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Piping using Creo Parametric 2.

T3910-390-01

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Training Agenda
Day 1
Module
Module
Module
Module
Module

01
02
03
04
05

Introduction to Piping
Creating Piping Assembly Structures
Configuring and Routing Pipelines
Moving and Modifying Pipelines
Configuring and Inserting Fittings

Day 2
Module 06
Module 07
Module 08
Module 09
Module 10
Module 11

Creating Solid Pipeline Models


Gathering Piping Information
Creating Piping Drawings
Specification Database Overview
Setting Up Specification Databases: Piping
Setting Up Specification Databases: Fittings

Day 3
Module 12
Module 13
Module 14
Module 15
Module 16
Module 17

General Master Catalog Files


Configuring Project-Specific Data Files
Specification-Driven Routing and Inserting Fittings
Using Creo Schematics Process and Instrumentation
Diagrams Data
Schematic Driven Pipeline Modeling
Using ISOGEN PCF Data

Table of Contents
Piping using Creo Parametric 2.0
Introduction to Piping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Piping Design Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual Piping Development Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specification-Driven Piping Development Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Piping Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding 2-D Schematic Piping Designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-1
1-2
1-3
1-5
1-7
1-9

Creating Piping Assembly Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1


Planning Piping Assembly Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Piping Assembly Structure: Sub-Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Piping Assembly Structure: No Sub-Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Piping Assembly Structure: Sub-Assemblies at Top Level . . . . . . . . 2-6
Understanding Piping Large Assembly Management Tools. . . . . . . . 2-9
Creating and Configuring Piping Skeletons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
Sharing Routing Geometry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Assembling Piping Components Using Component Interfaces . . . . 2-20
Configuring and Routing Pipelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Understanding Pipeline Routing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Configuring Non-Specification-Driven Pipelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Routing Pipelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Routing Flexible Hoses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14
Moving and Modifying Pipelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Adding Points and Moving Pipe Segments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Modifying Pipeline Routing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Configuring and Inserting Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-1
5-2
5-4
5-8

Creating Solid Pipeline Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1


Creating Solid Pipes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Extracting Models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
Gathering Piping Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Using Piping Reporting Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Creating Piping Drawings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Creating Piping Drawings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Displaying Piping Report Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
Specification Database Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Understanding the Piping Specification Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2

Master Catalog Directory and File Structure: Pipes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3


Master Catalog Directory and File Structure: Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
Setting Up Specification Databases: Piping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1
Piping Master Catalog Directory File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
Pipe Design Master Catalog Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5
Pipe Manufacture Directory File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-9
Pipe Manufacture Master Catalog Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11
Bend Machine Master Catalog Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-15
Setting Up Specification Databases: Fittings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1
Fitting Master Catalog Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
Mapping Catalog Data to Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5
Understanding Fitting Libraries and Fitting Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-6
Configuring Specification-Driven Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-8
Bolt Nut Master Catalog Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-13
General Master Catalog Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1
Master Catalog Files: Piping Material File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
End Compatibility File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-5
Insulation Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-7
Combined Size Code File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-9
Units System File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-12
Configuring Project-Specific Data Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-1
Configuring Auto-Selection Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2
Configuring Specification Directory Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-7
Insulation Directory Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-10
Fitting Category Map Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-11
Configuring Piping Config.pro Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-13
Specification-Driven Routing and Inserting Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-1
Specification-Driven Pipeline Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
Specification-Driven Fitting Insertion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-8
Design Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-13
Routing Continuous Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-17
Non-Break Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-21
Using Creo Schematics Process and Instrumentation Diagrams
Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-1
Process and Instrumentation Diagrams Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
Creo Schematics Concepts and Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-3
Investigating Process and Instrumentation Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . 15-5
Exporting Design Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-10
Schematic Driven Pipeline Modeling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-1
Designating Schematic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
Routing Pipelines Using Schematic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-6

Inserting Fittings Using Schematic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-10


Schematic Consistency Check Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-15
Updating Piping Designs from Creo Schematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-17
Using ISOGEN PCF Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-1
Creating ISOGEN PCF Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-2

Student Preface Using the Header


In this topic, you learn about the course handbook layout and
the header used to begin each lab in Creo Parametric.
Course Handbook Layout:
Modules
Topics
Concept
Theory
Procedure
Exercise (if applicable)
Procedure / Exercise Header:

Course Handbook Layout


The information in this course handbook is organized to help students locate
information after the course is complete. Each course is organized into
modules, each covering a general subject. Each module contains topics,
with each topic focused on a specific portion of the module subject. Each
individual topic in the module is divided into the following sections:
Concept This section contains the initial introduction to the topic and
is presented during the class lecture as an overhead slide, typically with
figures and bullets.

Theory This section provides detailed information about content


introduced in the Concept, and is discussed in the class lecture but not
shown on the overhead slide. The Theory section contains additional
paragraphs of text, bullets, tables, and/or figures.
Procedure This section provides step-by-step instructions about how to
complete the topic within Creo Parametric. Procedures are short, focused,
and cover a specific topic. Procedures are found in the Student Handbook
only. Not every topic has a Procedure, as there are knowledge topics that
contain only Concept and Theory.
Exercise Exercises are similar to procedures, except that they are
typically longer, more involved, and use more complicated models.
Exercises also may cover multiple topics, so not every topic will have an
associated exercise. Exercises are found in the separate Exercise Guide
and/or the online exercise HTML files.
The first module for certain courses is known as a process
module. Process modules introduce you to the generic high-level
processes that will be taught over the span of the entire course.

Procedure / Exercise Header


To make the exercises and procedures (referred to collectively as labs) as
concise as possible, each begins with a header. The header lists the name
of the lab, the working directory, and the file you are to open.
The following items are indicated in the figure above, where applicable:
1. Procedure/Exercise Name This is the name of the lab.
2. Scenario This briefly describes what will be done in the lab. The
Scenario is only found in Exercises.
3. Close Windows/Erase Not Displayed A reminder that you should
close any open files and erase them from memory:
Click Close
4.

5.

until the icon is no longer displayed.

and then click OK.


Click Erase Not Displayed
Folder Name This is the working directory for the lab. Lab files are
stored in topic folders within specific functional area folders. The path to
the lab files is:
PTCU\CreoParametric2\functional_area_folder\topic_folder
In the example, Round is the functional area folder and Variable
is the topic folder, so you would set the Working Directory to
PTCU\CreoParametric2\Round\Variable.
To set the working directory, right-click the folder in the folder tree or
browser, and select Set Working Directory.
Model to Open This is the file to be opened from the working
directory. In the above example, VARIABLE_RAD.PRT is the model to
open. The model could be a part, drawing, assembly, and so on. If
you are expected to begin the lab without an open model, and instead
create a new model, you will see Create New.
To open the indicated model, right-click the file in the browser and
select Open.

6.
7.

Task Name Labs are broken into distinct tasks. There may be one
or more tasks within a lab.
Lab Steps These are the individual steps required to complete
a task.

Two other items to note for labs:


Saving Saving your work after completing a lab is optional, unless
otherwise stated.
Exercises Exercises follow the same header format as Procedures.

Setting Up Creo Parametric for Use with Training Labs


Before you begin a lab from any training course, it is important that you
configure Creo Parametric to ensure the system is set up to run the lab
exercises properly. Therefore, if you are running the training labs on a
computer outside of a training center, follow these three basic steps:
Extract the class files zip file to a root level drive such as C: or D:.
The extracted zip will create the default folder path automatically, such
as C:\PTCU\CreoParametric2\.
Locate your existing Creo Parametric shortcut.
Copy and paste the shortcut to your desktop.
Right-click the newly pasted shortcut and select Properties.
Select the Shortcut tab and set the Start In location to be the same as
the default folder. For example, C:\PTCU\CreoParametric2\.
Start Creo Parametric using the newly configured shortcut.
The default working directory will be set to the CreoParametric2 folder.
You can then navigate easily to the functional area and topic folders.

PROCEDURE - Student Preface Using the Header


In this exercise, you learn how to use the header to set up the Creo
Parametric working environment for each lab in the course.
Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

SampleFunctionalArea\Topic1_Folder
Step 1:

EXTRUDE_1.PRT

Configure Creo Parametric to ensure the system is set up to run


the lab exercises properly.

Perform this task only if you are running the labs on a computer
outside of a training center, otherwise proceed to Task 2.
1. Extract the zipped class files to a root level drive such as C: or D:.
The extracted ZIP will create the default folder path automatically,
such as C:\PTCU\CreoParametric2.
2. Locate your existing Creo Parametric shortcut.
Copy and paste the shortcut to your desktop.
Right-click the newly pasted shortcut and select Properties.
Select the Shortcut tab and set the Start In location to be
PTCU\CreoParametric2.
3. Start Creo Parametric using the newly configured shortcut.
The default working directory is set to the CreoParametric2 folder.
You can then navigate easily to the functional area and topic folders.
Step 2:

Close all open windows and erase all objects from memory to
avoid any possible conflicts.

1. If you currently have files open, click Close


toolbar, until the icon no longer displays.

from the Quick Access

2. Click Erase Not Displayed


from the Data group in the ribbon.
Click OK if the Erase Not Displayed dialog box appears.

Step 3:

Browse to and expand the functional area folder for this procedure
and set the folder indicated in the header as the Creo Parametric
working directory.

1. Notice the SampleFunctionalArea\Topic1_Folder as


indicated in the header above.
2. If necessary, select the Folder
Browser
navigator.

tab from the

3. Click Working Directory


to view the current working
directory folder in the browser.
Double-click
SampleFunctionalArea.

4. Right-click the Topic1_Folder folder and select Set Working


Directory.
5. Click Working Directory from the Common Folders section to display
the contents of the new working directory in the browser.

Alternatively you can use the cascading folder path in the


browser to navigate to the topic folder, and then right-click and
select Set Working Directory from the browser.
Step 4:

Open the file for this procedure.

1. Notice the lab model EXTRUDE_1.PRT is specified in the header


above.
Double-click extrude_1.prt in the browser to open it.
2. You are now ready to begin the first task in the lab:
Read the first task.
Perform the first step, which in most cases will be to set the initial
datum display for the procedure or exercise.
Perform the remaining steps in the procedure or exercise.
Step 5:

Set the initial datum display options.

1. The instruction for setting the datum display indicates which Datum
Display types to enable and disable. For example, Enable only the
following Datum Display types:

2. To set the datum display, first click the Datum Display drop-down
menu from the In Graphics tool
bar.

3. Next, enable and disable the


check boxes as necessary. For
example you could disable the
Select All check box, and then
enable only the desired datum
types.

4. The model should now appear


as shown.

This completes the procedure.

Module

Introduction to Piping
Module Overview
Creo Piping enables you to create 3-D piping designs as part of an
integrated product development process. Piping designs can be either
specification driven or non-specification driven, for example, manually
routed. Specification-driven designs involve using piping specifications and
automated modeling tasks; this method is used by the Plant, Shipbuilding,
and Aerospace industries. Non-specification-driven piping involves creating
piping systems using manual tasks, and is often used when designing flexible
piping systems. In addition, 2-D schematic design information in the form of
Process and Instrumentation Diagrams (created in Creo Schematic) can be
used to pass design information into specification-driven piping designs in
Creo Parametric. It is important to understand the piping design processes,
concepts, and terminology associated with Creo Piping.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the manual piping design process.
Describe the specification-driven piping design process.
Describe Creo Parametric piping concepts and terminology.
Create manually routed (non-specification-driven) pipelines.
Create specification-driven pipelines.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 1

Understanding Piping Design Methods


Within Creo Parametric, there are two methods you can
use to develop 3-D piping designs: manually routed piping
(non-specification-driven piping) and specification-driven piping.
Non-Specification-Driven Piping
Configure pipeline stock
Route Pipelines
Insert Fittings
Flexible Piping
Tubing
Specification-Driven Piping
Configure pipeline stock
Industrial Piping Designs
Controlled by
Piping Specifications
Design Rules

Figure 1 Non-SpecificationDriven (Manual) Piping Design


Example

Figure 2 Specification-Driven
Piping Design Example

Understanding Piping Design Methods


Within Creo Parametric, there are two methods you can use to develop 3-D
piping designs:
Manually routed piping (non-specification-driven piping)
Specification-driven piping

Non-Specification-Driven Piping
This method of piping design enables maximum flexibility and involves
configuring pipeline stock and manually routing pipes and inserting fittings.
It typically applies to flexible piping designs and tubing.

Specification-Driven Piping
Piping design as utilized by designers in the Plant design, Shipbuilding, and
Aerospace design industries.
This method of piping design is driven by a set of piping specifications
and design rules.
Module 1 | Page 2

2012 PTC

Manual Piping Development Process


Creating manual piping systems involves configuring pipeline
stock, routing pipelines, and inserting fittings.

Figure 1 Manual Piping Development Process

Manual Piping Development Process


The manual piping process (often referred to as non-specification-driven
piping) can be divided into a number of tasks:
Configuring Pipeline Stock A line stock is a set of parameters that
describe material, grade, outside diameter, and other parameters of
pipeline segments.
These parameters are stored in the line stock feature.
Before you create any pipelines, you must configure a line stock.
Route Pipelines A physical pipeline consists of pipes and fittings.
Before routing a new line, you must create a pipeline feature by
assigning its name, line stock, and pipeline parameters. Parameters that
are set in a line stock determine routing commands.
While routing, you can assign another line stock for segments that start
after a fitting or from a new start point.
You can also change line shape and corner type for subsequent
segments.
During or after routing is completed, you can insert fittings or modify
pipeline properties according to design needs.
Insert Fittings Fittings are parts or assemblies added to piping systems to
perform specific functions, for example, reducers and valves.
Fittings are typically stored in libraries, enabling them to be easily
retrieved and inserted into pipelines when required.
Output Data When the piping design is complete, it is possible to generate
information for a number of downstream processes, including the following:
Generate PCF information for ISOGEN. It is technically possible to
create readable ISOGEN.pcf files if required. However, with mechanical
based flexible piping designs, this is not a common requirement.
2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 3

Generate Piping Drawings. You can create Creo Parametric drawings


of piping designs which can, for example, contain installation and bill of
materials information.
Output File Interchange Format (FIF). You can output information for
CNC bend machines if required.

Module 1 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Specification-Driven Piping Development


Process
Specification-driven piping designs involve using piping
specifications and semi-automated routing and fitting insertion.
This method is often used by the Plant, Shipbuilding, and
Aerospace industries.

Figure 1 Specification-Driven Piping Development Process

Specification-Driven Piping Development Process


Specification-driven piping can utilize both 2-D Schematic design information
and 3-D piping design information.
The 3-D piping design process can be divided into a number of tasks:
The Creo Parametric Piping Specification Database contains all of the
piping library and catalog files used to create specification-driven piping
systems. Setting up the specification database involves:
Creating Fitting library files. These are Creo Parametric part files with
their associated family tables. Fitting library files provide the physical
representation for fittings in a piping model, for example, valves,
gaskets, and reducers.
Creating Master Catalog (MCAT) files. These files contain all of the
basic design information required for pipe modeling. Creo Parametric
piping includes MCAT files. You can create MCAT files or modify existing
ones when you want to update and expand the piping data.
2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 5

Creating Project-Specific Data files involves assigning piping data from the
MCAT files for each new project specification. The project-specific data
can be stored in the following files:
Specification Directory Files: Store all piping specifications, mnemonics,
colors, layers, insulation codes, and assigned Auto-Selection files that
have been selected for a piping project.
Auto-Selection Files: Contain all selected pipes, fittings, bends, miters,
and assembly fittings for a piping project.
Insulation Directory Files: Contain all selected insulation files, insulation
codes, and colors for a piping project.
Routing Pipelines and Inserting Fittings is a semi-automatic process. Only
assigned project-specific piping data is available during these activities.
An additional option is to use 2-D Schematic Design information to further
automate pipe routing and inserting fittings.
Creo Schematic P & IDs can be used to export XML files and transfer
the data into 3-D piping designs. This enables designating of equipment,
nozzles, and fittings. In addition, when creating pipelines, routing pipes,
and inserting fittings, automatic selections (based on the XML data) are
made when possible.
When the piping design is complete, it is possible to generate information for
a number of downstream processes, including the following:
Generate the Piping Component File (PCF) information for the Isometric
Drawing Generation (ISOGEN). Creo Parametric piping provides an
ISOGEN interface that enables you to create isometric drawings of
pipelines. The ISOGEN interface exports material and geometrical data
from a Creo Parametric Piping model to a readable ISOGEN.pcf format.
This format serves as an input to ISOGEN for creating pipeline, spool, and
system isometric drawings.
Generate Piping Drawings. You can create Creo Parametric drawings
of piping designs, which can, for example, contain installation and bill of
materials information.
Output File Interchange Format (FIF). You can output information for CNC
bend machines.
Dynamic Design Rule Checking is possible during the pipeline routing
process. Various design errors such as bend violations, missing fittings,
and end type compatibility problems can be highlighted. These errors can
then be corrected before proceeding with the design.
The Schematic Consistency Check report provides information about the
correctness of a 3-D pipe model against the 2-D schematic information
stored in an XML file. You can generate reports for all typical pipeline
configurations in a piping design.

Module 1 | Page 6

2012 PTC

Understanding Piping Terminology


It is important to understand the terminology associated with
piping designs to fully understand the piping development
processes.
Understanding Piping Terminology
Pipelines
Pipe Segments
Fittings
Fittings
Insert in pipelines
Perform functions
Examples
Reducers/Valves
Equipment
Components with preconfigured
ports
Route to/from ports
Examples
Tanks/Pumps
ISOGEN Drawings
Industry Standard Isometric
Drawing Format
Auto-create from 3-D piping
models

Figure 1 Pipeline Example

Figure 2 Fitting Example

Figure 3 ISOGEN Drawing


Output Example

Understanding Piping Terminology


The following items are key items within both the manual piping development
process and the specification-driven piping development process.
Pipelines are made up of pipe segments and fittings.
Pipe Segments can consist of one or more consecutive sections: straight
pieces of pipe with bends or miter cuts, or a section of flexible tubing.
Creo Parametric creates a break whenever you create a fitting type
corner or insert an internal fitting in a pipeline.
Fittings are parts or assemblies added to piping systems to perform
specific functions.
Examples of fittings include reducers and different types of valves.
Equipment is represented by assembly components with predefined entry
ports.
Pipelines can be routed to or from equipment ports.
Examples of equipment include tanks and pumps.
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Module 1 | Page 7

ISOGEN Drawings Alias ISOGEN drawings are an industry standard


isometric drawing format for the plant piping industry.
These drawings can be created automatically from 3-D piping designs
in seconds.

Module 1 | Page 8

2012 PTC

Understanding 2-D Schematic Piping Designs


2-D schematic piping designs created in Creo Schematics
can be used to transfer piping design information into 3-D
specification-driven piping designs.
Process and Instrumentation Diagrams (P & ID)
Fluid System Map
Large-Scale Equipment
Tanks
Heat Exchangers
Functional Components
Valves

Flow Direction
Bore Sizes
Measurement and Control
Systems
Control and
Instrumentation Symbols

Figure 1 Schematic Piping Design Example

Understanding 2-D Schematic Piping Designs


Process and Instrumentation Diagrams (P & ID) are used to map fluid
systems.
They contain large-scale equipment, such as tanks and heat exchangers,
and major functional components, such as valves and orifice plates. They
also contain pipeline details documenting the flow direction, and labelling
indicating bore sizes.
The design intent of any associated measurement and control system can
also be captured using control and instrumentation symbols.
Piping designers may also create a Process Flow Diagram (PFD), in
addition to a P & ID.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 9

PROCEDURE - Manual Piping Development Process


Objectives
After successfully completing this exercise, you will be able to:
Create line stock.
Manually route pipelines.
Insert fittings into pipelines.
Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Design_Manual
Task 1:

MAN_DESIGN.ASM

Create pipeline stock.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:

2. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.


3. Click Piping

from the Engineering group.

4. Click the Setup group drop-down


menu and select Line Stock.
5. Click Create from the menu
manager.
Type PIPE_50A as the line
stock name and press ENTER.
Configure the LineStock dialog
box as shown.

For shape type and corner


type, the check boxes
configure selectable options,
and the green ball selection
configures the default
selection.
Click Save
in the LineStock
dialog box.
Click OK and then click Apply
Changes .
Click Done/Return from the
menu manager.

Module 1 | Page 10

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Create a pipeline and specify the start point.

1. If necessary, click Display Thick


from the View group
Pipes
to disable the display of thick
pipelines.
2. In the ribbon, click Create
from the Pipeline
Pipeline
group.
Type P50 for the pipeline
name and press ENTER.
Select PIPE_50A from the
menu manager.
In the ribbon, click Set Start
from the Routing group.
Zoom in and select the PORT1
coordinate system on the
multi-tank model, as shown.
Task 3:

Route the pipeline using various routing tools.

1. Create a pipe segment using the


Extend tool.
In the ribbon, click Extend
from the Routing group.
Drag the extend drag handle
to approximately the location
shown.
If necessary, edit the extend
value to 300 on the model.
Click OK.
You can create disjointed pipe segments and then join them into a
continuous pipeline, as needed.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 11

2. Create a disjointed pipe segment


using the Follow Curve tool.
Select Follow Curve
from
the Follow types drop-down
menu in the Routing group.
Select one section of the curve
in the model, as shown.
Press SHIFT and select the
other section of the curve, as
shown.
Notice that the curve
highlights, as shown.
Click Proceed With Changes
in the Follow Curve dialog
box.
3. Connect pipe segments using
the Connect tool.
In the ribbon, click Connect
from the Routing group.
Select the end of the first
segment, and then press
CTRL and select the end of
the follow curve segment, as
shown.
Edit Length 1 to 50.
Edit Length 2 to 200.
Notice that the pipeline
updates, as shown.
Click Proceed With Changes
in the Connect dialog box.

Module 1 | Page 12

2012 PTC

4. Create pipe segments using the


Extend tool.
In the ribbon, click Set Start
from the Routing group.
Select the end point of the
current pipeline, as shown.
from the
Click Extend
Routing group.
In the Extend dialog box,
select Along Csys Axis from
the drop-down list.
Select Offset from Ref for the
Dimension options.
For the Plane/Csys reference,
select the EXIT_PORT
coordinate system on the
man_design model, as shown.
Select the Y axis radio button.
Click Apply.
Notice that a pipe segment is
created.
Select the X axis radio button.
Click OK.
Notice that another pipe
segment is created, as shown.
5. Create a pipe segment using the
To Pnt/Port tool.
In the ribbon, click To Pnt/Port
from the Routing group.
Select the EXIT_PORT
coordinate system on the
model, as shown.
in
Click Apply Changes
the To Point/Port dialog box.
Notice that another pipe
segment is created, as shown.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 13

Task 4:

Insert a valve fitting in a pipeline.

1. Disable Csys Display

2. Enable Point Display

3. In the ribbon, click Insert Fitting


from the Fitting group.
Click Straight Brk from the
menu manager.
Select GATE_CHECK_
VALVE.ASM and click Open.
Select the approximate
location along the pipe
segment, as shown.
Click Length Ratio from the
menu manager.
Type 0.25 for the value, and
press ENTER.
Notice that the fitting assembly
appears in a sub-window, as
shown.
Prehighlight point END on the
fitting assembly model and
then select it.
Notice that a fitting is inserted
as shown. You can flip or
twist the fitting at this point if
required.
Click Done from the menu
manager.

Module 1 | Page 14

2012 PTC

Task 5:

Insert an end type flange fitting at the pipeline end port.

1. Enable Csys Display

2. In the ribbon, click Insert Fitting


from the Fitting group.
Click End from the menu
manager.
Select FLANGE_NECK_RF.
PRT and click Open.
Select the correct size to
match the current pipeline line
stock.
In the Select Instance
dialog box, select instance
FLANGE_NECK_RF-STEEL30K-50.PRT and click Open.
Zoom in and select the pipe
end next to the exit port, as
shown.
Notice that the flange instance
is now displayed in a separate
window.
Select PORT1 as the entry
port on the flange model, as
shown.
Prehighlight END point on the
model and then select it, as
shown.
Notice that the selected point
aligns the fitting centerline with
the pipe centerline.
Click Done from the menu
manager.
3. Disable Point Display

.
4. Disable Csys Display
Notice that the fitting is
inserted at the end of the pipe
segment, as shown.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 15

5. Review the completed pipeline.


Press CTRL+D to return to the standard orientation.
In the ribbon, click Display Thick Pipes
from the View group to
enable the display of thick pipelines.
Observe the completed pipeline, as shown. Notice that the pipeline
includes pipe segments and inserted fittings.

6. Save the piping assembly.


from the Quick Access toolbar.
Click Save
Click OK to save the assembly.
Click Close

from the Quick Access toolbar.

from the Data group.


Click Erase Not Displayed
Click OK to erase all non-displayed objects from memory.
This completes the procedure.

Module 1 | Page 16

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Specification-Driven Piping Process


Objectives
After successfully completing this exercise, you will be able to:
Route specification-driven pipelines using schematic information from Creo
Schematic.
Insert fittings in specification-driven pipelines using schematic information
from Creo Schematic.
Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Design_Spec
Task 1:

SPEC_DESIGN.ASM

Review schematic information.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:


2. Review the completed schematic piping design from Creo Schematic.
Observe the schematic piping design shown. It contains pipeline
size and fitting information.

The schematic information in this piping design has already been


exported to an XML file for use in a specification-driven pipeline
in Creo Parametric.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 17

Task 2:

Review master catalog (MCAT) information in the piping


specification database.

1. Review the MCAT file and folder


structure.
Click Folder Browser
from the navigator.
In the folder tree, browse to
the Piping\Design_Spec\
master_catalog folder to view
its contents in the browser.
Observe the different files and
folders contained within the
MCAT folder; these make up
the specification database.

2. Review the contents of the PIPING_MCAT_DIR.PTD file, as shown.

This file lists the available pipe and fitting MCAT files and insulation
files. Each file entry associates a piping category and an MCAT file
with a pipe outer diameter file, a pipe thickness file, a combined
size code file, a selection name for a fitting category, and the bolt
nut code associated with the fitting.

Module 1 | Page 18

2012 PTC

3. Review the contents of the fitting


MCAT folder.
In the folder tree, browse to
the Piping\Design_Spec\
master_catalog\fitting folder
to view its contents in the
browser.
Observe the different files
contained within the fitting
folder; these make up the
available fittings within the
specification database.
4. Review the contents of the ELBOW_90_BW_STEEL.PTD fitting file,
as shown.

This file specifies the elbow fitting name based on rating, size, and
end type. Any blank columns indicate the field is not applicable for
this type of fitting.
5. Click Model Tree
from the navigator to return to the model tree.
Minimize the browser pane.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 19

Task 3:

Prepare to route a specification-driven pipeline using schematic


information.

1. Click Settings

in the model tree and select Tree Filters.

2. Select the Features check box and click OK in the Model Tree Items
dialog box.
3. Load piping-specific configuration options.
Click File > Options.
Click Configuration Editor in the Creo Parametric Options window.
Select Import configuration file from the Import/Export drop-down
menu.

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK in the Creo Parametric Options dialog box.
Click No in the Creo Parametric Options message window.
This ensures that the configuration option piping_design_method
is set to spec_driven and piping_schematic_driven is set to yes.
This enables schematic information from Creo Schematics piping
designs to be used during specification-driven pipeline routing.

4. In the ribbon, select the


Applications tab.
5. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
6. Click Piping System Views
in the model tree.
If necessary, click Pipeline
View to de-select the option in
the drop-down list.
7. Expand WATER-LEG-1.ASM in
the model tree.
Notice the created line stock
(TRAINING_SPEC_150A_40)
and pipeline (LEG-1), as
shown.
This information was
generated using the schematic
design in Creo Schematic.

Module 1 | Page 20

2012 PTC

Task 4:

Route a specification-driven pipeline using schematic information.

1. In the ribbon, click Pipe


from
the Routing group.
Select LEG-1 in the model
tree.
Click Confirm to activate the
WATER-LEG-1.ASM.
Notice that the available
routing ports and components
are highlighted on the model,
as shown. These components
represent the entry and exit
ports for the pipeline.
2. Specify the pipeline start point.
In the ribbon, click Set Start
from the Routing group.
Zoom in and select PORT0 on
the 150A_IC component in the
model, as shown.
Click OK.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 21

3. Create the first pipeline segment.


In the ribbon, click Extend
from the Routing group.
Select Along Csys Axis as
the type of extend.
Select Offset from Ref as the
dimension option, as shown.
Select PORT0 on the 50A_IC
component in the model, as
shown.
Edit the offset value to 0.00
and press ENTER. Notice that
the Extend dialog box updates,
as shown.
Click Apply.

Module 1 | Page 22

2012 PTC

4. Create a second pipeline


segment by extending a
specified distance in a direction
along a coordinate system axis.
Select the Length Dimension
option.
Select the X axis radio button.
Edit the length value to 1000
and press ENTER, as shown.
Click Apply.
Notice that another pipe
segment is created, as shown.

5. Create a third pipeline segment


by extending a specified distance
in a different direction.
Select the Y axis radio button.
Select Offset from Ref as the
dimension option, as shown.
Select PORT0 on the 50A_IC
component in the model.
Click OK.
Notice that another pipe
segment is created, as shown.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 23

6. Create a fourth pipeline segment.


In the ribbon, click To Pnt/Port
from the Routing group.
Select PORT0 on the 50A_IC
component in the model.
Click Create Pipe Segment
in the To Point/Port dialog
box.
Notice the completed pipeline
routing, as shown.
The warning in the message area indicates that the pipe segment
size 150A and the entry port size 50A are mismatched. This can be
resolved by inserting a reducer in the pipeline.
Task 5:

Insert reducer fittings in the pipeline using schematic information.

1. Disable Csys Display

2. In the ribbon, click Insert Fitting


from the Fitting group.
Select a location on the
pipeline segment, as shown.
Notice that the Insert Fitting
dialog box is complete, as
shown. A reducer fitting of size
80A is automatically selected
based on the associated XML
file.
Edit the fitting position to 800
on the model.
Click Apply.
Notice that the reducer fitting
is placed on the pipeline, as
shown.

Module 1 | Page 24

2012 PTC

3. Insert a second reducer fitting.


Select a location on the
pipeline segment, as shown.
Notice that the Insert Fitting
dialog box is complete, as
shown. A reducer fitting of size
50A is automatically selected
based on the associated XML
file.
Edit the fitting position to 1000
on the model.
Click Apply.
Notice that the second reducer
fitting is placed on the pipeline,
as shown.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 25

Task 6:

Insert valve fittings in the pipeline using schematic information.

1. Insert a gate valve fitting.


Select a location on the
pipeline segment, as shown.
Notice that the Insert Fitting
dialog box is complete, as
shown. A gate valve fitting is
automatically selected based
on the associated XML file.
Edit the fitting position to 1000
on the model.
Click Apply.
Notice that the valve fitting
is placed on the pipeline, as
shown.

2. Insert a check valve fitting.


Select a location on the
pipeline segment, as shown.
Notice that the Insert Fitting
dialog box is complete, as
shown. A check valve fitting is
automatically selected based
on the associated XML file.
Edit the fitting position to 1000
on the model.
Click OK.
Notice that the valve fitting
is placed on the pipeline, as
shown.

Module 1 | Page 26

2012 PTC

Task 7:

Add corner fittings to the pipeline.

1. Click Piping System Views


in the model tree.
If necessary, click Pipeline
View to activate the option in
the drop-down list.
Expand the WATER and
LEG-1 items in the model tree.

Notice the invalid corners in the model tree. You can correct this by
inserting corner fittings.
2. Press CTRL and select the three
Invalid Corner fittings in the
model tree, as shown.
Right-click and select Insert >
Elbow.
Notice that the model tree
updates and elbow fittings are
inserted in the pipeline, as
shown.

2012 PTC

Module 1 | Page 27

3. Display thick pipe segments.


from the View group.
In the ribbon, click Display Thick Pipes
Notice that the pipe segments are displayed as thick pipes, as
shown.

You can toggle the display of thick pipe segments as required.


4. Save the piping assembly.
from the Quick Access toolbar.
Click Save
Click OK to save the piping assembly.
Click Close

.
Click Erase Not Displayed
Click OK to erase all non-displayed objects from memory.
This completes the procedure.

Module 1 | Page 28

2012 PTC

Module

Creating Piping Assembly Structures


Module Overview
Piping assembly structures can be developed in different ways depending
on your requirements. It is important to understand how and when different
assembly structures are applied. When developing piping assemblies,
skeletons, and data sharing tools, such as copy geometry and shrinkwrap,
enable controlled transfer of model geometry throughout the design.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the different assembly structures when designing pipelines.
Describe data sharing tools and large assembly management tools relevant
to pipeline design.
Configure design assemblies for pipeline design.
Create pipeline assembly structures.
Assemble piping equipment and components.

2012 PTC

Module 2 | Page 1

Planning Piping Assembly Structures


When starting a piping design, it is important to consider the
assembly structure of piping designs and the overall top-level
assembly structure.
Benefits

Considerations

Correct Piping Information


Bill of Materials
Fitting Reports
Insulation Reports
Mass Properties

Skeletons
Data Sharing Tools
Large Assembly Management
Assembly Structure
Component Interfaces

Piping Assemblies Structure Guidelines


Follow the company bill of materials (BOM) and part numbering structure.
Create the assembly structure first.

Figure 1 Piping Assemblies Structure Example

Benefits
Taking time to consider the assembly structure of piping designs helps ensure
correct piping information is created for downstream activities, such as:
Bill of materials
Fitting reports
Insulation reports
Mass properties
Other important benefits include effective control of external references, and
an appropriate level of detail in designs. Data sharing features such as
shrinkwrap and copy geometry can be used to control references and the
level of detail that should be considered when modeling frequently used
components such as flanges or fittings.

Considerations
The following points should be considered when planning an assembly
structure:
Module 2 | Page 2

2012 PTC

Using skeletons as a design framework.


Using data sharing tools, such as copy geometry to transfer design
information throughout designs.
Using large assembly management tools, such as simplified
representations, to create more lightweight and manageable assemblies.
Correct assembly structure in terms of hierarchy of components and
skeletons, to ensure required bill of materials are created.
Time-saving methods, such as using component interfaces when
assembling piping equipment and common components.

Piping Assemblies Structure Guidelines


When developing a piping design, it is important to follow a number of
guidelines:
Follow the company BOM and part numbering structure.
Plan and create the assembly structure first before starting the pipeline
design.
A complete piping assembly is shown, with three example piping assembly
structures.
These structures can be used in different situations to meet different
design requirements.

2012 PTC

Module 2 | Page 3

Piping Assembly Structure: Sub-Assembly


The sub-assembly option is best used when the piping
sub-assembly part number is required in the mechanical
sub-assembly bill of materials (BOM).
In this situation:
Pipelines connect components in the same mechanical sub-assembly.
Data sharing methods can be used.

Figure 1 Piping Assembly Structure Created Within a


Mechanical Sub-Assembly

Piping Assembly Structure: Sub-Assembly


This option is best used when the piping sub-assembly part number is
required in the mechanical sub-assembly BOM.
In this situation, pipelines connect components in the same mechanical
sub-assembly.
Data sharing methods such as copy geometry and shrinkwrap can be used
to transfer information into the piping skeleton.

Module 2 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Piping Assembly Structure: No Sub-Assembly


The no sub-assembly option is best used when piping
component part numbers are required in the mechanical
sub-assembly bill of materials (BOM).
In this situation:
Pipelines connect components in the same mechanical sub-assembly.
Data sharing methods are not used.

Figure 1 Piping Design Created Directly in the Mechanical Sub-Assembly

Piping Assembly Structure: No Sub-Assembly


This option is best used when piping component part numbers are required in
the mechanical sub-assembly BOM.
In this situation, pipelines connect components in the same mechanical
sub-assembly.
Data sharing methods are not required to transfer design information.

2012 PTC

Module 2 | Page 5

Piping Assembly Structure: Sub-Assemblies at


Top Level
The sub-assemblies at top-level option is best used when
piping component part numbers are required in the piping
sub-assembly bill of materials (BOM).
In this situation:
Pipelines connect components of different mechanical assemblies.
Data sharing methods can be used.

Figure 1 Piping Design Created in a Top-Level Piping Sub-Assembly

Piping Assembly Structure: Sub-Assemblies at Top Level


This option is best used when piping component part numbers are required in
the piping sub-assembly BOM.
Sub-Assemblies at Top Level is best used when pipelines connect
components from different mechanical assemblies.
Data sharing methods such as copy geometry and shrinkwrap can be used
to transfer information into the piping skeleton.
This technique is used for many of the lab exercises for this course.

Module 2 | Page 6

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Piping Assembly Structure:


Sub-Assemblies at Top Level
Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Assembly_Top
Task 1:

ASSY_TOP.ASM

Create a piping assembly within an existing assembly.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. Click Settings
in the model
tree and select Tree Filters.
3. In the Model Tree Items dialog
box, select the Features check
box under Display and click OK.
4. Observe the top-level assembly
and two sub-assemblies in the
model tree, as shown. The
two sub-assemblies contain
mechanical components.
5. Create a piping sub-assembly.

In the ribbon, click Create


from the Component group.
Click Subassembly as the type.
Type PIPING as the Name and click OK.
Click Copy From Existing and then click Browse.

.
Click Working Directory
Select MM_KG_SEC_ASSY.ASM and click Open.
Click OK.
You could have selected any suitable preconfigured piping template
assembly in the previous step.

2012 PTC

Module 2 | Page 7

6. Create an assembly constraint to


locate the piping sub-assembly
within the top-level assembly.
In the main graphics window,
right-click and select Default
Constraint.
Click Complete Component
in the Component
Placement dashboard.
Notice that the model tree
updates, as shown.

You can now start creating a piping skeleton and piping features
within the PIPING.ASM.
This completes the procedure.

Module 2 | Page 8

2012 PTC

Understanding Piping Large Assembly


Management Tools
When developing larger piping designs, it is often useful to
employ large assembly management tools to create a more
easy-to-use piping design.
Simplified Representations
Exclude Components
Substitution
Work Region
Visual States
Layers
Figure 1 Piping Assembly Master
Rep

Figure 2 Piping Assembly


Simplified Rep

Understanding Piping Large Assembly Management Tools


During the development of piping designs, it is often necessary to work
within a larger design assembly, for example, when designing industrial
piping systems. In addition to using data sharing tools and skeletons, other
large assembly management tools such as simplified representations, visual
states, and layers can be used to create a more lightweight and manageable
assembly.
Simplified Representations provide many ways in which the working
environment can be configured to suit your needs.
Components can be included or excluded from assemblies.
The level of detail can be controlled by substituting simpler versions
of components.
Work regions can be configured that remove a portion of a model from
display. Work regions behave like cuts, except that geometry is removed
from the display only, rather than physically removed from the model.
Visual States provide a means of applying environment display settings
to individual components. For example, you can selectively blank
components not relevant to current design tasks.
2012 PTC

Module 2 | Page 9

Layers can be used to organize information at the feature, part, and


assembly level. The display of items can be controlled at the part and
assembly level.

Module 2 | Page 10

2012 PTC

Creating and Configuring Piping Skeletons


Piping skeletons can be used to store routing references for
pipelines.
Design framework for assemblies:
Datum Features and Surfaces
References for assembling and
creating components
Allocate space for components
Configure interfaces between
components
Routing References in Piping Designs:

Figure 1 Surfaces Copied into


Piping Skeleton Part

Data sharing features


Lightweight representation
Changes to skeleton part propagate to:
Referenced components
Referenced pipeline routing
Figure 2 Resulting Piping
System References Skeleton
Part Surfaces

Creating and Configuring Piping Skeletons


Skeleton models are special parts that serve as the framework for designing
assemblies in a top-down design process. They act as the 3-D layout of
an assembly.
They are normally made up of datum features such as planes, axes,
coordinate systems, and surfaces.
They are the first component in an assembly; other components (such as
piping equipment) can be assembled or created referencing the skeleton
model.
Surfaces and datum planes within a skeleton can be used to allocate space
before assembling components to the assembly structure.
Skeletons can also be used to configure interfaces between components
in an assembly.
When designing piping assemblies, skeletons can be used as routing
references for pipelines.
References can be transferred into piping assembly skeletons using data
sharing tools such as copy geometry and shrinkwrap.
This provides piping designers with a lightweight representation of large
assembly components and features.
Any changes to skeleton models are propagated on to referenced
components and to any routing references.
2012 PTC

Module 2 | Page 11

PROCEDURE - Creating and Configuring Piping


Skeletons
Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Piping_Skeletons
Task 1:

ASSY_TOP.ASM

Create a skeleton part within an existing assembly.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. Click Settings
in the model
tree and select Tree Filters.
3. In the Model Tree Items dialog
box, select the Features check
box under Display and click OK.
4. Observe in the model tree that
the top-level assembly contains
two mechanical sub-assemblies
and a piping assembly, as
shown.

5. Activate the piping assembly.


Select PIPING.ASM in the model tree.
Right-click and select Activate.
6. Create a skeleton part within the piping sub-assembly.

In the ribbon, click Create


from the Component group.
Click Skeleton Model as the type.
Type PIPING_SKEL as the Name and click OK.
Click Copy From Existing and then click Browse.

.
Click Working Directory
Select MM_KG_SEC_PART.PRT and click Open.
Click OK.
You could have selected any suitable preconfigured piping template
skeleton part in the previous step.

Module 2 | Page 12

2012 PTC

7. Expand PIPING.ASM in the


model tree.
Notice that the skeleton part is
created, as shown.

You can now start creating piping features within the PIPING.ASM.

This completes the procedure.

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Module 2 | Page 13

Sharing Routing Geometry


You can use various data sharing tools to copy routing
references from mechanical assemblies into piping assemblies.
Copying non-solid references
Transfer of references into
skeletons
Lightweight references of parts
and assemblies
Controlled dependency
Types
Publish Geometry
Copy Geometry
External Copy Geometry
Shrinkwrap
External Shrinkwrap

Figure 1 Sample Model Tree with


Shrinkwrap and Geometry Features

Figure 2 Shrinkwrap Comps


Dialog Box

Sharing Routing Geometry


There are various data sharing tools that enable selective copying of
non-solid references throughout a design assembly.
Design references such as datum features and surfaces can be transferred
from components and assemblies into skeleton parts.
This enables users to create lightweight references of complex parts and
assemblies relevant to routing pipelines. This also enables users to work
on their individual subsystems without needing access to the top-level
assembly.
By default, all copied references maintain dependency or associativity
with source geometry, enabling automatic updates when design changes
occur. However, data sharing features can be made independent of source
geometry, if required. The associativity can be switched on and off as
desired.
Different types of data sharing features are available:
Publish Geometry Enables you to specify a collection of geometry to be
referenced by other components.
Module 2 | Page 14

2012 PTC

Copy Geometry Enables you to selectively copy geometry from other


models.
External Copy Geometry: Enables you to copy geometry from an
external model relative to a coordinate system.
Shrinkwrap Enables you to copy boundary surface references from other
components.
External Shrinkwrap: Enables you to copy boundary surface references
from another component relative to a coordinate system.

2012 PTC

Module 2 | Page 15

PROCEDURE - Sharing Routing Geometry


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Piping_Share_Geometry
Task 1:

ASSY_TOP.ASM

Create shrinkwrap features in the PIPING_SKEL.PRT.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. Click Settings
in the model
tree and select Tree Filters.
3. In the Model Tree Items dialog
box, select the Features check
box under Display and click OK.
4. Load piping-specific
configuration options.
Click File > Options.
Click Configuration Editor in
the Creo Parametric Options
window.
Select Import configuration
file from the Import/Export
drop-down menu.
.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO
and click Open.
Click OK in the Creo
Parametric Options dialog
box.
Click NO in the Creo
Parametric Options message
window.
5. If necessary, expand the
PIPING.ASM in the model tree.
Select PIPING_SKEL.PRT in
the model tree.
Right-click and select
Activate, then observe
the model tree as shown.

Module 2 | Page 16

2012 PTC

6. In the ribbon, click Shrinkwrap


from the Get Data group.
Click Subset in the Shrinkwrap
dashboard.
Select BASE.PRT from the
component listing. Right-click
and select Ignore.
Expand VESSEL_SUB.ASM
in the component listing.
Select the second
VESSEL.PRT. Right-click
and select Ignore.
Expand TANK_SUB.ASM in
the component listing.
Select the last
MULTI_TANK.PRT in the
listing. Right-click and select
Ignore.
Notice that the component
listing in the Shrinkwrap
Comps dialog box updates, as
shown.
Click OK.
7. Click Complete Feature
from
the Shrinkwrap dashboard.
Notice that the component
surfaces included in the
shrinkwrap feature are
highlighted on the model, as
shown.

2012 PTC

Module 2 | Page 17

Task 2:

Create copy geometry features in the PIPING_SKEL.PRT.

1. In the ribbon, click Copy


from the Get Data
Geometry
group.
Click Published Geometry
to disable it.
Only
Right-click and select
References.
Enable Csys Display
.
Zoom the assembly and select
PORT4 on the vessel model,
as shown.
Press CTRL and select
PORT3 on the vessel model,
as shown.
Click Complete Feature
from the Copy Geometry
dashboard.
Each copy geometry feature can only contain references from one
model; to copy additional references from other models, you must
create additional copy geometry features.
2. In the ribbon, click Copy
Geometry
from the Get Data
group.
Click Published Geometry
to disable it.
Only
Right-click and select
References.
Zoom in to the assembly
and select PORT2 on the
multi_tank model, as shown.
Press CTRL and select
PORT1 on the multi_tank
model, as shown.
Click Complete Feature
from the Copy Geometry
dashboard.

Module 2 | Page 18

2012 PTC

3. Expand the PIPING_SKEL.PRT


in the model tree.
Notice the shrinkwrap and
copy geometry features
contained within the
PIPING_SKEL.PRT in the
model tree, as shown.

4. Hide components in the


assembly.
In the model tree, select
BASE.PRT.
Press CTRL and select
VESSEL_SUB.ASM and
TANK_SUB.ASM.
Right-click and select Hide.
Notice that only the shrinkwrap
and copy geometry features
are now displayed in the main
graphics window, as shown.
This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 2 | Page 19

Assembling Piping Components Using


Component Interfaces
Component interfaces can be used repeatedly to place
components very quickly.
Component Interfaces

Stored constraints and references


Repeatedly place components
Faster component placement
Automatic drag-and-drop placement
possible

Examples
Piping Equipment
Common Components

Figure 1 Hydraulic Valve Block


with Highlighted References

Figure 2 Tubing Connector with


Highlighted References

Assembling Piping Components Using Component Interfaces


Component interfaces can be used repeatedly to place components very
quickly.
They contain a set of stored constraints and references.
Once an interface is configured and saved in a component, it can be used
anytime the component is placed into an assembly.
Placement of components using interfaces enables you to constrain
components faster, even by drag and drop.
Automatic drag-and-drop style placement of components is also possible if
the configuration option autoplace_single_comp is set to yes.
Component interfaces are useful whenever common components are
assembled using the same references.
For example, piping equipment and common components can be
created with component interfaces.

Module 2 | Page 20

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Assembling Piping Components Using


Component Interfaces
Close Window

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Piping\Piping_Comp_Interfaces
Task 1:

TUBE_UNION.PRT

Create a component interface in the TUBE_UNION.PRT to enable


rapid assembly.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. Click Component Interface
from the Model Intent group.
Leave the default interface
name of INTFC001.
Select the curved surface, as
shown, to create a Coincident
constraint.
3. Click New Constraint in the
Component Interface dialog box.
Select the planar surface as
shown, to create a Coincident
constraint.
in the
Click Apply
Component Interface dialog
box.
Click Close
from the Quick
Access toolbar.

2012 PTC

Module 2 | Page 21

Task 2:

Assemble the TUBE_UNION.PRT into the INTERFACES.ASM.

1. Click Open
from the Quick
Access toolbar.
Double-click INTERFACES.
ASM to open it.
from the
2. Click Assemble
Component group.
Select the TUBE_UNION.PRT
and click Open.
Click Auto Place from the
Component Placement
dashboard.
Select a location near the left
hole, as shown.
Notice that the component
position updates, as shown.
3. Select Location 1 in the Auto
Place dialog box, then click Add
Item .
Click Close in the Auto Place
dialog box.
Click Complete Component
in the Component
Placement dashboard.
Notice that the component is
assembled, as shown.
Using Component Interfaces can speed up repeated assembly
of components. If desired, you can assemble a second
TUBE_UNION.PRT to the hole on the right, using the same
method. Alternatively, you can reference pattern the assembled
TUBE_UNION.PRT, because the two holes are patterned.
This completes the procedure.

Module 2 | Page 22

2012 PTC

Module

Configuring and Routing Pipelines


Module Overview
A piping system typically consists of a number of pipelines connecting
various pieces of equipment. Each pipeline is made up of straight or flexible
pipe segments and fittings. Pipelines also have parameters associated with
them such as material, grade, and diameter; these parameters describe
the characteristics of each pipeline. In this module, you learn how to
describe the terminology associated with piping design. You also configure
non-specification-driven pipelines, which can involve configuring piping line
stock, pipeline parameters, allowable line shapes, and corner types. You also
learn how to route pipelines using various techniques that can be applied to
both non-specification-driven and specification-driven pipelines.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe piping terminology.
Configure non-specification-driven pipelines.
Route pipelines using various techniques.

2012 PTC

Module 3 | Page 1

Understanding Pipeline Routing


Routing pipelines involves configuring line stock, configuring a
pipeline start point, and creating pipeline segments.
Configure Line Stock
Parameters
Configure Pipeline Start Point
Entry Port
Pipe End
Select or Create Point
Create Pipeline Segments
Use line stock settings
Continuous/Unconnected
Connect individual segments
Insert Fittings (optional)
Create a Pipe Solid

Figure 2 Routed Pipeline Example

Figure 1 LineStock Dialog Box

Understanding Pipeline Routing


Routing pipelines typically involves the following tasks:
Configure Line Stock
Line stock is a list of parameters that describes the type of pipe in terms
of size, shape, and material.
Line stock files can be stored in a library and loaded as needed.
Configure Pipeline Start Point
Before you can route a pipeline segment, you must set a start point. You
can set a start point using an entry port, pipe end; or you can select an
existing datum point or create a new datum point.
Start points are displayed as a highlighted circle.
Entry ports are coordinate systems that can be used to specify start and
end points for pipelines. They are also used when inserting fittings to
determine the direction of routing and fitting orientation.
Create Pipeline Segments
When you create new routing features, the default settings for shape
and corner type are taken from the current line stock parameter file.
Segments can be routed continuously, or you can create individual
segments and connect them together as required.
Module 3 | Page 2

2012 PTC

You can insert fittings or modify pipeline properties during the routing of
pipelines or after routing is completed.
Once the pipeline is finalized, you can easily create a solid part based
on the pipeline routing and the information in the line stock file. The solid
part can be based on a model template, and can be opened on its own
as a model to create further features such as holes or tubing flares.

2012 PTC

Module 3 | Page 3

Configuring Non-Specification-Driven Pipelines


Configuring non-specification-driven pipelines involves
specifying pipeline characteristics such as line stocks, design
rules, and pipeline parameters.
Line Stock

Configure Parameters
Line Shape
Corner Type
Allowable Values
Design Rule Parameters
User-Defined Parameters
Rectangular Cross-Section
Flexible Hose
Figure 1 Line Stock Example

Figure 2 Design Rules Example

Figure 3 Rectangular Shape


Example

Configuring Line stock


Before creating pipelines, you must configure line stocks.
A line stock is a set of parameters that describe the material, grade, outside
diameter, and other parameters of pipeline segments.
Once the line stock is created or imported, these parameters are stored
in line stock features in the model.
You can assign different line stocks to different line segments of the
same pipeline because they may have different outside diameters,
materials, and grades.
Line shape is a line stock characteristic that specifies the pipe shape as
straight, flexible, or a combination of both.
Corner type is a line stock characteristic that specifies the type of corner
fittings used in pipelines. These can be bent or mitered, or fitting type
corners.
Fitting type corners create unconnected pipeline segments and are
intended to be locations for placing fittings at a later time.
You can also specify permitted values in the line stock file.
Bend Radius: A list of selectable bend radii.
Bend Angle: A list of selectable bend angles.
Module 3 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Miter Length: A list of selectable lengths for miter cuts. These values
are used only when the Miter Cut Number is greater than 1.
Miter Cut Number: A list of the permitted quantities of miter cuts. For
example, a setting of 2 forces the pipeline to have two miters as it moves
through a 90 degree corner.
Design rule parameters are used to verify that routed pipelines are within
specified limits. These parameters can also be configured when creating
line stocks.
For example, segment length, bend radius, and bend angle parameters
can be set within limits.
User-defined parameters can be configured for line stock; these can be
system parameters such as fluid_type or user-defined parameters such
as pressure.
Rectangular cross-section line stock can be configured.
This can be used for routing square or rectangular tubing or ductwork.
For flexible hose, you can configure and route pipelines with a minimum
bend radius; this can be changed for different pipe gauges to ensure
accurate representation of flexible hose.
After routing, you can check for bend radius violations using the Design
Rules Check dialog box.

2012 PTC

Module 3 | Page 5

PROCEDURE - Configuring Non-Specification-Driven


Pipelines
Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Non_Spec_Pipelines
Task 1:

ASSY_TOP.ASM

Create pipeline stock in the PIPING.ASM.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. In the ribbon, select the
Applications tab.
3. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
4. Click Settings
from the
model tree and select Tree
Filters.
5. In the Model Tree Items dialog
box, select the Features check
box under Display and click OK.
6. If necessary, expand
PIPING.ASM in the model
tree.
Select PIPING.ASM in the
model tree.
Right-click and select
Activate. Observe the
model tree as shown.
The active assembly is where all piping features are created. It is a
best practice to use a dedicated piping assembly, not the top-level
assembly.

Module 3 | Page 6

2012 PTC

7. Click the Setup group drop-down


menu and select Line Stock.
Click Create from the menu
manager.
Type PIPE_25A as the line
stock name and press ENTER.
Configure the LineStock dialog
box as shown.
For shape type
and corner type,
the check boxes
configure selectable
options, and the
green ball selection
configures the
default selection.
Click Save
in the LineStock
dialog box.
Double-click the piping_data
folder.
Click OK, and then click Apply
Changes .
Task 2:

Create duct line stock in the PIPING.ASM.

1. Click Create from the menu


manager.
Type DUCT_230_160 as the
line stock name and press
ENTER.
Configure the LineStock dialog
box as shown.
in the LineStock
Click Save
dialog box.
Click OK, and then click Apply
Changes .

2012 PTC

Module 3 | Page 7

Task 3:

Read line stock into the PIPING.ASM.

1. Click Read from the menu


manager.
Select pipe_15a.stk and click
Open.
Click Edit.
Click PIPE_15A from the
menu manager.
Notice the configured line
stock as shown. For bend
radius and bend angle, the first
value in the list is the default
value.
in
Click Apply Changes
the LineStock dialog box.
Click Done/Return from the
menu manager.
This completes the procedure.

Module 3 | Page 8

2012 PTC

Routing Pipelines
There are many different routing options available when
manually routing pipelines. These options provide a flexible
approach to pipeline routing.
Routing Tools

Extend
To Pnt/Port
Follow
Connect
Branch
Insert Point
Figure 1 Extend Dialog Box
Example

Figure 2 Completed Routing


Example

Figure 3 Connecting Segments


Example

Pipeline Routing Options


Before routing a pipeline, you must first configure the line stock, and specify
the pipeline start point. You can then use the following tools to route the
pipeline:
Extend enables routing of new piping segments by extending them from
the current position in a specified direction. Extensions can be done by
dragging, typing in an extension distance, or by specifying a reference to
extend to or offset from. Reference options include:
Csys Axis: Extend along a selected coordinate system axis.
Axis/Edge/Segment: Extend parallel to a selected axis, edge, or pipe
segment.
Plane/Point: Extend up to a selected plane or point.
Csys: Dynamically extend pipeline segments relative to a selected
coordinate system. The extension can be measured using cartesian,
cylindrical, or spherical systems.
To Pnt/Port creates a segment from the current start point to the selected
point, port, or pipe end.
To Port is useful when finishing pipelines at ports.
2012 PTC

Module 3 | Page 9

Follow creates a segment by following an axis, datum curve, existing


pipeline, or sketched path.
When using sketch, default bend radii and mitred corners are
automatically added after the sketch is completed.
A sketch is useful when routing a complex path around equipment.
Connect uses straight lines to connect disjointed segments from the same
pipeline or any entry port(s). Default corners are added automatically when
possible. There are four possible cases for connecting any two straight
segments.
Coplanar Parallel: Extends the selected segments until they meet,
forming a single segment.
Coplanar Non-Parallel: Extends the two segments and adds an
intermediate segment. You can modify the extension end points and the
angles of the corners. If the current corner type is Bend, the system
automatically adds bends. You can control the extension distances at
both ends, or the extension distance and angle at one end.
Collinear: Extends two segments by extending each segment in a
straight line toward the other. There are no dimensions to modify with
this type of connection.
Non-Planar: Extends each segment until they intersect, creating a single
corner. You can move the new end points of the connected segments to
create an intermediate segment.
Branch enables you to branch from the current pipeline to another pipeline.
When a branch is attached to a pipeline, cuts are automatically created in
the solids at the branch point.
Connection points are located on pipe center lines.
However, in non-specification-driven piping, you cannot branch to a
different segment of the same pipeline.
Insert Point enables you to add point to point features to create new
straight segments, and you can drag the points to configure the new
straight segments as required.
It is always recommended that you utilize this option before adding
fittings.

Module 3 | Page 10

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Routing Pipelines


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Route_Pipelines
Task 1:

PIPING.ASM

Create a pipeline and specify the start point in the PIPING.ASM.

1. Enable only the following Datum


Display types:

2. In the ribbon, select the


Applications tab.
3. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
4. In the ribbon, click Create
from the Pipeline
Pipeline
group.
Type P25A for the pipeline
name, and press ENTER.
Select PIPE_25A from the
menu manager.
from the
Click Set Start
Routing group.
Zoom in and select the PORT1
coordinate system on the
vessel model, as shown.
Notice the small blue circle at the selected start point. This indicates
the current end location of the pipeline being routed. This location
changes as you create pipe segments.

2012 PTC

Module 3 | Page 11

5. Create pipe segments using the


Extend tool.
Click Extend
from the
Routing group.
Drag the extend drag handle
to approximately the location
shown.
If necessary, edit the extend
value to 450 on the model.
Click Apply.
In the Extend dialog box, edit
the Y value to 300 and press
ENTER, as shown.
Click Apply.
Notice that a second pipe
segment is created, as shown.
6. Create more pipe segments
using the Extend tool.
In the Extend dialog box,
select Along Csys Axis from
the drop-down list.
Select Offset from Ref for the
Dimension options.
For the Plane/Csys reference,
select the PORT1 coordinate
system on the multi_tank
model, as shown.
Select the X axis radio button.
Notice that the dialog box
updates, as shown.
Click Apply.
Notice that a third pipe
segment is created, as shown.
Select the Y axis radio button.
Click OK.
Notice that a fourth pipe
segment is created, as shown.

Module 3 | Page 12

2012 PTC

7. Create a pipe segment using the


To Pnt/Port tool.
Click To Pnt/Port
from the
Routing group.
Select PORT1 on the
multi_tank model, as shown.
in
Click Apply Changes
the To Point/Port dialog box.
Notice that another pipe
segment is created, as shown.

Observe the bends that are automatically inserted into the pipeline
at each pipe corner. These are created using information contained
within the pipeline stock.
This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 3 | Page 13

Routing Flexible Hoses


You can configure and route flexible segments of pipelines,
enabling you to design flexible hoses.
Routing Flexible Pipes
Flexible/Straight Pipe Segments
Flexible
Extend
To Pnt/Port
Straight use appropriate tools
Configure Line Shape
Use Piping Environment
Route from Entry Ports
No fittings on flexible segments
Add fittings on straight
segments

Figure 1 Configuring Flexible


Pipe Segments

Figure 2 Flexible Hose Example

Routing Flexible Hoses


You can route flexible hoses by specifying flexible segments and straight
(fixed length) segments in the same pipeline. This enables you to control the
resulting pipeline shape and design characteristics.
When routing flexible segments, the following routing tools are available:
Extend Various options to extend a pipe segment.
To Pnt/Port This option creates a segment from the current start point to
the selected point, port, or pipe end.
Where necessary, you can route straight segments using appropriate routing
tools.
You can configure the line shape for each piping segment in the Piping
Environment dialog box.
You can route flexible pipes from an entry port of a fitting.
However, you cannot insert fittings on flexible pipes.
To route a hose from a fitting, you can use a straight segment with an
extend where it leaves the fitting.

Module 3 | Page 14

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Routing Flexible Hoses


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Route_Hoses
Task 1:

FLEX_HOSE.ASM

Create a pipeline and specify the start point in the


FLEX_HOSE.ASM.

1. Enable only the following Datum


Display types:

2. In the ribbon, select the


Applications tab.
3. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
4. In the ribbon, click Create
from the Pipeline
Pipeline
group.
Type FLEX_HOSE_1 for the
pipeline name, and press
ENTER.
Select LINE_STOCK_25A
from the menu manager.
from the
Click Set Start
Routing group.
Select the PORT1 coordinate
system on the multi_tank
model, as shown.

2012 PTC

Module 3 | Page 15

5. Create a straight pipe segment


using the To Pnt/Port tool.
from
Click Environment
the Routing group.
Notice that the line shape is
configured as straight; this
value is taken from the line
stock configuration.
Click OK.
from the
Click To Pnt/Port
Routing group.
Prehighlight the P1 point on
the model and then select it,
as shown.
in
Click Apply Changes
the To Point/Port dialog box.
Notice that a straight pipe
segment is created, as shown.

6. Create flexible pipe segments


using the To Pnt/Port tool.
from
Click Environment
the Routing group.
Select Flexible with Free
Length for the Line Shape.
Click OK.
from the
Click To Pnt/Port
Routing group.
Prehighlight the P2 point on
the model and then select it,
as shown.
Notice that the Create section
through all points check box
is selected. You create flexible
segments through all points in
this datum point array.
in
Click Apply Changes
the To Point/Port dialog box.
Notice that the flexible pipe
segments are created, as
shown.

Module 3 | Page 16

2012 PTC

7. Review the resulting pipeline.


Click Display Thick Pipes
to display thick pipelines.
Notice that the completed
pipeline interferes with
PILLAR_2.PRT, as shown.
To correct this, you can adjust
the position of one of the points
in the datum point array.
8. Adjust the datum point array.
Prehighlight the P5 point on
the model and then select it,
as shown.
Right-click and select Edit.
Edit the dimension shown to
200.
from the
Click Regenerate
Quick Access toolbar.
Notice that the pipeline no
longer interferes with the
PILLAR_2.PRT, as shown.

The flexible pipe segment length has also been updated.

This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 3 | Page 17

Module 3 | Page 18

2012 PTC

Module

Moving and Modifying Pipelines


Module Overview
You can use different methods to modify and move pipelines. You can
add points to pipelines to create pipe segments, then move and rotate the
resulting pipe segments. You can edit existing pipelines using various tools
contained within the Modify Pipeline dialog box, including editing corner
types, and editing line stock. You can edit pipe segment dimensions, and
redefine pipe segments. You can edit the location of routing references in
a piping assembly, such as components. Any routed pipelines in the piping
assembly update to reflect these changes. As you route pipelines, the default
piping environment settings are taken from the current line stock. You can
edit these default values for newly routed pipe segments.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Add points to pipelines to create pipe segments.
Move and rotate previously routed pipe segments.
Edit existing pipelines using various tools contained within the Modify
Pipeline dialog box.
Edit pipe segment dimensions.
Redefine pipe segments.
Edit the location of routing references in a piping assembly.
Edit the default piping environment settings.

2012 PTC

Module 4 | Page 1

Adding Points and Moving Pipe Segments


You can add break points to divide up pipe segments, then move
and rotate the resulting pipe segments.
Add Point Options

Distance
Length Ratio
Distance from a Corner
Distance from a Plane
Distance from a Fitting

Figure 1 Points Added to


Pipe Segment

Moving Pipe Segments


Translate and/or Rotate
Multiple Moves
Connect between moved
segments

Figure 2 Moving and Rotating


a Segment

Figure 3 Updated Pipeline

Adding Points on Pipe Segments


You can add break points to existing straight pipe segments.
The points can be located using the following options:
Insert a point at a specified distance along a pipe segment. The distance
value can be edited as required.
Insert a point at a specified length ratio along a pipe segment. The ratio
value can be edited between 0 and 1.0.
Insert a point at a specified distance from a corner along a pipe segment.
The distance value can be edited as required.
Insert a point at a specified distance from a specified plane along a pipe
segment. The distance value can be edited as required.
Insert a point at a specified distance from a fitting along a pipe segment.
The distance value can be edited as required.
Module 4 | Page 2

2012 PTC

Moving Pipe Segments


You can translate and rotate pipe segments that begin and end with either a
break point, a fitting corner, or a free end.
You can create multiple moves made up of both translate and rotate values.
Connect features are created between the moved segment and the pipeline.

2012 PTC

Module 4 | Page 3

PROCEDURE - Adding Points and Moving Pipe


Segments
Close Window

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Piping\Moving_Segments
Task 1:

MOVE_SEG.ASM

Insert break points in a pipeline.

1. Enable only the following Datum


Display types:

2. In the ribbon, select the


Applications tab.
3. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
4. Click Display Thick Pipes
necessary, to disable it.
5. In the ribbon, click Pipe
the Routing group.

, if
from

6. Select the pipe segment shown.


7. In the ribbon, click Break Point
from the Routing group.
Select a location on the pipe
segment approximately at the
location shown.
Edit the value on the model to
1300.
Click Apply in the Break Point
dialog box.
Select a second location on the
pipe segment approximately at
the location shown.
Edit the value on the model to
200.
Click OK in the Break Point
dialog box.
Notice that two break points
are inserted in the pipeline, as
shown.

Module 4 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Move a pipe segment on a pipeline.

1. Select Move Pipe Segment


from the Pipe Segment types
drop-down menu.
Select the pipe segment on
the model, as shown.
Drag the handle to
approximately the location
shown.
Edit the move distance value
on the model to 650.
Right-click and select New
Move.
Right-click and select Rotate.
Right-click and select
Direction Reference.
Select the Z-axis on the
coordinate system on the
model, as shown.
Drag the angular handle to a
value of approximately 90 on
the model, as shown.
If necessary, edit the rotation
angle to 90.
from
Click Apply Changes
the dashboard.
Notice that the pipeline is
updated, as shown.

This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 4 | Page 5

Modifying Pipeline Routing


There are various tools that enable you to modify previously
routed pipelines, and change the working environment as you
route pipelines.
Modify Routed Pipelines
Modify Pipeline Dialog Box
Corner Type
Line Stock
Parameters
Flex Shape
Flow Direction
Edit Pipe Segment Dimensions
Redefine Pipe Segments
Edit Routing References

Figure 1 Modifying Line Stock

Piping Environment
Default values from Line Stock
Piping Environment dialog box
Corner Type
Line Stock
Line Shape
Edited values used on new pipe
segments

Figure 2 Modifying Pipe


Segment Dimensions

Modifying Routed Pipelines


There are a number of ways in which you can modify routed pipelines
including the following:
You can use the Modify Pipeline tool. This provides access to the Modify
Pipeline dialog box, where the following options are available:
Corner Type: You can configure the corner type and value of single or
multiple corners. The corner type can be bend, fitting, or miter. For
bends you can specify the bend radius and for miter corners you can
specify the number of cuts, and if necessary, the cut length.
Line Stock: You can specify the line stock for single or multiple pipe
segments.
Parameters: You can modify pipeline and bend parameters.
Flex Shape: You can modify the line shape of a flexible hose between
fixed and free length.
Flow Direction: You can specify the flow unit and change the flow
direction on a pipeline.
Module 4 | Page 6

2012 PTC

You can edit dimensions created during the routing of a pipeline segment,
for example, pipe segment extend values. Regenerating the piping
assembly updates the pipeline geometry.
You can redefine a pipeline segment. This enables you to completely
change the routing references and options.
When redefining pipe segments, all subsequent pipe segments
are temporarily suppressed from the model. They are resumed
when the redefining operation is complete.
You can edit the location and geometry of any routing references, for
example, you can change the location of components referenced during
routing. Regenerating the piping assembly updates the pipeline geometry
accordingly.

Piping Environment
When you start routing a pipeline, the default piping environment settings are
taken from the line stock you are using and remain the same unless you
change them. You can change the default settings in the Piping Environment
dialog box. The following items can be edited:
Corner Type Can be specified as bend, fitting, or miter.
When the corner type is specified as bend, you can also specify the
bend radius, and for miter corners you can specify the number of cuts
and cut length.
Line Shape Can be straight or flexible.
Line Stock You can select an alternative line stock.
Any settings changed in the piping environment are only used for
newly routed pipe segments.

2012 PTC

Module 4 | Page 7

PROCEDURE - Modifying Pipeline Routing


Close Window

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Piping\Modifying_Routing
Task 1:

MOD_ROUTE.ASM

Modify existing pipeline segments.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. In the ribbon, select the
Applications tab.
3. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
4. Click Pipe
group.

from the Routing

5. If necessary, click Display Thick


Pipes
from the View group to
display thick pipelines.
6. Select the pipe segment shown.
7. Edit the line stock.
In the ribbon, click Modify

from the Pipeline


Pipeline
group.
Select the Line Stock option.
Select the pipe segment
shown.
Click OK.
Select PIPE_25A from the
Modify Linestock drop-down
menu.

.
Click Apply Changes
Notice that the line stock
thickness updates on the
pipeline, as shown.

Module 4 | Page 8

2012 PTC

8. Edit the bend radius for selected


corners.
Select the Corner Type option.
Zoom in and select the upper
corner on the pipeline as
shown.
Press CTRL and select the
lower corner on the pipeline as
shown.
Click OK.
Edit the Bend Radius to 40.
.
Click Apply Changes
Notice that the corner
geometry updates, as shown.

9. Edit the corner type for selected


corners.
Select Miter Cut from the New
Type drop-down menu.
Edit the Cut Number to 3.
Edit the Cut Length to 40.
.
Click Apply Changes
Notice that the corner
geometry updates, as shown.

2012 PTC

Module 4 | Page 9

10. Edit the flow direction.


Select the Flow Direction
option.
Select the pipe segment
shown.
Click OK.
Notice that the flow direction
is indicated in the model, as
shown.
button.
Click the Reverse
Notice that the flow direction
updates on the pipeline, as
shown.
Click Accept Changes .

This completes the procedure.

Module 4 | Page 10

2012 PTC

Module

Configuring and Inserting Fittings


Module Overview
Fittings are parts or assemblies that are added to pipelines to perform
specific functions, such as reducers, valves, and flanges. Fittings need to
have properly configured entry ports and datum points to enable proper
insertion into pipelines and the trimming of pipelines to entry ports. Fittings
can be stored in libraries using family tables, enabling them to be retrieved
and placed easily. In this module, you learn about different types of fittings,
you configure fittings for use in pipelines, and you learn how to insert fittings
in pipelines.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe different types of fittings.
Configure fitting models for use in pipelines.
Insert fittings in pipelines.

2012 PTC

Module 5 | Page 1

Understanding Fittings
Fittings are parts or assemblies that can be inserted into
pipelines to perform specific design functions, for example,
reducer fittings and valve fittings.
Fitting Types
Corner
Elbows
Reducers
Angle Valves
End
Caps
Plugs
Flanges
Straight (Internal)
Tees/Valves
Fitting Options
Straight Break
Straight Continuous

Figure 1 Corner Fitting Example

Figure 2 End Fitting Example

Figure 3 Check Valve Example


Displaying Entry and Exit Ports

Understanding Fittings
You can create fittings as part or assembly models. You can store fittings
in libraries, enabling you to easily retrieve the correct fitting size when you
need to insert them into a pipeline.
Fittings can be divided into three broad categories:
Corner fittings such as elbows, reducers, and angle valves.
You can locate Corner fittings quickly by selecting a pipeline corner.
Creo Parametric uses the intersection of the Z-axes of the coordinate
systems in the fittings to locate the fitting.
You can create Corner fittings in a variety of angles; they do not need to
be 90 degrees.
End fittings such as caps, plugs, and flanges.
Module 5 | Page 2

2012 PTC

End fittings are located by selecting the end of a pipeline. A coordinate


system (ENTRY_PORT) is then selected to orient the fitting, and a
datum point is selected in the fitting to locate the fitting on the pipeline.
Straight (or Internal) fittings such as tees and valves.
Straight fittings are located by selecting a location along a pipeline
segment. A coordinate system (ENTRY_PORT) is then selected to
orient the fitting, and a datum point is created using various options to
locate the fitting on the pipeline.
When inserting this type of fitting, there are two options:
Straight Break The pipeline is broken at the point of inserting the
fitting, for example, when inserting a valve.
Straight Continuous The pipeline is not broken at the point of
inserting the fitting, for example, when inserting a pipeline support.

2012 PTC

Module 5 | Page 3

Creating Fittings
You can add break points to divide up pipe segments, then move
and rotate the resulting pipe segments.
Fitting Model Requirements
Parts or Assemblies
Entry Ports
Coordinate Systems
Z-axis Orientation
Datum Point
Aligns Fitting
Center of Fitting

Figure 1 Corner Fitting Example

Penetration Distance
Termination of pipelines
Controlled by entry port location
Fitting Libraries
Family Tables
Figure 2 Tee Fitting Example

Figure 3 Fitting Family Table


Example

Figure 4 Penetration Distance


Example

Fitting Model Requirements


Fittings can be created as standard parts or assemblies. They are treated
as assembly components within a piping assembly. For a model (part or
assembly) to be used as a fitting, it must have the following features:
Entry ports created at the connection points.
Entry ports are coordinate systems renamed in the format PORT# (such
as PORT0 or PORT1). It is considered a best practice to create entry
ports at the top level of the fitting model (part or assembly).
The Z-axis of an entry port must point out of the fitting. Pipelines enter
or exit the fitting parallel to this Z-axis.
A datum point must be configured (except for Corner fittings).
The datum point is used for aligning the fitting with the centerline of the
connecting pipeline or at the end of a pipeline segment.

Module 5 | Page 4

2012 PTC

The alignment point is normally located along the Z-axis at the center of
symmetry of the fitting. For fittings with three entry ports (for example,
tee fitting), the alignment point is at the intersection of the three Z-axes.

Penetration Distance
Pipelines associated with a fitting terminate at the fittings coordinate
system entry ports. You can control the penetration distance in a fitting by
modifying the location of entry port coordinate systems. Regenerating
fitting models updates any routed pipelines and solid pipes.

Fitting Libraries
Fitting libraries can be configured using family tables. This saves time
when creating large numbers of fittings with only minor size variations. It
also enables easy selection and placement of fittings.

2012 PTC

Module 5 | Page 5

PROCEDURE - Creating Fittings


Close Window

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Piping\Creating_Fittings
Task 1:

TEE_STRAIGHT.PRT

Create an entry port coordinate system.


Notice two entry port coordinate systems have already been
created on the model, named PORT0 and PORT1. You can create
the third entry port coordinate system.

1. Enable only the following Datum


Display types:

2. In the ribbon, click Coordinate


System
from the Datum
group.
Press CTRL and Prehighlight
and select the FRONT datum
plane on the model; then
Prehighlight and select the
RIGHT datum plane on the
model.
Press CTRL and select the
flat surface on the model, as
shown.
Notice the location of the
coordinate system and the
direction of the axes, as
shown. Click OK.
Notice a coordinate system
feature is created, as shown.
3. Edit the name of the coordinate
system.
If necessary, select coordinate
system CSO in the model tree.
Right-click and select
Rename.
Type PORT2 for the name and
press ENTER.
Notice the model updates, as
shown.
De-select all geometry and
features.

Module 5 | Page 6

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Create a datum point at the intersection of two datum axes.

1. Enable Axis Display


2. Disable Csys Display

.
.

3. In the ribbon, click Point


from
the Datum group.
Press CTRL and Prehighlight
and select the A_1 datum
axis on the model; then
Prehighlight and select the
A_3 datum axis on the model.
Notice a datum point feature is
located, as shown.
Select the Properties tab in
the Datum Point dialog box.
Edit the name to CTR.
Click OK.
Notice a datum point feature
is created on the model, as
shown.
When inserting fittings into pipelines, the datum point is used for
aligning the fitting with the centerline of the connecting pipeline.
For fittings with three entry ports (for example, a tee fitting), the
alignment point is at the intersection of the three Z-axes.
This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 5 | Page 7

Inserting Fittings
You can insert fittings into pipelines using different location
options depending on your requirements.
Fitting Location Options
End
Corner
Straight Segment
Straight Break
Straight Continuous
Orientation Options
Flip
Twist

Figure 2 Tee Fitting Example

Figure 1 Corner Fitting Example

Figure 3 Tee Fitting Twisted


Example

Fitting Location Options


Fittings can be inserted using the following location options:
End Insert a fitting at the end of a pipeline.
Corner Insert a fitting at a corner of a pipeline.
Straight Segment Insert a fitting along a straight segment of pipeline. You
can select or create a datum point on the pipeline to position the fitting.
The Straight Brk option breaks the pipeline at the insertion point.
The Straight Cont option does not break the fitting at the insertion point.

Orientation Options
You can control the fitting orientation when inserting a fitting, and also by
using the Redefine option after the fitting is placed. There are two options to
control the fitting orientation:
Flip Turns the fitting so that entry ports face in the opposite direction.
Twist Twists the fitting by rotating or aligning entry port axes.

Module 5 | Page 8

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Insert Fittings


Close Window

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Piping\Inserting_Fittings
Task 1:

INSERT_FITT.ASM

Insert a corner fitting in a pipeline.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:

2. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.


3. Click Piping

from the Engineering group.

4. If necessary, click Display Thick Pipes


disable the display of thick pipelines.

from the View group to

5. In the ribbon, click Insert Fitting


from the Fitting group.
Click Corner from the menu
manager.
Select ELBOW_90_STEEL_
BW.PRT and click Open.
In the Select Instance dialog
box, select instance ELBOW_
90_BW-STEEL-S-80.PRT and
click Open.
Zoom in and select the pipe
segment next to the corner
location, as shown.
Notice a fitting is inserted as
shown.
Click Done from the menu
manager.

2012 PTC

Module 5 | Page 9

Task 2:

Insert a straight break fitting in a pipeline.

1. In the ribbon, click Insert Fitting


from the Fitting group.
2. Click Straight Brk from the
menu manager.
3. Select GATE_CHECK_VALVE.
ASM and click Open.
In this case there is only
one fitting size available, so
no instances are available
for selection.
4. Select the approximate location
along the pipe segment, as
shown.
5. Click Length Ratio from the
menu manager.
6. Type 0.3 for the value, and press
ENTER.
7. Notice the fitting assembly
appears in a subwindow, as
shown.
8. Prehighlight datum point END on
the fitting assembly model and
then select it.
9. Notice a fitting is inserted as
shown. You can flip or twist the
fitting at this point if required.
10. Click Done from the menu
manager.
This completes the procedure.

Module 5 | Page 10

2012 PTC

Module

Creating Solid Pipeline Models


Module Overview
You can create pipe solid model parts based on routed pipeline segments.
Pipe geometry is automatically trimmed to accommodate holes for branches
and any inserted fittings. You can also create a single solid model part of a
pipeline. This process is known as extracting a pipe model. The extracted
pipe model can be created using previously created pipe solid models, any
fittings inserted in the pipeline, and any assembly components within the
pipeline.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Create pipe solid model parts based on routed pipeline segments.
Extract pipe models using pipe solid models, fittings, and assembly
components within a pipeline.

2012 PTC

Module 6 | Page 1

Creating Solid Pipes


When you have completed routing pipelines, you can create
solid pipe models based on the routing centerline.
Creating Solid Pipes

Geometry based on line stock values


Geometry trimmed for holes and fittings
Use template parts
Driven dimensions
Display in drawings

Uses
Display in Bill of Materials
Engineering calculations
Retrieve without reference assembly

Figure 1 Pipe Solid


Dialog Box

Figure 2 Resulting Solid


Pipe Part

Creating Solid Pipes


Solid pipes have the following features:
Solid pipe geometry is based on line stock values for the selected pipeline.
A solid pipe appears as a cylinder of the correct diameter and wall
thickness.
When creating solid pipes, holes are automatically created for branches
and geometry is automatically trimmed to accommodate inserted fittings.
Template parts can be used when creating solid pipes. This enables the
use of common datum features and saved views for each solid pipe part.
When creating solid pipelines, driven dimensions are automatically created.
These dimensions cannot be modified, but can be shown in pipe drawings
and update automatically when pipe geometry is modified.
Module 6 | Page 2

2012 PTC

You can use solid pipes for the following tasks:


Showing pipe solid parts in the Bill of Materials.
Performing engineering calculations, such as mass property calculations
and interference calculations.
Retrieving a solid pipe in Part, Assembly, or Drawing mode without the
original reference assembly.

2012 PTC

Module 6 | Page 3

PROCEDURE - Creating Solid Pipes


Close Window

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Piping\Solid_Pipes
Task 1:

PIPE_SOLID.ASM

Create a solid pipe from a routed pipeline.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.
3. Click Piping

from the Engineering group.

4. Click Pipe Solid


from the
Fabrication group.
Ensure the routed pipeline is
named P1.
In the Pipe Solid dialog box,
expand P1 in the segment
tree, as shown.
Edit the solid name to Pipe_1.
In the Pipe Solid Dialog box,

from the Copy


click Open
From area.
Select MM_KG_SEC_PART.
PRT and click Open.
Select mm_kg_sec_part in
the Start Part column, as
shown.
If necessary, select P1001
in the Segment column, as
shown.
Click OK to create the solid
part.

5. In the model tree, notice that


a new part, PIPE_1.PRT, has
been created.
6. Click Settings
from the
model tree and select Tree
Filters.
7. In the Model Tree Items dialog
box, select the Features check
box under Display and click OK.
8. Expand PIPE_1.PRT in the
model tree, as shown.
Module 6 | Page 4

2012 PTC

9. Select PIPE_1.PRT in the model


tree, then notice that the solid
pipe geometry is highlighted on
the model, as shown.

10. With PIPE_1.PRT still selected


in the model tree, right-click and
select Open.
Notice that the part opens in a
new window, as shown.

This part can be used in drawings, where driven dimensions can


be shown. This part updates if the routed pipeline in the piping
assembly is modified.
11. Click Close

from the Quick Access toolbar.

This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 6 | Page 5

Extracting Models
You can extract a single solid model part of a pipeline using
selected pipe solids, inserted fittings, and any assembly
components within a piping assembly.
Extracting Models
Create Single Part
Use pipeline parts and fittings
Merge By Reference Geometry
Fully Associative
Part contained in Piping assembly
Independent Model
Use in drawings
Cannot display model dimensions
Can create driven dimensions
Figure 1 Extracted Model
Part with Merge Features
in Model Tree

Figure 2 Extracted
Model Example

Extracting Models
The following features describe extracted part models in piping:
Extracting a model enables you to create a single part model from a
continuous series of pipe solids, fittings, and, if required, assembled
components contained within a pipeline.
Extracting a model involves merging by reference the selected parts into
the extracted part model. Therefore, if the piping assembly changes, the
extracted part model also updates.
The extracted part model is contained within the piping assembly. It can be
hidden from view, if desired.
The part model is also stored as an independent model, so it can be
retrieved and viewed on its own without retrieving the entire piping
assembly.
You can also use it to create views in drawings.
Module 6 | Page 6

2012 PTC

However, because it is a merged by reference part, you cannot display


model dimensions in a drawing or obtain piping report information.
If desired, you can create driven dimensions on drawing views that
reference the merged part geometry. These driven dimensions update
if the piping assembly changes.

2012 PTC

Module 6 | Page 7

PROCEDURE - Extracting Models


Close Window

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Piping\Extract_Pipe_Models
Task 1:

EXTRACT.ASM

Extract a solid model from an existing pipeline containing fittings


and solid pipes.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.
3. Click Piping
4. Click Settings

from the Engineering group.


from the model tree and select Tree Filters.

5. In the Model Tree Items dialog box, select the Features check box
under Display and click OK.
6. Review the components
contained within the pipeline.
Select the first corner fitting,
ELBOW_90_BW-STEEL-S25.PRT, in the model tree, as
shown.
Notice that the part is
highlighted in the graphics
window. All the corner fittings
are colored differently to
enable them to be easily
identified in the pipeline.
Press SHIFT and select
PL5.PRT in the model tree.
Notice that all of the pipeline
solid parts and corner fitting
components are highlighted
on the model, as shown.
Click in the background of the
graphics window to de-select
all items.
You can create a single extracted model from selected components
contained within the pipeline assembly.
7. Create an extracted solid model.
Click Command Search
to enable it.
In the field, type Extract Model.

Module 6 | Page 8

2012 PTC

8. Click Extract Model


from the
Command Search.
From the menu manager, click
Extract.
Type Extracted_Pipe for the
name and press ENTER.
Select the first ELBOW_90_
BW-STEEL-S-25.PRT in the
model tree, as shown.
Press SHIFT and select
PL5.PRT in the model tree.
Click OK to create the
extracted model.
Click Done/Return from the
menu manager.
9. In the model tree, expand
EXTRACTED_PIPE.PRT, as
shown.
Notice the merge features
contained within the
EXTRACTED_PIPE.PRT.

10. With EXTRACTED_PIPE.PRT


still selected in the model tree,
right-click and select Open.
Notice that the part opens in a
new window, as shown.

This part can be used in drawings, where driven dimensions can


be created. This part updates if the routed pipeline in the piping
assembly is modified.

2012 PTC

Module 6 | Page 9

11. Click Command Search


12. Click Close

to disable it.

from the Quick Access toolbar.

This completes the procedure.

Module 6 | Page 10

2012 PTC

Module

Gathering Piping Information


Module Overview
You can create many different types of piping reports, enabling you to
obtain information about pipelines, pipe line stock, and pipe fittings. This
includes reports on pipe segments, bend location information, bend machine
information, and bill of materials information. Different types of reports can
be generated for both manually routed pipelines and specification-driven
pipelines.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the different types of reports that can be created for manually
routed pipelines and specification-driven pipelines.
Create reports for manually routed pipelines.
Create reports for specification-driven pipelines.

2012 PTC

Module 7 | Page 1

Using Piping Reporting Tools


Piping reporting tools can provide information about pipelines,
line stock, pipe segments, fittings, and for downstream
applications such as bend machines.
Manual Pipelines: Reporting Tools

General
Length
Bill of Materials
Bend Location
Bend Machine
Holes Report
Clocking Angle
File Interchange Format (FIF)
Check Pipe
Show Report Setup
Insulation Location

Specification-Driven Pipelines:
Reporting Tools

Segment
Pipeline
Fitting
Insulation
Bill of Materials
File Interchange Format (FIF)
Designatable
Bend Machine
Bend Location
Holes Report
Clocking Angle

Figure 2 Bend Machine Information


Figure 1 Stock Length
Information

Using Piping Reporting Tools


The Report Pipeline dialog box enables reporting about pipelines, fittings, and
bends. Different options are available depending on which type of pipeline
is selected. For example, a non-specification-driven (or manually routed)
pipeline, or a specification-driven pipeline.
The following reports can be created for manually routed pipelines:
General Displays general information for a pipe segment or pipeline,
including pipeline name, line stock name, material, and pipe diameter.
Length Displays lengths of pipelines, pipe segments, and line stock used
in a pipeline.
Bill of Materials Provides bill of materials information, including details of
quantity, pipeline name, pipeline segment name, line stock, and segment
length.
Bend Location Provides bend location information, including details of
bend number, offset in X, Y, and Z, bend angle, and bend radius.
Bend Machine Provides bend machine information, including details of
bend number, offset, twist angle, bend angle, and bend radius.
Module 7 | Page 2

2012 PTC

Holes Report Provides information about holes for the selected segment,
including intersecting branch sections and hole and cut features in the
selected segment.
Clocking Angle Calculates the clocking angle between two coordinate
systems on a flexible pipe segment.
File Interchange Format (FIF) Provides information for computer
numerical control (CNC) bend machines.
Check Pipe Checks a pipeline for line stock parameter violations. Any
violations are highlighted on the pipeline.
Show Report Setup Views reports previously set up for bend machine,
bend location, or clocking angle information.
Insulation Location Displays information about insulation within a pipe
segment.
The following reports can be created for specification-driven pipelines:
Segment Lists information about a selected pipeline segment, including
details of pipe size, material code, outer diameter, and pipe length.
Pipeline Provides summary information for selected pipelines, including
listed values for pipe size, fittings, segment length, and material code for
a complete pipeline. A formatted bill of materials is also included in this
report.
Fitting Provides information about selected fittings, including details of
size, weight, and center of gravity. Prompts for material density to complete
the mass property calculations accurately.
Insulation Provides information about selected insulation, including
details of insulation material, thickness, and description.
Bill of Materials Provides bill of materials information, including details of
quantity, pipeline name, pipeline segment name, line stock, and segment
length.
File Interchange Format (FIF) Provides information for CNC bend
machines.
Designatable Reports Enables you to designate specific reports for
a pipeline. The designated report information is stored within the piping
assembly and the reports are then available in any drawings associated
with the piping assembly. The following reports can be designated if
desired:
Bend Machine Provides bend machine information, including details
about bend number, offset, twist angle, bend angle, and bend radius.
Bend Location Provides bend location information, including details
about bend number, offset in X, Y, and Z, bend angle, and bend radius.
Holes Report Provides information about hole diameter, offset, and
angle in a pipe segment.
Clocking Angle Calculates the clocking angle between two coordinate
systems on a flexible pipe segment.

2012 PTC

Module 7 | Page 3

PROCEDURE - Using Piping Reporting Tools


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Piping\Pipe_Report_Tools
Task 1:

MAN_PIPELINE.ASM

Create pipeline reports.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:


2. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.
3. Click Piping

from the Engineering group.

4. In the ribbon, click Piping Info


from the Info group.
If necessary, select General
for the Info Type.
Select Segment for the
Definition.
Select the pipeline segment
between the flange and the
reducer, as shown.
Notice the information
contained in the Results
area, as shown.
In the Report Pipeline dialog
.
box, click Piping Info
Notice that the same results
are now displayed in a
separate information window.
Click Close from the
Information Window.
5. Review pipe length information.
Select Length for the Info
Type.
Select Line Stock for the
Definition.
Click Select All > Done Sel.
Notice the line stock
information contained in
the Results area, as shown.

Module 7 | Page 4

2012 PTC

6. Select Pipe Line for the Definition.


Click Select All > Done Sel.
Notice the pipe length information contained in the Results area,
as shown.

7. Review bend location


information.
Select Bend Location for the
Info Type.
Select the pipeline segment
after the reducer, as shown.
Select the ENTRY_PORT
coordinate system, as shown.
Notice the bend location
information contained in the
Results area, as shown.

2012 PTC

Module 7 | Page 5

8. Review bend machine


information.
Select Bend Machine for the
Info Type.
Select the same pipeline
segment after the reducer, as
shown.
Notice the bend machine
information contained in the
Results area, as shown.

9. Review bill of materials information.


Select Bill of Materials for the Info Type.
Notice the bill of materials information contained in the Results
area, as shown.
in the Report Pipeline dialog box.
Click Close

This completes the procedure.

Module 7 | Page 6

2012 PTC

Module

Creating Piping Drawings


Module Overview
You can create piping assembly drawings, which enable effective
communication of piping design details for the fabrication of piping materials,
and the installation of piping systems. Piping parameters, such as bend
information and material details, can be extracted from piping designs and
displayed in tables.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Create piping assembly drawings with configured pipeline views.
Create customized drawing report tables containing extracted pipe
parameters.

2012 PTC

Module 8 | Page 1

Creating Piping Drawings


Piping drawings enable you to create different views of piping
designs and display pipe design dimensions and notes.
Piping Drawings
Configure Design Views
Display Options
Hidden Lines/Shaded
Pipeline Display
Single or Double Line
Double Line Above
Add drawing details
Dimensions and Notes
Pipe Slope Symbols

Figure 1 Double Line


Pipe Display

Figure 2 Single Line


Pipe Display
Figure 3 Displaying Dimensions and Notes

Figure 4 Single Line Pipe


Display with Slope Symbol

Piping Drawings
You can create piping drawings, which display different views of piping
models.
Any desired piping design views can be displayed on the drawing:
You can display the top level assembly, piping assembly, or a specific
pipeline of the piping design.
There are several display options for piping drawings:
You can display piping views with hidden lines removed, or in a shaded
view display.
The pipeline display in selected views can also be controlled.
You can display pipelines in single-line representation or double-line
representation.
You can also display all pipelines with a size greater than a specified
size in double-line representation. All pipelines with a size smaller
than or equal to a specified size can be displayed in single-line
representation. Note, however, this option is only possible with
specification-driven pipelines, not manually routed pipelines.
Drawing details can also be added to piping assembly drawings:
Module 8 | Page 2

2012 PTC

Dimensions and any piping notes or annotations can be displayed.


You can display the slope of pipelines in each view of the piping
installation drawing using a slope symbol mark.
To display the slope of a pipeline, a set of slope symbols are placed
along the pipe segment.
The direction of the symbols indicates the slope direction.

Installation Drawings
You can create installation drawings that display different views of piping
designs with dimensions and piping annotations.
All hidden lines are removed from these drawings and they are used to
assist in the piping installation process.
Pipe segments can be displayed using single line or double line
representation.
You can insert a pipe symbol on pipe segments to display the slope of
the pipe.

2012 PTC

Module 8 | Page 3

PROCEDURE - Creating Piping Drawings


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Piping\Piping_Drawings
Task 1:

PIPE_DRAW.DRW

Add drawing views of a piping assembly.


The pipe design MANUAL_PIPELINE.ASM has already been
added as a model within this drawing.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. Add a general view.
Right-click and select Insert
General View.
The Select Combined State
dialog box appears. Ensure
that No Combined State is
selected and click OK.
Select a location in the top-left
corner of the drawing, as
shown.
Select TOP for the model view
name, and click Apply.
Select the Scale category.
Click Custom scale and edit
the custom scale value to
0.075. Click OK.
Notice the view updates, as
shown.
3. Add a projected view.
Ensure that the general view
is still selected.
Right-click and select Insert
Projection View.
Select a location below the
general view, as shown.
Notice the view is added, as
shown.

Module 8 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Configure the general view to display piping information.

1. In the ribbon, select the Tools


tab.
from the
2. Click Piping
Applications group.
3. Configure the pipeline display in
the general view.
In the ribbon, select the
Layout tab.
Click the Edit group drop-down
menu and select Pipeline
.
Style
Select the general view, and
click OK.
Ensure that Single Line is
selected and click OK.
Notice the view updates, as
shown.
For specification-driven pipelines you can also use the Double Line
Above option. This enables you to specify a line stock size above
which double lines are shown, and below which single lines are
shown.
4. Configure the pipeline slope
display in the general view.
Click the Edit group
drop-down menu and select
Pipeline Slope
.
Select the general view, and
click OK.
Click Open
in the Slope
Mark dialog box.
Click Working Directory
in the Open dialog box.
Select SLOPE.SYM and click
Open.
Edit the Interval between
Symbols to 10.
Click OK.
Notice the view updates, as
shown.

2012 PTC

Module 8 | Page 5

5. Display dimensions on a piping


view.
In the ribbon, select the
Annotate tab.
Right-click in the Graphics
window and select Show
Model Annotations.
Select the general view.
Select the 500, 600, and R40
dimensions on the drawing, as
shown.
Click OK.
Notice the view updates, as
shown.

This completes the procedure.

Module 8 | Page 6

2012 PTC

Displaying Piping Report Parameters


You can extract Report parameters containing useful piping
information from piping assemblies and display them in drawing
tables.
Pipe Parameter Categories
Line Stock
asm.mbr.pipe.stock...
Pipe Line
asm.mbr.pipe.line...

Figure 1 Bend Machine Table

Pipe Segment
asm.mbr.pipe.segment...
Pipe Segment Bend
asm.mbr.pipe.segment.csys...
Bill Of Materials Parameters

Figure 2 Bill of Materials Table

Figure 3 Pipe Stock Table

Pipe Parameter Categories


There are a number of specific parameters relating to piping systems that can
be divided into the following categories:
Line Stock These parameters display information about line stock used
in piping assemblies. For example, you can list the materials used for
all line stock in a piping assembly.
These Report parameters begin with asm.mbr.pipe.stock.
Pipe Line These parameters display information about pipelines in piping
assemblies. For example, you can list the names of all the pipelines in a
piping assembly.
These Report parameters begin with asm.mbr.pipe.line.
Pipe Segment These parameters display information about pipeline
segments in piping assemblies. For example, you can list the pre-cut
length for pipeline segments used in a piping assembly.
These Report parameters begin with asm.mbr.pipe.segment.
Pipe Line Segment Bend These parameters display information about
bends in pipe line segments. For example, you can list the bend machine
radius for bends in a pipeline.
2012 PTC

Module 8 | Page 7

These Report parameters begin with asm.mbr.pipe.segment.csys.


To enable the viewing of bend machine and bend location
parameters within Report tables, you must create designated
reports in the piping assembly first.

Bill Of Materials Parameters


Standard bill of materials parameters can also be used. For example, piping
assembly member names and quantities can be listed in tables. You can also
display BOM balloons on piping assembly drawing views.

Module 8 | Page 8

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Displaying Piping Report Parameters


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Piping_Report_Parameters
Task 1:

PIPE_PARAM.ASM

Create a designated bend machine report.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:


2. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.
3. Click Piping

from the Engineering group

4. Click Piping Info


from the
Info group.
Select Bend Machine for the
Info Type.
Select the pipeline segment
after the reducer, as shown.
Notice the information
contained in the Results
area, as shown.
Select the Designate for
Report Setup check box.
Type bend_machine in the
Name text box and press
ENTER.
Notice the BEND_LOCATION and BEND_MACHINE saved
analysis files, as shown. The information in these files can be used
in piping drawing report tables.
5. Click Close
in the Report
Pipeline dialog box.
6. Disable Csys Display

7. Open a piping drawing of the


PIPE_PARAM.ASM.
Click Open from the Quick
Access toolbar.
Select PIPE_PARAM.DRW
and click Open.
Notice that a general view
of the piping assembly has
already been created, as
shown.

2012 PTC

Module 8 | Page 9

Task 2:

Create bend machine and bend location report tables.

1. Create a bend machine table.


In the ribbon, select the Table
tab.
Click Table From File
from
the Table group.
Select BEND_MACH_TABLE.
TBL and click Open.
Select a location for the table
below the general view.
2. Configure a repeat region and
add report parameters to the
table.
Click Repeat Region
from
the Data group.
Click Add from the menu
manager.
From the second row in the
table, select the first and last
cells, as shown.
Click Done.
3. Select the cell below BEND #.
Right-click and select Report
Parameter.
The Report Symbol dialog box
appears. Click asm > mbr
> pipe > segment > csys >
bend > mach_num.
4. Repeat the previous step for the following cells in the table.
Below Cell

Report Symbol Selection

OFFSET

asm > mbr > pipe > segment > csys >
bend > mach_offset

TWIST ANG

asm > mbr > pipe > segment > csys >
bend > mach_twist

BEND ANG

asm > mbr > pipe > segment > csys >
bend > mach_bend

BEND RAD

asm > mbr > pipe > segment > csys >
bend > mach_radius

Module 8 | Page 10

2012 PTC

5. Edit the repeat region attributes.

Click Repeat Region


from the Data group.
Click Attributes from the menu manager.
Select the second row in the table.
From the menu manager, click No Duplicates > Recursive >
Done/Return > Done.

from the Data group.


If necessary, click Switch Symbols
Notice that the table updates, as shown.

Report parameters can be configured and saved in tables for future


use. You can then retrieve the preconfigured tables as required.
6. Retrieve a preconfigured bend location table.
from the Table group.
Click Table From File
Select BEND_LOC_TABLE.TBL and click Open.
Select a location for the table below the bend machine table, as
shown.

This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 8 | Page 11

Module 8 | Page 12

2012 PTC

Module

Specification Database Overview


Module Overview
Specification driven piping systems are based on the piping design method
used when designing industrial piping systems. Specification driven piping
systems use piping specification databases to determine which pipelines
can be routed and which fittings can be inserted when designing pipelines.
These databases are made up of master catalog (MCAT) files that store
all piping and fitting design data, fitting libraries consisting of parts and
assemblies representing fittings, and project specific data files which store
design information for a specific piping design project. In this module you
learn about the different types of MCAT files relating to piping.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the process of using MCAT files to create specification driven
piping systems.
Describe the master catalog directory and file structure for pipes and fittings.

2012 PTC

Module 9 | Page 1

Understanding the Piping Specification Database


The piping specification database can be divided into three
types of files.
Master Catalog
(MCAT) Files
Piping Data Files
Fitting Data Files
General Data
Files
Pipes and
Fittings

Figure 1 Sample MCAT File

Fitting Libraries
Parts and
Assemblies
Project-Specific
Data Files

Figure 2 Pipe Fittings

Auto-Selection
Files
Specification
Directory Files
Figure 3 Project Specific Data File

Understanding the Piping Specification Database


The specification database is made up of the following three groups of files:
MCAT, Fitting Libraries, and project-specific data files.
Master Catalog (MCAT) files are ASCII text files that store all pipe and
fitting design data. The design data is available for all projects and remains
unchanged as new piping projects are created. The MCAT file data sources
consist of manufacturers catalogs and industry standards and practices.
The MCAT files can be broken down into three broad areas consisting of
files relating to pipe data, files relating to fitting data, and general files
relating to both pipes and fitting data.
Fitting Libraries consist of Creo Parametric parts and assemblies, which
provide the physical representation of fittings in a pipeline.
Project specific data files are ASCII text files that store information for a
specific piping design project. They are a subset of the information stored
in the MCAT files and consist of two files:
Auto-selection files contain data on pipes, fittings, bends, miters, and
assembly fittings selected for a specific piping project. This data is
retrieved from the MCAT files.
Specification directory files contain piping specifications, mnemonics,
colors, layers, insulation codes, and assigned auto-selection files in a
specific piping project.
Module 9 | Page 2

2012 PTC

Master Catalog Directory and File Structure:


Pipes
All specification database files are normally stored within the
master_catalog directory; this provides a single logical location
to store data.

Figure 1 MCAT Catalog Directory and File Structure (Pipes Only)

Master Catalog Directory and File Structure: Pipes


The diagram provides an overview of the suggested directory and file
structure for piping data within the master_catalog directory.
A similar directory and file structure is provided below the Creo Parametric
loadpoint in the \text\piping_data\master_catalog folder. The master_catalog
folder contains the following files at the top level:
piping_mcat_dir.ptd
piping_manufacture_dir.ptd
piping_material.ptd
The following sub-folders containing relevant files are created below the
master_catalog folder:
Pipe
Pipeod
Pipethk
Bend
Bend_Machine
All folders and files can be pointed to using specific config.pro file options.
2012 PTC

Module 9 | Page 3

Master Catalog Directory and File Structure:


Fittings
All specification database files are normally stored within the
master_catalog directory; this provides a single logical location
to store data.

Figure 1 Master Catalog Directory and File Structure (Fittings)

Master Catalog Directory and File Structure: Fittings


The diagram provides an overview of the suggested directory and file
structure for fitting data within the master_catalog directory.
A similar directory and file structure is provided below the Creo Parametric
load-point in the \text\piping_data\master_catalog folder. The master_catalog
folder contains the following fitting related files at the top level:
piping_bolt_nut_select.ptd
piping_end_compatibility.ptd
piping_material.ptd
combined_size_code.ptd
piping_units_system_dic_file.ptd
The following sub-folders containing relevant fitting files are created below
the master_catalog folder:
Fitting
Module 9 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Insulation
Bolt nut
All folders and files can be pointed to using specific config.pro file options.

2012 PTC

Module 9 | Page 5

Module 9 | Page 6

2012 PTC

Module

10

Setting Up Specification Databases: Piping


Module Overview
The master catalog files relating to pipes can be broken into two groups,
those relating to pipe design and those relating to pipe manufacture. In this
module you learn about the different types of MCAT files relating to piping.
You also learn how to configure piping MCAT files.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the different types of MCAT files relating to pipe design and pipe
manufacture.
Configure piping MCAT files.

2012 PTC

Module 10 | Page 1

Piping Master Catalog Directory File


The Piping Master Catalog Directory file lists all the available
Pipe and Fitting MCAT files and insulation files.
Each entry associates piping categories and master catalog files with other
piping data files.

Figure 1 Piping Master Catalog Directory File

Piping Master Catalog Directory File


The Piping Master Catalog Directory file (piping_mcat_dir.ptd) lists all the
available Pipe and Fitting MCAT files and insulation files. Each file entry
associates a piping category and a Master Catalog file with a Pipe Outer
Diameter file, a Pipe Thickness file, a Combined Size Code file, a selection
name for a fitting category, and the bolt nut code associated with the fitting.
The Piping Master Catalog Directory file uses this information to do the
following:
Retrieve Pipe Outer Diameter and Pipe Thickness file data. This data is
based on the associated pipe or fitting MCAT file.
Retrieve fitting selection names based on fitting categories and fitting
MCAT file while creating the auto-selection file.
Retrieve size codes for pipes and fittings.
Retrieve the bolt and nut code associated with a fitting. The code provides
information about the type, quantity, associated Bolt Nut MCAT file, and
MCCS code.

Module 10 | Page 2

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Piping Master Catalog Directory File


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Piping_Catalog_Directory
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Edit the piping master catalog directory file (piping_mcat_dir.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog folder to
view its contents in the browser.
Right-click the master_catalog folder and select Set Working
Directory.
2. Select Open System Window from the Utilities group drop-down
menu.
The Pro/TABLE editor is used to edit all specification-driven files.
This editor must ALWAYS be started from within a Creo Parametric
system window to ensure correct formatting of table cells.
3. A system window appears. Type protab piping_mcat_dir.ptd and
press ENTER.
Observe the contents of the PIPING_MCAT_DIR.PTD file, as
shown.

4. Follow these guidelines for using Pro/TABLE:


When editing cell contents, ensure that quotation marks are
included at the beginning and end of each cell entry, for example,
"pipe/pipe_steel."
Pro/TABLE displays leading quotation marks only in the edit field,
not in the cells themselves.
In master catalog files, all pointers to folders and file locations
should be in lower case. All other text fields should be in upper
case.

2012 PTC

Module 10 | Page 3

5. Edit the contents of the PIPING_MCAT_DIR.PTD file as shown.

This file lists the available pipe and fitting MCAT files and insulation
files. Each file entry associates a piping category and a master
catalog file with a pipe outer diameter file, a pipe thickness file, a
combined size code file, a selection name for a fitting category, and
the bolt nut code associated with the fitting.
6. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
7. In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

Module 10 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Pipe Design Master Catalog Files


The Pipe Design Master Catalog files configure different pipe
properties based on material type, pipe size, and pipe schedule.
The different Pipe Design
Master Catalog files are:
Pipe Master Catalog File
(pipe_steel.ptd)
Pipe Outer Diameter File
(od_steel.ptd)
Pipe Thickness File
(thk_steel.ptd)

Figure 2 Pipe Outer


Diameter File (od_steel.ptd)

Figure 1 Master Catalog File


(pipe_steel.ptd)

Figure 3 Pipe Thickness File


(thk_steel.ptd)

Pipe Design Master Catalog Files


There are several different Pipe Design Master Catalog files:
Pipe Master Catalog File (pipe_steel.ptd)
This file configures available pipe sizes, schedules, and end types for
each pipe material type. Pipe end types are retrieved based on the
selected pipe size and schedule.
Pipe Outer Diameter File (od_steel.ptd)
This file configures the pipe outside diameter (OD). The OD is a fixed
value relative to the nominal pipe diameter and pipe material category.
The file is used to retrieve the pipe OD and pipe size code based on the
pipe size for specification-driven pipeline creation. The file is also used
to retrieve the fitting size code. This code is based on the fitting size and
is used for fitting stock number creation.
Pipe Thickness File (thk_steel.ptd)
This file configures the pipe wall thickness. The pipe wall thickness is
a fixed value relative to the nominal pipe diameter, pipe schedule, and
pipe material type.
The file is used to retrieve the pipe thickness based on the pipe size and
schedule for specification-driven pipeline creation.
In master catalog files, all pointers to folders and file locations should be in
lower case and all other text fields should be in upper case.
2012 PTC

Module 10 | Page 5

PROCEDURE - Pipe Design Master Catalog Files


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Pipe_Design_Catalog
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Edit the pipe master catalog file (pipe_steel.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog folder.
Right-click the pipe folder and select Set Working Directory.
Browse the pipe folder to view its contents.
Notice the PIPE_STEEL.PTD file in the pipe folder.
2. Select Open System Window
from the Utilities group
drop-down menu.
3. A system window appears. Type
protab pipe_steel.ptd and
press ENTER.
Edit the contents of the
PIPE_STEEL.PTD file as
shown.
In the Pro/TABLE window,
click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically
saved.

This file configures available pipe sizes, schedules, and end types
for each pipe material type. Pipe end types are retrieved based on
the selected pipe size and schedule.
4. In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
Task 2:

Edit the pipe outer diameter file (od_steel.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the pipeod folder to view its
contents in the browser.
Right-click the pipeod folder and select Set Working Directory.
Notice the OD_STEEL.PTD file in the pipeod folder.

Module 10 | Page 6

2012 PTC

2. Select Open System Window


from the Utilities group
drop-down menu.
A system window appears.
Type protab od_steel.ptd and
press ENTER.
Edit the contents of the
OD_STEEL.PTD file as
shown.
In the Pro/TABLE window,
click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically
saved.

The file is used to retrieve the pipe outside diameter and pipe
size code based on the pipe size for specification-driven pipeline
creation.
3. In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
Task 3:

Edit the pipe thickness file (thk_steel.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the pipethk folder to view its
contents in the browser.
Right-click the pipethk folder and select Set Working Directory.
Notice the THK_STEEL.PTD file in the pipethk folder.

2012 PTC

Module 10 | Page 7

2. Select Open System Window


from the Utilities group
drop-down menu.
A system window appears.
Type protab thk_steel.ptd
and press ENTER.
Edit the contents of the
THK_STEEL.PTD file as
shown.
In the Pro/TABLE window,
click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically
saved.

This file is used to retrieve the pipe thickness based on the pipe
size and schedule for specification-driven pipeline creation.
3. In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

Module 10 | Page 8

2012 PTC

Pipe Manufacture Directory File


The Pipe Manufacture Directory file relates to pipe manufacture.
The file specifies:

Bend file
Bend Machine file
Miter file
Bend Spring Elongation file

The file uses pipe material code.

Figure 1 Pipe Manufacture Directory File

Pipe Manufacture Directory File


The Pipe Manufacture Directory file (piping_manufacture_dir.ptd) relates to
pipe manufacture. This file associates a pipe material code with a Bend file, a
Bending Machine file, a Miter file, and a Bending Spring Back Elongation file.
The Pipe Manufacture Directory file is used to retrieve names of the Bend
file, Bend Machine file, Bending Spring Back and Elongation file, and Miter
file. This data is based on pipe material code.

2012 PTC

Module 10 | Page 9

PROCEDURE - Pipe Manufacture Directory File


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Pipe_Manufacture_Directory
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Edit the pipe manufacture directory file (piping_manufacture_dir.


ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog folder to
view its contents in the browser.
Right-click the master_catalog folder and select Set Working
Directory.
Notice the PIPING_MANUFACTURE_DIR.PTD file in the master
catalog folder.
2. Select Open System Window from the Utilities group drop-down
menu.
3. A system window appears. Type protab piping_manufacture_dir.
ptd and press ENTER.
Edit the contents of the PIPING_MANUFACTURE_DIR.PTD file
as shown.

The pipe manufacture directory file is used to retrieve names of the


bend file, bend machine file, bending spring back and elongation
file, and miter file. This data is based on pipe material code.
4. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
5. In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

Module 10 | Page 10

2012 PTC

Pipe Manufacture Master Catalog Files


The Pipe Manufacture Master Catalog files specify bend and
miter information for pipe sizes that are assigned to specific
pipe material codes.
These files include:
Bend Files (bend_steel.ptd)
Miter Files (miter_steel.ptd)
Figure 1 Bend File

Figure 2 Miter File

Pipe Manufacture Master Catalog Files


These files include:
Bend Files (bend_steel.ptd)
This file specifies the bend information for pipe sizes that are assigned
to specific pipe material codes.
Pipe material codes and Bend files are associated with the Pipe
Manufacture MCAT file. The Pipe Manufacture file is associated with
the Pipe Master Catalog file for each material code through the Piping
Material file.
The file retrieves the bend radius, based on the pipe size.
Miter File (miter_steel.ptd)
This file specifies miter information for pipe sizes that are assigned to
specific pipe material codes. The pipe material codes are associated
with the Pipe Master Catalog file through the Piping Material file.
The Miter file is used to retrieve the miter radius, the minimum and
maximum miter angles, and the number of cuts. The pipeline size and
the vertex angle are used to select the miter type from the Miter file
when you create miters.
The miter types can be one cut, two cut, three cut, or four cut. The
miter radius and the number of cuts from the selected miter file are used
to create miters.
The vertex angle must be greater than the minimum miter angle
(MIN_ANGLE) and less than or equal to the maximum miter
angle (MAX_ANGLE).

2012 PTC

Module 10 | Page 11

PROCEDURE - Pipe Manufacture Master Catalog Files


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Pipe_Manufacture_Catalog
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Edit the pipe bend file (bend_steel.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog folder.
Right-click the bend folder and select Set Working Directory.
Browse the bend folder to view its contents.
Notice the BEND_STEEL.PTD file in the bend folder.
2. Select Open System Window from the Utilities group drop-down
menu.
3. A system window appears. Type protab bend_steel.ptd and press
ENTER.
Edit the contents of the BEND_STEEL.PTD file as shown.

This file specifies the bend information for pipe sizes that are
assigned to specific pipe material codes.
4. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.

Module 10 | Page 12

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Edit the pipe miter file (miter_steel.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the miter folder to view its
contents in the browser.
Right-click the miter folder and select Set Working Directory.
Notice the MITER_STEEL.PTD file in the miter folder.

2012 PTC

Module 10 | Page 13

2. Select Open System Window from the Utilities group drop-down


menu.
A system window appears. Type protab miter_steel.ptd and press
ENTER.
Edit the contents of the MITER_STEEL.PTD file as shown.

This file is used to retrieve the miter radius, the minimum and
maximum miter angles, and the number of cuts.
3. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
4. In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.
Module 10 | Page 14

2012 PTC

Bend Machine Master Catalog Files


These files store spring back and elongation for a given pipe
material, and bend manufacturing information for bending
machines.
These files include:
Bending Spring Back and Elongation Files
Bend Machine Files

Figure 1 Bending Spring Back


and Elongation File

Figure 2 Bend Machine File

Figure 3 Bend Creation Examples

Bend Machine Master Catalog Files


These files include:
Bending Spring Back and Elongation File (bend_spring_back_elongation_
steel.ptd)
This file is used to store the spring back and elongation for a given pipe
material. The amount of spring back and elongation are determined
based on the pipe size, bend radius, and bend angle.
The Bending Spring Back and Elongation file units of
measurement must be the same as those in the Pipe Outer
Diameter file.
Bend Machine File (bend_machine.ptd)
This file configures bend manufacturing information for a particular
bending machine. The Bend Machine file is associated with the pipe
material codes in the Pipe Manufacture Directory file. The material
code is associated with the Pipe Master Catalog file through the Piping
Master Catalog Directory file.
The Bend Machine file is used to retrieve the start, middle, and end
clamp lengths. This data is based on the pipe size and is used during
bend creation and design rule checking.

2012 PTC

Module 10 | Page 15

In the lower figure, two bend creation examples are shown: one bend
and more than one bend.
The Bend Machine file units of measurement must be the same
as those in the Pipe Outer Diameter file.

Module 10 | Page 16

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Bend Machine Master Catalog Files


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Bend_Machine_Catalog
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Review the bend spring back and elongation file


(bend_springback_elong_steel.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog folder to
view its contents in the browser.
Right-click the bend_machine folder and select Set Working
Directory.
Browse the bend_machine folder to view its contents.
Notice the BEND_SPRINGBACK_ELONG_STEEL.PTD file in the
bend_machine folder.
2. Select Open System Window from the Utilities group drop-down
menu.
3. A system window appears. Type protab bend_springback_elong_
steel.ptd and press ENTER.
4. Review the contents of the BEND_SPRINGBACK_ELONG_STEEL.
PTD file as shown.

This file is used to store the spring back and elongation for a given
pipe material. The amount of spring back and elongation are
determined based on the pipe size, bend radius, and bend angle.

2012 PTC

Module 10 | Page 17

5. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.


In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
Task 2:

Edit the bend machine file (bend_machine.ptd).

1. Select Open System Window from the Utilities group drop-down


menu.
The system window appears. Type protab bend_machine.ptd
and press ENTER.
Complete the editing of the BEND_MACHINE.PTD file as shown.
Quotation marks should be included at the beginning and end of
each cell entry; these are not shown in the figure.

This file is used to retrieve the start, middle, and end clamp lengths.
This data is based on pipe size and is used during bend creation
and design rule checking.
2. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

Module 10 | Page 18

2012 PTC

Module

11

Setting Up Specification Databases:


Fittings
Module Overview
Master catalog fitting files specify the fittings available for insertion into
specification-driven pipelines. There is normally one file for each specific
type of fitting, for example, reducing tee and straight tee fittings. The data
contained within fitting files maps to parameter values within fitting models;
this ensures proper insertion of fittings. In this module, you learn about
the different types of MCAT files relating to fittings. You also learn how to
configure MCAT fitting files, and fitting library models.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the process of using master catalog (MCAT) files to insert fittings
in specification-driven piping systems.
Describe the different types of MCAT files relating to fittings.
Configure MCAT fittings files.
Configure fitting library models.

2012 PTC

Module 11 | Page 1

Fitting Master Catalog Files


Fitting Master Catalog files specify all the available pipe fittings
for each fitting item in the fitting library.
The Master Catalog files:
Specify available fittings in fitting
library.
Are referenced in the piping
MCAT directory file.
Figure 1 Piping MCAT
Directory File

Figure 2 Fitting Master Catalog File

Fitting Master Catalog Files (For example, tee_reducing_bw_


steel.ptd)
Fitting Master Catalog files specify the model fitting names in the fitting
library; this is based on fitting rating, fitting size, branch size, new size, and
inlet and outlet end types. There is one file per fitting type, for example,
elbow_90_bw_steel.ptd and tee_reducing_bw_steel.ptd.
Fitting master catalog files are referenced in the piping MCAT directory file,
where the folder and filename are specified. The following is a list of field
names with descriptions:
SCH_RATE: Fitting rating.
SIZE: Fitting inlet nominal diameter.
NSIZE: Fitting outlet nominal diameter (if different from the inlet diameter,
otherwise not specified).
BSIZE: Fitting branch outlet nominal diameter (if applicable to the fitting
type, and if different from the inlet diameter, otherwise not specified).
END_TYPE: Fitting inlet end type.
NEND_TYPE: Fitting outlet end type (if different from the inlet end type).
FITT_MODEL_NAME: Fitting component name in fitting library, can be part
assembly, or family table instance name.

Module 11 | Page 2

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Fitting Master Catalog Files


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Fitting_Catalog
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Edit a fitting master catalog file (red_concentric_bw_steel.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog\fitting
folder to view its contents in the browser.
2. Right-click the fitting folder and
select Set Working Directory.
Observe the different files
contained within the fitting
folder, as shown.

This folder contains all the available fitting master catalog files.
There is one file for each type of fitting.
3. Click the Utilities group drop-down menu and select Open System
Window.
4. A system window opens. Type protab red_concentric_bw_steel.ptd
and press ENTER.
Complete the editing of the RED_CONCENTRIC_BW_STEEL.PTD
file by specifying the last row, as shown. When editing cell contents,
ensure that quotation marks are included at the beginning and end
of each cell entry.

This file specifies the model fitting names in the fitting library; this
is based on fitting rating, fitting size, branch size, new size, and
inlet and outlet end types.
5. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
Leave the system window open for now.
2012 PTC

Module 11 | Page 3

Task 2:

Review a fitting master catalog file (elbow_90_bw_steel.ptd).

1. In the system window, type protab elbow_90_bw_steel.ptd and


press ENTER.
Review the contents of this file, as shown.

Any blank columns indicate that the field is not applicable for this
type of fitting.
2. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

Module 11 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Mapping Catalog Data to Fittings


Fitting master catalog files map catalog data to fitting component
data such as feature parameters and model names.
Fitting Master Catalog Files
Map master catalog data to
fitting component data.
For example, tee_reducing_bw_
steel.ptd

Figure 1 Tee Reducing Model

Figure 2 Data Values Mapped to Feature Parameter Values

Mapping Catalog Data to Fittings


The fitting master catalog files determine the selection options available when
inserting fittings. For example, specifying the size of a tee-reducer to be 50A
determines the selection options for the branch size (bsize).
The fitting model data is made up of feature parameters, such as size,
new_size, and end_type. These parameter values determine the resulting
pipeline properties.
Figure 1 illustrates the tee_reducing_bw_steel-50x25 model
and indicates the features affected by certain parameters.
Figure 2 displays how data values contained within the
tee_reducing_bw_steel file map to feature parameter values in the
above part model.

2012 PTC

Module 11 | Page 5

Understanding Fitting Libraries and Fitting


Models
You can create Creo Parametric models to represent pipe fittings
that can be inserted into pipelines.
Fitting Libraries
Supplied JIS Basic Library
Available ANSI/JIS Libraries
Fitting Models require:
Model Parameters
Feature Parameters
Figure 1 Tee Fitting

Figure 2 Table Mapping Required


Parameters

Figure 3 Reducer Fitting

Fitting Libraries
A library of basic fitting models is supplied below the Creo Parametric
load-point in the \text\piping_data\fittinglib folder. This library conforms to the
Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) piping standards.
More comprehensive fitting libraries conforming to ANSI and JIS standards
are available from the PTC customer support web site.

Fitting Models
When creating fitting libraries, it should be noted that fitting models require
the following parameters to enable correct mapping of information:
Model Parameter: Fitting_Code
Feature Parameters:
In coordinate system Port0: Size
In coordinate system Port0: End_Type
In coordinate system Port1: Size
In coordinate system Port1: End_Type
In coordinate system Port1: New_Size
Module 11 | Page 6

2012 PTC

In coordinate system Port2: Branch_Size


Not all feature parameters are required; this depends on the port
configuration of the fitting. For example, reducers do not have a
port2 coordinate system.

2012 PTC

Module 11 | Page 7

Configuring Specification-Driven Fittings


Fitting models should be created using specific guidelines.
Fitting Library Guidelines

One or more ports


Port Z-axis orientation
Local coordinate system
In-line fittings
In-line eccentric fittings
Corner and lateral fittings

Family Table Guidelines


SIZE
NEW_SIZE/BRANCH_SIZE

Figure 2 Non-Concentric Reducer

Figure 1 Tee Fitting

Figure 3 Elbow Fitting

Fitting Library Guidelines


Fitting models should be created using the following guidelines:
Fittings must have one or more ports.
The positive Z-axis direction of every port in a fitting must be perpendicular
to the fitting face at the respective port and oriented to point outward from
the fitting.
A fitting local coordinate system is a conceptual coordinate system used to
configure and create library parts. The coordinate system of the inlet port
of a library part represents the fitting local coordinate system.
The local coordinate system Z-axis represents the fitting axis that is aligned
with the pipeline segment during fitting insertion.
The local coordinate system Y-axis is used to specify the fitting stem or stem
axis. The stem axis is an imaginary axis that is parallel to the local coordinate
system Y-axis. The local coordinate system Y-axis is the axis along which
special graphical details are created for certain fittings during their library
part preparation.
The local coordinate system positive Y-axis is used to determine the default
stem orientation of a fitting when inserting fittings.
Module 11 | Page 8

2012 PTC

Note that default coordinate systems should be removed from fitting models
to avoid incorrect positioning of models in pipelines.
For in-line fittings, if there are two or more ports, the Z-axes of two of the
ports must be collinear with the fitting local coordinate system Z-axis.
For in-line eccentric fittings, if there are two or more ports, they must be
parallel to the local coordinate system Z-axis. The inlet port should be located
on the local coordinate system Z-axis, and the outlet port should be offset
along the local coordinate system Y-axis with its Z-axis parallel to the local
coordinate system Z-axis.
For corner fittings, if there are two or more ports, you must include an angle
equal to the vertex angle where the fitting is inserted. The inlet port should
be located on the local coordinate system Z-axis.
For lateral fittings, the Y-axis of the inlet port and the Z-axis of the lateral
outlet port must include an angle equal to the lateral angle of the fitting.
Locate the inlet port on the local coordinate system Z-axis.
Locate the outlet port along the lateral axis that lies on the local Z-Y plane
of the fitting.

Family Table Guidelines


When creating fitting models using family tables, as shown in Figure 4, the
following guidelines should be used:
Insert the SIZE column after the Instance Name column.
Insert the NEW_SIZE or the BRANCH_SIZE column, whichever is
applicable, after the SIZE column.

Figure 4 Family Table Example

2012 PTC

Module 11 | Page 9

PROCEDURE - Configuring Specification-Driven Fittings


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Fittings_Configuring
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Configure the ninety-degree steel elbow fitting.

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog\fittinglib\
elbow folder to view its contents in the browser.
2. Right-click the elbow folder and select Set Working Directory.
3. Double-click the
ELBOW_90_STEEL_BW.PRT
from the browser to open the
model.
4. In the ribbon, select the Tools
tab.
from the
5. Click Parameters
Model Intent group.
In the Parameters dialog box,
select Feature from the Look
In drop-down list.
Select the coordinate system
PORT0 on the model, as
shown.

Module 11 | Page 10

2012 PTC

6. Configure the following parameters for the PORT0 coordinate system,


as shown.
Click New Parameter .
Type SIZE as the Name and press ENTER.
Select String from the Type drop-down list.
Type 100 as the Value and press ENTER.
Click New Parameter .
Type END_TYPE as the Name and press ENTER.
Select String from the Type drop-down list.
Type BW as the Value and press ENTER.
Click OK to finish adding parameters to the PORT0 feature.

There is no need to add parameters to the PORT1 coordinate


system as the parameter values of SIZE and END_TYPE are
unchanged from the PORT0 coordinate system, and there are no
other additional parameters to configure for this type of fitting.
7. In the ribbon, click Family Table

from the Model Intent group.

and select the


8. In the Family Table dialog box, click Add Columns
Parameter radio button.
In the Select Parameter dialog box, select Feature from the Look
In drop-down list.
Select coordinate system PORT0 on the model.
In the Select Parameter dialog box, select SIZE and click Insert
Selected.
Click Close in the dialog box.
9. In the Family Items dialog box, select the Dimension radio button and
select the protrusion on the model.
Select the 100 (DIAMETER_OUT) dimension.
Select the 100 (ELBOW_RADIUS) dimension.
Select the 90 (ANGLE) dimension.
Click OK. Refer to the following figure.

2012 PTC

Module 11 | Page 11

10. Add instances to the family table, as shown.

In the Family Table dialog box, click Insert Instance


.
Type ELBOW_90_BW-STEEL-S-25 for the Instance Name.
Type 25A for the SIZE, and 34 for the DIAMETER_OUT.
Type 34 for the ELBOW_RADIUS, and 90 for the ANGLE.
Complete the family table as shown.

Click Lock Unlock Instance


not changed.

to ensure that the instances are

Notice the instance model names match the FITT_MODEL_NAME


values in the elbow_90_bw_steel.ptd file.
11. Click OK to complete the family table.
This completes the procedure.

Module 11 | Page 12

2012 PTC

Bolt Nut Master Catalog Files


The Bolt Nut Master Catalog files specify material classification
codes (MCCS) for the corresponding bolt nut codes, and the
material description and bulk item names.
Bolt Nut Selection File
Specifies unique material classification codes (MCCS).
Links material information to bolt nut master file.
Specifies number of bolt nuts for fittings.
Bolt Nut Master Catalog File
Specifies material description and bulk item name.

Figure 1 Bolt Nut Selection File

Figure 2 Bolt Nut Master Catalog File

Bolt Nut Selection File (piping_bolt_nut_select.ptd)


This file specifies a unique material classification code (MCCS) for the
corresponding bolt nut code. The MCCS is unique for different pipe sizes and
for different pressure ratings of a fitting. This code is subsequently used
to obtain information about the bolt nut material from the Bolt Nut Master
Catalog file.
The Bolt Nut Selection file also provides information about the number of bolt
nuts required for the main fitting and for the flanges mated to that main fitting.

Bolt Nut Master Catalog File (bolt_nut_mcat.ptd)


This file specifies material description and bulk item names based on unique
MCCS.
The process involves using the bolt nut code assigned to fittings to retrieve
the MCCS from the bolt nut selection file. This MCCS is then used to obtain
the bolt nut material description and bulk item name from the Bolt Nut Master
Catalog file.

2012 PTC

Module 11 | Page 13

PROCEDURE - Bolt Nut Master Catalog Files


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Bolt_Nut_Catalog
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Edit the bolt nut selection file (piping_bolt_nut_select.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog folder to
view its contents in the browser.
2. Right-click the master_catalog folder and select Set Working
Directory.
3. Click the Utilities group drop-down menu and select Open System
Window.
4. A system window appears. Type protab piping_bolt_nut_select.ptd
and press ENTER.
Complete the editing of the PIPING_BOLT_NUT_SELECT.PTD file
by specifying the last two rows, as shown.
When editing cell contents, ensure that quotation marks are
included at the beginning and end of each cell entry.

This file specifies a unique material classification code (MCCS) for


the corresponding bolt nut code. The MCCS is unique for different
pipe sizes and for different pressure ratings of a fitting. This code is
subsequently used to obtain information about the bolt nut material
from the Bolt Nut Master Catalog file.
5. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.

Module 11 | Page 14

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Edit the bolt nut master catalog file (bolt_nut_mcat.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog\boltnut
folder to view its contents in the browser.
2. Right-click the boltnut folder and select Set Working Directory.
3. Click the Utilities group drop-down menu and select Open System
Window.
4. A system window appears. Type protab bolt_nut_mcat.ptd and
press ENTER.
Complete the editing of the BOLT_NUT_MCAT.PTD file by
specifying the last two rows, as shown.
When editing cell contents, ensure that quotation marks are
included at the beginning and end of each cell entry.

This file specifies material description and bulk item names based
on unique MCCS.
5. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 11 | Page 15

Module 11 | Page 16

2012 PTC

Module

12

General Master Catalog Files


Module Overview
Some master catalog files provide information that relates to both pipes and
fittings. This includes the piping material file, which specifies pipe and fitting
material information. In addition, the end compatibility file specifies all the
compatible pipe and fitting end types. In this module, you learn about the
different types of MCAT files that relate to both pipes and fittings. You also
learn how to configure these files.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the different types of MCAT files relating to both pipes and fittings.
Configure MCAT files relating to both pipes and fittings.

2012 PTC

Module 12 | Page 1

Master Catalog Files: Piping Material File


The piping material file relates to both piping data and fitting
data.
The piping material file associates material codes with:
Piping master catalog files.
Fitting master catalog files.
Insulation master catalog files.
The piping material file enables:
Retrieval of material description and material density when routing pipes.
Retrieval of material description when inserting fittings.
Retrieval of insulation material description when creating insulation
reports.

Figure 1 Piping Material File

Master Catalog Files: Piping Material File


The piping material file (piping_material.ptd) relates to both piping data and
fitting data.
This file specifies piping material by using material code, material
description, and material density.
The Piping Material file associates material codes with Pipe, Fitting, or
Insulation Master Catalog files.
When routing pipelines, it retrieves the material description and material
density. This data is based on the material code and the Pipe Master
Catalog file name.
When inserting fittings, it retrieves the fitting material description. This
data is based on the fitting material code and the Fitting Master Catalog
file name.
When creating insulation reports, it retrieves the insulation material
description. This data is based on the insulation material code.

Module 12 | Page 2

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Piping Material File


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Piping_Material
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Review the contents of the piping material file (piping_material.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog folder to
view its contents in the browser.
2. Right-click the master_catalog folder and select Set Working
Directory.
3. In the ribbon, click the Utilities group drop-down menu and select
Open System Window.

2012 PTC

Module 12 | Page 3

4. A system window appears. Type protab piping_material.ptd and


press ENTER.
Review the contents of this file, as shown.

This file specifies piping material by using material code, material


description, and material density. When inserting fittings, it retrieves
the fitting material description. This data is based on the fitting
material code and the fitting master catalog file name.
5. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

Module 12 | Page 4

2012 PTC

End Compatibility File


The End Compatibility file specifies all the compatible pipe and
fitting end types.
This file specifies
Pipe and fitting end types.

Figure 1 End Compatibility File

End Compatibility File


The End Compatibility file (piping_end_compatibility.ptd) determines if two
ends are compatible and can be mated. End type compatibility is based on
end types and fitting ratings.
END_TYPE1 and END_TYPE2 values are mandatory; schedule rating
values are optional.

2012 PTC

Module 12 | Page 5

PROCEDURE - End Compatibility File


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\End_Compatibility
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Edit the contents of an end compatibility file (piping_end_


compatibility.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog folder to
view its contents in the browser.
2. Right-click the master_catalog folder and select Set Working
Directory.
3. In the ribbon, click the Utilities group drop-down menu and select
Open System Window.
4. A system window appears. Type protab piping_end_compatibility.
ptd and press ENTER.
Complete the editing of the PIPING_END_COMPATIBILITY.PTD
file by specifying the last two rows, as shown.
When editing cell contents, ensure that quotation marks are
included at the beginning and end of each cell entry.

This file specifies all the compatible pipe and fitting end types. The
file determines whether two ends are compatible and can be mated.
End type compatibility is based on end types and fitting ratings.
5. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

Module 12 | Page 6

2012 PTC

Insulation Files
The Insulation files specify insulation data for pipes and fittings.
These files are used in insulation modeling and reporting.
They retrieve insulation material codes and material thicknesses.

Figure 1 Insulation File

Insulation Files
The Insulation files (for example, general.ptd) specify insulation data for pipes
and fittings. The insulation material code and material thickness are retrieved
from the insulation file and used in insulation modeling and reporting.

2012 PTC

Module 12 | Page 7

PROCEDURE - Insulation Files


Close Window
Piping\Insulation
Task 1:

Erase Not Displayed


NO FILE OPEN

Edit the contents of the general insulation file (general.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog\insulation
folder to view its contents in the browser.
2. Right-click the insulation folder and select Set Working Directory.
3. In the ribbon, click the Utilities group drop-down menu and select
Open System Window.
4. A system window appears. Type protab general.ptd and press
ENTER.
Complete the editing of the GENERAL.PTD file by entering the
last two rows, as shown.
When editing cell contents, ensure that quotation marks are
included at the beginning and end of each cell entry.

The insulation material code and material thickness are retrieved


from the insulation file and used in insulation modeling and
reporting.
5. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

Module 12 | Page 8

2012 PTC

Combined Size Code File


The Combined Size Code file specifies combined size codes for
pipes and fittings of various combinations of sizes.
The Combined Size Code file:
Specifies combined size codes based on combinations of different size
codes.
Is used to specify stock number format.

Figure 1 Combined Size Code File

Combined Size Code File


You can use the combined size code to specify the stock number format for
pipes and fittings that represent all combinations of sizes.
The table shown illustrates various examples.
The pipes and fittings in the first row of the table shown have only one size.
Therefore, no values are specified for NSIZE and BSIZE.
A reducer fitting having main size 100A and new size 50A can be
represented by a combined size code 050. This combined size code
represents the size combination 100A x 50A. Because the combined size
code such as 050 is user-defined, it may not have any visual relation to
the actual fitting size combination.

2012 PTC

Module 12 | Page 9

PROCEDURE - Combined Size Code File


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Combined_Size_Code
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Edit the contents of the combined size code file


(combined_size_code.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog folder to
view its contents in the browser.
2. Right-click the master_catalog folder and select Set Working
Directory.
3. In the ribbon, click the Utilities group drop-down menu and select
Open System Window.
4. A system window appears. Type protab combined_size_code.ptd
and press ENTER.
Complete the editing of the COMBINED_SIZE_CODE.PTD file by
specifying the last two rows, as shown.
When editing cell contents, ensure that quotation marks are
included at the beginning and end of each cell entry.

This file specifies combined size codes for pipes and fittings of
various combinations of sizes. You can use the combined size
code to specify the stock number format for pipes and fittings that
represent all combinations of sizes.

Module 12 | Page 10

2012 PTC

5. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.


The edited file is automatically saved.
In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 12 | Page 11

Units System File


The Units System file specifies units for parameters in various
piping data files.
Examples are:
Pipe Outer Diameter file
Pipe Thickness file
Bend file

Figure 1 Units System File

Units System File


The Units System file (piping_units_system_dic_file.ptd) specifies units for
parameters in various piping data files. For example:
Pipe Outer Diameter file
Pipe Thickness file
Bend file

Module 12 | Page 12

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Units System File


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Unit_System
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN

Edit the units system file (piping_units_system_dic_file.ptd).

1. In the Folder Browser


, browse to the master_catalog folder to
view its contents in the browser.
2. Right-click the master_catalog folder and select Set Working
Directory.
3. In the ribbon, click the Utilities group drop-down menu and select
Open System Window.

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Module 12 | Page 13

4. A system window appears. Type protab piping_units_system_


dic_file.ptd and press ENTER.
Complete the editing of the PIPING_UNITS_SYSTEM_DIC_FILE.
PTD file by specifying the last two rows, as shown.
When editing cell contents, ensure that quotation marks are
included at the beginning and end of each cell entry.

This file specifies the units system that can be used for the various
parameter values in the piping data files.
5. In the Pro/TABLE window, click File > Exit.
The edited file is automatically saved.
In the system window, type exit and press ENTER to close the
window.
This completes the procedure.

Module 12 | Page 14

2012 PTC

Module

13

Configuring Project-Specific Data Files


Module Overview
Project-specific data files store specific project information and are created
when setting up new piping projects. These files include specification
directory files, which store piping specifications and assigned auto-selection
files for a piping project. Auto-selection files contain information on pipes and
fittings for a piping project, and are a subset of the information stored in MCAT
files. Other project-specific files include insulation directory files containing
information on insulation files and codes, and fitting category map files that
assign fitting categories to dialog box buttons used when inserting fittings. In
this module, you learn about the different types of project-specific data files.
You learn how to configure auto-selection files and specification directory
files. You also learn about the many config.pro options relating to piping.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the use of project-specific data files.
Configure auto-selection files.
Configure specification directory files.
Describe and configure the config.pro options relating to piping.

2012 PTC

Module 13 | Page 1

Configuring Auto-Selection Files


Auto-selection files simplify the design process and reduce
design error by making available only a subset of the master
catalog file piping data.
Auto-selection files:
Are project specific.
Are assigned to a specification
record.
Retrieve data when creating
pipelines and inserting fittings.

Figure 1 Piping Specification


Dialog Box

Figure 2 Pipe Data Sample Auto-Selection File

Figure 3 Assembly Fitting Data Sample Auto-Selection File

Configuring Auto-Selection Files


Auto-selection files are project specific and store subsets of data selected
from Master Catalog (MCAT) files. Auto-selection files can contain the
following data:
Pipe Data: Pipe categories, sizes, schedules, end types, material codes,
Pipe MCAT file names, and stock numbers. This data is retrieved from the
appropriate MCAT files and saved into pipe records.
Fitting Data: Fitting selection names, categories, sizes, end types, ratings,
material codes, bolt nut codes, fitting MCAT file names, and stock numbers.
This data is retrieved from the appropriate MCAT files and saved into fitting
records.
Assembly Fitting Data: Assembly fitting selection names, sizes,
configurations, and stock numbers. This data is retrieved from the
appropriate MCAT files and saved into assembly fitting records.
Auto-selection files are assigned to a specification record in a specification
directory file. This enables the specification directory file to direct the
Module 13 | Page 2

2012 PTC

system to the correct auto-selection file. For example, you can assign
the auto-selection file created for specification 11C (11c_asfile.ptd) to the
specification 11C record in a specification directory file.
When creating pipelines or inserting fittings, the system retrieves the
specification data from the specification directory file. The specification
directory file directs the system to the appropriate auto-selection file to
retrieve the pipe, fitting, and assembly fitting data.
The system retrieves the auto-selection piping data from the pipe, fitting,
and assembly fitting records defined for each specification. This data then
populates appropriate dialog boxes when routing pipelines or inserting fittings.
The location of all project-specific data files is controlled by various config.pro
options.

2012 PTC

Module 13 | Page 3

PROCEDURE - Configuring Auto-Selection Files


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Auto_Selection
Task 1:

PIPING.ASM

Create an auto-selection file.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. Click File > Options.
Click Configuration Editor in the Creo Parametric Options dialog
box.
Select Import configuration file from the Import/Export drop-down
menu.

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK in the Creo Parametric Options dialog box.
Click No in the Creo Parametric Options message window.

3. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.


4. Click Piping

from the Engineering group.

5. In the Piping tab, select Spec DB

from the Setup group.

6. In the Define Piping Specification dialog box, click New

7. Select the Auto-Selection File radio button.

Module 13 | Page 4

2012 PTC

8. Type training_asfile as the Name and click Accept

The Pipe tab in the Define Piping Specification dialog box


enables configuration of piping records. Notice how the system
automatically populates the fields in the Select Pipe area by reading
data from previously configured MCAT files.
Category is set to Pipe: Only one pipe category in the
piping_mcat_dir.ptd file.
Master Catalog is set to pipe/pipe_steel from the
piping_mcat_dir.ptd file.
Material Code is set to AB from the piping_material.ptd file.
Schedule is set to 40 from the pipe_steel.ptd file.
End Type is set to PE from the pipe_steel.ptd file.
9. Click Sizes
.
Notice that the Pipe Size dialog box lists the available pipe sizes
from the PIPE_STEEL.PTD file.
from the Pipe Size table to maintain all available
Click Accept
pipe sizes.
Sizes can be made unavailable by clearing the appropriate check
box.
10. Configure the Select Stock Number Format:
Type SNF in the Select Stock Number Format text box.
Select from the Delimiter drop-down list.
Select MATL_CODE from the Keyword drop-down list.
The entry should read: SNF,,MATL_CODE

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Module 13 | Page 5

11. Configure the Select Material Classification Code Format entry.


Type MCCS in the Select Material Classification Code Format text
box.
Select from the Delimiter drop-down list.
Select SCH_RATE from the Keyword drop-down list.
The entry should read: MCCS,,SCH_RATE
12. Select the Allow Bend and Allow Miter check boxes.
13. Click Insert Instance
Click Save

to add a record to the auto-selection file.

to save the auto-selection file.

The auto-selection file is saved to the class_project folder specified


by the config.pro option piping_project_data_dir.
This completes the procedure.

Module 13 | Page 6

2012 PTC

Configuring Specification Directory Files


Specification directory files store piping specifications for a
piping project.
Create Specification Records
Assign Data
Data Fields:

Specification
Mnemonic
Color
Layer
Auto-Selection File
Insulation Code
Figure 1 Portion of the Piping
Specification Dialog Box

Figure 2 Input Data Sample

Configuring Specification Directory Files


Specification directory files are created when setting up a specification-driven
piping project.
To create a specification directory file, you configure piping specification
records by assigning the following data fields:
Specification: Project specification names for a piping project.
Mnemonic: Fluid or piping system assigned to each specification.
Color: Color assigned to each specification. The system retrieves colors
from the Piping Appearance Map Master Catalog (MCAT) file.
Layer: Layer assigned to each specification.
Auto-Selection File: An auto-selection file is assigned to each specification.
The auto-selection files store pipe, fitting, and assembly fitting data
assigned to each specification record.
Insulation Code: An insulation code is assigned to each specification. The
insulation code points to the insulation directory file. This file stores the
insulation data assigned to a specification.
The mnemonic, layer, and insulation code fields are optional; all
other fields are required in a specification record.
2012 PTC

Module 13 | Page 7

PROCEDURE - Configuring Specification Directory Files


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Specification_Directory
Task 1:

PIPING.ASM

Configure a specification directory file.

1. Click File > Options.


Click Configuration Editor in the Creo Parametric Options dialog
box.
Select Import configuration file from the Import/Export drop-down
menu.

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK in the Creo Parametric Options dialog box.
Click NO in the Creo Parametric Options message window.
The configuration options ensure that the correct piping related
folders are specified.

2. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.


3. Click Piping
4. Click Spec DB

from the Engineering group.


from the Setup group.

in the Define Piping Specification dialog box.


5. Click New
Select the Spec Directory File radio button.
Type spec_dir_file as the Name.
Click Accept .
6. In the Define Record area, type the following values:
Type training_spec as the Specification and press ENTER.
Type water as the Mnemonic and press ENTER.
Select ptc-metallic-blue from the Color drop-down list.
Type training_layer as the Layer and press ENTER.
.
For the Auto-Selection field, click Open
Notice that the files in the class_project folder are listed in the
dialog box.
Select complete_training_asfile.ptd and click Open.

Module 13 | Page 8

2012 PTC

7. Click Insert Instance


8. Click Save

to add a record to the auto-selection file.

to save the specification directory file.

The specification directory file is saved to the class_project folder


specified by the config.pro option piping_project_data_dir.
9. Click File > Exit to close the Define Piping Specification dialog box.
This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 13 | Page 9

Insulation Directory Files


Insulation directory files store insulation data for a piping
project.
Insulation Data for a Piping Project
Insulation Records
Data Fields
Insulation Codes
Insulation MCAT Filenames
Insulation Colors

Figure 1 Sample Insulation


Directory File

Used to transfer data for


Insulation Modeling
Insulation Reporting
Figure 2 Sample Insulation
Directory File

Insulation Directory Files


Insulation directory files are created when setting up a specification-driven
piping project.
To create an insulation directory file, you configure insulation records by
assigning the following data fields:
Insulation Codes: All insulation codes assigned to a piping project. The
system retrieves these codes from the insulation directory file and uses
them to identify each insulation type during the insulation modeling and
reporting process. Each code is assigned to an MCAT file.
Insulation MCAT Filenames: All insulation file names stored in the piping
MCAT directory file. These file names point to the insulation MCAT files.
The system retrieves insulation data for pipe and fittings from these files.
Insulation Colors: Color name for each quilt representation of insulation.
You can assign a color to each insulation code. The system retrieves
colors from the piping appearance map (MCAT) file.
Insulation directory files are used to transfer insulation data for insulation
modeling and insulation reporting. The process can be summarized in the
following way:
Selecting a specification for creating pipelines retrieves specification data
including the insulation code from the specification directory file. The
insulation code directs the system to the appropriate insulation record (in
the insulation directory file) where the insulation color and the insulation
MCAT file name are retrieved.
The insulation file name specifies the piping MCAT directory file and the
insulation MCAT file. Insulation data is retrieved from both files. The
system copies the insulation data to the insulation features for insulation
modeling and reporting.
Module 13 | Page 10

2012 PTC

Fitting Category Map Files


The fitting category map file enables you to select a fitting
category button when inserting fittings.
Maps Fitting Categories to Fitting Category Icons
Used when inserting fittings.
The fitting category map file contains the following data fields:

Icon Number
Icon Bitmap File Name
Fitting Category
Valve Number

Reassign fitting categories at any time.

Figure 1 Sample Fitting Category Map File

Fitting Category Map Files


The fitting category map file maps each fitting category to a fitting category
icon file. Mapping the icon file enables you to select a fitting category (icon)
button when inserting fittings; this retrieves a list of fittings for the selected
category and specification. There are by default seven fitting category icons.
However, you can create as many fitting category icons as required.
The fitting category map file contains the following data fields:
Icon Number: Orders the fitting category (icon) buttons under Fitting
Selection in the Insert Fitting and Insert Group Fitting dialog boxes. The
order begins from left to right beginning with the number one.
Icon Bitmap File Name: Specifies the icon graphics file.
Fitting Category: Specifies the auto-selection file to retrieve fitting selection
names.
Valve Number: Specifies if a valve number is required for fittings.
You can assign and reassign fitting categories to icons at any time by
mapping each fitting category to an icon bitmap file and assigning an order
2012 PTC

Module 13 | Page 11

number. Any unmapped fitting categories are assigned to the general


category and general icon.

Module 13 | Page 12

2012 PTC

Configuring Piping Config.pro Options


You can customize the way specification-driven piping operates
by specifying various config.pro options.
Specification-Driven Piping Options:
Customize Operation
The config.pro options related to piping can be divided into the following
areas:

Design Mode
Pipeline Environment
File Name and Directory Locations
ISOGEN Interface

Figure 1 Example Piping Config.pro Options

Configuring Piping Config.pro Options


There are many config.pro options related to piping. These can be divided
into the following broad areas:
Design Mode: You can configure if the design method is specification
driven, non-specification driven, or user-defined where you can switch
between design methods. You can also enable schematic driven options
for routing pipelines and inserting fittings.
Pipeline Environment: You can control the appearance pipelines and
fittings using many different config.pro options. For example, you can
configure the display of pipelines to have a solid centerline.
File name and directory locations: You need to specify the location of all
MCAT files and directories.
ISOGEN Interface: You can create isometric pipeline drawings using the
ISOGEN interface. A number of config.pro options must be set to use
the ISOGEN interface.

2012 PTC

Module 13 | Page 13

PROCEDURE - Configuring Piping Config.pro Options


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Piping_Configs
Task 1:

NO FILE OPEN.

Configure piping config.pro options.

1. Click File > Options.


Click Configuration Editor in the Creo Parametric Options dialog
box.
Select Import configuration file from the Import/Export drop-down
menu.
.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click Add, then type the first option listed in the table and press
ENTER.
Add and/or verify the remaining options and corresponding values
as shown.

As you type each option, the option name is completed for you. In
addition, certain options have a set of values to select from. For the
purposes of simplifying this exercise, all directory paths are given
as relative to the current directory. It is recommended that absolute
paths be used in a work situation.
2. Add and/or verify the remaining options and corresponding values
as shown.

Module 13 | Page 14

2012 PTC

3. Select Export all options to configuration file from the


Import/Export drop-down menu.
Type piping_config.pro, if necessary, and click OK.
Click OK in the Creo Parametric Options dialog box.
This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 13 | Page 15

Module 13 | Page 16

2012 PTC

Module

14

Specification-Driven Routing and Inserting


Fittings
Module Overview
Specification-driven pipeline routing provides the capability to access and
route only those pipelines that have been set up in the project-specific data
created from a piping specification database. In addition, when inserting
fittings by default only those fittings within the pipe specification are available
for selection. Dynamic design rule checking is also possible when routing
pipelines. Design errors such as bend violations, missing fittings, and
end type compatibility problems can be highlighted and corrected before
proceeding with the design. You can also route continuous fittings prior
to routing a pipeline, and insert fittings into a pipeline that do not break
the pipeline, such as a clamp. In this module, you learn how to create
specification-driven pipelines, how to insert fittings into specification-driven
pipelines, and how to perform dynamic design rule checking during the
routing process.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the process of routing specification-driven pipelines.
Describe the process of inserting fittings into specification-driven pipelines.
Create specification-driven pipelines.
Insert fittings into specification-driven pipelines.
Perform dynamic design rule checking.
Route continuous fittings in pipelines.
Understand how to insert non-break fittings in pipelines.

2012 PTC

Module 14 | Page 1

Specification-Driven Pipeline Routing


Specification-driven pipeline routing enables you to configure
and route pipelines using information from project-specific data.
Creating Pipelines
Use Project-Specific Data Files
Routing Pipelines
Use Routing Toolbar
Set Start
Extend
To Pnt/Port
Follow
Connect
Branch Routing

Figure 1 Pipeline Information

Equipment Nozzles
Connection Port
Feature Level Parameters
Size/End_Type/Rating

Figure 2 Routed Pipelines

Figure 3 Equipment Nozzle

Specification-Driven Pipeline Routing


Specification-driven pipelines are configured and created from the
project-specific data files. This includes configuring the piping specification,
pipeline size, schedule, and mnemonic.
Routing pipelines involves using the standard routing options that are also
available for non-specification-driven routing. All routing options can be
accessed from the Routing toolbar. These include the following:
Set Start: Before routing can begin, you must specify a pipeline start point.
You can set a start point using an entry port, pipe end, pipe segment, or you
can select an existing datum point or use the corner of a corner-type fitting.
Extend: Extend enables routing of new piping segments by extending
them from the current position in a specified direction.
To Pnt/Port: Create a segment from the current start point to the selected
point, port, or pipe end. Useful when finishing pipelines at ports.
Follow: Create a segment by following an axis, datum curve, existing
pipeline, or sketched path.
Module 14 | Page 2

2012 PTC

Connect: Connect uses straight lines to connect disjointed segments


from the same pipeline or any entry port. Default corners are added
automatically when possible.
Branch Routing: In specification-driven routing, you can branch to a
pipeline in another subassembly or you can branch from the active piping
assembly.
Equipment Nozzles: A nozzle is either a part or an assembly that has a
coordinate system representing a connection port. Pipelines can be routed
from or to equipment nozzle ports. The following feature level parameters
must be present in the port:
Size: A string parameter that stores the nozzle size, which is used to set up
the default pipe size when a pipe routing starts from the port. It is also used
for the size match checking between a nozzle and its connected pipeline.
Nozzle sizes specified here must match those in the specification database.
End_Type: A string parameter that stores the nozzle end type, which is
used to automate the fitting selection. It is also used for end compatibility
checking between a nozzle and its connected pipeline.
Rating: A string parameter used to store the nozzle rating, which is used to
automate the fitting selection. It is also used for end compatibility checking
between a nozzle and its connected pipeline.

2012 PTC

Module 14 | Page 3

PROCEDURE - Specification-Driven Pipeline Routing


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Specification_Driven_Routing
Task 1:

PIPING.ASM

Create a specification-driven pipeline.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:

2. Load piping-specific configuration options.


Click File > Options.
Click Configuration Editor in the Creo Parametric Options dialog
box.
Select Import configuration file in the Import/Export drop-down
menu.

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK in the Creo Parametric Options dialog box.
Click NO in the Creo Parametric Options message window.
This ensures that the configuration option piping_design_method
is set to spec_driven, thus enabling specification-driven pipeline
routing.

3. In the ribbon, select the


Applications tab.
4. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
5. Click Create Pipeline
from
the Pipeline group.
Select 50A from the Size
drop-down list.
Type Pipe-1 in the Number
text box, and press ENTER.
Notice that the Create Pipeline
dialog box is filled in, as
shown.
Click Save Pipeline Changes
in the Create Pipeline
dialog box.

Module 14 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Route a specification-driven pipeline.

1. Click Piping System Views


in the model tree.
Click Pipeline View to
de-select the option in the
drop-down list, as shown.
in the model
2. Click Settings
tree and select Tree Filters.
3. In the Model Tree Items dialog
box, select the Features check
box under Display and click OK.
4. Expand WATER-PIPE-1.ASM in
the model tree.
Notice the created line stock
and pipeline features, as
shown.
Select ASM_DEF_CSYS in
the model tree, right-click, and
select Hide.
5. Configure the pipeline start.
from the
Click Set Start
Routing group.
Select the PORT0 coordinate
system on the model, as
shown.
Click OK.

6. Create the first pipeline segment


using the extend pipeline tool.
from the
Click Extend
Routing group.
Select Along Csys Axis as
the type of extend, as shown.
Edit the length value to 1000
and press ENTER.
Click Apply.

2012 PTC

Module 14 | Page 5

7. Create the second pipeline


segment using the extend
pipeline tool.
Select the Y axis option, as
shown.
Edit the length value to 1000
and press ENTER.
Click Apply.
8. Create the third pipeline
segment.
Select the X axis option.
Select Offset from Ref as the
Dimension options, as shown.
Select the PORT0 coordinate
system on the model, as
shown.
Edit the offset value to 0 and
press ENTER.
Click OK.

9. Configure a new pipeline start


point.
from the
Click Set Start
Routing group.
Select a location on the third
pipeline segment, as shown.
Edit the length value to 500.
Click OK.

Module 14 | Page 6

2012 PTC

10. Create a branch pipeline


segment.
from the
Click To Pnt/Port
Routing group.
Select the PIPE_END point,
as shown.
in
Click Apply Changes
the To Point/Port dialog box.

This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 14 | Page 7

Specification-Driven Fitting Insertion


The piping specification determines the possible fittings and
sizes that can be used when inserting specification-driven
fittings.
Inserting Fittings

Group Fitting Option

Select Fitting Location


Select Fitting Category
Orient Fitting
Rotation Angle/Flip
Specification Override

Insert Multiple Fittings


End Compatibility Checks
Insert Gaskets and Flanges
Mate Adjacent Faces

Branch Fittings
Insert at Branch Points

Figure 1 Insert Fitting Dialog Box

Figure 2 Inserting a Group


Fitting

Specification-Driven Fitting Insertion


Inserting fittings follows a similar process to non-specification-driven piping.
However, when the fitting location and fitting category have been determined,
the piping specification determines the possible fittings and sizes that can
be used.
Fittings can be oriented during insertion by changing the rotation angle and
using the flip option.
If desired, you can insert a fitting with a specification that is different from
the selected pipe specification. This overrides the specification of the
selected fitting. You can also override specifications when you insert group
fittings. In this case, use the specification override feature individually for
each fitting in the group.
Branch fittings are standard fittings that can be inserted at configured branch
points. Branch fittings can have three or four legs; any corresponding
Module 14 | Page 8

2012 PTC

pipelines are trimmed to the location of the coordinate system ports on each
leg.
When using the Group Fitting option, you can insert more than one fitting
during the insertion process. In addition, the group fitting functionality enables
the following:
Automatic end type compatibility checking between adjacent fittings in
the group.
Automatically select and insert appropriate gaskets between adjacent
flanged fittings in the group.
Automatically select and insert an appropriate pair of flange and gaskets
between a flanged end of a fitting and a non-flanged end of another fitting.
Insert the specified group fittings on a pipe segment with their adjacent
faces mated.

2012 PTC

Module 14 | Page 9

PROCEDURE - Specification-Driven Fitting Insertion


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Specification_Driven_Fittings
Task 1:

FITTING.ASM

Configure specification-driven pipeline options.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:

2. Load piping-specific configuration options.


Click File > Options.
Click Configuration Editor in the Creo Parametric Options dialog
box.
Select Import configuration file from the Import/Export drop-down
menu.

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK in the Creo Parametric Options dialog box.
Click NO in the Creo Parametric Options message window.

3. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.


4. Click Piping

from the Engineering group.

This ensures that the configuration option piping_design_method


is set to spec_driven, thus enabling a specification-driven pipeline
design.

Module 14 | Page 10

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Insert a fitting into a pipeline segment.

1. Place and configure a reducer


fitting.
Click Insert Fitting
the Fitting group.

from

Click Reducer
in the Insert
Fitting dialog box.
Select a location on the
pipeline segment, as shown.
Edit the fitting location value
to 1000.
Click Expand Preview in the
Insert Fitting dialog box.
Notice the fitting preview
graphics, as shown.
Select the Placement/
Orientation tab.
Notice that the reducer location
is previewed on the model, as
shown.
Select the Selection tab.
Click Apply.
Notice that the reducer is
placed on the model.
2. Place and configure a branch
fitting.
Click Tee
in the Insert
Fitting dialog box.
Select APNTO on the model,
as shown.
Notice that the fitting preview
graphics update and the
branch size changes, as
shown. The branch size is
determined by the pipeline
size.
Click OK in the Insert Fitting
dialog box.
Notice that the tee fitting is
placed on the model.

2012 PTC

Module 14 | Page 11

3. Place and configure a gate and


check valve as a group fitting.
from
Select Group Fitting
the Group Fitting drop-down
menu in the Fitting Group.
Select a location on the
pipeline segment, as shown.
Type 1 in the Valve number
text box.
Select the Placement/
Orientation tab.
Edit the length dimension to
800, as shown.
Select the Selection tab.
.
Click Insert Fitting After
Select CHECK from the
Selection name drop-down
menu.
Type 2 in the Valve number
text box.
Click OK in the Insert Group
Fitting dialog box.
Notice that the gate and check
valves are placed together on
the pipeline, as shown.

This completes the procedure.

Module 14 | Page 12

2012 PTC

Design Rules
You can specify line stock parameters that check selected
pipelines to ensure pipes stay within defined limitations.
Design Rule Parameters

Dynamic Design Rule Checking

Assign Line Stock Parameters


By Default MCAT Data

Figure 1 Design Rule Parameters

Missing Fittings
Segment Violations
Bend Violations
Branch Violations
Flow Violations
End Type Compatibility
Invalid Pipeline Label Size

Figure 2 Design Rule Checks

Design Rules
Design Rule Parameters: These are parameters that can be assigned
to pipe segments or to an entire line stock within a piping design. In
specification-driven piping, default values are assigned from the MCAT files.
Dynamic Design Rule Checking: You can enable or disable design rule
checking during the pipe modeling process. When you enable design rule
checking, the location of violations can be displayed and you can correct
them at an early stage. The modeling process then proceeds with greater
accuracy. The following design rules can be checked:

Missing Fittings: Check for missed fittings and gaskets.


Segment Violations: Check for violations in segment length.
Bend Violations: Display the bend violation results for a pipeline.
Branch Violations: Display the branch violations in a pipeline.
Flow Violations: Check for conflicts in the flow direction.
End Type Compatibility: Checks for conflicts in the end type for two mated
fittings.
Invalid Pipeline Label Size: Checks for conflicts when the pipe pieces do
not have the same size as specified in the pipeline label.

2012 PTC

Module 14 | Page 13

PROCEDURE - Design Rules


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Piping_Design_Rules
Task 1:

RULES.ASM

Load piping configuration options and activate a piping assembly.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. Load piping-specific configuration options.
Click File > Options from the main menu.
Click Configuration Editor in the Creo Parametric Options dialog
box.
Select Import Configuration File from the Import/Export
drop-down menu.

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK in the Creo Parametric Options dialog box.
Click NO in the Creo Parametric Options message window.

3. In the ribbon, select the


Applications tab.
4. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
5. Click Piping System Views
in the model tree.
6. Click Pipeline View to deselect
the option in the drop-down list.
in the model
7. Click Settings
tree and select Tree Filters.
8. In the Model Tree Items dialog
box, select the Features check
box under Display and click OK.
9. Select WATER-PIPE-1.ASM in
the model tree.
Right-click and select
Activate.
Expand WATER-PIPE-1.ASM
in the model tree.

Module 14 | Page 14

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Perform a design rule check.

1. Click Pipe Check Rule


the Info group.

from

2. Click Missing Fitting (2) in the


Design Rules Check dialog box.
3. Notice the violation details, as
shown.

4. Expand Missing Fitting (2) in


the Design Rules Check dialog
box.
5. Select violation detail 1 in the
Design Rules Check dialog box.
6. Select violation detail 2 in the
Design Rules Check dialog box.
7. Notice that the pipe corners
without corner fittings are
highlighted on the model, as
shown.
8. Click Quit Dialog
Task 3:

Place and configure missing elbow fittings in the pipeline.

1. Click Insert Fitting


Fitting group.

from the

2. Click Fitting Elbow


in the
Insert Fitting dialog box.
3. Select a location on the corner of
a pipeline segment, as shown.
4. Click Apply.
5. Select a location on another
corner of a pipeline segment, as
shown.
6. Click OK in the Insert Fitting
dialog box.

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Module 14 | Page 15

7. Notice elbow fittings have been placed on the model, as shown.

This completes the procedure.

Module 14 | Page 16

2012 PTC

Routing Continuous Fittings


You can route continuous fittings prior to routing a pipeline,
providing a flexible approach to pipeline routing.
Routing Continuous Fittings
Route fittings prior to pipeline.
Fittings inserted back to back.
Benefits
Minimize Pipe Segments between Fittings
Reduce manufacturing costs.
Minimize welding requirements.
Routing Flexibility
Combination of methods.

Figure 1 Continuous Fittings


Example

Figure 2 Fittings in the Model Tree

Routing Continuous Fittings


With specification-driven routing, in addition to placing fittings on pipelines,
you can also route a series of fittings prior to routing a pipe centerline.
Therefore, a pipe centerline is not required.
When routing continuous fittings, the fittings automatically propagates,
enabling additional fittings to be inserted back to back.
Benefits
Routing continuous fittings enables you to minimize pipe segments
between fittings.
This can reduce manufacturing costs and minimize the associated
welding required.
Routing continuous fittings enables for greater flexibility since you can
still choose to route a pipe centerline and then assemble fittings, or
you can route a series of continuous fittings prior to the routing of a
centerline.
You can also use a combination of the two methods.

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Module 14 | Page 17

PROCEDURE - Routing Continuous Fittings


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Continuous_Fittings
Task 1:

CONT_FITTING.ASM

Load piping configuration options and activate a piping assembly.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:

2. Load piping-specific configuration options.


Click File > Options.
Click Configuration Editor in the Creo Parametric Options dialog
box.
Select Import Configuration File from the Import/Export
drop-down menu.

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK in the Creo Parametric Options dialog box.
Click NO in the Creo Parametric Options message window.

3. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.


4. Click Piping

from the Engineering group.

5. Click Piping System Views

in the model tree.

6. Click Pipeline View to clear the option in the drop-down list.


7. Click Settings

in the model tree and select Tree Filters.

8. In the Model Tree Items dialog box, select the Features check box
under Display and click OK.
9. Select WATER-PIPE-2.ASM in the model tree.
Right-click and select Activate.
Expand WATER-PIPE-2.ASM in the model tree.

Module 14 | Page 18

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Route continuous fittings.

1. Click Insert Fitting


Fitting group.

from the

in the
Click Fitting Elbow
Insert Fitting dialog box.
Select a location at the end
of the horizontal pipeline
segment, as shown.
Click Apply.
Notice that the fitting is
inserted at the end of the
pipeline segment, as shown.
2. Insert a second continuous
elbow fitting.
Select the PORT1 coordinate
system on the elbow fitting, as
shown.
Select the Placement/
Orientation tab.
Notice that the elbow fitting
location is previewed on the
model, as shown.
Click the 180 Rotation angle
option.
Click OK in the Insert Fitting
dialog box.
Notice that the elbow fitting
position is rotated on the
model, as shown.

Task 3:

Create a pipeline segment between the elbow fitting and a pipeline


end point.

1. Click Pipe
group.

from the Routing

2. Click To Pnt/Port
Routing group.

from the

3. Select the PORT1 coordinate


system on the elbow fitting
model, as shown.

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Module 14 | Page 19

4. Click Apply Changes


in the
To Point/Port dialog box.
5. Disable Csys Display

6. Click Display Thick Pipes


from the View group.
7. Notice the continuous fittings
in the completed pipeline, as
shown.
This completes the procedure.

Module 14 | Page 20

2012 PTC

Non-Break Fittings
You can insert fittings into a pipeline that do not break the
pipeline such as a clamp.
Non-Breaking Fittings for Pipelines
For example: Clamps.
Automatic selection and propagation.
Displayed in the model tree.

Figure 1 Non-break Fitting


Inserted in Pipeline

Figure 2 Model Tree with


Non-break Fittings

Specification-Driven Pipeline Routing


Non-Breaking Fittings for Pipelines
Pipelines often contain fittings that do not break pipelines, such as a pipe
clamp. You can now insert non-breaking fittings and ensure automatic
selection and propagation during the creation and modification of
pipelines.
Fittings that do not break the pipeline can now be inserted using Spec
Driven Piping in addition to Non-Spec driven piping.
Automatic Selection and Propagation: This capability is available for Spec
Driven pipelines; it is not available for Non-Spec Driven pipelines.
The model tree displays non-breaking fittings within the pipeline in which
they are placed.

2012 PTC

Module 14 | Page 21

Module 14 | Page 22

2012 PTC

Module

15

Using Creo Schematics Process and


Instrumentation Diagrams Data
Module Overview
Creo Schematics can be used to create 2-D schematic fluid system designs
known as process and instrumentation diagrams (P & IDs). These diagrams
can contain routed pipelines and in-line components, such as reducers and
valves. Creo Schematics P & IDs can be used to transfer schematic data into
specification-driven piping designs in Creo Parametric. This enables the
automatic designation of equipment and nozzles in Creo Parametric. When
creating pipelines, routing pipes, and inserting fittings, automatic selections
based on imported XML data can be made where possible. It is important to
correctly configure design properties within P & IDs to ensure correct transfer
of information into specification-driven piping designs in Creo Parametric.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the process of transferring 2-D schematic data into
specification-driven piping designs in Creo Parametric.
Describe Creo Schematics concepts and terminology.
Configure design data in Creo Schematics.
Export XML data.

2012 PTC

Module 15 | Page 1

Process and Instrumentation Diagrams Overview


Process and Instrumentation Diagrams are created in Creo
Schematics and can be used to transfer routing and fitting
information into Creo Parametric piping designs.
Fluid System Map
Pipelines
Bore Sizes
Flow Direction
Equipment
Tanks
Nozzles

Components
Reducers
Valves

Figure 1 Sample Process and Instrumentation Diagram

Process and Instrumentation Diagrams Overview


Process and Instrumentation Diagrams (P & IDs) are used to map out fluid
systems.
P & IDs can contain pipelines and details documenting bore sizes and
the flow direction of pipes.
P & IDs can also contain equipment such as tanks and nozzles.
P & IDs can also contain in-line functional components such as valves
and reducers.

Module 15 | Page 2

2012 PTC

Creo Schematics Concepts and Terminology


Piping designs in Creo Schematics are created by placing piping
components onto diagram sheets and routing pipelines between
components.
Creo Schematics
Diagram Sheets
Design Catalog
Design Catalog
Port/Block/Fiber/Group
Artifacts
Properties
Instancing
Datatables
Datasets
Figure 1 Block Properties
Dialog Box

Figure 2 Block Properties Shape


Figure 3 Catalog Explorer

Creo Schematics Concepts and Terminology


Creo Schematics consists of a series of diagram sheets and a design catalog.
The Design Catalog contains the library of all the items that can be used in
the design. This includes ports, blocks, groups, fibers, design templates,
and sheet templates. The catalog explorer enables you to create and
manage catalog items, and place catalog items on sheets. Items that can be
configured in catalogs include the following:
Port: A port is a terminal or pin that can be connected to other ports. A port
always has a parent or an owner. The parent can be a block, a group,
or a fiber. A port can connect to any port irrespective of the parent. For
example, you can connect a port on a block to a port on another block, a
port on a fiber, or a port on a group.
Block: A block is an object that can contain ports. The ports can accept
connections. Examples of blocks include reducers and valves.
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Module 15 | Page 3

Fiber: A fiber is a component such as a pipeline that can be routed. A fiber


can have two or more ports joined by a network of segments.
Group: Groups are used to associate multiple blocks or fibers together in a
single object, for example, multiple nozzles in a cabinet.
Artifacts design items within a design catalog such as ports, blocks, groups,
and fibers are known as artifacts. Artifacts have properties and can be
graphically represented by one or more shapes for use in different types
of diagrams.
Each artifact is configured by a prototype definition and is placed on a
design sheet by creating an instance that is linked back to the original
prototype.
Datatables are tables of properties derived from manufactured parts which
contain columns of properties and rows representing different combinations
of properties called datasets.
For example, a manufacturer may have a data catalog with a table of
values for a particular part family, such as reducers or gate valves. You can
associate a datatable with a prototype item in an Creo Schematics catalog.
When you instance an item from the catalog, you can select a specific
dataset for the instance from the datatable.

Module 15 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Investigating Process and Instrumentation


Diagrams
You can investigate the components within process and
instrumentation diagrams. This enables you to view component
properties.
Investigate Process and Instrumentation
Diagrams
Piping Components
Blocks
Ports
Pipelines

Figure 1 Reducer Block


Properties Dialog Box
Recommended Properties
Pipelines Spec
Equipment Category = Equipment, and Model_Name.
Nozzles Category = Nozzle, Model_Name, End_Type, Sname, and
Spec.
Branches Category = Branch, Model_Name, End_Type, Sname, and
Spec.
Fittings Category, Model_Name, Size, Nsize, Bsize, End_Type,
Sname, and Spec.
Ports Entry_Port, Size.

Investigating Process and Instrumentation Diagrams


You can investigate the properties of components such as blocks, ports, and
pipelines within piping design diagrams.
To enable correct transfer of XML data into Creo Parametric, a number of
recommended properties should be specified in the P & IDs design:
Pipelines: Spec The value of this parameter must match the name of the
SPEC parameter defined in the piping_spec_dir.ptd file in the specification
database. Properties read from the XML file are added to the pipeline
as user-defined properties.
Equipment: Category To classify a Creo Schematics component as
equipment, specify CATEGORY = EQUIPMENT. Model_Name This
2012 PTC

Module 15 | Page 5

property is used to match components in the 3-D assembly with those in


the schematic during designation.
Nozzles: Category To classify a Creo Schematics component as a
nozzle, specify CATEGORY = NOZZLE. Model_Name This property is
used to match components in the 3-D assembly with those in the schematic
during designation.
Branches: CATEGORY = BRANCH. Sname This property is optional
and is used only if the type of branch is known, that is, olet, bran, and
so on. If this property is used, it must match the sname property of the
piping_mcat_dir.ptd file in the specification database for the branch being
used. Model_Name This property is optional and is used by Creo
Parametric to automatically designate branch components in the 3-D
assembly.
Fittings: Category The value of this parameter must match the value
found in the piping_mcat_dir.ptd file in the specification database for the
fitting being used. For example, a reducers category property is set to
REDUCER.
Sname The value of this parameter must match the value found in
the piping_mcat_dir.ptd file for the fitting being used. For example, a
concentric reducers sname property is set to CRED.
Model_Name This property is used by Creo Parametric during fitting
insertion. If the Model_Name property matches the part name of the
assembly fitting, the component is automatically designated as selected
during insertion.
Size This property is optional but it is recommended to use the Size
property as found in each individual fittings .ptd file in the Creo Piping
specification database. This property is used to automatically select the
correct fitting for insertion.
Nsize/Bsize These properties (reducer and branch properties) are
optional and are used to automatically select the correct fitting for
insertion.
Ports: Entry_Port This property is optional. You can add this property to
the port of a fitting or nozzle. The value of this property must match the
name of the coordinate system in the 3-D component to which the pipeline
needs to be attached.

Module 15 | Page 6

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Investigating Process and


Instrumentation Diagrams
Close Design

Piping\Review_Design

PIPING_REVIEW
Task 1:

Review and identify Creo Schematics properties.

1. Select the P & ID Diagrams


folder from the Design Explorer.
2. Select Piping Layout.
3. Right-click and select Open
Sheet.
4. Click Close to close the Design
Explorer.
5. Select the R1 Reducer on
pipeline Leg-1, as shown.
6. Right-click and select
Properties.
Observe the properties, as
shown.

2012 PTC

Module 15 | Page 7

7. Note the following property values:


Category: The value of this property must match the value found
in the piping_mcat_dir.ptd file in the specification database for the
fitting being used. For example, a reducers category property is
set to REDUCER. A valves category property is set to VALVE.
Sname: The value of this parameter must match the value found in
the piping_mcat_dir.ptd file for the fitting being used. For example,
a concentric reducers sname property is set to CRED. A gate
valves sname property is set to GATE and a check valves sname
property is set to CHECK as defined in the piping_mcat_dir.ptd file.
Model_Name: This property is used by Creo Parametric during
fitting insertion. If the Model_Name property matches the part
name of the assembly fitting, the component is automatically
designated as selected during insertion. If the Model_Name
property does not match the part name of the assembled fitting, the
fitting is automatically designated as selected during insertion and
a mismatch is permitted.
Size: This property is optional but it is recommended to use the
Size property as found in each individual fittings .ptd file in the
piping specification database. This property is used to automatically
select the correct fitting for insertion.
Nsize/Bsize: These properties (reducer and branch properties) are
optional and are used to automatically select the correct fitting for
insertion. You can add these properties to the Creo Schematics
component as found in each individual fitting's .ptd file in the piping
specification database. If you do not specify these properties, you
may need to select some fittings manually.
8. Click Cancel to close the Properties dialog box.
To export a Creo Schematics design to Creo Parametric as an XML
file, you must specify certain properties for fittings and pipelines.
Specifying these properties enables you to use logical referencing
seamlessly, and enables automatic selection of fittings.

Module 15 | Page 8

2012 PTC

9. Select the T1 branch on pipeline


Leg-1, as shown.
10. Right-click and select
Properties.
Observe the properties, as
shown.

11. Note the following property values:


Category is used to classify a Creo Schematics component as a
branch fitting. Specify CATEGORY = BRANCH.
The Sname property is NOT required and should only be used if
the actual type of branch is known. If this property is used, it MUST
match the "sname" parameter found in the piping_mact_dir.ptd file
in the specification database for the branch being used.
The Model_Name property is optional and is used by Creo
Parametric to match components in the 3-D assembly with those
in the XML during designation. If this property is not specified,
components can be matched manually.
12. Click Cancel to close the Properties dialog box.
This completes the procedure.

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Module 15 | Page 9

Exporting Design Information


Piping design information such as pipeline size and fitting
properties can be exported as an XML file into Creo Parametric.
Export Design Information
XML Data
Designate Components
Automate Selections

Figure 1 Example Reducer


Block Properties Dialog Box

Exporting Design Information


Export Design Information: P & IDs design data can be exported as an XML
file to Creo Parametric.
The XML data can then be used in specification-driven piping designs to
further automate the design process.
This includes automatic designation of equipment and nozzles in Creo
Parametric. In addition, when creating pipelines, routing pipes, and
inserting fittings, automatic selections (based on imported XML data)
can be made where possible.
Creo Schematics component properties should be correctly configured
prior to exporting.

Module 15 | Page 10

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Exporting Design Information


Close Design

Piping\Export_Design

PIPING_EXPORT
Task 1:

Export an XML file of the piping design.

1. Click File > Export > XML.


Click the File Selector button.
Browse to the PTCU\CreoParametric2\Piping\Export_Design
folder.
Type piping_layout in the File name text box.
Click Open.
2. Validate the XML data.
Select the Pro\PIPING option.
Ensure the Current Sheet option is selected.
Ensure the Duplicate Ref Des check box is selected.
If necessary, clear the Ignore warnings check box.
Click the Validate XML button.
Observe the XML Validation Report, as shown. Note none of the
warnings are critical.
Click Close in the XML Validation Report dialog box.

The XML checker validates all the information before generating


the XML file and exporting it to a Piping Design in Creo Parametric.
This process ensures that the data in the XML file conforms to
defined rules.

2012 PTC

Module 15 | Page 11

3. Export the XML data.


Select the Ignore warnings check box.
Click OK.
Click OK in the Overwrite window.
Note that an XML file has been created.
You can import the XML file into a Creo Parametric piping design.
You can then use the information to designate piping components,
create pipelines, and ensure that the correct fittings are inserted
within pipelines.
This completes the procedure.

Module 15 | Page 12

2012 PTC

Module

16

Schematic Driven Pipeline Modeling


Module Overview
Schematic driven pipeline modeling involves creating 3-D piping designs
based on 2-D schematic data created in Creo Schematics. The 2-D
schematic data is mapped to piping specification data when creating 3-D
piping systems. The 2-D schematic data is stored in an XML file. The
mapping of data occurs when you create pipelines, route pipelines, and insert
fittings. Changes to piping diagrams in Creo Schematics can be passed on to
piping designs in Creo Parametric. Modified diagrams can be re-exported,
and imported again into piping designs. Logically referenced data such as
fittings can be updated and design changes can be implemented in piping
designs. When design changes are being implemented, it is important to
use reporting tools such as the schematic consistency checker to monitor
progress of changes and provide feedback on design problems. In this
module, you route pipelines using previously created XML data, and insert
fittings in the routed pipelines. You update schematic piping designs and
pass these changes on to 3-D piping designs in Creo Parametric.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Describe the process of using 2-D schematic data when creating 3-D
piping designs.
Create schematic driven pipelines.
Insert fittings in schematic driven pipelines.
Describe the process of passing on changes from Creo Schematics piping
diagrams into piping designs.
Pass changes from Creo Schematics piping diagrams into Creo Parametric
piping designs.
Understand how to use the schematic check report tool.

2012 PTC

Module 16 | Page 1

Designating Schematic Information


You can relate items in 2-D schematic designs to specification
driven piping assemblies. This enables transfer of 2-D design
information into 3-D pipelines and piping components.
Designating Schematic Items
Map 2-D schematic data to 3-D piping
designs
Pipelines/Equipment/Nozzles/Fittings/
Branches
Reference Columns
Designator
Model
Component

Figure 1 Designating
Equipment

Status Options

Designated
Auto Match
Manual Match
Multiple
Missing
Undesignated

Figure 2 Designated
Pipeline Information

Designating Schematic Items


Designating schematic items involves mapping 2-D schematic data created
in Creo Schematics to items in specification-driven piping assemblies. Items
that can be designated are pipelines, equipment, nozzles, fittings, and
branches.
During the designation process, the following items can be displayed as
reference columns in the Pipeline Designation dialog box. These items
identify XML properties and Creo Parametric components:
Designator The value of the refdes property specified in the XML file.
Model The value of the modelname property in the XML file.
Component The Creo Parametric piping assembly component name.
The following Status Options are displayed when the results of mapping
model property values to components are displayed in the status column:
Designated The component is designated and this information is stored
in the pipeline.
Auto Match A single instance of the component is found in the piping
assembly and is automatically matched.
Manual Match The component has been selected manually.
Multiple Several components with the same name have been found.
Module 16 | Page 2

2012 PTC

Missing A component with the specified name under the Model column
is not found.
Undesignated A component that has been undesignated manually.

2012 PTC

Module 16 | Page 3

PROCEDURE - Designating Schematic Information


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Designating_Information
Task 1:

DESIGNATE.ASM

Create a pipeline using schematic information.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:

2. Load piping specific configuration options.


Click File > Options.
Click Configuration Editor from the Creo Parametric Options
window.
Select Import configuration file from the Import/Export drop-down
menu

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK from the Creo Parametric Options window.
Click No from the Creo Parametric Options window.
This ensures that the configuration option piping_design_method is
set to spec_driven and that piping_schematic_driven is set to yes.
This enables schematic information from Creo Parametric piping
designs to be used during specification-driven pipeline routing.

3. Select the Applications tab.


4. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
5. Click Create Pipeline
the Pipeline group.

from

in the Create
Click Open
Pipeline dialog box.
Select PIPING_OUTPUT.XML
and click Open.
Notice that the schematic
information is used to complete
the Create Pipeline dialog box,
as shown.

Module 16 | Page 4

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Designate components in the piping assembly.

1. Click Designate Pipeline


in the Create
Components
Pipeline dialog box.
Notice that the 150A_IC
component is automatically
designated, as shown.
Select the IC2 row in the
dialog box, as shown.
Notice that both 50A_IC
components are highlighted
on the model, as shown.
Select the right 50A_IC
component on the model, as
shown.
Notice that the IC2 row
updates, as shown. All
required components for
pipeline routing have been
designated.

2. Click Store Designation Info


in the Pipeline Designation
dialog box.
Notice that the components
and ports where pipelines can
be routed from are highlighted
on the model, as shown.
This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 16 | Page 5

Routing Pipelines Using Schematic Information


You can route a specification driven pipeline based on the
schematic information within a 2-D Creo Schematics piping
design.
Enabling Schematic Driven
pipeline_schematic_driven = yes
Use with Spec Driven Piping
Schematic Driven Pipeline Routing
Start/End Port Locations Highlighted
Matched ENTRY_PORT parameter
Equipment/Nozzles Highlighted
Connected Items
Not Highlighted
Warning Messages
Non-Designated Items

Figure 1 Highlighted
Port Locations and
Components

Routing Pipelines Using Schematic Information


Enabling Schematic Driven: You can route a pipeline based on the schematic
information if the piping_schematic_driven configuration option is set to yes.
The Schematic Driven option is only available within Specification Driven
Piping.
Schematic Driven Pipeline Routing assists in routing operations in the
following ways:
All available start and end port locations (coordinate systems) along with
the corresponding equipment or nozzle are highlighted during routing.
The coordinate systems are highlighted only if the ENTRY_PORT
parameter in XML has the same value as the coordinate system name
of the corresponding equipment or nozzle. (For example, port0.)
Terminal ports and models that are already connected are not
highlighted.
Warning messages appear if you select a non-designated item for a start or
end port location. You can ignore the warning message and continue the
routing operation from the selected port. This difference can be verified by
performing a schematic consistency check after routing is complete.

Module 16 | Page 6

2012 PTC

PROCEDURE - Routing Pipelines Using Schematic


Information
Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Schematic_Routing
Task 1:

SCHEM_ROUTE.ASM

Prepare to route a pipeline using schematic information.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:

2. Load piping-specific configuration options.


Click File > Options.
Click Configuration Editor in the Creo Parametric Options window.
Select Import configuration file from the Import/Export drop-down
menu.

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK in the Creo Parametric Options window.
Click No in the Creo Parametric Options window.
This ensures that the configuration option piping_design_method
is set to spec_driven and piping_schematic_driven is set to yes.
This enables schematic information from Creo Schematics piping
designs to be used during specification-driven pipeline routing.

3. Select the Applications tab.


4. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
5. Click Piping System Views
in the model tree.
If necessary, click Pipeline
View to de-select the option in
the drop-down list.
in the model
6. Click Settings
tree and select Tree Filters.
7. In the Model Tree Items dialog
box, select the Features check
box under Display and click OK.
8. Expand WATER-LEG-1.ASM in
the model tree.
Notice the created line stock
and pipeline, as shown.

2012 PTC

Module 16 | Page 7

Task 2:

Route a pipeline using schematic information.

1. Click Pipe
from the Routing
group.
Select LEG-1 in the model
tree.
Click Confirm to activate the
WATER-LEG-1.ASM.
Notice that the available
routing ports and components
are highlighted on the model,
as shown.

2. Edit the corner type for pipelines.


from the Routing group.
Click Environment
Select Fitting from the Corner Type drop-down list. Click OK.
This ensures that sharp corners are created in pipelines instead of
bends. You can add corner fittings later.
3. Click Set Start
from the
Routing group.
Select PORT0 on the 150A_IC
component on the model, as
shown.
Click OK.

Module 16 | Page 8

2012 PTC

4. Create the first pipeline segment.


from the
Click Extend
Routing group.
Select Along Csys Axis as
the type of extend, as shown.
Edit the length value to 3000
and press ENTER.
Click Apply.
5. Create the second pipeline
segment.
Select the Y axis option.
Edit the length value to 1000
and press ENTER, as shown.
Click OK.

6. Create a third pipeline segment.


from the
Click To Pnt/Port
Routing group.
Select PORT0 on the 50A_IC
component on the model, as
shown.
in the To
Click Apply
Point/Port dialog box.
Notice the completed pipeline
routing, as shown.

The warning in the message area indicates that the pipe segment
size, 150A, and the entry port size, 50A, are mismatched. This can
be resolved by inserting a reducer in the pipeline.
This completes the procedure.

2012 PTC

Module 16 | Page 9

Inserting Fittings Using Schematic Information


You can insert fittings in a specification driven pipeline based
on the schematic information within a 2-D Creo Schematics
piping design.
Inserting Fittings
Associated schematic pipeline in XML
Fitting Requirements
Category Parameter
Mapped value in piping_mcat_dir.ptd
Controls Fitting Category Icons
SNAME Parameter
Mapped value in piping_mcat_dir.ptd
SIZE Parameter
Optional
Matches size in pipe segment
Group Fittings
Context-sensitive Information Displayed
Valve Number/New Size/Branch
Size
Figure 1 Insert Fitting Dialog
Box

Inserting Fittings Using Schematic Information


Inserting Fittings: You can insert a fitting using schematic information if a
pipeline in a piping assembly is associated with an appropriate schematic
pipeline in XML.
Fitting Requirements: To insert a schematic fitting, a number of requirements
need to be satisfied:
The XML information for a fitting must contain a CATEGORY parameter
that has a value specified in the piping_mcat_dir.ptd file. This value
controls the activation of the fitting category icons in the Insert Fitting dialog
box after you select a pipe segment.
The SNAME parameter must have a value in the piping_mcat_dir.ptd file
corresponding to a category. For example, if you specify CATEGORY =
REDUCER and SNAME = CRED, the fitting category icon for a reducer is
activated and the Selection Name list displays CRED in the Insert Fitting
dialog box.
If the XML information for a fitting contains the SIZE parameter, the fitting
is then only available if the selected pipe segment has a matching size. If
the SIZE parameter is not present the fitting can be inserted regardless of
the pipe segment size.
Module 16 | Page 10

2012 PTC

Group Fittings: When inserting group fittings context-sensitive information


such as the valve number, new size, and branch size for the selected fitting
are displayed based on the information in the XML file.

2012 PTC

Module 16 | Page 11

PROCEDURE - Inserting Fittings Using Schematic


Information
Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Schematic_Fittings
Task 1:

SCHEM_FITT.ASM

Prepare to route a pipeline using schematic information.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. Load piping specific configuration options.
Click File > Options.
Click Configuration Editor from the Creo Parametric Options
window.
Select Import configuration file from the Import/Export drop-down
menu.

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK from the Creo Parametric Options window.
Click No from the Creo Parametric Options window.
This ensures that the configuration option piping_design_method
is set to spec_driven and piping_schematic_driven is set to yes.
This enables schematic information from Creo Schematics piping
designs to be used during specification-driven fitting insertion.

3. In the ribbon, select the


Applications tab.
4. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
5. Click Piping System Views
in the model tree.
If necessary, click Pipeline
View to de-select the option in
the drop-down list.
in the model
6. Click Settings
tree and select Tree Filters.
7. In the Model Tree Items dialog
box, select the Features check
box under Display and click OK.
8. Expand WATER-LEG-1.ASM in
the model tree.
Notice the pipeline features as
shown.
Module 16 | Page 12

2012 PTC

Task 2:

Insert reducer fittings in the pipeline using schematic information.

1. Click Insert Fitting


from the
Fitting group.
Select a location on the
pipeline segment, as shown.
Notice that the Insert Fitting
dialog box is completed, as
shown. A reducer fitting of size
80A is automatically selected
based on the associated XML
file.
Edit the fitting position to 1000
on the model.
Click Apply.
Notice that the reducer fitting
is placed on the pipeline, as
shown.

2. Insert a second reducer fitting.


Select a location on the
pipeline segment, as shown.
Notice that the Insert Fitting
dialog box is completed. A
reducer fitting of size 50A is
automatically selected based
on the associated XML file.
Edit the fitting position to 1000
on the model.
Click Apply.
Notice that the second reducer
fitting is placed on the pipeline,
as shown.

2012 PTC

Module 16 | Page 13

Task 3:

Insert valve fittings in the pipeline using schematic information.

1. Insert a gate valve fitting.


Select a location on the
pipeline segment, as shown.
Click Expand Preview in the
Insert Fitting dialog box.
Notice that the Insert Fitting
dialog box is completed, as
shown. A gate valve fitting is
automatically selected based
on the associated XML file.
Edit the fitting position to 1500
on the model.
Click Apply.
Notice that the valve fitting
is placed on the pipeline, as
shown.

2. Insert a check valve fitting.


Select a location on the
pipeline segment, as shown.
Notice that the Insert Fitting
dialog box is completed, as
shown. A check valve fitting is
automatically selected based
on the associated XML file.
Edit the fitting position to 1500
on the model.
Click OK.
Notice that the valve fitting
is placed on the pipeline, as
shown.

This completes the procedure.

Module 16 | Page 14

2012 PTC

Schematic Consistency Check Report


You can compare 2-D schematic design data with the equivalent
schematic driven 3-D piping design using the schematic
consistency check report tool.
Comparing 2-D and 3-D Data

Schematic Report Information

2-D schematic XML data files


3-D pipelines

Schematic and Model Data


General Pipeline Information
List items in pipelines and
branches
Status Column Options
Blank Space = Identical
X Mismatch
+ Additional item in model
Item missing from model

Pipeline Designation Dialog Box


Click Info > Schematic Check

Figure 1 Schematic Report Results

Schematic Consistency Check Report


Comparing 2-D and 3-D Data: The schematic consistency check report is
generated by comparing the 2-D schematic information and the 3-D model
information of a pipeline.
In the Pipeline Designation dialog box, you can click Info > Schematic Check
to generate a schematic check report.
Report Information: The report consists of four columns: Item, Schematic
Info, Status, and Model Info. The report provides information in the following
sequence:
General information about the pipeline, such as Mnemonic, Number, Size,
and Spec.
Information relating to the main extension, followed by each branch
extension. The branch extensions are identified using the string BRxx
DETAILS, where xx is the extension number. Within each extension, the
connected series and their constituent components are reported using the
flow direction and the sequence in which they appear on the pipeline.
Each element is reported in a row. The schematic and model information
are reported under the respective Schematic Info and Model Info columns.
The Status column is used to indicate the result of the consistency check.
The following options can be displayed in the Status column:
2012 PTC

Module 16 | Page 15

Blank Space Item is identical between schematic and model.


X Item is mismatched between schematic and model.
+ Additional item in the model.
Item is missing from the model.

Module 16 | Page 16

2012 PTC

Updating Piping Designs from Creo Schematics


You can pass on changes from schematic designs in Creo
Schematics into schematic driven 3-D piping designs.
Creo Schematics
Changes to Creo Schematics Piping
Diagram
Export XML file
Piping Design
Import XML File
Update Designated Information
Pipelines
Equipment
Fittings
Schematic Consistency Check

Figure 1 Modified Schematic


Design

Figure 2 Pipeline Designation


Dialog Box

Compare 2-D and 3-D Data


Update Piping Design
Modify Pipelines
Replace Fittings

Updating Piping Designs from Creo Schematics


Creo Schematics: Changes to Creo Schematics piping diagrams (P & IDs)
can be passed on to piping designs by re-exporting an XML file from the
piping diagram once changes have been made to the diagram.
Piping Design: To maintain design integrity, the updated XML file can be
imported to the piping design.
This can be achieved by updating the designated information such as
pipelines, equipment, and fittings.
A schematic consistency check can then be performed. This compares the
2-D and 3-D data and identifies differences such as pipeline segments
and fittings.
It is then possible to update the piping design. This can involve modifying
pipeline segments, rerouting pipelines to different locations, and replacing
inserted fittings.

2012 PTC

Module 16 | Page 17

PROCEDURE - Updating Piping Designs from Creo


Schematics
Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Schematic_Update
Task 1:

RSD_UPDATE.ASM

Import updated schematic data and designate components.

1. Disable all Datum Display types.


2. Load piping-specific configuration options.
Click File > Options from the main menu.
Click Configuration Editor from the Creo Parametric Options
window.
Select Import configuration file from the Import/Export drop-down
menu.

.
Click Working Directory
Select PIPING_CONFIG.PRO and click Open.
Click OK in the Creo Parametric Options window.
Click No in the Creo Parametric Options window.

3. In the ribbon, select the


Applications tab.
4. Click Piping
from the
Engineering group.
5. Click Piping System Views
in the model tree.
If necessary, click Pipeline
View to de-select the option in
the drop-down list.
6. Right-click WATER-LEG-1.ASM
in the model tree and select
Activate.
Expand WATER-LEG-1.ASM
in the model tree.
Notice the two reducer fittings
in the model tree, as shown.

Module 16 | Page 18

2012 PTC

7. Click Designation
from the
Pipeline group.
Select the pipeline segment
between the two reducers.
Click Open
in the Pipeline
Designation dialog box.
Click Working Directory
.
Select NEW_REDUCERS.
XML and click Open.
The new_reducers.xml file contains schematic information that
does not match with the two reducer fittings currently inserted in the
pipeline. See the schematic diagram below.

8. Select the Equipment tab.


Notice that both components
are designated and auto
matched, as shown.
9. Select the Fittings tab.
Notice that both reducer
components are not
designated and that their
status is missing, as shown.
The existing reducers need to
be replaced with reducers of
the correct size.
10. Click Info > Designation Info in the Pipeline Designation dialog box.
Notice that the two connectors are listed as missing in the
information window, as shown.
Click Close in the information window.
in the Pipeline Designation dialog
Click Store Designation Info
box.

2012 PTC

Module 16 | Page 19

Task 2:

Replace the current reducers in the pipeline with new reducers.

1. Select the first reducer in the


pipeline, as shown.
Right-click and select
Replace.
Select the XML File check box
in the Replace Fitting Dialog
box, as shown.
Notice that the New size
text box updates to 100A
automatically. This information
is being read from the
new_reducers.xml file.
Click OK to replace the first
reducer.
2. Notice that you then zoom in
to the second reducer in the
pipeline, as shown.
Click OK in the Modify Fitting
dialog box to replace the
second reducer fitting.
Notice that both reducers have
been replaced in the model
tree, as shown.

This completes the procedure.

Module 16 | Page 20

2012 PTC

Module

17

Using ISOGEN PCF Data


Module Overview
You can export Isometric Drawing Generation (ISOGEN) PCF data from
within Creo Parametric piping designs. This data can be used as an input
to ISOGEN applications for the automatic creation of pipeline, spool, and
system isometric drawings.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to:
Create ISOGEN PCF files for use with ISOGEN applications.
Review DXF files created by an ISOGEN application.

2012 PTC

Module 17 | Page 1

Creating ISOGEN PCF Data


You can create ISOGEN PCF data that can be used as an input
to ISOGEN applications for the automatic creation of pipeline,
spool, and system isometric drawings.
ISOGEN Output
PCF Data
ISOGEN Applications
Automatic isometric drawings
Isometric Drawing Types
Pipeline
Spool
System

Figure 1 ISOGEN PCF File in


3rd Party Application

Configuration Options
Configure PCF output

Figure 2 Imported DXF File

Creating ISOGEN PCF Data


The Isometric Drawing Generation (ISOGEN) interface exports material and
geometrical data from piping designs to create ISOGEN PCF data. This data
can be used as an input to ISOGEN applications for the automatic creation of
pipeline, spool, and system isometric drawings.
The following Isometric drawing types can be created:
Pipeline Generates a pipeline isometric for each selected pipeline. A
separate PCF file is created for each selected pipeline.
Spool Generates a spool isometric for each selected pipeline. A separate
PCF file containing spool data is created for each selected pipeline.
System Generates a system isometric for each selected pipeline system.
For each selected pipeline, the data for connected pipelines is exported to
a PCF file.
A number of configuration options can be used to configure the PCF data
output, including:
Module 17 | Page 2

2012 PTC

isogen_attribute_map_file Specifies a path and name for the file that


maps Creo Piping attributes or parameters to the ISOGEN user-definable
attributes.
isogen_endtype_map_file Specifies a path and name for the file that
maps Creo Piping endtypes with ISOGEN endtypes.
isogen_mandatory_attr_file Specifies a name for the file that contains
ISOGEN mandatory attribute files.
isogen_nominal_size_map_file Specifies a path and name for the file
that maps Creo Piping sizes with ISOGEN nominal sizes in millimeters
and inches.
isogen_output_files_dir Specify a directory path for archiving ISOGEN
output files.
isogen_pcf_filename_format Specify a name format for ISOGEN PCF
files, for example water-1001-is.pcf.
isogen_symbol_map_file Specify a path and name for the file that maps
Creo Piping fitting library part names with ISOGEN component names
and symbol keys (SKEY).

2012 PTC

Module 17 | Page 3

PROCEDURE - Creating ISOGEN PCF Data


Close Window

Erase Not Displayed

Piping\Isogen
Task 1:

ISOGEN.ASM

Generate a PCF file for use with ISOGEN applications.

1. Enable only the following Datum Display types:

2. In the ribbon, select the Applications tab.


3. Select Piping from the Engineering group.
4. Click File > Options.
5. The Creo Parametric Options window appears. Do the following:
Click Configuration Editor.
Select Import configuration file from the Import/Export drop-down
menu.
Click Working Directory
.
Select ISOGEN.PRO and click Open.
The options contained within the isogen.pro file are used
when exporting PCF files.
Click OK, then click No.
6. Click Piping System Views
in the model tree.
If necessary, click Pipeline View to clear the option in the
drop-down list.
7. Select WATER-LEG-1.ASM in the model tree, right-click, and select
Activate.
8. In the ribbon, click Drawing
from the Fabrication group.
9. Select the first pipeline segment
on the model, as shown.
Notice the options in the
Generate Isometric dialog
box, as shown. These have
been read from the isogen.pro
configuration file.
Click OK.

Module 17 | Page 4

2012 PTC

10. Click Generate PCF File

11. Observe the message that displays in the message area, indicating
that the Generate Isometric task has completed successfully.
The PCF file can be used for automatic piping isometric
generation (ISOGEN). The results of using this PCF file in a third
party ISOGEN application display as shown.

Task 2:

Import an example DXF file into a drawing.

1. Click Open
from the Quick Access toolbar.
Select the ISOGEN.DRW drawing and click Open.
2. If necessary, click the flyout arrow in the Insert group.
3. Select Import Drawing/Data
menu.

from the Insert group drop-down

4. If necessary, select All Files (*) from the Type drop-down list.
5. Select ISOGEN.DXF and click Open

2012 PTC

Module 17 | Page 5

6. The Import DXF dialog box


appears. Do the following:
Select the Properties tab.
Click the Creo Parametric
button.
Notice that the Colors tab
updates, as shown.
Click OK.
When prompted, click Yes to
scale the drawing to fit the
format.

7. Notice the content of the drawing, as shown.


This particular drawing was generated as a Check style drawing
in the third party application.

This completes the procedure.

Module 17 | Page 6

2012 PTC

Copyright
Piping using Creo Parametric 2.0
Copyright 2012 Parametric Technology Corporation and/or Its Subsidiary Companies.
All Rights Reserved.
User and training guides and related documentation from Parametric Technology Corporation and its subsidiary companies (collectively
"PTC") are subject to the copyright laws of the United States and other countries and are provided under a license agreement that restricts
copying, disclosure, and use of such documentation. PTC hereby grants to the licensed software user the right to make copies in printed form
of this documentation if provided on software media, but only for internal/personal use and in accordance with the license agreement under
which the applicable software is licensed. Any copy made shall include the PTC copyright notice and any other proprietary notice provided by
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modified, or reduced to any form, including electronic media, or transmitted or made publicly available by any means without the prior written
consent of PTC and no authorization is granted to make copies for such purposes.
Information described herein is furnished for general information only, is subject to change without notice, and should not be construed as a
warranty or commitment by PTC. PTC assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this document.
The software described in this document is provided under written license agreement, contains valuable trade secrets and proprietary
information, and is protected by the copyright laws of the United States and other countries. It may not be copied or distributed in any form
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UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED RIGHTS LEGEND
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Parametric Technology Corporation, 140 Kendrick Street, Needham, MA 02494 USA

PRINTING HISTORY
Document No.
T3910-390-01

Date

Description

05/22/2012

Initial Printing of:


Piping using Creo Parametric 2.0

Order Number DT-T3910-390-01


Printed in the U.S.A