt Handler.
Module II (13 hours)
Processes - Process Descriptor - Process State, Process relationship Creating Processes Process Termination - Process Scheduling Scheduling algorithm SMP Scheduler.
Kernel Synchronization - Synchronization Techniques - Process Communication - System V
IPC.
Module III (10 hours)
Paging in Linux - Memory Management - Page Frame Management - The Buddy System
Algorithm - The Process's Address Space - The Memory Descriptor - Memory Regions - Page
Fault Exception Handler.
Module IV (14 hours)
Overview of the Unix File System - The Virtual File System - role of the VFS - VFS Data
Structures File system Mounting.
The Ext2 File system - Disk Data Structures - Creating the File system - Data Blocks
Addressing - Allocating a Data Block.
Module V (10 hours)
Managing I/O Devices - Associating Files with I/O Devices - Device Drivers - Character
Device - Block Device.
Disk Caches - Buffer Cache - Writing Dirty Buffers to Disk - Page Cache.

Reference Books
1) Daniel P. Bovet, Marco Cesati, Understanding the Linux Kernel, First ed.,
O'Reilly, 2000
2) M Bech et al., Linux Kernel Internals, 2nd ed., Addison-Wesley, 1998
3) Maurice J. Bach, The Design of the Unix Operating System, First Edition,
Pearson Education, 1999.
4) Abraham Silberschatz, Peter B.Galvin and Greg Gagne, Operating System
Concepts, John Wiley & Sons Inc, 8th Edition 2010.
Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 706L04 :

Digital image processing

Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives
To learn the image fundamentals and mathematical transforms necessary for image
processing.
To learn the image enhancement techniques and image restoration procedures.
To learn the image segmentation and representation techniques.
Module I (14 hours)
Digital image representation : Elements of digital image processing systems - Image
digitizers & scanners - Elements of visual perception - Brightness & contrast - colour
perception & processing - pixel based transformation geometric transformation image file
formats
Image sampling & Quantization - Two dimensional Sampling theorem - Reconstruction of
image from its samples Aliasing
Module II (14 hours)

Image Transforms : Two dimensional DFT & its properties - Walsh Transform,
Hadamard Transform, Discrete Cosine Transform, Haar, Slant, and Karhunen
Loeve transforms
Module III (10 hours)

Image Enhancement : Point processing - Histogram processing - Spatial Filtering


image subtraction - image averaging - Enhancement in the frequency domain - colour
Image processing.
Module IV (12 hours)
Image Restoration : Degradation model Diagonalization of circulant matrices - Inverse
filtering - Wiener filter methods Constrained least mean square filtering
Image Coding & Compression- basic principles Image compression: Run length coding ,
predictive coding ,Basics of Image compression standards:
Module V (10 hours)

Image analysis : Segmentation Thresholding point, line and edge detection


Boundary detection - Region Based segmentation - image reconstruction radon
transform projection theorem convolution filter back projection - Fourier
reconstruction method applications of image processing.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

References
1. Rafael C. Gonzalez - Richard E. Woods, Digital Image Processing, Pearson
Education
2. Dutta Majumdar - Digital Image Processing and Applications, PHI

3. Madhuri A. Joshi Digital Image Processing,PHI, New Delhi,2010


4. Anil K. Jain - Fundamentals of Digital Image processing," Prentice Hall India,
1989.
5. William K. Pratt - Digital Image Processing, John Wiley and sons, New delhi,
2010.
6. S.Jayaraman, S. Esakkiarajan. T. Veerakumar- Digital Image
Processing,TMH,New Delhi, 2010.
7. Rosenfield and A. C. Kak - Digital Picture Processing, 2nd edition, Vols. 1 & 2,
a. Academic Press, New York, 1982.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 706L05: DATA PROCESSING AND FILE STRUCTURES


Teaching scheme
Credits: 4
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week
Objectives
To develop an understanding about basic concepts of data processing in mainframe
system.
To enable the students to learn the detailed features of COBOL, database concepts.

Module I

(10 hours)

Introduction to mainframe system


IntroductionEvolution of Mainframe Systems, Introduction to COBOL & JCL,
COBOL/JCL Relation ,Compiling and Linking Programs in Mainframes, VSAMVSAM
Data SetsMainframes Operating Systems(over view), z/OS , OS/2 , MVS --Features
Module II

(14 hours)

Programming Concept
Mainframe ProgrammingIntroduction to COBOL, Structure of COBOL Programs,
COBOL words, Identification and Environment Division, Configuration Section, Inputoutput Section, Data Division, Level Structure File section, Assign to clause, Working
Storage section-Editing, Special-names paragraph, Usage clauseSynchronized, Justified,
Redefines, Renames clauses
Module III

(11hours)

Data Processing Concept


Procedure divisionData movement, Arithmetic, Sequence control , Input/Output
Conditional verbs, Group moves, Compute verb, Conditions, Table handling, Occur
clausePerform verb, Set verb, Writing simple COBOL programs
Module IV

(14 hours)

File Handling in Mainframes


File types Sequential, Direct, Indexed files, Using Files in COBOL Programs, File
Manipulation Verbs, JCL BasicsWriting to disk, DSN, DISP, Unit, Space, DCB
Parameters, Job statement and Parameters Positional and keyword Parameters, EXEC
statement, EXEC Parameters, Concept of Compile and Run JCL s.
Module V

(11 hours)

DataBase Concepts
Introduction to DB2Relational DBMS Concept, Writing DB2/COBOL programs,
Compilation and Binding of DB2 Programs , Concepts of DBRM, Bind JCL, Introduction

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science &Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

to CICS Case study (library information system in COBOL/JCL/DB2to be taken along


with all modules as example )

Reference Books
1. M K Roy, D Ghosh Dastidar ,Cobol Programming ,Tata McGraw Hill,New
Delhi,1999,Second Edition
2. M K Roy, D Ghosh Dastidar ,Cobol Programming : problems & Solutions, Tata
McGraw Hill, New Delhi
3. Saba Zamir, Chander Ranade ,The MVS JCL Primer (J Ranade IBM Series),

McGraw-Hill
th

4. C.J. date, Colin J White, A Guide to DB2, Pearson Education , New Delhi,4

Edition, 2006.
5. Craig S. Mullins, DB2 Developers Guide, Pearson education , New Delhi, 5th
Edition,2008
6. Andreas S Philippakis, Leonard J Kazmier ,Information System through COBOL,
McGraw-Hill

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science &Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 706L06 CLIENT SERVER ARCHITECTURE AND


APPLICATIONS
Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart an introduction Client-Server system.

To develop basic knowledge on securing Client-Server system.

To have exposure to applications of Client-Server system.


Pre-requisites: Computer Networks and Operating Systems
Module I

(10 hours)

Introduction: History-uses-Client Server Computing& Heterogeneous Computing


Cross Platform Computing Distributed Computing - The costs of Client Server
Computing - Advantages and Disadvantages - Client Server Databases.
Module II

(12 hours)

Design: Fundamentals of client server design - Managing the interaction of client and
server - Communications Techniques protocols & Client server interaction protocols Preparing applications for client server - Optimizing applications for client server Example client server implementations - Request acceptance dispatching - Execution
of requests - Client server interaction using message.
Module III

(14 hours)

Multitasking: Multi programming vs multitasking - Processor - Advantages and draw


backs of multiple processor - Child and parent processor - Case study Novell Netware
and Windows NT - Developing server applications - Threads - Server communication
model.
Module IV

(12 hours)

Synchronization: Scheduling implementations - processing queues - context switching


pre-emptive systems - critical sections - mutual exclusion - semaphores semaphore
implementations in NT & Netware
Module V

(12 hours)

Communications: Network communication - Inter process communication - Building


portable client server applications - Introduction to Client/server security concepts- Secure
client/server communications password security at system level and application level

Reference Books

1. Jeffrey D.Schank, Novell's Guide to Client-Server Application & Architecture


Novell Press.
2. Robert Orfali,Dan Harkey, Jeri Edwards,Clien/Server Survival Guide,WileyIndia Edition,Third Edition,2007
3. Dawna Travis Dewire, Client Server Computing, McGraw Hill
4. W.H.Inman,Developing Client Server Applications , BPB
5. Joe Salemi, Guide to Client Server Databases, BPB.
6. David Vaskevitch, Client Server Strategies,Galgotia.
7. Peter T.Davis, Securing Client/Server Computer Networks, McGraw Hill
8. Subhash Chandra Yadav, Sanjay Kumar Singh,An Introduction to Client/Server
Computing, New Age International Publishers,2009
Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 707: Systems Programming Lab


Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per week

Credits: 2

Objectives

To familiarize the design of all phases of compilers up to a stage of


intermediate code generation.

To enable the students to design and implement modern compilers for any
environment.

Section 1 (Compiler Design)


1. Design of a Lexical Analyzer using Finite Automation (including Symbol table)
(The program should be designed for a specific number of keywords, identifiers,
numbers,
operators, punctuators etc. Finite automata should be designed for each type of token)
2. Design of lexical analyzer using LEX
3. Design of recursive descent and LL (1) parsers (including syntax tree)
(The programme should be designed for a subset of PL features (For example
Arithmetic
expressions with operators +, -, *, /, etc)
4. Implementation of Operator precedence Parsing (including syntax tree)
5. Design of parser for arithmetic expressions using YACC
6. Design of a simple type checker (For eg for the primitive types of C)
7. Generation of IC for arithmetic expressions
8. Simple code optimization strategies (For example Constant folding, Loop invariant
elimination, common sub expression elimination etc)
9. Design of a code generator for arithmetic expressions using Expression tree
(The program should take a set of IC as the input and produce the target code for
some
machine such as Intel 8086 Microprocessor)
10. Writing a simple Compiler for a subset of Language features
Section 2:1.Design of 2-Pass Assembler(The Program should be designed for the generation for
machine code of any simple processor such as Intel 8005)
2.Design of Absolute Loader
3.Design of Macro Pre-processor(The program should be designed for a simple
preprocessor such as the # define in C)

Syllabus B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

Mahatma Gandhi University

4 Design of Device Drivers (Implementation of Simple Device Drivers such as one


for the
PC Speaker.)
Remark:
At Least 8 experiments from Section 1 and 2 experiments from section

Syllabus B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 708: Networking Lab


Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per week

Credits: 2

Objectives

To provide experience on design, testing, and analysis of Java Programs.

To acquaint the students with the Networking Protocols and Communication


using ports and sockets.
1) Basic Java Programming
2) Programs to create Applets
3) Programs to create Graphic User Interfaces
4) Programs to implement Client and Server Sockets
5) Programs for Chatting using TCP and UDP
6) Programs for Remote Procedure Call
7) Programs for Remote Method Invocation
8) Programs to interface with XML
9) Programs to implement Sliding Window Protocols
10) Programs for Multicasting
11) Programs to interface with Databases
12) Programs for Image Processing
13) Programs in Perl and PHP
14) Programs to create Dynamic Web Pages

Any experiment according to the syllabus of CS010 602 Internet Computing,


CS010604 Computer Networks, CS010701 Web Technologies may be
substituted subjected to permission from competent authority.

Syllabus B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

CS 010 709 Seminar


Teaching scheme

credits: 2

2 hours practical per week


The seminar power point presentation shall be fundamentals oriented and advanced topics in the
appropriate branch of engineering with references of minimum seven latest international journal
papers having high impact factor.
Each presentation is to be planned for duration of 25 minutes including a question answer session of five
to ten minutes.

The students internal marks for seminar will be out of 50. The marks will be awarded based on
the presentation of the seminar by the students before an evaluation committee consists of a
minimum of 4 faculty members. Apportioning of the marks towards various aspects of seminar (extent
of literature survey, presentation skill, communication skill, etc.) may be decided by the seminar
evaluation committee.

A bona fide report on seminar shall be submitted at the end of the semester. This report shall
include, in addition to the presentation materials, all relevant supplementary materials along with detailed
answers to all the questions asked/clarifications sought during presentation. All references must be given
toward the end of the report. The seminar report should also be submitted for the viva-voce

examination at the end of eighth semester.


For Seminar, the minimum for a pass shall be 50% of the total marks assigned to the
seminar.

CS 010 710 Project Work


Teaching scheme

credits: 1

1 hour practical per week

Project work, in general, means design and development of a system with clearly specified objectives.
The project is intended to be a challenge to intellectual and innovative abilities and to give students the
opportunity to synthesize and apply the knowledge and analytical skills learned in the different
disciplines.
The project shall be a prototype; backed by analysis and simulation etc. No project can be deemed to be
complete without having an assessment of the extent to which the objectives are met. This is to be done
through proper test and evaluation, in the case of developmental work, or through proper reviews in the
case of experimental investigations.

The project work has to be started in the seventh semester and to be continued on to eighth
semester.

Project work is to be done by student groups. Maximum of four students only are permitted in
any one group.

Projects are expected to be proposed by the students. They may also be proposed by faculty
member (Guide) or jointly by student and faculty member.

Students are expected to finalise project themes/titles with the assistance of an identified faculty
member as project guide during the first week of the seventh semester.

The progress from concept to final implementation and testing, through problem definition and the
selection of alternative solutions is monitored. Students build self confidence, demonstrate independence,
and develop professionalism by successfully completing the project.
Each student shall maintain a project work book. At the beginning of the project, students are required to
submit a project plan in the project book. The plan should not exceed 600 words but should cover the
following matters.
Relevance of the project proposed
Literature survey
Objectives
Statement of how the objectives are to be tackled

Time schedule
Cost estimate
These proposals are to be screened by the evaluation committee (EC- minimum of 3 faculty members

including the guide) constituted by the head of department, which will include a Chairman and the EC
will evaluates the suitability and feasibility of the project proposal. The EC can accept, accept with
modification, request a resubmission, or reject a project proposal.
Every activity done as part of project work is to be recorded in the project book, as and when it is done.
Project guide shall go through these records periodically, and give suggestions/comments in writing in the
same book.
The students have to submit an interim report, along with project work book showing details of the work
carried out by him/her and a power point presentation at the end of the 7th semester to EC. The EC can
accept, accept with modification, request a resubmission, or extension of the project.

The students internal marks for project will be out of 50, in which 30 marks will be based on
day to day performance assessed by the guide. Balance 20 marks will be awarded based on the
presentation of the project by the students before an evaluation committee consists of a minimum
of 3 faculty members including the guide.
For Project, the minimum for a pass shall be 50% of the total marks assigned to the Project
work.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 801 : HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING


Teaching scheme
3 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To design a powerful and cost-effective computer system.

To provide the basic concepts of parallel processing on high performance


computers.
Module I (15 hours)
Introduction to parallel processing - Trends towards parallel processing - Parallelism
in
uniprocessor - Parallel computer structures-Architecture classification schemes ,Amdahls
law,Indian contribution to parallel processing
Module II (15 hours)
Principles of pipelining and vector processing - Linear pipelining - Classification of pipeline
processors - General pipelines - Instruction and Arithmetic pipelines Design of Pipelined
instruction unit-Principles of Designing Pipeline Processors- Instruction prefetch and branch
handling- Data Buffering and Busing Structure-Internal forwarding and register taggingHazard detection and Resolution,Dynamic pipelines and Reconfigurability

Module III (15 hours)


Array processors - SIMD array processors - Interconnection networks - Static vs dynamic
networks - mesh connected networks - Cube interconnection networks - Parallel algorithms
for array processors - SIMD matrix multiplication-Parallel sorting on array processors Associative array processing - Memory organization.

Module IV (15 hours)


Multiprocessor architectures and Programming - Loosely coupled and Tightly coupled
multiprocessors - Interconnection networks - Language features to exploit parallelism -Inter
process communication mechanism-Process synchronisation mechanisms,synchronization
with semaphores.

Module V (15 hours)


Dataflow computers - Data driven computing and Languages, Data flow computers
architectures - Static data flow computer , Dynamic data flow computer ,Data flow design
alternatives.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

References:
1.Computer Architecture & Parallel Processing - Kai Hwang &
FayeA.Briggs,McGraw Hill
2. Computer architecture A quantitative approach - John L Hennessy and David A.
Patterson-ELSEVIER,Fourth Edition
3. Elements of Parallel computing - V. Rajaraman - PHI
4. Super Computers - V. Rajaraman - Wiely arstern
5. Parellel Processing for Super Computers & AI Kai Hwange & Douglas Degneot
Mc Graw Hill
6. Highly parallel computing - George S. Almasi,Allan Gottlieb. - Benjamin Cumings
Publishers.
7. HIgh Performance Computer Architecture - Harold S. Stone, Addison Wesley.
8. Advanced Computing- Vijay P.Bhatkar, Asok V.Joshi,
Arirban Basu, Asok K.Sharma.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 802: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To provide introduction to the basic knowledge representation,


problem solving, and learning methods of Artificial Intelligence.
To familiarize with Fuzzy Logic and knowledge processing in expert systems
To give exposure to problem solving in AI using Python
Module 1 (14 hours)
Problems- problem spaces and search, production systems, Problem characteristics, Searching
strategies Generate and Test, Heuristic Search Techniques- Hill climbing issues in hill climbing,
General Example Problems.
Python-Introduction to Python- Lists Dictionaries & Tuples in Python- Python implementation of
Hill Climbing
Module 2 (12 hours)
Search Methods- Best First Search- Implementation in Python- OR Graphs, The A * Algorithm,
Problem Reduction- AND-OR Graphs, The AO* algorithm, Constraint Satisfaction. Games as
search problem, MINIMAX search procedure, AlphaBeta pruning.
Module3 (12 hours)
Knowledge representation -Using Predicate logic- representing facts in logic, functions and
predicates, Conversion to clause form, Resolution in propositional logic, Resolution in predicate
logic, Unification, Question Answering, forward and backward chaining.
Module 4 (12 hours)
Learning- Rote Learning Learning by Advice- Learning in Problem Solving - By Parameter
Adjustment with Macro Operators, Chunking, Learning from Examples- Winstons Learning
Program, Version Spaces- Positive & Negative Examples Candidate Elimination- Decision TreesID3 Decision Tree Induction Algorithm.
Module 5 (10 hours)
Fuzzy Sets Concept of a Fuzzy number- Operations on Fuzzy Sets Typical Membership
Functions Discrete Fuzzy Sets.
Expert System Representing and using Domain Knowledge Reasoning with knowledge Expert
System Shells Support for explanation- examples Knowledge acquisition-examples.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

References
1. Elaine Rich, Kevin Knight, Shivashankar B Nair
Tata McGraw Hill- Artificial Intelligence, 3rd Edn ,2004.
2. Stuart Russell Peter Narang, Pearson Education Asia - Artificial
Intelligence- A modern approach.
3. George F Luger - Artificial Intelligence, Pearson Education Asia
4. Allen B. Downey (Think Python) Python for software design- How to
think like a computer scientist, Cambridge University press, 2009 .
Web Reference
1. http://code.google.com/p/aima-python/ - Website for search strategy
implementation in python

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 803: Security in Computing


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart an essential study of computer security issues

To develop basic knowledge on cryptography

To impart an essential study of various security mechanisms

Module 1 (12 hours)


Introduction: Security basics Aspects of network security Attacks Different types Security
attacks -Security services and mechanisms.
Cryptography: Basic Encryption & Decryption Classical encryption techniques symmetric
encryption, substitution ciphers Caesar cipher Monoalphabetic Cipher, Playfair Cipher,
Polyalphabetic cipher - Vigenre Cipher, Transposition ciphers - Rail Fence cipher, Row
Transposition Ciphers.
Module 2 (12 hours)
Modern Block Ciphers - Fiestel Networks , DES Algorithm Avalanche Effect.
Introduction to Number Theory - Prime Factorisation, Fermat's Theorem, Euler's Theorem,
Primitive Roots, Discrete Logarithms.
Public key Cryptography:- Principles of Public key Cryptography Systems, RSA algorithmsKey Management Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange, Elliptic curve cryptography.
Module 3 (12 hours)
Message Authentication-Requirements- Authentication functions- Message authentication
codes-Hash functions- Secure Hash Algorithm, MD5, Digital signatures- protocols- Digital
signature standards, Digital Certificates.
Application Level Authentications- Kerberos, X.509 Authentication Service, X.509
certificates.
Module 4 (12 hours)
Network Security: Electronic Mail Security, Pretty Good Privacy, S/MIME, IP Security
Overview, IP Security Architecture, Authentication Header, Encapsulating Security Payload.
Web Security: Web Security considerations- Secure Socket Layer -Transport layer SecuritySecure electronic transaction. Firewalls-Packet filters- Application Level Gateway- Circuit
Level Gateway.
Module 5 (12 hours)
Operating System Security: Memory and Address Protection, Control of Access to General
Objects, File Protection Mechanisms, Models of Security Bell-La Padula Confidentiality
Model and Biba Integrity Model.
System Security: Intruders, Intrusion Detection, Password Management, Viruses and Related
Threats, Virus Countermeasure.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

Reference Books

1. William Stallings, Cryptography and Network Security Principles and Practices, Pearson
Education, Fourth Edition, 2006.
2. Charles P. Pfleeger, Security in Computing, Pearson Education, Third Edition, 2005.
3. Behrouz A. Forouzan, Dedeep Mukhopadhyay Cryptography & Network Security, Second
Edition,Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2010.
4. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Modern Operating Systems, Pearson Education, Second Edition,
2002.
5. Atul Kahate, Cryptography and Network Security, Second Edition, Tata McGraw Hill
6. Wenbo Mao, Modern Cryptography- Theory & Practice, Pearson Education, 2006.
7. Bruce Schneier, Applied Cryptography, John Wiley and Sons Inc, 2001.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 804L01: E-COMMERCE


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart an introduction to Elecronic Commerce.

To develop basic knowledge of Business in Internet and Electronic Payment.


Module I (12 hours)
Introduction to Electronic Commerce:- E-Commerce Framework, Anatomy of ECommerce Applications, E-Commerce Consumer & Organization Applications.
ECommerce and World Wide Web Internet Service Providers, Architectural Framework
for Electronic Commerce, WWW as the Architecture, Hypertext publishing.
Module II

(14 hours)

Network Security:- Client-Server Network Security, CS Security Threats, Firewalls,


Data & Message Security, Encrypted Documents, Security on the Web.
Consumer Oriented Electronic Commerce:- Consumer Oriented Applications,
Mercantile Process Models, Mercantile Models from the Consumers Perspective,
Mercantile Models from the Merchants Perspective
Module III

(10 hours)

Electronic Payment Systems :- Types of Electronic Payment Systems, Digital Token


Based Electronic Payment System, Smart Cards, Credit Cards, Risk in Electronic
Payment Systems, Designing Electronic Payment Systems.
Module IV

(12 hours)

Electronic Data Interchange:- EDI Application in Business, EDI-Legal, Security


and Privacy Issues, EDI standardization, EDI Envelope for Message Transport,
Internet based EDI, Internal Information System, Work-flow Automation and
Coordination, Supply Chain Management, Document Library, Types of Digital
Documents, Corporate Data Warehouses.
Module V

(12 hours)

Recent Trends in E-Commerce:- Multimedia in E-Commerce, Video Conferencing


with Digital Videos, Broad Band Telecommunication, Frame & Cell Relays,
Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS), Asynchronous Transfer Mode, Mobile
Computing and Wireless Computing.
Reference Books

1) Ravi Kalakota, Andrew B Whinston, Frontiers of Electronic Commerce, Pearson


Education Inc., New Delhi, 2009
2) Ravi Kalakota, Andrew B. Whinston, Electronic Commerce A Managers Guide,
Pearson Education Inc., New Delhi, 2007
3) P. T. Joseph, E-Commerce An Indian Perspective, PHI Learning Private Limited,
New Delhi, 2009

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 804L02: GRID COMPUTING


( Common to IT010 804L06:Grid Computing )
Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To impart an introduction to Grid Computing.

To develop basic knowledge about the Open Grid Service Architecture.


Module I (12 hours)
Grid Computing Introduction- Grid Activities- Overview of Grid Business Areas- Grid
Applications- Grid Infrastructure.
Module II
(12 hours)
Grid Computing Organizations and their roles- Grid Computing Anatomy- Grid ProblemConcept of Virtual Organizations- Grid Architecture- Autonomic Computing- Business on
Demand and Infrastructure Virtualization- Semantic Grids.
Module III
(12 hours)
Merging the Grid Services Architecture- Service Oriented Architecture- Web Service
Architecture- XML relevance to Web Services- Service Message Description MechanismsRelationship between Web Service and Grid Service.

.
Module IV
(12 hours)
Open Grid Services Architecture- OGSA Platform Components- Open Grid Services
Infrastructure- Introduction to Service Data Concepts- Grid Service- OGSA Basic ServicesCommon Management Model- Policy Architecture- Security Architecture.
Module V
(12 hours)
Grid Computing Toolkits- GLOBAS GT3 Toolkit Architecture- GLOBAS GT3 Toolkit
Programming Model- GLOBAS GT3 Toolkit High Level Services.

.
Reference Books
1) Joshy Joseph, Craig Fellenstein, Grid Computing, Pearson Education Inc, New Delhi 2004.

2) D Janakiram, Grid Computing A research Monograph, Tata McGraw-Hill


Publishing Company Limited New Delhi, 2005.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer science and Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 804L03: Bioinformatics


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives

To understand the science of storing, extracting, organizing, analysing and


interpreting biological data.

Module 1 (12 hours)


Basic Concepts of Molecular Biology: Cells - Chromosomes, DNA, RNA, Proteins,
Central dogma of molecular biology, RNA classification coding and non coding RNAmRNA, tRNA, miRNAand sRNA , Genomes and Genes - Genetic code, ORFs,Slice
varients,Transcription ,Translation and Protein synthesis.
Module 2 (12 hours)
Sequence alignments - local/global, pairwise/multiple Sequence alignment- Smith-Waterman
algorithm, NeedlemanWunch algorithm, Multiple sequence alignment Sum-of-Pairs measure Star and tree alignments ,Scoring matrices: basic concept of a scoring matrix, Matrices for
nucleic acid and proteins sequences, PAM and BLOSUM ,Phylogenetic Trees
Module 3 (12 hours)
Informational view of Genomic data, Gene expression, Microarrays-cDNA arrays,Oligo
Arrays, Data analysis methodologies-Normalization,Principal Componenet Analysis,ClusteringHierarchical,K-meana,FCM,Application of Microarrays.
Gene regulation, Gene Ontology, metabolic pathways, and gene set enrichment analysis.
Module 4 ( 12 hours)
Evolution of Protein Structures, Classification of Protein Structures- primary,secondary,ternary
and quatenary,Protein Structure prediction and modeling, Assignment of protein structures to
genomes, Prediction of protein function, Protein folding problem, Protein Threading, Drug
discovery and development
Module 5 (12 hours)
Biological data bases: Pubmed,Swissport,EMBL,DDBJ,Genbank,
Software Tools: Use of Tools for basic and specialized sequence processing such as: BLAST,
FASTA, RasMol, Phylip, ClustalW

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

References
1. Setubal & Meidanis, Introduction to Computational Molecular Biology, Brooks/Cole
Cengage Learning 2009.
2. Arthur M Lesk, Introduction to Bioinformatics, Oxford University Press, India, 2004
3.Vittal R. Srinivas Bioinformatics a mordern Approach,PHI Learning 2009 .
4.Shuba Gopal,Rhys Price Jones,Paul Thymann,Anne Haake,Bioinformatics with
fundamentals of Genomics and proteomics, Tata McGraw Hill
3.Zoe Lacroix,Terence Critchlow Bioinformtics managing scientific Data,Morgan
Koufmann Publishers
4.B.G Curran,R J walker,SC BhattiaBioinformatics,CBS Publishers,2010
5.Harshawardhana P. Bal Bioinformatics Principles and Applications,Tata MacGraw Hill

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 804L04 :Optimization Techniques


Teaching Schemes
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week.

Credits: 4

Objectives:
To understand the need and origin of the optimization methods.
To get a broad picture of various applications of optimization methods
used in engineering.
To define an optimization problem and its various components.
Module I (12 Hrs)
One Dimensional Unconstrained Minimization techniques, single variable
minimization, unimodality, bracketing the minimum, necessary and sufficient
conditions for optimality, convexity, steepest descent method.
Module II (12Hrs)
Linear programming, introduction, linear programming problem, linear
programming problems involving LE (?) constraints, simplex method, optimality
conditions, artificial starting solutions, the M method.
Module III (12hrs)
Transportation models, definition, non traditional models, transportation algorithm,
East West corner method, Vogel approximation method. Assignment model,
Introduction, Hungarian method.
Module IV (12Hrs)
Forecasting Models, moving average technique, regression method, exponential
smoothing. Game Theory, two persons zero sum games, mixed strategy gamesgraphical method.
Module V (12Hrs)
Queuing models, elements of queuing model, pure birth and death model,
specialized Poisson queues, single server models. Multiple server models, self
service model.
References:
1. Ashok D Belegundu, Tirupathi R Chandrupatla, optimization concepts and Application in
Engineering, pearson Education.
2 Kalynamoy Deb, Optimization for Engineering Design, Alogorithms and
Examples, Prentice Hall,
3. Hamdy A Taha, Operations Research An introduction, Pearson Education,
4. Hillier / Lieberman, Introduction to Operations Research, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing
company Ltd,
5. Singiresu S Rao, Engineering optimization Theory and Practice, New Age International,
6. Mik Misniewski, Quantitative Methods for Decision makers, MacMillian Press Ltd.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 804L05: MOBILE COMPUTING


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives
To study the relevance and underlining infrastructure of multimedia system.
To enable the students to apply contemporary theories of multimedia learning to the
development of multimedia products.
Module I
(10 hours)
Introduction to wireless communication system:- 2G cellular network,2G TDMA
Standards,3G wireless networks,wireless local loop and LMDS, Broadcast Systems-Broadcast
transmission, Digital Audio Broadcasting-Multimedia Object Transfer Protocol. Digital
Video Broadcasting.
Cellular concepts-channel assignment strategy-hand off strategy-interface and system
capacity-trunking improving coverage and capacity in cellular system.
Module II
(12 hours)
Wireless Communication Systems:-Telecommunication Systems-GSM-GSM services &
features,architecture,channel type,frame structure,signal processing in GSM & DECTfeatures & characteristics,architecture,functional concepts & radio link,personal access
communication system(PACS)-system architecture-radio interface,
Protocols.Satellite Systems-GEO, LEO, MEO.
Module III
(11 hours)
Wireless LAN and ATM:- Infra red and Radio Transmission, Infrastructure and ad hoc
networks ,802.11- Bluetooth- Architecture, Applications and Protocol, Layers, Frame
structure. comparison between 802.11 and 802.16.
Wireless ATM- Services, Reference Model, Functions, Radio Access Layer. HandoverReference Model, Requirements, Types, handover scenarios.
Location Management, Addressing, Access Point Control Protocol (APCP).
Module IV
(14 hours)
Mobile Network and Transport Layers:- Mobile IP- Goals, Requirements, IP packet
delivery, Advertisement and discovery. Registration, Tunneling and Encapsulation,
Optimization, Reverse Tunneling, IPv6, Dynamic Host configuring protocol, Ad hoc
networks Routing, DSDV, Dynamic source routing. Hierarchical Algorithms.
Traditional TCP, Indirect TCP, Snooping TCP, Mobile TCP, Transmission.
Module V
(13 hours)
Wireless Application Protocol & World Wide Web
WAP- Architecture, Protocols-Datagram, Transaction, Session.-Wireless Application
Environment-WML- Features, Script- Wireless Telephony Application.
WWW- HTTP, Usage of HTML, WWW system architecture.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

References
1. Jochen Schiller Mobile Communications , Preason Education Asia
2.Wireless communications Principles and practice-second edition-Theodore
S.Rappaport,PHI,Second Edition ,New Delhi, 2004
3. Computer

Networks Andrew S. Tanenbaum , PHI

4.. Communication Networks -Fundamental Concepts and Key Architectures


Leon-Garcia & Indra Widjaja, Tata McGraw Hill

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 804L06 : Advanced Networking Trends


Teaching scheme

Credits: 4

2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Objectives

To acquaint the students with the application of networking.


To understand the variousTCP/IP protocols and the working of ATM and its
performance, Network security and authentication, and variousalgorithms related to
it has been dealt, to get a practical approach ,advanced topics in the design of
computer networks and network protocols

Module 1 (12 hours)


Ethernet Technology Frame format Interface Gap CSMA/CD 10 mbps
Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, Wire
less Ethernet.
ISDN - Definition - Protocol architecture - System architecture - Transmission
channels - ISDN interface, B-ISDN.
Module 2 (12 hours)
ATM ATM Principles BISDN reference model ATM layers ATM adaption
Layer AAL1, AAL2, AAL3/4, AAL5 ATM addressing UNI Signaling PNNI
Signaling
Module 3 (12 hours)
Wireless LAN Infrared Vs Radio transmission Infrastructure & ad hoc n/w
IEEE 802.11 Physical Layer MAC layer.
Bluetooth Physical Layer MAC layer Networking - Security
Module 4 (12 hours)
Mesh Networks- Necessity for Mesh Networks MAC enhancements IEEE
802.11s Architecture Opportunistic Routing Self Configuration and Auto
Configuration - Capacity Models Fairness Heterogeneous Mesh Networks
Vehicular Mesh Networks
Module 5 (12 hours)
Sensor Networks- Introduction Sensor Network architecture Data Dissemination
Data Gathering MAC Protocols for sensor Networks Location discovery Quality
of Sensor Networks Evolving Standards Other Issues Recent trends in
Infrastructure less Networks
References
1. An introduction to Computer Networking - Kenneth C Mansfield, Jr., James L. Antonakos, PHI
2. Communication Networks Fundamental Concepts & Key Architecture - Leon-Garcia
Widjaja, Tata McGraw Hill
3. Mobile Communication - Jochen Schiller, Pearson Education Asia
4. C. Siva Ram Murthy and B.S.Manoj, Ad hoc Wireless Networks Architectures and
Protocols, Pearson Education, 2004
5. C.K.Toh, Adhoc Mobile Wireless Networks, Pearson Education, 2002.
Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 805G01: MULTIMEDIA TECHNIQUES


Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives
To study the relevance and underlining infrastructure of multimedia system.
To enable the students to apply contemporary theories of multimedia learning to the
development of multimedia products.
Module I
(10 hours)
Multimedia Basics: Multimedia and Hypermedia, Multimedia Software, Editing and
Authoring Tools, VRML.
Graphics and Image Data Representation Graphics/Image Data Types, Popular File
Formats.
Concepts in Video and Digital Audio Color Science, Color Models in Images, Color
Models in Video. Types of Video Signals, Digitization of Sound, MIDI - Musical Instrument
Digital Interface, Quantization and Transmission of Audio.
Module II
(12 hours)
Lossless & Lossy Compression Algorithms Introduction, Basics of Information
Theory, Run-Length Coding, Variable-Length Coding, Dictionary-Based Coding,
Arithmetic Coding, Lossless Image Compression. Distortion Measures, The RateDistortion Theory, Quantization, Transform Coding, Wavelet-Based Coding, Wavelet
Packets, Embedded Zerotree of Wavelet Coefficients, Set Partitioning in Hierarchical
Trees (SPIHT).
Module III
(11 hours)
Image, Video and Audio Compression Image Compression -JPEG , JPEG-LS.
Basic Video Compression Techniques - Introduction to Video Compression, Video
Compression Based on Motion Compensation, MPEG
Video Coding Audio Compression Techniques-MPEG, ADPCM in Speech Coding,
Vocoders, Psychoacoustics, Audio Codecs.
Module IV
(14 hours)
Storage and Retrieval of Images Content-Based Retrieval in Digital Libraries: Image
retrieval, CBIRD. A Case Study, Image Search Systems, Quantifying Results, Querying on
Videos, Querying on Other Formats, Outlook for Content-Based Retrieval.
Image Databases Raw Images, Compress Image Presentations, Image Processing
Segmentation, Similarity- Based Retrieval, Alternating Image DB Paradigms,
Representing Image DBs with Relations and R Trees, Retrieving Images by Special
Layout, Implementations, Selected Commercial Systems.
Module V
(13 hours)
Multimedia Databases
Text/Document Databases Precision and Recall, Stop Lists, Word Stems and
Frequency tables, Latent Semantic Indexing, TV-Trees, Other Retrieval Techniques.
Multimedia DatabasesDesign and Architecture of a Multimedia Database, Organizing
Multimedia Data based on the Principle of Uniformity, Media Abstractions, Query Languages
for Retrieving Multimedia Data , Indexing SMDSs with Enhanced Inverted Indices, Query
Relaxation/ Expansion.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

References
1. .Ze-Nian Li and M. S. Drew, .Fundamental of Multimedia., Pearson Education,2004
2. V. S. Subrahmanian, .Principles of Multimedia Database Systems., Morgan Kaufmann
Publication.
3. K. R. Rao, Zoran S. Bojkovic, D. A. Milovanovic, .Introduction to Multimedia
Communications., Wiley.
4. R. Steinmetz and K. Nahrstedt .Multimedia: Computing, Communication &
Applications, Pearson Education.
5. Buford, .Multimedia Systems., Pearson Education.
6. C. T. Bhunia, .Multimedia and multimedia Communications., New Age International
Publishers.
7. Prabhat K. Andheigh, Kiran Thakrar, Multimedia Systems design., PHI.
8. Koegel Buford, Multimedia Systems., Pearson Eduaction.
9. J. D. Gibson, .Multimedia Communications: Directions and Innovations., Academic
10. Press, Hard-court India.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 805G02 :Neural networks


( Common to IT010 805G05

Neural Networks )

Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives
To understand the fundamental building blocks of Neural networks
Module 1 (14 hours)
Biological Neurons and Neural Networks, Basic Structures and Properties of Artificial Neural
Networks, Basic Neuron Models-McCulloch-Pitts -Nearest Neighbour- Radial Basis Function,
Activation Functions ,Singe Layer Perceptrons-Linear Seperability, Learning and Generalization in
Single Layer Perceptron-Hebbian Learning-Gradient Descent Learning-Widrow-Hoff Learning-The
Generalized Delta rule, Practical Considerations
Module 2 (12 hours)
Multi Layer Perceptron Learning,Back Propogation Algorithim -Applications Limitations
Network Paralysis Local Minima Temporal Instability, Pattern Analysis Tasks- ClassificationRegression- Clustering, Pattern Classification and Regression using Multilayer Perceptron.
Module 3 (10 hours)
Radial Basis Function Networks: Fundamentals, Algorithms and Applications, Learning with
Momentum, Conjugate Gradient Learning, Bias and Variance. Under-Fitting and Over-Fitting,
Stochastic neural networks, Boltzmann machine.
Module 4 (12 hours)
Network based on competition:- Fixed weight competitive Network-Maxnet, Mexican Hat and
Hamming Net, Counter Propagation Networks- Kohonens self-organizing map Training the
Kohonen layer Training the Grossberg layer Full counter propagation network Application,
Adaptive resonance theory classification- Architecture Learning and generalization.
Module 5 (12 hours)
Pattern Association: - training algorithm for pattern association - Hetro Associative Network, Auto
Associative Network, Architecture of Hopfield nets stability analysis ,General Concepts of
Associative Memory, Bidirectional Associative Memory (BAM) Architecture, BAM training
algorithms.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

References
1. B. Yegnanarayana, "Artificial Neural Networks", PHI.
2. Simon Haykin, Neural Networks, 2/e, Prentice Hall
3. Neural Computing & Practice Philip D. Wasserman
4. Neural Networks in Computer Intelligence-Limin Fu,Tata Mc.Hill Edition

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 805G03 : Advanced Mathematics


( common to IT010 805G02 Advanced Mathematics )
Teaching Schedule:

Credits: 4

2 hour Lecturer and 2 hour Tutorial per week

Objectives
To provide an understanding of Greens Function, Integral Equations, Gamma, Beta
functions, Power Series solution of differential equation, Numerical solution of partial
differential equations
Module 1 (12 Hours)
Greens Function
Heavisides, unit step function Derivative of unit step function Dirac delta function properties
of delta function Derivatives of delta function testing functions symbolic function symbolic
derivatives inverse of differential operator Greens function initial value problems boundary
value problems simple cases only
Module 2 (12 Hours)
Integral Equations
Definition of Volterra and Fredholm Integral equations conversion of a linear differential
equation into an integral equation conversion of boundary value problem into an integral equation
using Greens function solution of Fredhlom integral equation with separable Kernels Integral
equations of convolution type Neumann series solution.
Module 3 (12 Hours)
Gamma, Beta functions
Gamma function, Beta function Relation between them their transformations use of them in
the evaluation certain integrals Dirichlets integral Liouvilles extension of Dirichlets theorem
Elliptic integral Error function.
Module 4 (12 Hours)
Power Series solution of differential equation
The power series method Legendres Equation Legendres polynomial Rodrigues formula
generating function Bessels equation Bessels function of the first kind Orthogonality of
Legendres Polynomials and Bessels functions.
Module 5 (12 Hours)
Numerical solution of partial differential equations
Classification of second order equations- Finite difference approximations to partial derivatives
solution of Laplace and Poissons equations by finite difference method solution of one
dimensional heat equation by Crank Nicolson method solution one dimensional wave equation.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

References
1. S.S Sasthri, Introductory methods of Numerical Analysis,Prentice Hall of India.
2. Ram P.Kanwal, Linear Integral Equation, Academic Press, New York.
3. Allen C.Pipkin, Springer, A Course on Integral Equations, Verlag.
4. H.K.Dass, Advanced Engg. Mathematics, S.Chand.
5. Michael D.Greenberge, Advanced Engg. Mathematics, Pearson Edn. Asia.
6. B.S.Grewal, Numrical methods in Engg.&science, Khanna Publishers.
7. R.F. Hoskins, Generalized functions, John Wiley and Sons.
8. Bernard Friedman, Principles and Techniques of Applied Mathematics, John Wiley
and sons
9. James P.Keener, Principles of Applied Mathematics, Addison Wesley.
10. P.Kandasamy, K.Thilagavathy, K.Gunavathy Numerical methods, S.Chand & co

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 805G04: Software Architecture


(Common to IT010 805G01

Software Architecture )

Teaching scheme
2 hours lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week

Credits: 4

Objectives
To understand the role of a software architecture in the development of an enterprise
application system.
To develop the ability to understand the models that are used to document a software
architecture.
Module I

(13 hours)

Software ArchitectureSoftware Architecture, Software Design Levels, The status of


Software Engineering and Architecture.
Architecture StylesUse of Patterns and Styles in Software Design, Common Architectural
Styles -Pipes and Filters, Data Abstraction and Object Orientation, Event Based Implicit
Invocation, Layered Systems, Repositories, Interpreters, Process Control ParadigmsCase
Studies to Illustrate the use of Architectural Principles.
Module II

(11 hours)

Architectural DesignGuidelines for User Interface Architectures, Design Space and


Rules, Applying Design Space with an Example, A Validation
The Quantified Design SpaceBackground, Quantified Design Space.
Module III

Experiment.

(11 hours)

Formal models and Specifications Formalizing the Architecture of a Specific SystemArchitectural Formalism and its Applications, Formalizing Various Architectural Styles,
Filters, Pipes, Pipe-and-Filter System, Formalizing Architectural Design Space.
Module IV

(14 hours)

Architectural Description LanguagesRequirements for Architectural Description


Languages, The Linguistic Character of Architectural Description, Desiderata for
Architecture Description Languages, Problems.
First-Class ConnectorsCurrent practice, Software System Composition
.
Adding Implicit Invocation to Traditional Programming Languages
Module V
(11 hours)
Architectural Design Tools UniCon A Universal Connecting Language, Components,
Abstraction and Encapsulation, Types and Type checking.
Architectural Design - Exploiting Styles , Architectural Interconnection

References
1. Mary Shaw & David Garlan, Software Architecture, Prentice Hall India Private
Limited, Third Edition, New Delhi, 2000.
2. Len Bass, Paul Clements, & Rick Kazman, Software Architecture in Practice,
Pearson Education.

Syllabus - B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg.

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 805G05: Natural Language Processing


Teaching scheme

Credits: 4

2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Objectives

Module I

To acquire a general introduction including the use of state automata for


language processing
To understand the fundamentals of syntax including a basic parse
To explain advanced feature like feature structures and realistic parsing
methodologies
To explain basic concepts of remotes processing
To give details about a typical natural language processing applications
(12 hours)

INTRODUCTION:Introduction: Knowledge in speech and language processing Ambiguity


Models and Algorithms Language, Thought and Understanding. Regular Expressions and
automata: Regular expressions Finite-State automata. Morphology and Finite-State
Transducers: Survey of English morphology Finite-State Morphological parsing
Combining FST lexicon and rules Lexicon-Free FSTs: The porter stammer Human
morphological processing

Module II

(12 hours)

SYNTAX:Word classes and part-of-speech tagging: English word classes Tagsets for
English Part-of-speech tagging Rule-based part-of-speech tagging Stochastic part-ofspeech tagging Transformation-based tagging Other issues. Context-Free Grammars for
English: Constituency Context-Free rules and trees Sentence-level constructions The
noun phrase Coordination Agreement The verb phase and sub categorization
Auxiliaries Spoken language syntax Grammars equivalence and normal form Finite-State
and Context-Free grammars Grammars and human processing. Parsing with Context-Free
Grammars: Parsing as search A Basic Top-Down parser Problems with the basic TopDown parser The early algorithm Finite-State parsing methods.
Module III

(12 hours)

ADVANCED FEATURES AND SYNTAX :Features and Unification: Feature structures


Unification of feature structures Features structures in the grammar Implementing
unification Parsing with unification constraints Types and Inheritance. Lexicalized and
Probabilistic Parsing: Probabilistic context-free grammar problems with PCFGs
Probabilistic lexicalized CFGs Dependency Grammars Human parsing.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

Module IV

(12 hours)

SEMANTIC:Representing Meaning: Computational desiderata for representations Meaning


structure of language First order predicate calculus Some linguistically relevant concepts
Related representational approaches Alternative approaches to meaning. Semantic Analysis:
Syntax-Driven semantic analysis Attachments for a fragment of English Integrating
semantic analysis into the early parser Idioms and compositionality Robust semantic
analysis. Lexical semantics: relational among lexemes and their senses WordNet: A database
of lexical relations The Internal structure of words Creativity and the lexicon.
Module V

(12 hours)

APPLICATIONS:Word Sense Disambiguation and Information Retrieval: Selectional


restriction-based disambiguation Robust word sense disambiguation Information retrieval
other information retrieval tasks. Natural Language Generation: Introduction to language
generation Architecture for generation Surface realization Discourse planning Other
issues. Machine Translation: Language similarities and differences The transfer metaphor
The interlingua idea: Using meaning Direct translation Using statistical techniques
Usability and system development.

References:
1. Daniel Jurafsky & James H.Martin, Speech and Language Processing, Pearson
Education(Singapore)Pte.Ltd.,2002.
2. James Allen, Natural Language Understanding, Pearson Education, 2003

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010805G06:PatternRecognition
Teaching Schemes
2 hours lecture and 2 hours tutorial per week

Credits:4

Objectives:
To impart a basic knowledge on pattern recognition and to give a sound idea
on the topics of parameter estimation and supervised learning, linear discriminant
functions and syntactic approach to PR.

To provide a strong foundation to students to understand and design pattern


recognition systems.
Module I (12 hours)
Introduction: introduction to statistical, syntactic and descriptive approaches, features
and feature extraction, learning and adaptation. Bayes Decision theory, introduction,
continuous case, 2-categoryclassification, minimum error rate classification,
classifiers. Discriminant functions and decision surfaces.
Module 2(12 hours)
Introuction- Maximum likelihood estimation - General principle,Gaussian case ; bias.
Bayesian estimation class conditioned density, parameterdistribution, Bayesian
Parameter estimation General Theory,Gibbs Algorithm Comparison of Bayes
Method with Maximum likelihood.
Module 3(12 hours)
Introduction,Density Estimation. Parzen Windows Convergence of mean,
variance,Kn Nearest Neighbourestimation,Nearest neighbor rule,Converge error
rate, error bound , partial distance.
Module 4(12 hours)
Linear discriminate functions and decision surfaces:-Introduction, training error,
Threshold weight, discriminate function two category case, multicategory case.
Generalized discriminant function, Quadratic discriminant functions, Polynomial
discriminant, PHI functions. Augmented vector.Two category linearly separable case:
weight space, solution region, margin, learning rate ,algorithm(Gradient descent
newton)Relaxation procedures.
Module 5(12 hours)
Syntactic approach to PR : Introduction to pattern grammars and languages ,higher
dimensional grammars, tree, graph, web, plex, and shape grammars, stochastic
grammars , attribute grammars, Parsing techniques, grammatical inference.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University


References
1.
2.

3.
4.
5.

R.O Duda, Hart P.E, Pattern Classification And Scene Analysis, John Wiley
Gonzalez R.C. & Thomson M.G., Syntactic Pattern Recognition - An Introduction,
Addison

Wesley.
J. T. Tou and R. C. Gonzalez, Pattern Recognition Principles, Wiley, 1974
Fu K.S., Syntactic Pattern Recognition And Applications, Prentice Hall,
Rajjan Shinghal, Pattern Recognition: Techniques and Applications, Oxford
University Press, 2008.

Syllabus- B.Tech. Computer Science & Engg

Mahatma Gandhi University

CS010 806: Computer Graphics Lab


Teaching scheme
3 hours practical per week

Credits: 2

Objectives

To acquaint the students with the implementation of fundamental algorithms in


Computer Graphics.

I. Experiments to implement the following: ( first 3 weeks)


1.
2.
3.
4.

DDA Algorithm
Bresenham's Line drawing Algorithm for any slope.
Mid-point Circle Algorithm.
2D Transformations

II. Experiments to implement the following:


1. 3D Rotations on a cube (about any axis, any general line) controlled by keyboard
navigation keys.
2. 3D Rotations on a cube with hidden surface elimination.(keyboard controlled)
3. Composite transformations
4. Bezier cubic splines like screen saver
5. Any Fractal Construction (Koch curve )
6. Animations using the above experiments.(eg.moving along curved path)
Any experiment according to the syllabus of CS010 702 Computer Graphics can be
substituted subjected to permission from competent authority.

Syllabus B.Tech. Computer Science & Engineering

CS010 807 Project Work


Teaching scheme

credits: 4

6 hours practical per week


The progress in the project work is to be presented by the middle of eighth semester before the
evaluation committee. By this time, the students will be in a position to publish a paper in
international/ national journals/conferences. The EC can accept, accept with modification, and request
a resubmission.
The progress of project work is found unsatisfactory by the EC during the middle of the eighth semester
presentation, such students has to present again to the EC at the end of the semester and if it is also found
unsatisfactory an extension of the project work can be given to the students.
Project report: To be prepared in proper format decided by the concerned department. The report shall
record all aspects of the work, highlighting all the problems faced and the approach/method employed to
solve such problems. Members of a project group shall prepare and submit separate reports. Report of
each member shall give details of the work carried out by him/her, and only summarise other members
work.

The students sessional marks for project will be out of 100, in which 60 marks will be based on
day to day performance assessed by the guide. Balance 40 marks will be awarded based on the
presentation of the project by the students before an evaluation committee.
For Project, the minimum for a pass shall be 50% of the total marks assigned to the Project
work.

CS010 808
Teaching scheme

Viva -Voce
credits: 2

A comprehensive oral Viva-voce examination will be conducted to assess the student's


intellectual achievement, depth of understanding in the specified field of engineering and papers
published / accepted for publication etc. At the time of viva-voce, certified bound reports of
seminar and project work are to be presented for evaluation. The certified bound report(s) of
educational tour/industrial training/ industrial visit shall also be brought during the final VivaVoce.
An internal and external examiner is appointed by the University for the Conduct of viva voce
University examination.
For Viva-voce, the minimum for a pass shall be 50% of the total marks assigned to the
Viva-voce.
Note: If a candidate has passed all examinations of B.Tech. course (at the time of publication of
results of eighth semester) except Viva-Voce in the eighth semester, a re-examination for the
Viva-Voce should be conducted within one month after the publication of results. Each candidate
should apply for this Save a Semester examination within one week after the publication of
eighth semester results.

APPENDIX 2
Publication List

Publication List for the past three years:


1. M Thangamani, Manoj T Joy, K. Venkatachalam, A. Kalyanasaravanan,Performance Comparison of
Document Clustering with Ontology Knowledge Representation,International Conference on
Advances in Science and Technology(ICAST 2014), Bangkok,ISSN 2348-5426,Vol.7, Issue 2,on 15th
and 16th Feb 2014
2. Manoj T Joy,Jenny Elizabeth John,A Novel Approach for improving the performance of Geographic
Routing
in MANET using OGRP,International Journal of Engineering Research and Technology,ISSN: 22780181,Vol. 3 Issue 8, August - 2014
3. Manoj T Joy,Josekutty Abraham,Intelligent HTML Code Analyzer and Builder from PSD
Layers,International
Journal of Scientific and Research Publications,ISSN 2250-3153,Volume 4, Issue 10,October 2014
4. Syamala S,Shiney Thomas, Manoj T Joy,Face Detection-A Comparison of HSV With LAB Color Space
Model,International Journal of Engineering Research and Technology,IJERT,Volume 2,Issue 9,ISSN:
2278-0181,Vol. 2 Issue 9, September - 2013
5. Fr. Rubin Thottupuram, Sandhya Ramakrishnan, Joms Antony,SMS based E-Assessments enabling
better student engagement,evaluation and recommendation services in E-Learning making use of
Fuzzy rules and course ontology, IEEE conference at IIT-Hyderabad(T4E 2012) ,ISBN:978-1-46732173-0,18-20 July 2012,DOI:10.1109/T4E.2012.9
6. Saranya S Kumar , Rakhi MR , Pranamya V Nair , Pritty M ,Multifactor authenticated Voting System
based on Mobile Communication,National Conference
7. Muhusina Ismail, Shiney Thomas,Survey on Wavelet Based ECG Steganography for Protecting
Patients Confidential Information,International Journal of Scientific Research and Development
Volume 2,Issue 12- February 2015,ISSN (online): 2321-0613,Volume 2,Issue 12- February 2015
8. Sonu Jacob,Neethu Thomas,Aby Jacob, Shiney Thomas,INSTALERT - A Path Tracker Mobile
Application Using GPS,proceedings of International Conference on Recent Trends in Engineering
and Technology-2014 (ICRTET-2014),Kanthimathi Publications, Chennai ,ISBN No. 978-93-5137551-7,pp-5-8,18th - 19th January 2014
9. Neethu K George, Shiney Thomas,Data Hiding for High Image Quality Based on Local Complexity
and Interpolation,International Journal of Advance Research in Computer Science and
Management Studies,ISSN: 232 7782 (Online)pp:217-222,Volume 2, Issue 9, September 2014
10. Tina Maria Thomas, Shiney Thomas,Fibonacci Based Permutation Tree for 3D
Steganography,International Journal of Research in Computer Application and Information
Technology,ISSN: (O) 2347-5099(P) 2348-0009,pp:17-26,Volume 2, Issue 6, November-December,
2014,DOI:10.1109/T4E.2012.9
11. Tina Maria Thomas, Jiss Varghese and Shiney Thomas,An Improvement to Vertex Decimation:
Finding referencing neighbors for low distortion in 3D steganography,International Conference on
Control Communication and Computing (ICCC) ,ISBN: 978-1-4799-0573-7,13-15 Dec. 2013,
12. DOI: 10.1109/ICCC.2013.6731661
13. Gloriya Mathew, Shiney Thomas,A Novel Multifactor Authentication System Ensuring Usability and
Security,International Journal of Security, Privacy and Trust Management ( IJSPTM) Vol 2, No 5,
October 2013,ISSN(Online) 2394-1537,DOI:10.5121/ijsptm.2013.2503, Vol 2, No 5, October 2013
14. Syamala S,Shiney Thomas, Manoj T Joy,Face Detection-A Comparison of HSV With LAB Color Space
Model,International Journal of Engineering Research and Technology,IJERT,Volume 2,Issue
9(September 2013),e-ISSN: 2278-0181,,Volume 2,Issue 9, September 2013
15. Merin G Varghese,Meenumol Babu,Maria Jacob,Lakshmy Mohan,Shiney Thomas,GSM Based PC
Controller,ACUMEN6[1],March 2013
16. Gloriya Mathew, Shiney Thomas,An Authentication System for Information Security using Cued
Click Point and one time session key,International Journal of Engineering Research & Technology
(IJERT),e-ISSN: 2278-0181, Vol. 2 Issue 7, July - 2013

17. Merin G. Varghese, Meenumol Babu, Maria Jacob, Lakshmi Mohan, Shiney Thomas,GSM Based PC
Controller,National Conference Mobile Computing, 20th to 21st September 2012, Marian College,
Idukki.,,
18. Joms Antony, Fr. Rubin Thottupuram, Shiney Thomas, Melbin Varghese John,Semantic Web based
Adaptive E-Learning triggered through Short Message Services,The 7th International Conference
on Computer Science & Education (ICCSE 2012) ,14-17 July 2012, ISBN:978-1-4673-0241-8,
DOI: 10.1109/ICCSE.2012.6295434,
19. Sai Krishna , Resmipriya M G,A Comparative Analysis on Techniques for Recognition of Facial
Images with Problem Specification,International Journal of Computer Science and Management
Research ,ISSN 2278-733X,Volume 4,Issue 3, March 2015
20. Resmipriya M G, Sangeetha N,An efficient approach for preventing online password guessing
attacks,International Journal of Computer Science and Management Research,ISSN 2278-733X,Vol
2, Issue 3,March 2013
21. Fathima Nizar,G.S. Santhoshkumar,A Survey on ABE Based Secure Data Retrieval Schemes for DTN
Networks,International Journal of Engineering Trends and Technology,ISSN: 2231-5381,Volume 20
Number 1 Feb 2015
22. Varsha Sabu,G.S. Santhoshkumar,Ensuring Fairness in the distributed Peer to peer file sharing
System,International Journal Of Scientific Research And Education,ISSN (e): 2321-7545,Volume2,
Issue 9, September-2014
23. Veena Rani,G.S. Santhoshkumar,A Novel Approach for Improving the Network Performance in
MANET using ant Intelligence,International Journal of Engineering Research & Technology
(IJERT),e-ISSN: 2278-0181,Vol. 3 Issue 8, August - 2014
24. Joms Antony , Bichu Vijayan, Sudhin Joy, G.S. Santhoshkumar, Nikhil Chandran,Ubiquitous Patient
Monitoring and Smart AlertGeneration in an Intensive Care Unit Supported by Low Cost Tablet PC
based Automation System Powered through Open Source Software and Hardware
Platforms,Global Humanitarian Technology Conference: South Asia Satellite (GHTC-SAS), 2013
IEEE
,Print
ISBN:
978-1-4799-1094-6, Page(s): 334 - 339,23-24 Aug. 2013, DOI:10.1109/GHTC-SAS.2013.6629941
25. Anju.K.S, Anumol Mathew, Joms Antony , Sudhin Joy , Bichu Vijayan,G.S. Santhoshkumar,Business
Process Reengineering of the Workflows in Intensive Care Unit Supportedwith a Tablet PC Based
Automation System,2013 Third International Conference on Advances in Computing and
Communications ,978-0-7695-5033-6/13,Page(s): 265 - 268,29-31 Aug. 2013
26. Anju.K.S ,G.S. Santhoshkumar,Tintu Alphonsa Thomas,Secure-BIGWHEEL: A Secure Multi-party
Communication Protocol for DDoS Defence Framework in NS2,International Journal of Advanced
Research in Computer Science and Software Engineering,ISSN: 2277 128X,Volume 3, Issue 10,
October 2013
27. Ani Jacob, Alpha Jose , Meril D Pallan, Nessy Susan Varghese,G.S. Santhoshkumar,Secure Public
Information Services Using SMS with IMEI Authentication System, National Conference Saint Gits.
28. Jenny Elizabeth John, Varsha Sabu,Veena Rani,G.S. Santhoshkumar,A Novel Approach for
Enhancing Trustworthiness using ReTT and Mobile Agent Technology for Securing Ad Hoc Wireless
networks.
29. Anju.K.S ,G.S. Santhoshkumar,Tintu Alphonsa Thomas,A Dynamic Cryptographic Approach to
defend against Distributed DoS Attacks in Multiparty Applications,International Journal of
Engineering Research & Technology , ISSN: 2278-0181, Vol.2 - Issue 8 ,August - 2013
30. Soumya Thomas,Syam Gopi,A secure data transmission in manets using hybrid
technique,International Journal of Engineering Research & Technology (IJERT),ISSN: 2278-0181,
Vol.2 - Issue 8 ,August - 2013
31. Bini M Issac,Neethu K George,Syam Gopi, A Novel Approach for Sampling Mobile Phone
Accelerometer Sensor Data for Daily Mood Assessment,International Conference at Saintgits
College of Engineering,Pathamuttom (ICGITS 2013),41365
32. Sonia Thomas, Elisabeth Thomas,Survey on Real Time Broadcast Authentication Schemes for

33.
34.
35.
36.

37.
38.

39.

40.

41.

42.
43.
44.
45.

46.

47.

Command and Control Messages,International Journal of Computer Science and Information


Technologies ,ISSN :0975-9646,Volume 6,Issue 1- January 2015
Sanjuna Sabu,Jerin Thomas,A Survey on Segmentation Techniques used for Brain Tumor
Detection,International Journal of Modern Trends in Engineering and Research ,e-ISSN: 2349-9745
p-ISSN: 2393-8161,Volume 2,Issue 1- January 2015
Reshma Raj, Anishamol Abraham,A Survey on Communciation for Smartphone,International
Journal of Modern Trends in Engineering and Research ,e-ISSN: 2349-9745 p-ISSN: 23938161,Volume 2,Issue 1- January 2015
Irin Ani John, Tintu Alphonsa Thomas,A survey on Big Data mining Challenges,International Journal
of Modern Trends in Engineering and Research ,e-ISSN: 2349-9745 p-ISSN: 2393-8161,Volume
2,Issue 1- January 2015
Safna Sulaiman, Tintu Alphonsa Thomas,A Neighbor Coverage-Based Rebroadcast in MANETs
Based on Energy Efficient Rebroadcast Probability,International Journal of Innovative Research in
Electronics and Communications (IJIREC),ISSN 2349-4042 (Print) & ISSN 2349-4050
(Online),Volume 1, Issue 7, PP 1-8, October 2014
Anju.K.S ,G.S. Santhoshkumar,Tintu Alphonsa Thomas,A Dynamic Cryptographic Approach To
Defend Against Distributed DoS Attacks In Multiparty Applications,International Journal of
Engineering Research & Technology(IJERT), e-ISSN: 2278-0181, Vol.2 - Issue 8,August - 2013
Anju.K.S ,G.S. Santhoshkumar, Tintu Alphonsa Thomas,Secure -BIGWHEEL: A Secure Multiparty
Communication Protocol for DDoS Defence Framework in NS3,International Journal of Advanced
Research in Computer Science and Software Engineering ,ISSN: 2277 128X,Volume 3, Issue 10,
October 2013
Oleena Thomas, Sumy Joseph,Literature Analysis on Reputation Models for Feedback in Ecommerce,International Journal of Advanced Research in Computer and Communication
Engineering, ISSN (Online) : 2278-1021 ISSN (Print) : 2319-5940,Vol. 4, Issue 1, January 2015,
DOI:10.17148/IJARCCE.2015.4167
Bittu Ann Mathew, Sumy Joseph,A novel approach for load balancing in heterogeneous Cellular
network,International Conference On Innovations & Advances In Science, Engineering And
Technology,ISSN (Online) : 2319 - 8753 ISSN (Print) : 2347 - 6710,Volume 3, Special Issue 5, July
2014
Bittu Ann Mathew,Sneha Sebastian,Neenu R,Sumy Joseph,A survey of two probabilistic and
Deterministic packet marking mechanism for IP Traceback,International Conference on Global
Innovations in Technology and Sciences, ICGITS 2013, organized by SAINTGITS College of
Engineering,6th April 2013
Rintu Tom, Catherine Jose, Sumy Joseph, A Hybrid Approach for biometric Security Using Tone
mapping,CBIR,and SRC,International Conference on Global Innovations in Technology and
Sciences, ICGITS 2013, organized by SAINTGITS College of Engineering,6th April 2013
Fr. Biju John, Sumy Joseph, Data Migration and controlling issues in Cloud Computing, Proceedings
of the 5th International Conference SEEC-2012, pp: 41-47.
Sumy Joseph, An Architecture Based Methodology for Parallel Independent Computation in
Enterprise Edition, Proceedings of the 5th International Conference SEEC-2012, pp: 1-5.
Veena U K, Catherine Jose, Jayakrishna V,A Novel Approach for Mass Classification of Digital
Mammogram Using Multiresolution Analysis and Adaptive Dimension Reduction,International
Conference on innovations, Advances in Science, Engineering and Technology (ICIASET-2014)TOCH Institute of Technology,2014
Veena U K, Catherine Jose, Jayakrishna V,A Novel Approach for Mass Classification of Digital
Mammogram Using Multiresolution Analysis and Adaptive Dimension Reduction,International
Journal of Innovative Research in Science, Engineering and Technology-IJIRSET volume 3, Special
Issue July 5, 2014),ISSN (Online):2319-8753, ISSN (Print): 2347-6710,Volume 3, Special Issue 5,
July 2014
Veena, Jayakrishna V,CAD Based System for Automatic Detection and Classification of Suspicious

48.
49.

50.
51.

52.

53.
54.
55.
56.
57.

58.
59.
60.

61.
62.

Lesions in Mammograms,International Journal of Emerging Trends & Technology in Computer


Science (IJETTCS), ISSN 2278-6856,Volume 3, Issue 4, August 2014
Nisha Joseph , Divya Mohan, Jayakrishna V,Compression of Color Images Using Clustering
Techniques, International Conference on Global Innovations Technology and Science (ICGITS),6th
April 2013
Nisha Joseph , Divya Mohan,Jayakrishna V.,Compression of Color Images Using Clustering
Techniques, International Journal of Scientific and Engineering Research,ISSN 2229-5518,Volume
4,
Issue
8,
August 2013
Shafeena Basheer, Akas G Kamal,Jayakrishna V,Computer Assisted X-Ray Analysis System for
Detection of Onset Tuberculosis.,International Journal for Scientific Research and
Development,ISSN 2229-5518,Volume 4, Issue 9, September 2013
Gloriya Mathew, Neema Babu, Rintumol Joseph, Shafeena Basheer ,Shiju George, Dr. Dina
Nair,Jayakrishna V,Ubiquitous creation of electronic medical records and clinical data
management using Tablet PC,International Conference on Global Innovations Technology and
Science- SAINTGITS (ICGITS),6th April 2013
Gloriya Mathew, Neema Babu, Rintumol Joseph, Shafeena Basheer ,Shiju George, Dr. Dina
Nair,Jayakrishna V,Ubiquitous creation of electronic medical records and clinical data
management using Tablet PC,International Journal of Scientific and Engineering Research,ISSN
2229-5518,Volume 4, Issue 8, August 2013
Jisha Babu, Neema Babu, Teenu Therese Paul, Shiju George, Jayakrishna V, Gomathi
Sekhar,Business Process Re-engineering of Bacteriology Laboratory Using Tablet PC,International
Conference on Global Innovations Technology and Science- SAINTGITS (ICGITS),6th April 2013
Jisha Babu, Neema Babu, Teenu Therese Paul, Shiju George, Jayakrishna V, Gomathi
Sekhar,Business Process Re-engineering of Bacteriology Laboratory Using Tablet PC,International
Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research,ISSN 2229-5518,Volume 4, Issue 8, August 2013
Akhila G.P, Shafeena Basheer, Jayakrishna V,Advanced Hybrid Color Space Normalization for
Human Face Extraction and Detection,International Journal for Scientific Research and
Development (IJSRD), ISSN (Online): 2321-0613,Volume 1, Issue 4,July 2013
Neethu C Sekhar, Neenu R,Secure and Efficient Mechanism for quick transmission of Safety Critical
Information in VANET,International Journal of Engineering Research and Technology (IJERT) ,eISSN: 2278-0181,Volume 2 - Issue 11,November- 2013
Bittu Ann Mathew,Sneha Sebastian,Neenu R,Sumy Joseph,A survey of two probabilistic and
Deterministic packet marking mechanism for IP Traceback,International Conference on Global
Innovations in Technology and Sciences, ICGITS 2013, organized by SAINTGITS College of
Engineering,6th April 2013
Antony Thomas, Krishnalal G,A Novel Approach of Load Balancing Strategy in Cloud Computing,
International Conference on Innovations, Advances in Science, Engineering and Technology
(ICIASET-2014)-TOCH Institute of Technology,2014
Antony Thomas, Krishnalal G,A Novel Approach of Load Balancing Strategy in Cloud Computing,
International Journal of Innovative Research in Science, Engineering and Technology (IJIRSET),
ISSN (Online) : 2319 - 8753,ISSN (Print) : 2347 - 6710,Volume 3, Special Issue 5, July 2014
Antony Thomas,Krishnalal G, Jagathy Raj V P,Credit Based Scheduling Algorithm in Cloud
Computing Environment,Proceedings of the International Conference on Information and
Communication Technologies, ICICT 2014 at Bolgatty Palace & Island Resort, Kochi,
India,ISSN:1877-0509,Volume
46,
Pages
913920,3-5
December
2014,DOI:10.1016/j.procs.2015.02.162
Jisha Babu, G. Krishnalal,A Secure Communication for a Reputation Management Model in Multiagent System,International Journal of Computer Applications, ISSN:09758887,Volume 84 No 2,
December 2013
Jisha Babu, G. Krishnalal,A Secure Data Transmission For Mutliagent System Using Digital

63.
64.
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66.
67.
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71.
72.

73.

74.
75.

76.
77.

Signature,International Journal of Engineering Research & Technology(IJERT),e-ISSN: 22780181,Vol. 2, Issue 8, August - 2013
Sneha Sebastian,Neethu C Sekhar,A Method Based on Data Fragmentation to Increase the
Performance of ICTCP During Incast Congestion in Networks,International Journal on Recent and
Innovation Trends in Computing and Communication,2321-8169, Volume: 2,Issue: 9, Sept 2014
Neethu C Sekhar,Design Of High Probability and Low Overhead Propagation Mechanism for
Beacons in VANET,International Journal of Computer Science Trends and Technology (IJCST),ISSN:
2347-8578,Volume 2, Issue 3,June 2014
Neethu C Sekhar,Neenu R,Secure and Efficient Mechanism for quick transmission of Safety Critical
Information in VANET,International Journal of Engineering Research and Technology (IJERT) , eISSN: 2278-0181,Vol.2 - Issue 11, November - 2013
Bini M Issac,Deepu Benson,Distributed Addressing Protocol for Node Auto configuration in Ad Hoc
Networks using Bloom Filters,International Journal of Computer Applications Technology and
Research,ISSN:23198656,Volume 3 Issue 6,July 2014
Bini M Issac,Deepu Benson,ID Based Addressing Scheme for Node Autoconfiguration in Ad Hoc
Networks,International Journal of Computer Science & Communication Networks,ISSN:22495789,Vol 4(5),pp:160-164,2014
Teenu Therese Paul, Jisha Babu, Neema Babu, Shiju George, Jayakrishna V, Gomathi
Sekhar,Business Process Re-engineering of Bacteriology Laboratory Using Tablet PC,International
Conference on Global Innovations Technology and Science- SAINTGITS (ICGITS),6th April 2013
Teenu Therese Paul, Jisha Babu, Neema Babu, Shiju George, Jayakrishna V, Gomathi
Sekhar,Business Process Re-engineering of Bacteriology Laboratory Using Tablet PC,International
Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research,ISSN 2229-5518,Volume 4, Issue 8, August 2013
Teenu Therese Paul,Secure Android Model-Based Voice Recognition for Laboratory Test Result
Entry,International Conference on Semantic E-business and Enterprise Computing, December
2013
Teenu Therese Paul, Shiju George,Voice Recognition Based Secure Android Model for Inputting
Smear Test Results,International Journal for Engineering Sciences and Emerging Technologies,
ISSN: 22316604, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp: 344-351,December 2013
Jiss Varghese, Lisha Varghese , Fabeela Ali Rawther,Enabling Search and Retrieval over Encrypted
Data using Homomorphic Encryption,International Journal of Innovative Research in Science,
Engineering and Technology,ISSN (Online) : 2319 - 8753 ISSN (Print) : 2347 - 6710,Volume 3,
Special Issue 5, July 2014
Balagopal Komarath, Jayalal Sarma, K. S. Sunil , On the Complexity of L-reachability. ,Lecture Notes
in Computer Science in Book Tilted Descriptional Complexity of Formal Systems in 16th
International Workshop, DCFS 2014,Turku, Finland, Series volume: 8614,Series ISSN:03029743,Springer International Publishing, Print ISBN: 978-3-319-09703-9,Online ISBN:978-3-31909704-6, Proceedings Pages pp 258-269, August 5-8, 2014, DOI:10.1007/978-3-319-09704-6_23
Treesa Antony , Lisha Varghese,A Novel Approach for Efficient Log Management using Event
Filtering,International Journal of Application or Innovation in Engineering & Management
(IJAIEM),ISSN 2319 - 4847,Volume 3, Issue 8,August 2014
Jiss Varghese , Lisha Varghese , Fabeela Ali Rawther,Enabling Search and Retrieval over Encrypted
Data Using Homomorphic Encryption,International Journal of Innovative Research in Science,
Engineering and Technology,ISSN (Online) : 2319 - 8753 ISSN (Print) : 2347 - 6710,Volume 3,
Special Issue 5,July 2014
Treesa Antony, Lisha Varghese,A Novel Approach for Efficient Log Management using Event
Filtering,International Journal of Application or Innovation in Engineering & Management
(IJAIEM),ISSN 2319 - 4847,Volume 3, Issue 8, August 2014
Jiss Varghese , Lisha Varghese,Homomorphic Encryption for Multi-keyword based Search and
Retrieval over Encrypted Data,International Journal of Application or Innovation in Engineering &
Management (IJAIEM),ISSN 2319 - 4847,Volume 3, Issue 8, August 2014

78. Fr. Biju John,Sumy Joseph,Data Migration and controlling issues in Cloud Computing,Proceedings
of the 5th International Conference SEEC-2012,pp:41-47,2012.

APPENDIX 3
List of Faculty Interactions &
Funding

Sl.
No
1
2
3

4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

13

14

15
16

17

18

19

20

Name of the Programme

Coordinator Name

Dates

Amount

Funding Agency

Two weeks ISTE workshop


on Introduction to Algorithms
Aakash Lab setup
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Pedagogy in Engg.
education
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Control Systems
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Cyber Security
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Computer networks
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Computer Programming
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Fluid Mechanics
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Signals and Systems
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Engineering Mechanics
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Analog Electronics
Two week ISTE workshop on
Database Management
Systems
Aakash Android Application
Programming Workshop for
Student
Two day ISTE Workshop on
Research Methods in
Educational Technology
Two week ISTE workshop on
Thermodynamics
Two Week ISTE workshop
on Introduction to Research
Methodologies
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Computational Fluid
Dynamics
Two day ISTE workshop on
Writing Papers for Technical
Conferences
Two weeks ISTE workshop
on Heat Transfer

Shiney Thomas,
Syam Gopi
Prof.Manoj T Joy
Syam Gopi

May 2015

79,963

NMEICT-IIT KGP

January 2015
5-31,January
2015

1,00,000
53,964

NMEICT-IIT Bombay
NMEICT-IIT Bombay

Syam Gopi

2-12,Dec 2014

94,768

NMEICT-IIT KGP

Prof.Manoj T Joy,
Syam Gopi
Resmipriya M G,
Syam Gopi
Santhosh Kumar
G.S, Syam Gopi
Syam Gopi

10-20,July 2014

1,06,028

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

30 June-5 July
2014
10-20 July 2014

65,650
1,06,018

NMEICT-IIT
Bombay
NMEICT-IIT Bombay

20-30 May 2014

1,37,708

NMEICT-IIT KGP

Syam Gopi

2-12 JAN 2014

1,41,000

NMEICT-IIT KGP

Syam Gopi

26 NOV-6 DEC

1,63,421

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

Syam Gopi

June 4 - 14, 2013

1,46,615

NMEICT-IIT KGP

Krishnalal G,
Syam Gopi

May 21 - 31,
2013

1,43,537

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

Prof.Manoj T Joy

23rd & 24th Feb


and 2nd & 3rd
March 2013
February 2 & 9,
2013

10,000

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

7,000

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

Syam Gopi

December 2012

1,24,732

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

Jayakrishna V,
Syam Gopi

June 2012

1,73,071

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

Syam Gopi

June 2012

1,62,252

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

Arun K S,
Syam Gopi

18, 19 February
2012

33,500

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

Syam Gopi

Dec 2011

2,03,025

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

Two weeks ISTE workshop


on Software Development

Sunil K S,
Syam Gopi

Nov 2011

3,75,381

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

Syam Gopi

21

22
23

Techniques for Teachers of


Engineering and Science
Institutes
Two weeks ISTE workshop
Syam Gopi
on Solar PhotovolaticsFundamentals, Technologies
and Applications
Two weeks ISTE workshop
Syam Gopi
on Basic Electronics
Two weeks ISTE workshop
Syam Gopi
on Thermodynamics
Total Funds received

Dec 2011

1,99,045

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

June 2011

2,40,406

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

June 2011

1,99,679

NMEICT-IIT Bombay

29,86,800/
-