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ENC 1102-522, 3 credit hours

Composition II
Fall 2016, Online
Instructor: Dr. Ann Lawrence
E-mail: annlawrence@sar.usf.edu (preferred means of contact)
Office Phone: (941)359-4226
Office Location: SMC C236
Online Office Hours: by appointment
Google Hangout & Skype Username: annmlawrence (Please note the m.)
PREREQUISITES: ENC 1101 (or the equivalent, i.e. passing the CLEP exam)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: ENC 1102 emphasizes argument, research, and style. As students
engage in creative and critical thinking, they learn to support assertions based on audience and
purpose; students apply library research, strategies for revision, and peer response.
General Education Communication Course (SMCO)
o USFSM Core Communication Learning Outcome: Students will communicate effectively by
means of written and/or oral modalities.
Florida DOE Statewide General Education Communications Learning Outcome #1
o USFSM Core Critical Thinking Learning Outcome: Students will demonstrate the skills
necessary to be proficient critical thinkers.
Florida DOE Statewide General Education Communications Learning Outcome #2
Gordon Rule Communication Course (6ACO)
COURSE TOPICS:
Following ENC 1101, ENC 1102 offers students more complex opportunities to engage with
rhetorical concepts (e.g., argument, audience, genre, purpose) and strategies for using them to
analyze, evaluate, and compose a variety of texts;
library research and strategies for working with source material (e.g., analyzing, synthesizing, and
evaluating magazine/newspaper and scholarly articles);
undergraduate research involving field observations, interviews, surveys, and/or questionnaires;
Book Club discussions that focus on rhetorical genre study;
composing processes (invention, arrangement, revision, collaboration);
strategic rhetorical uses of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, punctuation,
spelling) and the broader stylistic conventions of particular genres (e.g., organization, tone, word
choice);
APA style.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
USFSM First-Year Writing Outcomes
(based on the Council of Writing Program Administrators (2014) "WPA Outcomes Statement for FirstYear Composition (3.0);" http://wpacouncil.org/positions/outcomes.html)
Rhetorical Knowledge: Students understand rhetorical concepts (e.g., argument, audience,
genre, purpose) and use them strategically in analyzing, evaluating, and composing a variety of
texts.
Critical Thinking, Reading, and Composing: Students identify appropriate sources for their
projects; analyze and evaluate evidence-claim connections in those sources; and responsively
and responsibly integrate those sources with their own arguments.
Processes: Students explore composing processes and acquire a repertoire of creative, critical,
and collaborative strategies that they apply to develop and refine effective texts, using
appropriate technologies.
Knowledge of Conventions: Students learn about sentence-level language conventions (e.g.,
grammar, punctuation, spelling) and the broader stylistic conventions of particular genres (e.g.,
organization, tone, word choice); moreover, students strategically use language to appeal to
different audiences and to address a range of purposes.

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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USFSM Critical Thinking Outcomes


Students formulate vital questions and problems/issues clearly.
Students gather and assesses relevant information.
Students identify relevant assumptions, alternatives, and implications.
Students come to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions.
Students communicate reasoning effectively.
COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of ENC 1102, students will have
engaged in regular explorations of composing processes, including peer response;
written a personal essay in which they recounted three stories about their lives and explained
how each story illustrates their research interests;
selected a research topic for an undergraduate research project and reviewed 5
magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles on their topic in an annotated bibliography;
written a formal research proposal in which they synthesized their 8 annotated articles, developed
research question(s) on their topic, and outlined their study design;
designed and presented a slideshow on their proposed undergraduate research project;
composed a writing portfolio in which they explained how samples of their ENC 1102 work met
the USFSM First-Year Writing and Critical Thinking Outcomes;
practiced using APA style.
TEXTS AND MATERIALS:
The required book for ENC 1102 is Rebekah Nathans (2005) My Freshman Year: What a
Professor Learned by Becoming a Student. You are not required to purchase this book at the
USF Bookstore. The first selection of this book must be read by 10/12/16.
In addition to the required course book, selected readings will be posted on CANVAS.
USFSM requires all students to have laptops that can be brought with them to class. You are
required to use a working laptop or equivalent in ENC 1102 to complete your online work.
In ENC 1102, you will have opportunities during peer-response sessions to receive feedback on
your compositions from your classmates, and to explore and refine your repertoire of peerresponse strategies. Be prepared to e-mail copies of Major Projects 1-3 to your classmates, as
well as your feedback on their work, for Peer Response days listed on the course schedule.
CANVAS USE:
The class syllabus is posted in CANVAS, an online course management system. In ENC 1102,
you will use CANVAS to submit your work for grading. For this purpose, you will need to create a
unique filename for each document that you upload to CANVAS (e.g.,
AnnLawrence_ReadingResponse1_082916).
Course information will also be provided on CANVAS. Accordingly, you should check CANVAS
on a regular basis.
Information on how to use CANVAS is available at: http://usfsm.edu/elearning
CANVAS is accessible via the myUSF online web portal, or directly at http://learn.usf.edu
Dr. Lawrence will notify you of any course schedule changes in advance. However, you should
make it a policy to check CANVAS for updates at least 2 hours before class meetings.
COURSE POLICIES:
Course Assignments
Weekly Work: 20% of course grade
Project 1: 15% of course grade
Project 2: 20% of course grade
Project 3: 30% of course grade
Project 4: 10% of course grade
Project 5: 5% of course grade (To pass ENC 1102, you must earn at least a 2.00 on Project 5.)

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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Grading Scale
Weekly Work assignments are graded Complete/Incomplete. Major Projects are graded on a 4.00
scale. Similarly, your final course grade is calculated using the USFSM grading scale:
A = 4.00
A- = 3.67
B+ = 3.33
B = 3.00

B- = 2.67
C+ = 2.33
C = 2.00
C- = 1.67*

D+ = 1.33
D = 1.00
D- = 0.67
F = 0.00

For example, in ENC 1102, a final grade more than 3.67 is an A; a final grade less than 1.00 is an F.
*To pass ENC 1102 (a General Education course), you must earn a final grade of 1.67 (C-) or better.
Late Assignments
Dr. Lawrence will accept 1 of the first 3 major projects up to 7 days late, no questions asked.
Subsequent late projects will receive one full letter grade (1.00) less for each day (24 hours) that
they are late.
No late Weekly Work will be accepted in ENC 1102.
Revising Major Projects
From the date that you receive a grade on each of the first 3 major projects, you will have 7 days
to submit a revision.
As a reminder, Dr. Lawrence will announce these revision due dates online.
The grade that you receive on your revision will be averaged with your initial grade for the major
project.
Late major projects are not eligible for revision.
Make-Up Work
Make-up work will not be accepted in ENC 1102.
Extra Credit
Extra credit opportunities will not be offered in ENC 1102.
Attendance
All USFSM writing courses are interactive and require committed student participation.
Accordingly, you may miss up to one week of class, or 1 day of Weekly Writing assignments,
without adversely affecting your grade.
You should reserve this absence to address the observance of religious holidays not
acknowledged by the university calendar, family events, serious illness, etc.
You will not need to provide Dr. Lawrence with the reason for your absence or supporting
documentation.
Inappropriate behavior (e.g., insults, off-topic comments, profanity) in your online interactions with
your classmates or Dr. Lawrence will result in an automatic grade of Incomplete for the Weekly
Writing assignment. Hate speech or threats of any kind will not be tolerated and will result in a
final course grade of 0.00 (F) and expulsion from the online course.
Note Taking
You are invited to take notes on ENC 1102. However, no audio or video recording is permitted.
You are not allowed to purchase or sell notes for ENC 1102.
You are also welcome to share your notes with your ENC 1102 classmates.
Professional Conduct
You are expected to be courteous, thoughtful, compassionate, and responsible in your interactions with
your ENC 1102 classmates and Dr. Lawrence.

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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Plagiarism
Plagiarism is intentionally or carelessly presenting others work of as ones own. Plagiarism
includes submitting an assignment purported to be the students original work, which has, in fact,
been partially or wholly devised by another author. Plagiarism also encompasses improper
citation of sources. Students who are unsure about strategies for avoiding plagiarism must
consult with Dr. Lawrence for clarification and guidance before plagiarism is committed.
In your ENC 1102 work (Weekly Work, Major Projects),
o every direct quotation must be identified by quotation marks or appropriate indentation
(block quotes), and properly acknowledged, using APA conventions for parenthetical
citations and references;
o every partial or total paraphrase or summary of source material must be properly
acknowledged, using APA conventions for parenthetical citations and references;
o information gained from other sources, which is not common professional knowledge
(unlike, for example, Tallahassee is the capital of Florida), must be properly
acknowledged, using APA conventions for parenthetical citations and references.
All work (Weekly Work, Major Projects) submitted for a grade in ENC 1102 should be unique to
this course.
USFSM AND USF SYSTEM POLICIES:
Policies are available in the USFSM Catalog and at regulationspolicies.usf.edu
A. Academic Dishonesty: The University considers any form of plagiarism or cheating on exams,
projects, or papers to be unacceptable behavior. Please review the USF System Regulation USF3.027
Academic Integrity of Students and the USF System Regulation USF6.0021 Student Code of Conduct.
B. Academic Disruption: The University does not tolerate behavior that disrupts the learning process.
Please review USF System Regulation USF3.025 Disruption of Academic Policy.
C. Contingency Plans: In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USFSM to suspend
normal operations. During this time, USFSM may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods
that include but are not limited to: Canvas, online conferencing/collaboration tools, email messaging,
and/or an alternate schedule. It is the responsibility of the student to monitor Canvas for each of their
classes for course specific communication, as well as the USFSM website, their student email account,
and MoBull messages for important general information. The USF hotline at 1 (800) 992-4231 is updated
with pre-recorded information during an emergency. See the Campus Police Website for further
information.
D. Disabilities Accommodation: Students are responsible for registering with the Office of Students
with Disabilities Services (SDS) in order to receive academic accommodations. Reasonable notice must
be given to the SDS office (typically 5 working days) for accommodations to be arranged. It is the
responsibility of the student to provide each instructor with a copy of the official Memo of Accommodation.
Contact Information: Disability Coordinator, 941-359-4714, disabilityservices@sar.usf.edu,
http://usfsm.edu/disability-services/
E. Fire Alarm Instructions: At the beginning of each semester please note the emergency exit maps
posted in each classroom. These signs are marked with the primary evacuation route (red) and
secondary evacuation route (orange) in case the building needs to be evacuated. See Emergency
Evacuation Procedures.
F. Religious Observances: USFSM recognizes the right of students and faculty to observe major
religious holidays. Students who anticipate the necessity of being absent from class for a major religious
observance must provide notice of the date(s) to the instructor, in writing, by the second week of classes.
Instructors canceling class for a religious observance should have this stated in the syllabus with an
appropriate alternative assignment.
G. Protection of Students Against Discrimination and Harassment:
1. Sexual Misconduct/Sexual Harassment Reporting: USFSM is committed to providing an
environment free from sex discrimination, including sexual harassment and sexual violence (USF
System Policy 0-004).

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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2.

Other Types of Discrimination and Harassment: USFSM also is committed to providing an


environment free from discrimination and harassment based on race, color, marital status, sex,
religion, national origin, disability, age, genetic information, sexual orientation, gender identity and
expression, or veteran status (USF System Policy 0-007).

The Counseling and Wellness Center is a confidential resource where you can talk about incidents of
discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, gender-based crimes, sexual assault,
stalking, and domestic/relationship violence. This confidential resource can help you without having to
report your situation to either the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities (OSSR) or the Office of
Diversity, Inclusion, and Equal Opportunity (DIEO), unless you request that they make a report.
Please be aware that in compliance with Title IX and under the USF System Policy, educators must
report incidents of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, gender-based crimes,
sexual assault, stalking, and domestic/relationship violence. If a student discloses any of these situations
in class, in papers, or to a faculty member personally, he or she is required to report it to OSSR or DIEO
for investigation. Students who are victims or who have knowledge of such discrimination or harassment
are encouraged to report it to either OSSR or DIEO. The Deputy Coordinator for USFSM is Allison
Dinsmore, Coordinator of Disability Services & Student Advocacy, 941-359-4714 or
adinsmore1@sar.usf.edu.
Campus Resources:
Counseling Center and Wellness Center 941-487-4254
Victim Advocate (24/7) 941-504-8599
Off-Campus Resources:
HOPE Family Services: 941-755-6805
Safe Place & Rape Crisis Center (SPARCC) Sarasota: 941-365-1976
First Call for Help- Manatee: 941-708-6488
Sarasota & North Port 941-366-5025
Manatee Glens: 941-782-4800; 24-hr Hotline 941-708-6059
H. Web Portal Information: Every newly enrolled USF student receives an official USF e-mail account.
Students receive official USF correspondence and Canvas course information via that address. The web
portal is accessed at http://my.usf.edu.
I. Academic Support Services
The Information Commons provides students with individual and group study spaces, computers, printers,
and various media equipment for temporary use. The Information Commons is staffed by librarians,
learning support faculty, tutors, and technology and e-learning specialists. Students challenged by the
rigors of academic writing, mathematics, or other course content are urged to contact their professors
early in the semester to chart out a plan for academic success, and/or regularly use the tutoring services
provided by Learning Support Services, which are provided at no cost to students.
J. Career Success Center
Students can explore careers through activities such as job shadowing, mentoring, and internships.
Whether students will be pursuing graduate school or seeking employment, Career Services can help
develop a plan to reach their next destination. Students can prepare professional documents, practice for
the interview and attend employer or graduate school information sessions. Access these resources or
schedule an appointment with career advisors at www.usfsm.edu/career-services.
COURSE SCHEDULE
The course schedule is provided below, after the list of important course dates. The course schedule is
subject to change. Dr. Lawrence will notify you of any schedule changes in advance.
Drop Dates
08/26/16: last day to drop the course without financial responsibility
10/29/16: last day to drop the course with a W, no refund, and no academic penalty

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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Major Project Due Dates


Project 1: 09/19/16 by 10am on CANVAS
Project 2: 10/24/16 by 10am on CANVAS
Project 3: 11/21/16 by 10am on CANVAS
Project 4: 11/28/16 by 10am on CANVAS
Project 5: 12/08/16 by 10am on CANVAS
Composing Processes
As is indicated by the First-Year Writing Program Outcomes listed above, composing processes are a
central focus of ENC 1102. In this course, Weekly Work assignments are important steps in the
processes of inventing, arranging, and revising the Major Projects. In other words, your Weekly Work
assignments are layers of your final projects, which you should develop and reconsider over time. Given
your decision to enroll in ENC 1102 as an online course, it is your responsibility to pace your Weekly
Work appropriately. To this end, you may wish to read each Weekly Work assignment one week in
advance of the due date.
Final Exam
There will be no online class meeting during finals week. Instead, Project 5 will function as a final exam.
Dr. Lawrence will provide you with resources for successfully completing Project 5, beginning on
11/28/16. Subsequently, you will have several days to compose and revise Project 5 before you submit it
on CANVAS by 10am on 12/08/16.

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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COURSE SCHEDULE
The course schedule is subject to change. You will be notified if changes are made.
Week Date Weekly Work due by 10am
2
M
Introduction to ENC 1101
08/29
Terrific Tens & Seeking Heat
Introduction to Project 1
Complete the Getting to Know You questionnaire, and post it on CANVAS.
Participate in the "Introducing Myself" discussion forum on CANVAS.
Read the syllabus, and post one question about the syllabus on CANVAS.
Project 1 Invention Strategies
3

M
09/05

Project 1 Invention Strategies


Post your "Which Three Stories?" worksheet on CANVAS.
Project 1 Arrangement Strategies

M
09/12

Write Story 2 (summary-scene-summary), and post it on CANVAS.


Post a layer of Project 1 on CANVAS by 10am on W 09/07, if you would like Dr.
Lawrence to respond to it by 10pm on F 09/16.
Project 1 Arrangement Strategies
Post a layer of Project 1 on CANVAS in preparation for peer response.

M
09/19

Project 1 Revision Strategies


Peer Response due by 11:59pm on F 09/16
Project 1 Revision Strategies
Write a Terrific Ten in which you make a plan to revise Project 1, in response to the
feedback that you received from your classmates. Post it on CANVAS.
Project 1 Revision Strategies

Project 1 due
M
Introduction to Project 2
09/26
Project 2 Invention Strategies: Research Topic
Review of Library Research
Find 5 magazine and/or newspaper articles on your research topic.
Find 3 scholarly articles on your research topic.
Write a Terrific Ten in which you explain why you chose your 8 articles, and post it
on CANVAS.
Project 2 Arrangement Strategies
Review of Toulmin's (1958) Model of Argumentation
M
10/03

Read your 5 magazine/newspaper articles on your research topic.


Project 2 Arrangement Strategies
Introduction to Rhetorical Conventions of Disciplinary Research Writing
Post a layer of Project 2 on CANVAS for peer response.
Dr. Lawrence will respond to this layer by 10pm on F 10/14.

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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M
10/10

M
10/17

10

M
10/24

Peer Response due by 11:59pm on F 10/07


Write a Terrific Ten in which you make a plan to revise Project 2, in response to the
feedback that you received from your classmates. Post it on CANVAS.
Project 2 Revision Strategies
Introduction to Project 3
Project 3 Invention Strategies
Article Conversations Map
Write a Terrific Ten in which you explain what you learned in working with your
Article Conversations Map, and post it on CANVAS.
Project 3 Arrangement Strategies: Problem Statement, Literature Review, and
Research Question(s)
Post a layer of your Problem Statement, Research Question(s), and 1 Three INs
Literature Review paragraph on CANVAS.
Select three objects of your reading life (e.g., book, coffee mug, Kindle, magazine,
online newspaper, phone): one representing your reading past, one representing
your reading present, and one representing your reading future. (Be sure to pick
objects that you can share with classmates.) Post photos of your three objects on
CANVAS.
Write a Terrific Ten in which you explain why you chose your three objects, and
post it on CANVAS.
Introduction to Book Clubs
Project 3 Invention Strategies: Analyzing Collected Artifacts, Using the "5W + H"
Basic Narrative Questions
Read Nathan's (2005), pp. 1-18.
Write Reading Response 3, and post it on CANVAS.
Participate in Book Club Meeting 1 on CANVAS.
Project 3 Invention Strategies: Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes and Memos:
Observations, Interpretations, and Questions
Read Nathan (2005), pp. 19-40.
Write Reading Response 4, and post it on CANVAS.
Participate in Book Club Meeting 2 on CANVAS.
Post your "5 Senses of Observation" worksheet and photos on CANVAS.
Project 3 Invention Strategies: Analyzing Photos
Project 3 Arrangement Strategies: Three INs Site Selection Paragraph
Read Nathan (2005), pp. 41-66.
Write Reading Response 5, and post it on CANVAS.
Participate in Book Club Meeting 3 on CANVAS.
Project 3 Invention Strategies: Designing, Conducting, and Analyzing Surveys and
Questionnaires
Project 3 Arrangement Strategies: Three INs Participant Selection Paragraph

Project 2 due

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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11

M
10/31

12

M
11/07

13

M
11/14

14

M
11/21

15

Distribute your survey or questionnaire to 10 people (e.g., by e-mail, face-to face,


Facebook, SurveyMonkey).
Project 3 Invention Strategies: Generating Patterns Among Observations,
Interpretations, and Questions
Evidence Map
Project 3 Arrangement Strategies: Three INs Data Source(s) Paragraph
Read Nathan (2005), pp. 67-89.
Write Reading Response 6, and post it on CANVAS.
Participate in Book Club Meeting 4 on CANVAS.
Project 3 Invention Strategies: Writing Interview Protocols and Conducting
Interviews
Project 3 Arrangement Strategies: Three INs Data Collection Paragraph
Interview someone "unlike you," using the interview protocol that you developed on
10/19. Upload to CANVAS a copy of the interviewees signed consent form.
Project 3 Invention Strategies: Generating Patterns Among Observations,
Interpretations, and Questions
Evidence Map
Project 3 Arrangement Strategies: Three INs Data Analysis Paragraph
Read Nathan (2005), pp. 90-106.
Write Reading Response 7, and post it on CANVAS.
Participate in Book Club Meeting 5 on CANVAS.
Project 3 Invention Strategies: Discourse Analysis
Project 3 Arrangement Strategies: Three INs Researcher Positionality Paragraph
Write a Terrific Ten discourse analysis of language use in a context of your
choosing, and post it on CANVAS.
Project 3 Invention Strategies: Using Visual Rhetoric for Discourse Analysis
Read Nathan (2005), pp. 132-168.
Write Reading Response 8, and post it on CANVAS.
Participate in Book Club Meeting 6 on CANVAS.
Project 3 Invention Strategies: Ethical Issues of Undergraduate Research
Project 3 Arrangement Strategies: Anticipated Contributions of the Study
Post a layer of Project 3 on CANVAS in preparation for peer response.
Dr. Lawrence will respond to this layer by 10pm on F 11/18.
Peer Response due by 11:59pm on F 11/18
Write a Terrific Ten in which you make a plan to revise Project 3, in response to the
feedback that you received from your classmates. Post it on CANVAS.
Project 3 Revision Strategies

Project 3 due
M
Introduction to Project 4
11/28
Project 4 Invention and Arrangement Strategies
Project 4 Revision Strategies
Project 4 due

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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Finals Th
12/08

Post your evaluations of your classmates Project 4 presentations on CANVAS.


Introduction to Project 5
Post your "Project 5 Invention" worksheet on CANVAS.

Project 5 due

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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PROJECT 1:
THREE STORIES OF MY RESEARCH PASSION
PURPOSE
During your undergraduate experiences, you will need to select and declare a major. Similarly,
professional academics specialize in the areas of study that most interest them, and become experts in
their research passions. If you took Composition I with Dr. Lawrence, you had the opportunity to explore
your educational and professional interests in a personal essay about your previous life experiences. In
Composition II, you will build on that work by writing a personal essay that presents three stories of your
life and explains how they each illustrate your research passion. Later this semester, in Project 3, you will
design your own undergraduate research project. Project 1 is a chance to generate a possible research
topic for your subsequent work in Composition II. Moreover, gaining a better sense of your research
passion may give focus and depth to your participation in USFSM activities.
AUDIENCES
Project 1 Audiences: audiences interested in who you are as an undergraduate researcher
Workshop Audiences: you, your ENC 1102 classmates, and Dr. Lawrence
GENRE
personal essay
Dr. Lawrence will provide possible outlines in class when you begin working on Project 1. However,
please feel free to create a structure for your personal essay that best suits your project. (If you took
Composition I with Dr. Lawrence, please use a different Project 1 outline from the one you used in ENC
1101.)
ASSIGNMENT
1. a personal essay (100% of your Project 1 grade): at least 6 double-spaced pages (not including
APA cover page and references, if applicable), APA style, Times New Roman, 12-point font, 1inch margins, file format: .doc, .docx, or .pdf
DUE M 09/19 by 10am on CANVAS

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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PROJECT 1: Three Stories of My Research Passion


PERSONAL ESSAY RUBRIC
STORY 1: 15% of Project 1 Essay Grade
4 Story 1 is a vivid narrative: its skillful use of descriptive detail makes the events easy to imagine.
3 Story 1 is a clear narrative: its use of descriptive detail makes the events possible to imagine.
2 Story 1 is a vague narrative: its lack of descriptive detail makes the events difficult to imagine.
1 This essay includes material for Story 1 but does not organize this material as a narrative.
0 This essay does not include material for Story 1.

STORY 2: 15% of Project 1 Essay Grade


4 Story 2 is a vivid narrative: its skillful use of descriptive detail makes the events easy to imagine.
3 Story 2 is a clear narrative: its use of descriptive detail makes the events possible to imagine.
2 Story 2 is a vague narrative: its lack of descriptive detail makes the events difficult to imagine.
1 This essay includes material for Story 2 but does not organize this material as a narrative.
0 This essay does not include material for Story 2.

STORY 3: 15% of Project 1 Essay Grade


4 Story 3 is a vivid narrative: its skillful use of descriptive detail makes the events easy to imagine.
3 Story 3 is a clear narrative: its use of descriptive detail makes the events possible to imagine.
2 Story 3 is a vague narrative: its lack of descriptive detail makes the events difficult to imagine.
1 This essay includes material for Story 3 but does not organize this material as a narrative.
0 This essay does not include material for Story 3.

STORIES 1-3 ARE RELATED TO EACH OTHER: 5% of Project 1 Essay Grade


4 This essay provides a clear and complex explanation of how Stories 1-3 relate to each other.
3 This essay provides a clear explanation of how Stories 1-3 relate to each other.
2 This essay provides a vague explanation of how Stories 1-3 relate to each other.
1 This essay provides an explanation of how two of the stories relate to each other.
0 This essay does not explain how any of the stories relate to each other.

STORIES 1-3 ILLUSTRATE MY RESEARCH PASSION:


45% of Project 1 Essay Grade
4 Based on evidence presented in Stories 1-3, this essay makes clear, complex, and well-supported
claims about the authors research passion.
3 Based on evidence presented in Stories 1-3, this essay makes clear and well-supported claims
about the authors research passion.
2 Based on evidence presented in Stories 1-3, this essay makes vague or poorly supported claims
about the authors research passion.
1 This essay makes claims about the authors research passion; however, none of these claims is
clearly connected to Stories 1-3.
0 This essay does not make claims about the authors research passion.

FORMATTING: 3% of Project 1 Essay Grade


4 This essay meets all of the formatting requirements: at least 6 double-spaced pages (not including
APA cover page and references, if applicable), Times New Roman, 12-point font, 1 margins, APA
style, file format: .doc, .docx, .pdf.
3 This essay meets all of the formatting requirements, except for a few APA errors.
2 This essay meets all of the formatting requirements, except for many APA errors.
1 This essay does not meet the page count.
0 There is no essay.

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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SENTENCE-LEVEL LANGUAGE CONVENTIONS:


2% of Project 1 Essay Grade
4 This essays use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
does not detract from the reading experience and enhances it.
3 This essays use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
somewhat detracts from the reading experience.
2 This essays use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
frequently detracts from the reading experience.
1 This essays use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
makes it nearly impossible to read.
0 There is no essay.

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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PROJECT 2:
LIVING MY PASSION: ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
PURPOSE
USFSM encourages you to be an engaged and active learner who thinks critically and creatively in
making claims about evidence. Moreover, USFSM invites you to generate your own evidence through
inquiries that you design and conduct as an undergraduate researcher. Later this semester, in Project 3,
you will make a plan for your own research project. As preparation for that work, in Project 2, you will
select a research topic based on the research passion that you identified in Project 1, and review 5
magazine and/or newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles on your topic in an annotated bibliography.
Subsequently, in Project 3, you will compose a formal literature review that synthesizes these 8 articles.
Thus, your conscientious and diligent work on Project 2 will facilitate your successful completion of
Project 3. (If you took Composition I with Dr. Lawrence, you will need to select a different, though possibly
related, research topic from the one that you explored in ENC 1101.)
AUDIENCES
Project 2 Audience: your researcher self
Workshop Audiences: you, your ENC 1102 classmates, and Dr. Lawrence
GENRE
annotated bibliography
Dr. Lawrence will provide a possible outline in class when you begin working on Project 2. However,
please feel free to create a structure for your annotated bibliography that best suits your project.
ASSIGNMENT
1. an annotated bibliography (100% of your Project 2 grade): at least 8 single-spaced annotations,
APA style, Times New Roman, 12-point font, 1-inch margins, file format: .doc, .docx, or .pdf
DUE M 10/24 by 10am on CANVAS

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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PROJECT 2: My Annotated Bibliography


ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY RUBRIC
Purpose
10% of Project 2 Annotated Bibliography Grade
4 This annotated bibliography provides clear, well-supported, and complex analyses of the specific
purposes of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
3 This annotated bibliography provides clear and well-supported analyses of the specific
purposes of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
2 This annotated bibliography provides vague or poorly supported analyses of the specific
purposes of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
1 This annotated bibliography does not analyze the specific purposes of at least 5
magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
0 This annotated bibliography does not include analyses of the specific purposes of
magazine/newspaper and scholarly articles.

Audience
10% of Project 2 Annotated Bibliography Grade
4 This annotated bibliography provides clear, well-supported, and complex analyses of the specific
audiences of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
3 This annotated bibliography provides clear and well-supported analyses of the specific
audiences of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
2 This annotated bibliography provides vague or poorly supported analyses of the specific
audiences of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
1 This annotated bibliography does not analyze the specific audiences of at least 5
magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
0 This annotated bibliography does not include analyses of the specific audiences of
magazine/newspaper and scholarly articles.

Evidence
15% of Project 2 Annotated Bibliography Grade
4 This annotated bibliography provides clear, well-supported, and complex analyses of the specific
evidence presented in 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
3 This annotated bibliography provides clear and well-supported analyses of the specific
evidence presented in 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
2 This annotated bibliography provides vague or poorly supported analyses of the specific
evidence presented in 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
1 This annotated bibliography does not analyze the specific evidence presented in at least 5
magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
0 This annotated bibliography does not include analyses of the specific evidence presented in
magazine/newspaper and scholarly articles.

Claims
15% of Project 2 Annotated Bibliography Grade
4 This annotated bibliography provides clear, well-supported, and complex analyses of the specific
claims made in 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
3 This annotated bibliography provides clear and well-supported analyses of the specific
claims made in 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
2 This annotated bibliography provides vague or poorly supported analyses of the specific
claims made in 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
1 This annotated bibliography does not analyze the specific claims made in at least 5
magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
0 This annotated bibliography does not include analyses of the specific claims made in
magazine/newspaper and scholarly articles.
2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence
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Contributions
15% of Project 2 Annotated Bibliography Grade
4 This annotated bibliography provides clear, well-supported, and complex evaluations of the specific
contributions of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
3 This annotated bibliography provides clear and well-supported evaluations of the specific
contributions of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
2 This annotated bibliography provides vague or poorly supported evaluations of the specific
contributions of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
1 This annotated bibliography does not evaluate the specific contributions of at least 5
magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
0 This annotated bibliography does not include evaluations of the specific contributions of
magazine/newspaper articles.

Limitations
15% of Project 2 Annotated Bibliography Grade
4 This annotated bibliography provides clear, well-supported, and complex evaluations of the specific
limitations of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
3 This annotated bibliography provides clear and well-supported evaluations of the specific
limitations of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
2 This annotated bibliography provides vague or poorly supported evaluations of the specific
limitations of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
1 This annotated bibliography does not evaluate the specific limitations of at least 5
magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
0 This annotated bibliography does not include evaluations of the specific limitations of
magazine/newspaper and scholarly articles.

Enduring Questions
15% of Project 2 Annotated Bibliography Grade
4 This annotated bibliography identifies clear, relevant, and interesting questions that remain
unanswered by each of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
3 This annotated bibliography identifies clear and relevant questions that remain unanswered
by each of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
2 This annotated bibliography identifies vague or irrelevant questions that remain unanswered
by each of 5 magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
1 This annotated bibliography does not identify questions that remain unanswered by at least 5
magazine/newspaper articles and 3 scholarly articles.
0 This annotated bibliography does not identify questions that remain unanswered by
magazine/newspaper and scholarly articles.

Formatting
3% of Project 2 Annotated Bibliography Grade
4 This annotated bibliography meets all of the formatting requirements: at least 8 single-spaced
annotations, Times New Roman, 12-point font, 1-inch margins, APA style, file format: .doc, .docx,
.pdf.
3 This annotated bibliography meets all of the formatting requirements, except for a few APA errors.
2 This annotated bibliography meets all of the formatting requirements, except for many APA errors.
1 This annotated bibliography does not meet the required minimum page count.
0 There is no annotated bibliography.

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Sentence-Level Language Conventions


2% of Project 2 Annotated Bibliography Grade
4 This annotated bibliographys use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling,
punctuation) does not detract from the reading experience and enhances it.
3 This annotated bibliographys use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling,
punctuation) somewhat detracts from the reading experience.
2 This annotated bibliographys use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling,
punctuation) frequently detracts from the reading experience.
1 This annotated bibliographys use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling,
punctuation) makes it nearly impossible to read.
0 There is no annotated bibliography.

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PROJECT 3:
LIVING MY PASSION: RESEARCH PROPOSAL
PURPOSE
Studies benefit from meticulous planning, careful decision making, and rigorous justification before they
are officially launched. In Project 3, you will engage in these indispensable inquiry activities by writing a
formal research proposal, in which you will synthesize the 8 articles on which you wrote your Project 2
annotated bibliography, develop research question(s) on your topic, outline your own study design, and
anticipate contributions of your inquiry.
Through your proposed research project, you should aim to learn more about a center of activity (places,
people, activities, goals, products, language use) related to the passion that you identified in Project 1.
You may wish to model your Project 3 study design on Rebekah Nathans (2005) My Freshman Year. To
explore research methods that you might include in your Project 3 study proposal, in class and in
homework, you will conduct field observations in a research site of your choosing. You will take photos of
this site, if permitted, excluding any people from the photo frame. In addition, you will design and
distribute a survey or questionnaire to at least 10 people, whose identities you must protect with
pseudonyms. Similarly, you will develop 3-5 interview questions, then conduct a 15-minute interview with
a person who has consented in writing to the interview. You will take notes on the interviewees
responses to your interview questions. If the interviewee gives you written permission, you may also
audio-record the interview. Again, you must protect the interviewees identity with a pseudonym. You may
not publish or otherwise disseminate any of your data sources or other work for Project 3 outside of ENC
1102, as this opportunity to learn about and practice undergraduate research methods is solely for
educational purposes. (If you took Composition I with Dr. Lawrence, you will need to design a different,
though possibly related, research project from the one that you undertook in ENC 1101.)
AUDIENCES
Project 3 Audience: your researcher self
Workshop Audiences: you, your ENC 1102 classmates, and Dr. Lawrence
GENRE
research proposal
Dr. Lawrence will provide a possible outline in class when you begin working on Project 3. However,
please feel free to create a structure for your research proposal that best suits your project.
ASSIGNMENT
1. a research proposal (100% of your Project 3 grade): at least 4 double-spaced pages (not
including APA cover page and references, if applicable), APA style, Times New Roman, 12-point
font, 1-inch margins, file format: .doc, .docx, or .pdf
DUE M 11/21 by 10am on CANVAS

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Introduction to Undergraduate Research


INTERVIEW CONSENT FORM
[Date]
Dear [Interview Participant],
I am an undergraduate student at the University of South FloridaSarasota-Manatee. For my academic
writing course (ENC 1102), I am conducting an undergraduate research project on a topic of my
choosing. A key component of my study is a 15-minute interview. I have selected you as a potential
interviewee for my research project, should you agree to participate.
If you permit me to interview you during a 15-minute period, I will ask you several questions, which you
may elect not to answer. Depending on the consent that you provide below, I may audio-record the
interview, as well as take written notes on your responses to my questions. If you consent to be audiorecorded, you may request that the recording be stopped or resumed at any time during the interview. No
one but I will have access to the interview notes and/or audio recording. Moreover, I will destroy any
audio recording of the interview once I have completed my research project. In addition, your identity will
be protected by a pseudonym in my course work and interactions with my classmates.
My undergraduate research project is solely for educational purposes. Outside of my academic writing
course (ENC 1102), I will not publish or otherwise disseminate any of my data sources or other work for
this study. Please feel free to contact my course instructor Dr. Ann Lawrence, if you have any questions
or concerns regarding my research project:
Dr. Ann Lawrence
Instructor of English and Composition
College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
University of South Florida--Sarasota-Manatee
8350 N. Tamiami Trail, C263
Sarasota, FL 34243-2025, USA
annlawrence@usf.edu
(941)359-4226
Below is an interview consent form that asks for specific permission to interview you and to audio-record
the interview. Please indicate "Yes" or "No" for each item on the list, and return the form to me. Thank you
for considering this possibility.
Sincerely,
[Students Name]
[Students Mailing Address]
[Students E-mail Address]
[Students Phone Number]
I give my written consent to be interviewed for 15 minutes.

Yes_____

No_____

I give my written consent to be audio-recorded during the interview.

Yes_____

No_____

Date:
Name:
Contact Information:
Signature:

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


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PROJECT 3: My Research Proposal


RESEARCH PROPOSAL RUBRIC
Purpose of the Study (Problem Statement, Literature Review, & Research Question(s))
30% of Project 3 Proposal Grade
4 This proposal formulates a clear, appropriate purpose for the authors research project, derived
from a clear, well-supported, and complex analysis of the contributions and limitations of relevant
scholarly and magazine/newspaper articles.
3 This proposal formulates a clear, appropriate purpose for the authors research project, derived
from a clear and well-supported analysis of the contributions and limitations of relevant scholarly
and magazine/newspaper articles.
2 This proposal formulates a clear, appropriate purpose for the authors research project, and
presents a clear and well-supported analysis of the contributions and limitations of previously
published scholarly and magazine/newspaper articles. However, this proposal does not make
explicit how the purpose for the study is derived from those articles.
1 This proposal formulates a vague or inappropriate purpose for the authors research project, and a
vague or poorly supported analysis of the contributions and limitations of previously published
scholarly and magazine/newspaper articles, which may not all be relevant to this study.
Additionally, this proposal may not make explicit how the purpose for the study is derived from
those articles.
0 This proposal does not formulate a purpose for the authors research project.
Sources (Literature Review)
20% of Project 3 Proposal Grade
4 This proposal includes a literature review that analyzes
magazine/newspaper articles.
3 This proposal includes a literature review that analyzes
magazine/newspaper articles.
2 This proposal includes a literature review that analyzes
magazine/newspaper articles.
1 This proposal includes a literature review that analyzes
0 This proposal does not include a literature review.

3 scholarly articles and 5


3 scholarly articles and 3-5
3 scholarly articles and 1-2
less than 3 scholarly articles.

Study Design
35% of Project 3 Proposal Grade
4 This proposal presents a clear, detailed, and well-justified plan for the authors research project.
Methodological decisions related to site selection, participant selection, data sources, data-collection
procedures, and data-analysis procedures are thoroughly explained. The authors research project is
purposeful and feasible.
3 This proposal presents a clear and well-justified plan for the authors research project, yet lacks
some detail. Methodological decisions related to site selection, participant selection, data sources,
data-collection procedures, and data-analysis procedures are, for the most part, explained. The
authors research project is purposeful and feasible.
2 This proposal presents a clear but poorly justified plan for the authors research project.
Methodological decisions related to site selection, participant selection, data sources, data-collection
procedures, and data-analysis procedures are described but not explicitly connected to the purpose
of the study (research question(s)). Thus, the authors research project, though feasible, does not
seem to be purposeful.
1 This proposal presents a vague and poorly justified plan for the authors research project.
Some methodological decisions related to site selection, participant selection, data sources, datacollection procedures, and data-analysis procedures are neither described nor explained. Thus, the
authors research project does not seem to be either feasible or purposeful.
0 This proposal does not present a study design for the authors research project.

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


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Anticipated Contributions of the Study


10% of Project 3 Proposal Grade
4 This proposal offers a clear and complex analysis of the anticipated contributions and limitations of
the authors research project.
3 This proposal offers a clear analysis of the anticipated contributions and limitations of the authors
research project.
2 This proposal offers a clear analysis of the anticipated contributions of the authors research project,
but does not address the studys limitations.
1 This proposal offers a vague or poorly developed analysis of the anticipated contributions and
limitations of the authors research project.
0 This proposal does not offer an analysis of the anticipated contributions and limitations of the authors
research project.
Formatting
3% of Project 3 Proposal Grade
4 This proposal meets all of the formatting requirements: at least 4 double-spaced pages (not
including an APA cover page and references), Times New Roman, 12-point font, 1-inch margins, APA
style, file format: .doc, .docx, .pdf.
3 This proposal meets all of the formatting requirements, except for a few APA errors.
2 This proposal meets all of the formatting requirements, except for many APA errors.
1 This proposal does not meet the required minimum page count.
0 There is no proposal.
Sentence-Level Language Conventions:
2% of Project 3 Proposal Grade
4 This proposals use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
does not detract from the reading experience and enhances it.
3 This proposals use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
somewhat detracts from the reading experience.
2 This proposals use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
frequently detracts from the reading experience.
1 This proposals use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
makes it nearly impossible to read.
0 There is no proposal.

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PROJECT 4:
LIVING MY PASSION: RESEARCH PRESENTATION
PURPOSE
Both during and after college, you will likely be asked to design and deliver oral presentations in which
you analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information. Moreover, to write effectively in 21st-century
workplaces, it will be important for you to know how to transform information in one medium or genre into
another. For example, during your job search, you may find yourself translating your written resume into
your spoken responses to interview questions. While on the job, you may be asked by an employer to
redesign a print document as a video to be posted on a Web site. In Project 4, you will transform your
written research proposal from Project 3 into a slideshow and an oral presentation on your research
project, which you will deliver to your ENC 1102 classmates and Dr. Lawrence, using Jing, the free
screencast software that has made our online course possible this semester.
Free Jing Download: https://www.techsmith.com/jing.html
Jing Tutorials: https://www.techsmith.com/tutorial-jing.html
AUDIENCES
Project 4 Audience: a serious audience interested in new information on your research topic
Workshop Audiences: you, your ENC 1102 classmates, and Dr. Lawrence
GENRES
research-proposal presentation slideshow, oral research-proposal presentation
Dr. Lawrence will provide a possible outline in class when you begin working on Project 4. However,
please feel free to create a structure for your research presentation that best suits your project.
ASSIGNMENT
1. a research presentation slideshow (50% of your Project 4 grade): APA style, font(s) of your
choosing, file format: .pdf;
2. a Jing screencast of an oral research presentation (45% of your Project 4 grade) to be graded
by your classmates: at least 4.5 minutes;
3. careful evaluations of your classmates presentations during the Research Roundtables (5% of
your Project 4 grade);
DUE M 11/28 by 10am on CANVAS

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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PROJECT 4: MY RESEARCH PRESENTATION


SLIDESHOW RUBRIC
Audience Appeal
5% of Project 4 Slideshow Grade
4 This slideshow consistently makes rhetorical moves to appeal to a serious, interested audience.
3 This slideshow frequently makes rhetorical moves to appeal to a serious, interested audience.
2 This slideshow rarely makes rhetorical moves to appeal to a serious, interested audience.
1 This slideshow does not make rhetorical moves to appeal to a serious, interested audience.
0 There is no slideshow.

Purpose of the Study (Problem Statement, Literature Review, & Research Question(s))
15% of Project 4 Slideshow Grade
4 This slideshow formulates a clear, appropriate purpose for the authors research project, derived
from a clear, well-supported, and complex analysis of the contributions and limitations of relevant
scholarly and magazine/newspaper articles.
3 This slideshow formulates a clear, appropriate purpose for the authors research project, derived
from a clear and well-supported analysis of the contributions and limitations of relevant scholarly
and magazine/newspaper articles.
2 This slideshow formulates a clear, appropriate purpose for the authors research project, and
presents a clear and well-supported analysis of the contributions and limitations of previously
published scholarly and magazine/newspaper articles. However, this slideshow does not make
explicit how the purpose for the study is derived from those articles.
1 This slideshow formulates a vague or inappropriate purpose for the authors research project, and a
vague or poorly supported analysis of the contributions and limitations of previously published
scholarly and magazine/newspaper articles, which may not all be relevant to this study.
Additionally, this slideshow may not make explicit how the purpose for the study is derived from
those articles.
0 This slideshow does not formulate a purpose for the authors research project.

Study Design
20% of Project 4 Slideshow Grade
4 This slideshow presents a clear, detailed, and well-justified plan for the authors research project.
Methodological decisions related to site selection, participant selection, data sources, data-collection
procedures, and data-analysis procedures are thoroughly explained. The authors research project is
purposeful and feasible.
3 This slideshow presents a clear and well-justified plan for the authors research project, yet lacks
some detail. Methodological decisions related to site selection, participant selection, data sources,
data-collection procedures, and data-analysis procedures are, for the most part, explained. The
authors research project is purposeful and feasible.
2 This slideshow presents a clear but poorly justified plan for the authors research project.
Methodological decisions related to site selection, participant selection, data sources, data-collection
procedures, and data-analysis procedures are described but not explicitly connected to the purpose
of the study (research question(s)). Thus, the authors research project, though feasible, does not
seem to be purposeful.
1 This slideshow presents a vague and poorly justified plan for the authors research project.
Some methodological decisions related to site selection, participant selection, data sources, datacollection procedures, and data-analysis procedures are neither described nor explained. Thus, the
authors research project does not seem to be either feasible or purposeful.
0 This slideshow does not present a study design for the authors research project.

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Anticipated Contributions of the Study


5% of Project 4 Slideshow Grade
4 This slideshow offers a clear and complex analysis of the anticipated contributions and limitations of
the authors research project.
3 This slideshow offers a clear analysis of the anticipated contributions and limitations of the authors
research project.
2 This slideshow offers a clear analysis of the anticipated contributions of the authors research project,
but does not address the studys limitations.
1 This slideshow offers a vague or poorly developed analysis of the anticipated contributions and
limitations of the authors research project.
0 This slideshow does not offer an analysis of the anticipated contributions and limitations of the
authors research project.

Slideshow Design
50% of Project 4 Slideshow Grade
4 The slideshow skillfully uses appropriate visual-rhetoric design principles (e.g., contrast, repetition,
alignment, proximity, and color theory).
3 The slideshow clearly uses some visual-rhetoric design principles (e.g., contrast, repetition,
alignment, proximity, and color theory).
2 The slideshow uses at least one visual-rhetoric design principle (e.g., contrast, repetition, alignment,
proximity, and color theory).
1 The slideshow includes visual material composed by the authors but does not exhibit visual-rhetoric
design principles (e.g., contrast, repetition, alignment, proximity, and color theory).
0 The slideshow was not composed by the authors, including any preset slideshow themes. OR There
is no slideshow.

Formatting
3% of Project 4 Slideshow Grade
4 This slideshow meets all of the formatting requirements: APA style, file format: .pdf.
3 This slideshow meets all of the formatting requirements, except for a few APA errors.
2 This slideshow meets all of the formatting requirements, except for many APA errors.
1 This slideshow does not meet the required minimum page count.
0 There is no slideshow.

Sentence-Level Language Conventions


2% of Project 4 Research Slideshow Grade
4 This slideshows use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
does not detract from the reading experience and enhances it.
3 This slideshows use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
somewhat detracts from the reading experience.
2 This slideshows use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
frequently detracts from the reading experience.
1 This slideshows use of sentence-level language conventions (e.g., grammar, spelling, punctuation)
makes it nearly impossible to read.
0 There is no slideshow.

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


annlawrence@usf.edu

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PROJECT 4: My Research Presentation


ORAL PRESENTATION RUBRIC
Name of Evaluator:
Name of Speaker:
4 The oral presentation enhances the slideshow and skillfully informs the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
3 The oral presentation echoes the slideshow and clearly informs the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
2 The oral presentation does not partner with the slideshow but does inform the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
1 The oral presentation does little to inform the audience about the speakers undergraduate research
project.
0 There was no oral presentation.

Name of Speaker:
4 The oral presentation enhances the slideshow and skillfully informs the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
3 The oral presentation echoes the slideshow and clearly informs the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
2 The oral presentation does not partner with the slideshow but does inform the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
1 The oral presentation does little to inform the audience about the speakers undergraduate research
project.
0 There was no oral presentation.

Name of Speaker:
4 The oral presentation enhances the slideshow and skillfully informs the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
3 The oral presentation echoes the slideshow and clearly informs the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
2 The oral presentation does not partner with the slideshow but does inform the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
1 The oral presentation does little to inform the audience about the speakers undergraduate research
project.
0 There was no oral presentation.

Name of Speaker:
4 The oral presentation enhances the slideshow and skillfully informs the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
3 The oral presentation echoes the slideshow and clearly informs the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
2 The oral presentation does not partner with the slideshow but does inform the audience about the
speakers undergraduate research project.
1 The oral presentation does little to inform the audience about the speakers undergraduate research
project.
0 There was no oral presentation.

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


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PROJECT 5:
MY ENC 1102 Writing Portfolio
PURPOSE
To succeed in college, you will need to develop a habit of reflecting on your previous coursework,
synthesizing your learning, and evaluating your developing competencies. Moreover, both during and
after college, you will likely be asked to demonstrate how your work aligns with the stated goals of a
project, program, group, or institution. Such performances of accountability require writers to provide
evidence of their work and to make claims about the quality of that work, given the specified goals. To
practice formal self-assessment, in Project 5, you will compose an administrative portfolio focused on the
work that you did in Composition I. You will also complete a questionnaire in which you will evaluate your
own progress in ENC 1102.
USFSM First-Year Writing Outcomes
(based on the Council of Writing Program Administrators (2014) "WPA Outcomes Statement for FirstYear Composition (3.0)": http://wpacouncil.org/positions/outcomes.html)
Rhetorical Knowledge: Students understand rhetorical concepts (e.g., argument, audience,
genre, purpose) and use them strategically in analyzing, evaluating, and composing a variety of
texts.
Critical Thinking, Reading, and Composing: Students identify appropriate sources for their
projects; analyze and evaluate evidence-claim connections in those sources; and responsively
and responsibly integrate those sources with their own arguments.
Processes: Students explore composing processes and acquire a repertoire of creative, critical,
and collaborative strategies that they apply to develop and refine effective texts, using
appropriate technologies.
Knowledge of Conventions: Students learn about sentence-level language conventions (e.g.,
grammar, punctuation, spelling) and the broader stylistic conventions of particular genres (e.g.,
organization, tone, word choice); moreover, students strategically use language to appeal to
different audiences and to address a range of purposes.
USFSM Critical Thinking Outcomes
Students formulate vital questions and problems/issues clearly.
Students gather and assesses relevant information.
Students identify relevant assumptions, alternatives, and implications.
Students come to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions.
Students communicate reasoning effectively.
AUDIENCES
Project 5 Audience: USFSM faculty assessing the undergraduate writing program
Workshop Audiences: you, your ENC 1102 classmates, and Dr. Lawrence
GENRES
writing portfolio questionnaire, writing portfolio
ASSIGNMENT
1. a writing portfolio questionnaire (80% of your Project 5 grade);
2. a writing portfolio (20% of your Project 5 grade): copies of Projects 1-4 posted together on
CANVAS.
DUE Th 12/08 by 10am on CANVAS

2016-2017 Ann M. Lawrence


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PROJECT 5: MY WRITING PORTFOLIO


QUESTIONNAIRE RUBRIC
COMPLETION
100% of Project 5 Portfolio Questionnaire Grade
4 Every question is answered.
0 Not every question is answered.

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PROJECT 5: MY WRITING PORTFOLIO


PORTFOLIO RUBRIC
CONTENTS:
100% of Project 5 Portfolio Grade
4 Projects 1-4 and the Project 5 questionnaire are posted together on CANVAS under Major Project 5.
0 Projects 1-4 and the Project 5 questionnaire are not posted together on CANVAS under Major
Project 5.
.

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