Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 128

THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY

SPECIAL
COUNTRY
HOUSE
ISSUE

Easy
Chc

ALL-AMERICAN
DECORATING

JULY 2O16

07.2016

A house that architect


Steve Mensch designed
for himself and his
partner, Greg Patnaude,
in Rhinebeck, New York.

FEATURES
52 MAINE CHANCE

A family of six revels in a fresh


summer retreat on the Pine
Tree States romantic shoreline.
By Kathleen Hackett
Architecture by
Cole & Cole Architects
Interiors by Suzanne Kasler Interiors

64 MALIBU REVIVAL

One of architect John Lautners


legendarily mod houses undergoes
a sensitiveand sensational
renovation. By Mayer Rus
Architecture by Kovac Design Studio
Interiors by Waldos Designs

74 AMERICAN BEAUTY

90
84 WAVE LENGTH

90 CRYSTAL CLEAR

In New Yorks Hudson Valley,


an inventive architect downsizes
from a rambling compound
to an airy glass-walled box.
By Vicky Lowry
Architecture and interiors by
Steve Mensch

98 FAMILY AFFAIR

Kicky patterns offset soothing hues


in the Hamptons vacation
home of Coach chairman emeritus
Lew Frankfort and his clan.

A tour of the lovingly maintained


Mulberry Plantation, an antebellum
masterpiece in South Carolina.

By Brad Goldfarb
Architecture by Historical Concepts
Interiors by S. R. Gambrel Inc.

By Howard Christian
Interiors by Mark Hampton LLC

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 10)

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

VOLUME 73 NUMBER 7

Looking to make a splash? Dive into


ADs sparkling parade of stylish
pools from around the world and get
inspired. By Vicky Lowry

Cover: The screened porch of a


coastal getaway in New England.
Maine Chance, page 52.
Photography by William Waldron;
produced by Howard Christian.

PIETER ESTERSOHN

CONTENTS

CONTENTS

98

74
26

28

40
Clockwise from top left: A Hamptons kitchen by Steven
Gambrel. Live oaks at South Carolinas Mulberry Plantation.
Seaside swimming on Italys dramatically beautiful
Salento peninsula. A Michael S. Smith daybed for Brown
Jordan. A porcelain soup plate by Richard Ginori.

A Hong Kong couple finds peace


in an ultramodern villa in Colorados
Elk Mountains. By Stephen Wallis

Architecture by
Studio B Architecture + Interiors
Interiors by
Shawn Henderson Interior Design

DEPARTMENTS
21 DISCOVERIES

The best in design, culture, and style

26 DEBUT: OUTSIDE INTERESTS


Michael S. Smith creates alfresco
furnishings for Brown Jordan.
By Vicky Lowry

28 SHOPPING
Produced by Parker Bowie Larson

10

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

40 TRAVELS:
SOUTHERN ITALY

Discover the glories of the Salento


peninsula, Italys under-the-radar
treasure where savvy jetsetters meet architecture of old.
By Maria Shollenbarger

44 ESTATES: ON THE MARKET

IN EVERY ISSUE
12 ARCHDIGEST.COM EXCLUSIVES
16 EDITORS PAGE By Margaret Russell
18 FEEDBACK
120 SOURCES The designers, architects,
and products featured this month.
By Julie Daniels

Houses worth dreaming about.


By Geoffrey Montes

122 ENCORE

In the 1980s, garden designer Paolo


Pejrone planted a paean to green at
Giancarlo Giammettis Tuscan villa.
By Mitchell Owens

SUBSCRIPTIONS
For subscription information
go to archdigest.com,
call 800-365-8032, or email
subscriptions@archdigest.com.
Download ADs digital edition at
archdigest.com/app. To sign up
for ADs daily newsletter, go to
archdigest.com/newsletter.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ERIC PIASECKI; PIETER ESTERSOHN;


MASSIMO VITALI; TREVOR TONDRO; STUART TYSON

112 NATURAL HIGH

ONLINE

Head to the Web for more great

homes, discoveries, and resources

OUT AND ABOUT


With summer in full swing, theres no better place to enjoy art
than out in the open. Dont miss our list of outdoor exhibitions
and installations around the world. archdigest.com/outdoorart
Above: An installation by Ugo Rondinone near Las Vegas.

S TAY I N G
PRESENT

Our favorite
designers and
tastemakers
shared their
go-to summer
hostess gifts
take a look at
their picks to
find the perfect
something to
show your
appreciation.
archdigest.com/
hostessgifts

L I K E U S O N FA C E B O O K

D A Z Z L I N G D I S P L AY
In honor of Independence Day, weve
rounded up some of the best spots to see
fireworks across the countryfrom the
slopes of Aspen to Nashvilles riverfront.
archdigest.com/fireworks
Above: Vibrant pyrotechnics light up
the Aspen sky every July 4th.

facebook.com/architecturaldigest

TWEET WITH US ON TWITTER


@archdigest

PIN WITH US ON PINTEREST


pinterest.com/archdigest

F O L L O W U S O N I N S TA G R A M
@archdigest

FROM TOP: GIANFRANCO GORGONI/COURTESY OF


ART PRODUCTION FUND AND NEVADA MUSEUM OF
ART; COURTESY OF MIRAVAL; C2 PHOTOGRAPHY

Right: A bottle
of Miraval ros.

THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY VOLUME 73 NUMBER 7


EDITOR IN CHIEF

PUBLISHER, CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER

Margaret Russell

Giulio Capua

executive editor

art director

managing editor

Shax Riegler

Ann Marie Mennillo

Laurie Sprague

design
projects editor

decorative arts
& antiques editor

Jacqueline Terrebonne

Mitchell Owens

editorial projects
director

Vicky Lowry

digital director

Erica Duecy

Features
west coast editor Mayer Rus
features editor Sam Cochran
associate editors Lacy Morris, Susan Sedman,

Leslie Anne Wiggins


assistant editor Geoffrey Montes
Market
style editor Parker Bowie Larson
associate market editor Hadley Keller
assistant editor Julie Daniels
Art
associate art director Neal Phiefer
senior designer Danlly Domingo
art assistant Megan Spengler
art production director Karrie Cornell
production manager Michele Tymann
Photo
photo director Michael Shome
associate editor Lyne Lucien
Copy and Research
deputy editor, copy Kate Hambrecht
copy editor Kimberly Peterson
research chief Andrew Gillings
archdigest.com
deputy editor, digital Kristen Flanagan
home editor, digital Jennifer Fernandez
senior design reporter Hannah Martin
senior associate editor, digital Lindsey Mather
associate editor, digital Nick Ma
assistant editor, digital Stefanie Waldek
photo editor, digital Melissa Maria
photographer/videographer Genevieve Garruppo
associate product manager Amy Liebster
producer Laura Ratliff
social media manager Lindsey DeSimone
copy chief, digital Kelly Borgeson
research editor, digital Pearly Huang
editorial assistant, digital Melissa Minton
executive assistant to the editor in chief
editorial coordinator
editorial development manager
contributing interiors editor
contributing international projects editor

Madeline OMalley
Nick Traverse
Alison Levasseur
Anita Sarsidi
Carlos Mota

public relations director Dylan Edwards


public relations consultant Mary Wible Vertin
special projects editors

Brad Goldfarb, Lee F. Mindel, Carolyne Roehm, Hal Rubenstein,


Nathan Turner, Bronson van Wyck
contributing editors at large David Colman, Jeffrey Slonim, Carlos Souza
contributing style editors Carolina Irving, Michael Reynolds
contributing art & architecture editor Elizabeth Sverbeyeff Byron
contributing editors

Matt Berman, R. Louis Bofferding, Rebecca Bond, Muriel Brandolini, Simon Doonan,
Neely Barnwell Dykshorn, Miguel Flores-Vianna, Jamee Gregory, Jeff Klein,
Reed Krakoff, Richard Lambertson, Viscount Linley, Art Luna,
Natalie Massenet, Martha McCully, Anne Monoky, Lars Nilsson, Allison Sarom,
Steven Stolman, Mish Tworkowski, Stephen Wallis, Stephen Werther,
Katherine Whiteside, Vicente Wolf, William Yeoward, John Yunis, Zez
contributing photographers

Tim Beddow, Roger Davies, Pieter Estersohn, Scott Frances, Oberto Gili, Franois Halard,
Nikolas Koenig, Joshua McHugh, Ngoc Minh Ngo, Derry Moore, Michael Moran, Art Streiber,
William Waldron, Bjrn Wallander, Paul Warchol, Simon Watson, Firooz Zahedi
editor emeritus Paige Rense Noland
artistic director

Anna Wintour

subscriptions
If you are moving or renewing or have a question about your subscription, please visit
archdigest.com/customerservice, email subscriptions@archdigest.com, call 800-365-8032,
or write to Architectural Digest, P.O. Box 37641, Boone, IA 50037-0641. Please allow
8 weeks for a change of address and include your subscription label for faster service.
Direct any nonsubscription correspondence to the editorial office.
International editions of Architectural Digest are published in the following regions:
China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Mexico, Middle East, Russia, and Spain.
Those submitting manuscripts, photographs, artwork, or other materials to
Architectural Digest for consideration should not send originals unless specifically requested
to do so by Architectural Digest in writing. Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs,
and other submitted materials will not be returned. Editorial and New York advertising offices:
1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007; 212-286-2860.

associate publisher

Susan Keena

associate publisher,
integrated marketing

Caitlin Murphy

executive director,
business & digital operations

advertising director

William Pittel

Kevin T. Kunis
executive director,
strategic branding & insights

executive director, integrated


marketing & digital strategy

Barri Trott

Shelly Johnson

Advertising
luxury goods director Pat McGirl
integrated sales director Priya Nat
fashion director & digital strategist Kathryn Nave
senior account executives Nina B. Brogna, Wendy Gardner Landau
senior account director Alexandru Sinclair
home furnishings & new england Meghan Garlich
senior business director Jennifer Crescitelli
business analyst Ting Wang
sales planning analyst Emma Maybury
executive assistant to the publisher Michelle Elezovic
advertising coordinator Shay Myrick
advertising assistants Sarah Bergeron, Eden Moscone,

Rebecca Park, Jennifer Peterson, Jack Tippett


Integrated Marketing
integrated marketing director Amanda Thornquist
strategic branding & events director Jeffrey C. Caldwell
integrated design director Kathleen Manstream
art director Marisa Ehrhardt
senior marketing manager Jamie Bruno
senior manager, integrated marketing Matthew Hare
integrated marketing managers Caroline Luppescu, Arisara Srisethnil
associate marketing manager Jay Salasko
strategic branding & events manager Nicole Pawson
marketing associate Caroline Stenbeck
Branch Ofces
los angeles director Ruth Tooker 323-965-3772
los angeles account manager Law Chambers 323-965-3774
san francisco director Kelly L. Givas 415-781-1888
midwest director Ashley Connor 312-649-3512
detroit director Mike Ienna 248-458-7957
southeast director Donna Jernigan 404-812-5392
orida Peter Zuckerman, z media 305-532-5566

Esther Jackson, mds inc. 305-373-3700


southwest Ellen Lewis, lewis stafford co. 972-960-2889
hawaii Loren Malenchek,
canada
united kingdom/france
france/switzerland
italy

malenchek & associates llc 808-283-7122


Lori Dodd, dodd media group 905-885-0664
Juliet Fetherstonhaugh +44-20-7349-7111
Sylvie Durlach, s&r media +33-1-44-18-06-62
MIA s.r.l. Concessionaria Editoriale
+39-02-805-1422

PUBLISHED BY COND NAST

chairman emeritus
chairman
president & chief executive ofcer
chief nancial ofcer
chief marketing ofcer & president,
cond nast media group
chief administrative ofcer

S.I. Newhouse Jr.


Charles H. Townsend
Robert A. Sauerberg Jr.
David E. Geithner
Edward J. Menicheschi
Jill Bright

evp & chief digital ofcer


evp, consumer marketing
evp, human resources
evp, corporate communications

Fred Santarpia
Monica Ray
JoAnn Murray
Cameron Blanchard

svp, business operations


svp, corporate controller
svp, managing director, 23 stories
svp, network sales & partnerships,
cond nast & chief revenue ofcer, cn
svp, nancial planning & analysis
svp, strategy, 23 stories
svp, ad tech
svp, licensing
svp, research & analytics
svp, digital operations

David Orlin
David B. Chemidlin
Josh Stinchcomb
Lisa Valentino
Suzanne Reinhardt
Padraig Connolly
David Adams
Cathy Hoffman Glosser
Stephanie Fried
Larry Baach

COND NAST ENTERTAINMENT

president
evp/general manager, digital video
evp & chief operating ofcer
evp, motion pictures
evp, programming & content strategy,
digital channels
evp, alternative tv
evp, cn studios
svp, marketing & partner management

Dawn Ostroff
Joy Marcus
Sahar Elhabashi
Jeremy Steckler
Michael Klein
Joe LaBracio
Al Edgington
Teal Newland

COND NAST INTERNATIONAL

chairman & chief executive Jonathan Newhouse


president Nicholas Coleridge
Cond Nast is a global media company producing premium content for more than
263 million consumers in 30 markets.
condenast.com
condenastinternational.com

E DI TOR S PAG E

n the dizzying world of real estate, one mans dream house is another
mans teardown. At least thats often the case, whether youre talking
about a modest Craftsman-style bungalow in a Midwestern suburb
or architect Bruce Goffs fabled Bavinger project in Oklahoma, an
award-winning modernist masterpiece that was recently demolished.
This issue of Architectural Digest, though, features a homeowner who
took an inspiringly different tack.
The owner, a Hong Kongbased businessman, had purchased a glorious
mountain parcel in Colorado, complete with a log cabin whose rugged looks
were a far cry from the sleek, low-slung house of his dreams. But
instead of reducing the unwanted building to a pile of kindling
destined for the nearest landll, he donated it to Habitat for
Humanity to be repurposed elsewhere. This cabin, which some
people would have bulldozed, now has a second lifeand today
its rooms are fostering new memories.
Habitat for Humanity (habitat.org) accepts not only houses
but also land, building materials, appliances, and even furniture and cars, all with the goal of providing low-income
men, women, and childrennearly seven million people and
countingwith more than just a roof over their heads. It offers
them what we all want and need: a place to live, a place to love, a place where
they can be the best they can be. In short, a home.
For nearly six years Architectural Digest has been my home, but I am now
moving on to other projects. My friend and colleague Amy Astley, former editor
in chief of Teen Vogue, will lead this venerable brand. All my thanks to my exceptional team and to youour readers and design talentsfor what has been a
truly remarkable experience.

MARGARET RUSSELL, Editor in Chief


Instagram: @margaretrussell

16

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

FROM TOP: GREEN EYES AERO; PIETER ESTERSOHN; COURTESY OF J. PAUL GETTY
TRUST/GETTY RESEARCH INSTITUTE, LOS ANGELES; SEAN ZANNI/PMC

From top: South Carolinas


antebellum Mulberry
Plantation, which we are
thrilled to feature this
month. The estates
historical marker. An
archival photo of a
recently updated John
Lautnerdesigned Malibu
house, also profiled in
this issue. Todd Merrill
with me at the opening
of his new Manhattan
furnishings showroom.

F E E D B AC K
H I S T O R I C I M PA C T
I was delighted to see a page devoted
to the Royal Tapestry Factory in
Madrid [Artisan, May], where I have
been a part-time resident. As a
designer, I have brought clients to this
wonderful establishment to craft
rugs that are one-of-a-kind treasures,
and as an author, I have included it
in a recent book. Your readers would
definitely enjoy the factorys own
book from a few years ago, Real
Fbrica de Tapices: A Living History,
which details their 300 years of
incredible creativity.
jody brotherston, Denver
The May cover.

PA G E - T U R N E R
Ive been reading Architectural Digest
for decades and always loved it.
(I have hundreds of clippings to prove
it!) But I must say the May issue
is the most outstanding: beautiful and
inspiring homes, travel, and thoughts.
I have rendered the issue into a
great many tear sheets! Thank you!

JUST THE RIGHT TO UCH


I am in ecstasy over your April story
featuring the magnificent Long Island
estate of Delphine and Reed Krakoff
[Hampton Classic]. I adore the fact
that they respected the aesthetic of the
historic Bouvier home, ensuring that
it looks as though they did nothing
when actually they freshened it entirely
while retaining its vintage spirit. That

Tiffany light fixture in the entrance


hall is jaw-droppingly gorgeous,
and the master bedroom is exquisitely
serene. And I love that you included
a montage of furnishings along with
family photos and architectural
drawingssheer perfection. I can just
feel the sun, hear the birds outside,
and catch the faint scent of aged
wood inside. Thank you for allowing
me to bask in this glorious place.
jan kyle
West Palm Beach, Florida

A G I N G G R A C E F U L LY
I never write in to magazines, but this
time I have to. Thank you for the
Encore column! What a tribute to truly
well-done decorating and to those
of us who love to choose well instead
of often. I havent redecorated my
living room in 20 years and I still love
it, and so do those who see it for
the first time. Many things were learned
from decades of reading AD.
gail hallie
Roseau, Minnesota

maureen egen, New York City

B U I LT - I N A U D I E N C E
ADs daily email newsletter is a welcome
bonus to my subscription. I enjoyed
todays roundup, which included the
story Genius Built-in Furniture Ideas.
I appreciate solutions like those featured;
they remind me of a bed I created
that has drawers in the footboard.
a. a. dunham

I N S TA G R A M
COMMENTS
Clearly blue is the new black.
@lufthouse
Just inspired some book
reading!
@spchomes
Adore the Yves Klein coffee
tablea true masterpiece!!
@pattydjaninteriors
Bookshelf goals.
@rach_silv

D O U B L E TA K E
How very odd to open the May issue
and see the same blue cocktail table
by Yves Klein in both Fiona Koturs
Hong Kong home [In the Bag] and
in the London townhouse of Kathryn
and Milos Brajovic [Living Large].
Regardless, I did love seeing the
Brajovic familys dog, Duke! Boxers are
sweet dogs with such expressive eyes.
sharon miller
Newport, North Carolina

18

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

Love how the colors work together and brass accents.


@livinlarch
Really love the combination of
blue tones!
@thevictoriashtainerteam

The library in Fiona Koturs


Hong Kong home (In the Bag, May),
which she decorated herself.

Oh so lovely.
@13.maja
Great-looking library.
@improvementsfor.yourhome

We welcome your comments and suggestions. Contact us via email at letters@archdigest.com


or by mail at Letters, Architectural Digest, 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. Please
include your name and city. Correspondence may be edited for length, clarity, and style and may
be published or otherwise reused in any medium.

FROM TOP: RICHARD POWERS; SIMON UPTON

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

T H E B E S T I N D E S I G N, C U LT U R E, A N D S T Y L E

SHOPS

GROOMING BY MARY GUTHRIE @ ABTP

MOVER AND SHAKER


For tastemaking Manhattan design dealer Todd Merrill, relocating to a 100-year-old storefront in Tribeca has required
the patience of an archaeologist. There were surprises at every
turn, he says of his renovation of the space, which was formerly
occupied by a massage parlor and a check-cashing business. Over
the decades partitions had been added, windows covered up,
and not one but two drop ceilings installed, concealing a jungle
of electrical and mechanical systems. Merrill peeled it all back.
The result, unveiled in May, is an airy sun-drenched gallery with
P O RT R A I T BY J O S H U A M C H U G H

20-foot ceilings and a total of 4,000 square feetmore than double that of Merrills previous outpost. Theres now ample breathing room for his dynamic mix of vintage and contemporary
treasures. Were in this gray area between art and design, says
Merrill (photographed next to a chair by cutting-edge woodworking atelier Yard Sale Project and a ceramic wall sculpture by
Molly Hatch). As the dealer explains, Im always on the hunt for
the Paul Evans and George Nakashima of today. At 80 Lafayette
St., New York, NY; toddmerrillstudio.com TIM MCKEOUGH
A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

21

D I S C OV E R I E S
SHOPS

Bright Idea
Driving past stylesetter Alexandra von
Furstenbergs new flagship store in West
Hollywood, one cant help but notice her signature acrylic tables and home accessoriesthey
sparkle like vibrant bijoux set in a modernist
vitrine. Its no accident. Von Furstenberg credits her husband, architectural designer Dax
Miller, with lighting the boutique as if it were
a jewelry shop (specifically, using a trifecta
of LED, fluorescent, and incandescent fixtures). Dax provided the perfect shell, clean
and crisp, and I provided the products, Von
Furstenberg says. I think we make a pretty
good team. At 300 N. Robertson Blvd., West
Hollywood, CA; avfhome.com MAYER RUS

Leos Oyster
Bar, a new
San Francisco
restaurant
with a hidden
lounge.

R E S TA U R A N T S

Alexandra von
Furstenberg in her
brands new West
Hollywood flagship.

Its as if Don Draper and Betsy Bloomingdale had a baby, jokes Ken Fulk,
describing the decor he and fellow designer Jon de la Cruz devised for the new
San Francisco hot spot Leos Oyster Bar (the latest from restaurateurs Anna
Weinberg, James Nicholas, and Jennifer Puccio). Think 1950s Beverly Hills
meets Manhattan club. Bespoke botanical wallpaper, rattan furnishings, and
brass light fixtures serve as an exuberant backdrop to the menu of seafood
specialties and island-inspired drinks. And just past the kitchen lies the Hideaway,
an unmarked lounge and courtyard offering Champagne cocktails and bowls of
punch, among other group libations. The space feels unapologetically nostalgic
and glamorous, Fulk says, adding mischievously, Its the perfect place to start
an affair. At 568 Sacramento St., San Francisco, CA; leossf.com LACY MORRIS

EXHIBITIONS

Georgia on My Mind
To help herald its glittering pyramidal extension by Herzog &
de Meuron, Londons Tate Modern museum will kick off
summer with a blockbuster survey of iconic Georgia OKeeffe
paintings. More than 100 works created over six decades
show the range of the 20th-century artists inquisitive eye
from moody cityscapes to blue-sky Western vistas to those
dreamy flower portraits, including Jimson Weed/White Flower
No. 1, the 1932 stunner that garnered $44.4 million at
auction in 2014. July 6October 30; tate.org.uk VICKY LOWRY
From near right: Georgia OKeeffes Grey Lines with Black, Blue
and Yellow, circa 1923, and Abstraction White Rose, 1927.

22

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

FROM TOP: DOUGL AS FRIEDMAN; SAM FROST; COURTESY OF THE GEORGIA OKEEFFE MUSEUM/DACS, LONDON (2)

OPEN SECRET

D I S C OV E R I E S

S H O W RO O M S

Labor of Love
Little did Dimonah and Mehmet Iksel
know when they first met in the late 1980s
that what began as a coup de foudre
would blossom into a full-fledged global
design empire. This spring the couples
studio, Iksel-Decorative Arts, continued its
expansion with the opening of its first
public showroom, situated in Londons
Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour. There,
the husband and wife display their eyepopping collection of scenic and architectural wallpapers, each inspired by
preindustrial arts and crafts (from Iznik
botanicals to Roman mosaics). New
to their mix of offerings, meanwhile,
is a line of fabrics influenced by historic
Indian and Ottoman textiles. iksel.com
MIGUEL FLORES-VIANNA

24

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

From top: Exotic patterns fill the


new London showroom of IkselDecorative Arts. Hindustan, one of
the firms scenic wallpapers.

. . . that guests at the newly revitalized Ritz Paris hotel can unwind
in the first-ever Chanel spa . . . that
on July 8 the National Museum
of Scotland will debut ten new
galleriesdisplaying more than 3,000
treasures, among them Charles
Rennie Mackintosh furnishings and
Picasso glassworkas part of the
completed restoration of the 1880s
Edinburgh building . . . that the World
Monuments Fund and Beijings
Palace Museum expect the longshuttered Qianlong emperors private
garden complexa magical, nearly
two-acre retreat currently being
rehabbedto welcome visitors in
2020, in time for the Forbidden
Citys 600th anniversary . . . that the
Vanderbilt family mausoleum,
a Romanesque masterpiece by architect Richard Morris Hunt in Staten
Islands Moravian Cemetery, has been
afforded New York City landmark
protection . . . that Chicago-based
furnishings emporium Jayson Home
has set up a seasonal Sag Harbor,
New York, pop-up shop, open through
September . . . that when budgetary
constraints kept Quinlan & Francis
Terry Architects from installing
towering Corinthian pilasters on the
back side of its new neoclassical apartment building Strathmore House
in Poundbury, England, the firm
painted the details in cunning trompe
loeil . . . that landscape-design studio
James Corner Field Operations (of
High Line fame) is filling the Great
Hall at Washington, D.C.s National
Building Museum with an immersive
installation inspired by underwater
glaciers, debuting July 2 . . . that
AD100 designer Jacques Garcia is
transforming an erstwhile Baptistchurch headquarters in London
into a boutique hotel . . . that star
New Orleans chef John Besh is
on track to launch a whopping three
restaurants in Nashville this fall.
MITCHELL OWENS

MIGUEL FLORES-VIANNA

AD
HEARS . . .

D I S C OV E R I E S
Clockwise from bottom left: Interior designer
Michael S. Smith with pieces from his
new outdoor furniture collections for Brown
Jordan. A sofa from his faux-bois Arbre
line. The Arbre tagre. His Deia line includes
this lounge chair, shown cushioned
in an awning-stripe Sunbrella fabric.

DEBUT

OUTSIDE INTERESTS

With his first designs for Brown Jordan, Michael S. Smith


brings a new level of chic to alfresco furniture

ichael S. Smith has designed


everything from the interiors
of the White House to
kitchen sinks, but the Los
Angeles tastemaker had never tackled
outdoor furniture. When he went
in search of some for his own use,
he remembers thinking, If I want something special, others must, too. Now
Smith has teamed with Brown Jordan,
the venerable American company
that has been cosseting sunbathers
for seven decades, to launch not one
but three furniture collections that
put the emphasis on alfresco pleasure.

26

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

I love the romance of outdoor


furniture, says Smith, who grew up in
California, where Brown Jordan
was everywhere. The idea of working
with a brand that made something
familiar, comfortable, and of amazing
quality really appealed to me.
The first two collections, available
now, are called Deia and Arbre. The latter
(French for tree) offers a sculptural
riff on traditional faux bois, with handlathed branches forming the frames
of ten pieces, among them a sofa, lounge
chair, bench, and tagre. Fine finishes
lend extra personality. A blue-green
patina conjures antique garden
furniture (perfect for the Hamptons,
Smith says) while gilding exudes what
he calls a witty surrealist quality.

Deia, on the other hand, is based on


the peripatetic designers excursions to a
favorite village in Majorca, Spain. The
eight-piece group features clean neoclassical lines with a 1940s Italian vibe. Its
very California, he says, or anywhere
with a Mediterranean climate. The
standout item is a sumptuous daybed
fitted with cushions that, as with all
the seating in the collections, are covered
in serenely hued Sunbrella fabrics. It
positively beckons a siesta.
This was about creating instant
classics, explains Smith, who will
debut his third Brown Jordan range
a series with Chippendale vibesthis
summer. I wanted everything to have
beautiful lines yet be truly comfortable.
brownjordan.com VICKY LOWRY

P H O T O G R A P H Y BY T R E V O R T O N D R O

D I S C OV E R I E S

SHOPPING

MOST WANTED

From simple pleasures to ultimate luxuries


PRODUCED BY PARKER BOWIE LAR S ON



Vivienne Westwoods
Thistle carpet for the Rug
Company nods to the
floral emblem of Scotland. The
silk-and-wool rug comes in gold
(shown) and pewter colorways;
$10,422 for a 6' x 9' size. therugcompany.com, 212-274-0444




AD100 designer Jean-Louis


Deniots debut collection
for Baker includes the
ethereal 42"-dia. Tourmaline convex mirror in acrylic, brass,
and steel ($4,495) and the smartly
tailored 26"-tall Sodalite brass
table lamp ($1,491). bakerfurniture.com, 800-592-2537



Mesedia, Versaces first


outdoor chair, renders
the companys signature
Medusa head in a seductive
aluminum-fretwork design. It
measures 27" w. x 22" d. x 34" h.
and comes in five hues (haze is
shown); price upon request.
us.versace.com, 888-721-7219




28

Contemporary meets retro


in the sprightly Cubic alarm
clock by Newgate Clocks.
The 4"-sq. timepiece, pictured
in orange, is also offered in limegreen or gray and costs $40
through Burke Decor. burkedecor.com, 888-338-8111

RUG: COURTESY OF THE RUG COMPANY; CART: COURTESY OF KRAVET; MIRROR AND L AMP:
STUART TYSON; CHAIR: COURTESY OF VERSACE; CLOCK: COURTESY OF NEWGATE CLOCKS

With its gracefully curved


gold-finished-iron frame
and glass shelves, the Eliza
bar cart by Jan Showers for
Kravet whispers elegance. The
34.75" l. x 18" w. x 32.5" h.
trolley is available to the trade.
kravet.com, 800-648-5728

D I S C OV E R I E S



Harry Winstons Emerald


watch, named for the classic
gemstone cut, features
a blue-lacquer face surrounded
by diamonds set in 18K white
gold. Its brilliant color recalls the
iconic Hope diamond, once
owned by the rms eponymous
founder; price upon request.
harrywinston.com, 800-988-4110






Alessandro Michele
looked to 18th-century
stencils when creating the
intricate motifs on his Babele
porcelain for Richard Ginori.
Shown, from left, are the service
plate ($110), dinner plate ($50),
and soup plate ($50) from the
comprehensive tableware collection; available through Gumps.
gumps.com, 415-982-1616




James Turrells 2013


Guggenheim light installation, Aten Reign, is
reproduced in a series of aquatints from Pace Prints. Shown is
the blue print for Suite from
Aten Reign, a three-piece set that
includes red and green versions.
Individual prints are also
offered; prices upon request.
paceprints.com, 212-421-3237



Christian Liaigre brings the


outdoors in with the Bruyre
stool, made entirely of chestnut branches. The 17.75" w. x 12.5"
d. x 17.75" h. seat costs $1,560.
christian-liaigre.us, 212-201-2338

HADLEY KELLER

30

WATCH: COURTESY OF HARRY WINSTON; PL ATES AND FABRICS: STUART TYSON;


PRINT: JAMES TURRELL /COURTESY OF PACE PRINTS; STOOL: PAUL ROBIDA



Graphic patterns radiate


Parisian chic in Hermss
inaugural line of outdoor
fabrics. From top are the designs
Pavage and Perspective Cavalire
Bayadre, the latter a stylized
amalgam of the letters in the fashion houses name; $420 per yard.
hermes.com, 800-441-4488

T R AV E L S

A PLACE IN
THE SUN
Italys Salento peninsula, an undiscovered
treasure in southern Puglia, seduces
with Baroque architecture, natural beauty,
and lifes simple pleasures

Bathers off the


shore of Otranto,
a city on Puglias
Salento peninsula,
at the very tip
of Italys heel.

40

MASSIMO VITALI

ndless travel fantasy fulfillment has long been an


Italian specialty. Think of the early-Renaissance glory
of Siena, Palermos exotic Moorish roots, and the
aqueous fever dream that is Venice. Increasingly
among these iconic destinations is Puglias Salento peninsula
far down in the stiletto tip of Italys boot, a region of windbuffeted plains, olive groves, and secret rocky beaches.
Puglia has always been a beautiful place, but it had
somehow been neglected, notes photographer Massimo
Vitali, who has scoured Salento, snapping dreamy images of
its jagged coastline. Miraculously, over the past decade, any
dark aspects have disappeared and the region has regained its
order. Witnessing this transition has been inspiring.
With natural splendor, captivating buildings, and great
food abounding, its no surprise that Salentos habitus
include a coterie of tastemakersfrom actress Helen Mirren
and her husband, filmmaker Taylor Hackford, who have a
home near the town of Tricase, to Martine Guerrand Herms
(of the French fashion family), who produces artisanal olive
oil at her farm in the countryside. Guerrand Herms was
introduced to Salento several years ago when a friend,
entrepreneur Fouad Filali, took her to Leccethe areas best
known cityon a holiday. I was immediately intrigued by its

T R AV E L S

Clockwise from above: A


market-lined street in Gallipoli,
a town on Salentos west coast.
The grounds at La Fiermontina
resort, in the city of Lecce.
Pugliese pasta at the Lo Scalo
beach club in Marina di Novaglie.
The sun-dappled terrace at
Otrantos LaltroBaffo restaurant.

astonishing architecture, she recalls,


referring to the many Baroque palazzi,
civic buildings, and churchesmost
notably the Basilica di Santa Croce.
(Its these structures that earned the city
the nickname Florence of the South.)
Clad in local limestone, their faades
capture the light magnificently. At noon
in summer, they blaze creamy white; by
late evening, they glow mellow pink.
The recent arrival of two boutique
hotels has only added to Lecces appeal.
Last year Filali opened La Fiermontina,
a 16-room resort set in a 17th-century
building whose vaulted ceilings and
pietra di Trani stone floors provide a
sophisticated backdrop to choice works
of art and design, including originals
by Fernand Lger and Charlotte Perriand.
On the outskirts of town, meanwhile, is
Masseria Trapan, a 1500s farmhouse
turned hotel. There, a vast contemporary
kitchen hosts cooking classes and acts

42

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

as a general gathering spot, as do the


walled gardens and chaise-lined pool.
Lecces modest dimensions (you can
stroll across the centro storico, or old city,
in about half an hour) make it blissfully
easy to explore. At the caf Doppiozero,
in the shadow of the towns duomo,
the genial staff makes afaultless caff in
ghiacciotheir local variation features
iced espresso with sweet almond milk.
Pasticceria Natale,a wonderland of
cakes and pastries, serves what might be
the best pistachio gelato south of Rome. An
alfresco table at Corte dei Pandolfi,
though, is the place to be on Saturday
afternoons; the salads and Puglian dishes
are a perfect light lunch. Right around the
corner is Society, a minimalist shop
offering bed and table linens in saturated
jewel tones. And, just outside the old city,
you wont want to miss the restaurant
Trattoria Cucina Casereccia, known as
Le Zie.Here youll find no Michelin stars,

no rigorous decoronly worn wood tables,


aged tile floors, and supremely delicious
cucina poverastandards like ciceri e tria, a
vibrant pasta dish with chickpeas.
South of Lecce lies the true heart of
Salento. Some 2,500 years ago the area
was a stronghold of Magna Graecia, and
despite the occasional stretch of breezeblock apartments, its landscape remains
ancient and timelessthe olive trees
more monumental than their Tuscan
counterparts, the sea an otherworldly mix
of blues. It seduced, among many others,
the late author, antiquarian, and politician
Alistair McAlpine, who, along with his
wife, Athena, transformed the 14thcentury Il Convento di Santa Maria di
Costantinopoli in Marittima di Diso into
a bed-and-breakfast filled with a stellar
collection of aboriginal art. At Tulsi Shop,
in the same town, designer Deborah
Nolan sells resortwear in exuberant colors
and floaty shapes inspired by her travels.

CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: STEFANO SCAT; COURTESY OF YLTOUR PR; MASSIMO VITALI; GREG ELMS; GIANNI CIPRIANO; KEN KOCHEY (2)

A swimming hole at the Roca


Vecchia archaeological site, outside Lecce. Right, from top: A
guest room at Il Convento di
Santa Maria di Costantinopoli,
a bed-and-breakfast in
Marittima di Diso. Lecces San
Giovanni Battista church.

Some five miles south, in Tricase,


esteemed winemaker Francesco
Winspearethe son of a Salentine
nobleman and an Austrian princess
mixes respect for local vintages with a
healthy dose of cool at the wine bar
Farmacia Balboa (co-owned by Taylor
Hackford). For supper, try the nearby
Ristorante Lem, where chef Ippazio
Turco gives traditional seafood recipes
an adventurous twist. Or head up the
coast to Otranto, where sublime fresh
fish and produce get contemporary
treatment in the airy restaurant
LaltroBaffo. Says Guerrand Herms,
In Otranto I can lose myself in the
white buildings and blue Adriaticplus
the Cattedrale di Otranto, with its
gorgeous 12th-century mosaic floors.
Beach-going is a Puglians birthright
and a visitors rite of passage. And
theres no shortage of small waterfront

SALENTO DETAILS
SHOPS
Society Via Arcivescovo Petronelli 9,
Lecce; epiphanysociety.com.
Tulsi Shop Via Armando Diaz 47,
Marittima di Diso; tulsishop.com.
RESTAURANTS AND CAFS
Corte dei Pandol Piazzetta Orsini,
Lecce; cortedeipandol.com.
Doppiozero Via Guglielmo Paladini 2,
Lecce; emporiodoppiozero.com.

clubs at which to do it in style. Lo


Scalo, in Marina di Novaglie, has stuck
to the same formula for four decades:
blue and white tablecloths, caught-thismorning seafood, and chilled local
wines. (A stone staircase leads straight
down into the water for postprandial
dips.) At Mora Mora, in San Foca, grab
a seat at the tall communal table in the
glass-walled bistro, which is fronted
by a ribbon of fine sand. And at Otrantos
Lido La Castellana, owned by Lecceborn Costume National cofounder
Ennio Capasa and his sister, Rita, fish is
grilled and served at tables scattered
around a small lawn overlooking a
cove dotted with umbrellas and chaise
longues. Theres simplicity to the
proceedingsnature, culture, and style
in a union thats unpretentious, easy,
and eminently Salentino.
MARIA SHOLLENBARGER

Farmacia Balboa Piazza Pisanelli 24,


Tricase; farmaciabalboabar.com.
LaltroBaffo Via Cenobio Basiliano 23,
Otranto; laltrobaffo.com.
Pasticceria Natale Via Trinchese 7, Lecce;
natalepasticceria.it.
Ristorante Lem Via Vittorio Emanuele II,
Tricase; ristorantelemi.it.
Le Zie Via Costadura 19, Lecce;
lezietrattoria.com.

BEACH CLUBS
Lido La Castellana Via Antonio Sforza,
Otranto; +39-33-5811-2520.

Mora Mora SP 366-Litoranea San Cataldo,


San Foca; moramorabeach.it.
Lo Scalo Via Amerigo Vespucci,
Marina di Novaglie; loscalo.net.

HOTELS
Il Convento di Santa Maria di
Costantinopoli Via Convento, Marittima
di Diso; +44-77-3636-2328.
La Fiermontina Piazzetta Scipione
de Summa 4, Lecce;
laermontina.com.
Masseria Trapan Strada Provinciale 236,
Lecce; trapana.com.

E STAT E S

ON THE MARKET

AD editors select extraordinary homes for sale around the world

Bora-Bora $50 MILLION


When cosmetics mogul Franois Nars purchased the private South Pacific island of
Motu Tane, 16 years ago, there wasnt even any electricity or running water on the
property. A total overhaul by designer Christian Liaigre transformed the ten-acre isle
(just a five-minute boat ride from the Bora-Bora airport) into an enchanting retreat,
with a constellation of thatched-roof bungalows housing sleeping quarters for up to 20
people, plus a photography studio. Parisian landscape guru Pascal Cribier, meanwhile,
planted 1,500 coconut palms and swaths of other native flora, conjuring a gardenlike
respite from the tropical sun. contact: sothebysrealty.com; +689-40-50-11-11

Crafted by AD100 firm Jacobsen Architecture, this


award-winning 2013 compoundsituated in the exclusive
oceanfront community of Windsorcombines the studios
signature minimalist aesthetic with Caribbean Colonial
touches. Bermuda shutters accent the gabled buildings,
which include a main house and two guest villas, for
a total of seven bedrooms. Light floods the spare, cleanlined interiors, most notably the main houses doubleheight living room, whose sliding glass doors open to
a grassy courtyard. There, take a dip in the blackbottomed pool or lounge on one of the many trellis-shaded
terraces. contact: windsorflorida.com; 800-233-7656

Sant Aniol de Finestres, Spain $1.8 MILLION


In 2010 Spanish architect skar Vlez Carrasco completed a
sophisticated update to this onetime agricultural estate, set some
80 miles northeast of Barcelona. In addition to restoring the
propertys historic seven-bedroom farmhouse, he added a modernist
stone villa and serene swimming pool to the 17-acre grounds,
which boast sweeping views of the majestic Zona Volcnica de la
Garrotxa park. Both structures are eco-friendly, with geothermal
heating, solar panels, and a rainwater-purification system.
contact: amatluxury.com; +34-93-452-9960 GEOFFREY MONTES

View more prime properties online at archdigest.com/estates.

44

FROM TOP: PATRICK DEMARCHELIER; RAFAEL VARGAS; JESSICA KLEWICKI GLYNN

Vero Beach, Florida $7.5 MILLION

PIETER ESTERSOHN

The secret garden: A verdant parterre flourishes behind brick walls at a South Carolina plantation.

JULY
51

MAINE

Courtney and Paul Amoss


sons Mansell and Dan haul
in a lobster trap at the
familys summer home in
Port Clyde, Maine. Cole &
Cole Architects, Suzanne
Kasler Interiors, and
landscape firm Mohr &
Seredin collaborated on
the coastal getaway.
For details see Sources.

52

CHANCE

For a young family, designer Suzanne Kasler and architect Les Cole shape a
charming New England compound with a spirit both modern and timeless
TEXT BY KATHLEEN HACKETT PHOTOGRAPHY BY WILLIAM WALDRON
PRODUCED BY HOWARD CHRISTIAN

Maine. The way life should be, say the


states official highway welcome signs.
For Georgia natives Courtney and Paul Amos, the slogan
took on a life of its own one frigid November day nine years
ago as they walked the breathtaking landequipped with
a pair of tumbledown yet charming cottagesthey would
eventually purchase on Maines storied mid-coast. It was
the dead of winter! We couldnt begin to imagine how gorgeous such a place would be in July and August, Courtney
says of the former saltwater farm. But they had an inkling.
Both had enjoyed idyllic childhood summers in New
England, far from the Southern heat: She at her grandparents lakeside cottage in Vermont and at a house they
bought later on a remote Down East island, and he at a
family home in Kennebunkport. Now the duo wanted to
re-create those experiences for their own brood, which at
the time included three young sons.
Sensitive to the surrounding community, its architectural vernacular, and, most pointedly, Mother Nature,
the Amoses moved slowly. From the beginning I
felt the property would tell us what to do, Courtney
says. To help them coax instructions from the 40 acres,
the couple tapped Portland-based landscape architect
Stephen Mohr. I mean it when I say this man is a genius,
Courtney says. He has a sixth sense for how to enhance,
rather than impose on, the land.
The Amoses decided that before setting shovel to soil,
they would live in one of the existing cottages, which had
been built by the previous owner decades earlier. Padlocked
shut and with no available keys, the small cabins had been
abandoned for years. We were planning to tear them down
because, well, lets just say they had reached their life
expectancy, Courtney says. But after her husband and
Mohr hoisted her up through a window to look at the larger
cottage, she had a change of heart. I sensed something
magical in those walls, she remembers.
With a coat of paint, new windows, and some further
improvements, they made the 900-square-foot house habitable. It wasnt until a few summers later that the Amoses
started to gently transform the parcel. Instead of breaking
ground on a home, though, they first added a pool and an
1,800-square-foot poolhouse with a kitchen, billiard room,
and other public spaces, a collaboration between Mohr,
Montgomery, Alabamabased architect Les Cole, and
Atlanta interior designer Suzanne Kasler, who had worked
with the family on their Columbus, Georgia, residence. It
was fabulous to finally have a big kitchen to cook in,
Courtney says. Paul could do a little work there, wed eat
dinner, and then go back to the tiny cabin to sleep.

54

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

But with the addition of another child and several dogs


to the family, Paul was feeling the squeeze in their pint-size
slice of heaven. He longed for a quiet refuge of his own. Still,
says Courtney, I loved how close we were in that little
space. I could hear the kids breathe at night.
Living on such an intimate scale felt so right to the Amoses
that Cole drew up a design that eschewed the sprawl associated with many contemporary coastal getaways. One of the
more unusual features of the house is that it isnt too big,
Kasler notes. Its reminiscent of the shingled cottages that
have been in the area forever. Indeed, the three boys insisted
on sharing a room, while their mother allowed for just one
bathroom for all four children, including the baby, a girl.
That drove Les crazy! Courtney says. And the modest residence is woven into a naturalistic landscape with abundant
mature trees, thanks to Mohrs thoughtful ministrations.
Today the Amos family has settled comfortably into what
Kasler calls their legacy house, a classic four-bedroom that
will age well and become a place where grandchildren and
great-grandchildren will return every summer. (Those two
cabins have been rehabbed and stand ready for guests.) The
designer points to the blue-and-white porcelain Courtney
inherited from her mother-in-law as chief inspiration for the
homes palette. The colors are timeless, Kasler says. But I
wanted to do blue and white in a way that wasnt clich. So we
went with neutral upholsterywhites and off-whiteslivened
up with pillows and curtains. That was enough pattern.
With the acreage now boasting a quintet of alpacas, a
coop full of chickens, four fainting goats, an orchard, vegetable and flower gardens, six dogs, and a pig named Elvis,
who has time to fuss with fabrics and fluff pillows? The
Amoses are a modern family, so it was important to keep the
design youthful and as maintenance-free as possible,
Kasler says. My hope is that in 20 years or so maybe theyll
have to reupholster something, but thats it.

Opposite, top, from left: Courtney and her children, (from left)
Knox, Dan, Mansell, and Eden, with Norwich terrier Harley.
The blue-and-white porcelain displayed in the breakfast areas
Christopher Peacock cabinetry inspired the houses palette;
a bespoke banquette and Charles Fradin chairs cushioned
with a Clarence House linen surround a Jeff Soderbergh table,
while light fixtures from Circa Lighting illuminate the space.
Opposite, bottom: In the living room, a Raoul Textiles print
curtains French doors by Marvin Windows and Doors;
the Hickory Chair sectional sofa is clad in a Kravet fabric, the
cocktail table and kilim-covered bench are from Wisteria,
and the rug is by Mary McDonald for Patterson Flynn Martin.

The fireplace anchoring


the enclosed porch was
crafted of local stone.
The custom-made twig
chandelier is by Paul
Ferrante, the wicker
seating and teak cocktail
and dining tables are by
Janus et Cie, and the
white curtain and throwpillow fabric and the
paisley used for the
cushions are by Kravet.
The custom-made outdoor rug is by Perennials.

57

Top, from far left:


The pool area is
paved with bluestone and outfitted
with Munder-Skiles
furniture. In the
poolhouse, mahogany doors by Marvin
Windows and Doors
open onto a loggia;
a Lee Jofa floral
was used for the
curtains and pair of
Victoria Hagan
slipper chairs, the
chandelier is by Paul
Ferrante, the 19thcentury carvedwood eagle is from
Parc Monceau, and
the cocktail table
is by Rose Tarlow
Melrose House.
Bottom, from far
left: The poolhouse
kitchen features
Urban Archaeology
pendant lights, a
Thermador range,
sink fittings by
Michael S. Smith for
Kallista, and counter
stools from Walters;
the Roman shade
is made of a Jasper
print, the backsplash
is of Waterworks
tile, and the walls
are painted in a
Benjamin Moore
blue. A barn on the
property houses
most of the familys
animals. MunderSkiles furniture
graces a terrace.

59

Above: The Amos children with their alpacas


and fainting goats.
Left: Table lamps from
Circa Lighting join a
Charles P. Rogers iron
bed in a guest room;
an artwork by Jay Hall
Connaway hangs
on a wall painted in a
Glidden silver-blue,
and the floral fabric is
a custom-colored
Peter Fasano print.
Opposite: A graphic
Serena & Lily wallpaper
enlivens the boys
room; chairs upholstered in a denim stripe
by Ralph Lauren Home
flank an 1870 English
chest, the framed
naval flags are vintage,
and the rug is by
Montagne Handwoven.

61

A gilded-metal bench from


Joseph Konrad makes
a striking statement in the
master bedroom; the wing
chair is by Suzanne Kasler
for Hickory Chair, and
the floral linen used for the
curtains and a throw pillow
is by Bennison. The ceiling
fan is by Casablanca Fan
Co., and the lamp and sconce
are from Circa Lighting.
Opposite: The master bath
boasts custom-made mosaic
tile by Waterworks and light
fixtures from Circa Lighting.

62

MALIBU REVIVAL

WITH AN ASSIST FROM INTERIOR DESIGNER WALDO FERNANDEZ


AND ARCHITECT MICHAEL KOVAC, BUSINESS DYNAMO JAMIE MCCOURT
BREATHES NEW LIFE INTO A CLASSIC JOHN LAUTNER BEACH GETAWAY
TEXT BY MAYER RUS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROGER DAVIES

PRODUCED BY ANITA SARSIDI

Designer Waldo Fernandez and architect Michael Kovac collaborated on the renovation of Jamie McCourts 1980 John Lautner
beach house in Malibu, California. The living room is outfitted with
Charlotte Perriand cocktail tables, Oscar Niemeyer ottomans,
and a matching vintage Jean Royre sofa and club chair; the pair
of sculptures at left is by Isa Genzken. The grounds were
revamped by Diamond Landscaping. For details see Sources.

65

The curved guardrail


and floors on
the upper level are
of Douglas fir.
Right: The swooping
roofs are capped
with copper. Vintage
outdoor seating and
tables by Walter
Lamb are arrayed
on the teak deck.

nyone who has ever delighted in a love affair


with their home can appreciate the impulse
to break into swooning rhapsodies that
might otherwise seem hyperbolic or saccharine. Chalk it up to the power of place.
So when Jamie McCourt, former CEO and
co-owner of the Los Angeles Dodgers,
describes her dazzling John Lautner beach
house in Malibu as a living organism and one of my closest
friends, she can hardly be faulted. After all, most disciples of great
design would give their eyeteeth to have such a friend.
This house breathes with me, muses the high-octane entrepreneur, whose career has encompassed real-estate development,

A
66

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

investing in tech start-ups, and tending the Napa Valley vineyard she purchased in 2013. The trees, the boulders, the
waterthey keep me grounded, she continues. You look out
at the ocean and hear the waves, and you understand your own
insignificance in a bigger world.
McCourt bought the cedar-clad, copper-roofed residence on
tony Carbon Beach in 2006 from Courteney Cox and David
Arquette. Built in 1980, the nearly 7,000-square-foot structure
bears all the hallmarks of Lautners most acclaimed projects:
striking spatial adagios, avant-garde engineering, sculptural
applications of wood and concrete, and a kind of organic spirit
that feels at once primitive and futuristic. The minute I walked
in, it felt right, McCourt recalls.

Before embarking on a renovation, though, she lived in the


house for five years, acquainting herself with its many moods
and nuances. The real catalyst for redoing the home was
Jamies desire to have a 25-meter indoor pool, explains architect Michael Kovac of Los Angelesbased Kovac Design Studio,
the firm entrusted with the commission. She is a passionate
swimmer, and the original pool was really more of a beautiful
water feature than a place to do laps.
To carve out sufficient space for the amenity, Kovac and
McCourt decided to remove an awkward two-story bedroom
addition that had been built at the front of the house sometime
in the 90s. The new concrete pool is sympathetic to the original
architecture, to the point of being largely indistinguishableits

vaulted timber ceiling mirrors that of the adjacent living room,


and the panel of glass that separates the two spaces echoes the
curtain-wall details of the dwellings oceanside faade.
Our guiding principle wasnt, What would Lautner have
done? It was, What would Lautner do if he were designing the
house today? McCourt says. That concept was put to the test
in the next phase of the makeover, when she called on interior
designer Waldo Fernandez, a friend and previous collaborator,
to join what she says was a mission to make the house perfect.
In practical terms that meant preserving the pillars of Lautners
visionthe muscular concrete stairwells and fireplaces; the
lyrical, swooping fir ceilings; the mammoth boulderswhile
replacing every inch of timeworn metal and glass, installing

Left: In the dining area, a


Frederik Molenschot chandelier hangs above an oak
dining table and custommade chairs covered in a de
Le Cuona fabric; the light
sculpture in the foreground
is by Robert Irwin.
Above: A new stainlesssteel island and butcherblock countertops blend
with the kitchens original concrete counter,
Yosemite-slate floor, and
fireplace/grill; the curtain
panel is of a Cowtan & Tout
fabric, the clocks are
by George Nelson, the sink
fittings are by Kallista,
and the barstools are vintage Pierre Jeanneret.

brand-new electrical, mechanical, and plumbing systems, and


manipulating the floor plans to provide for updated conveniences such as a large chefs kitchen, a cozy media room, and
an expanded master suite.
A house like this is very specific, so you need to be careful
with the moves you make, Fernandez observes. We love the
complex geometries and the scale of Lautners rooms, but it
takes a bit of imagination to find pieces that suit all of those
curves and angles.
Despite the parade of pedigreed furnishings and accessories
by the likes of Charlotte Perriand, Pierre Jeanneret, Oscar
Niemeyer, Maria Pergay, Wharton Esherick, and Jean Prouv,
Fernandezs tightly edited ensembles essentially defer to
the bravura architecture. On the other hand, McCourts art
collectionwhich combines canonical works by Cy Twombly,

Milton Avery, Betty Woodman, and Francis Picabia with signature


contemporary pieces by Rashid Johnson, Jules de Balincourt,
Doug Aitken, Subodh Gupta, and otherslends the surroundings
a breath of fresh air and just the right kind of kick in the pants.
I love to grow things, McCourt says, casting her net wide
enough to include her four adult sons, her precious wine
grapes, the art she collects, the fledgling businesses she funds,
and her butterfly-dappled garden of fruit trees, herbs, and
dahlias. Asked the inevitable question of what she thinks
Lautner would make of her emendations to the property,
McCourt remains sanguine. I feel like I know him at this point,
and I think hed be proud, she says. In the end, she and her
designers have paid the architect the ultimate compliment:
celebrating his daring point of view by safeguarding one of his
creations for decades to come.

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

69

On the second level, the


master suite terrace
overlooks a green roof; the
custom-made teak table
and chairs are by Alwy
Visschedyk for Summit,
and the cushions are
of a Holly Hunt fabric.
Top right: The new lap pool
echoes John Lautners
forms and materials.
A large window at the far
end lets in ocean breezes.
Bottom right: A Jules de
Balincourt painting and a
vintage Serge Mouille
double sconce surmount
a banquette dressed in a
Holly Hunt suede in the
master suite sitting room.
The cashmere carpet
is by Mansour Modern,
and the bookcase is by
Waldos Designs.

71

In the master bedroom,


Jean Royrestyle
poufs clad in a de Le
Cuona linen are
grouped on a cashmere
carpet by Mansour
Modern; the coverlet
is made of a Lee Jofa
linen, the walnut
cabinet conceals a
pop-up television,
and the concrete
fireplace is original
to the house.

72

AMERICAN
BEAUTY
South Carolinas most unusual plantation house
is a paradise for a New Yorkbased family
WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY HOWARD CHRISTIAN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PIETER ESTERSOHN

Built around 1714 and


decorated by the late
Mark Hampton in 1988,
Mulberry Plantation in
South Carolina has gone
from glory to dilapidation and back again.
For details see Sources.

75

fter passing through the


unpretentious wood gates at
South Carolinas Mulberry
Plantation, not too far from
Charleston, visitors will
find themselves navigating
a straight-shot drive that
slices through jungly Low Country landscape. Magnolias and
palmettos fringe natural swamps as well as drainage canals from
Mulberrys days as a rice plantation. Miles on, at a bend in the
road, shimmers an eight-acre lake that was once a rice field.
Then the drive makes its way toward a 35-foot-high bluff, twisting, turning, and climbing through a cathedral of gnarled oaks,
their great branches draped with resurrection ferns and Spanish
moss. Finally, the bluff comes into view, and there, overlooking
the winding Cooper River, sits a house unlike any other.

76

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

The site, originally part of a 12,000-acre land grant to 17thcentury baronet Sir Peter Colleton, was eventually sold to
Thomas Broughton, a British official who would serve as South
Carolinas acting royal governor. Broughton built the plantation
house around 1714, employing an aesthetic unique in the annals
of American architecture. The home has defied fixed description for generations, blending, as it does, Jacobean, Queen
Anne, Baroque, and Georgian styles.
Walled with English-bond brickworkdarker burned bricks
trim the corners and window quoinsthe two-story main block
rises to a dormered and hipped gambrel roof. This section on its
own would constitute a very fine house indeed. But what makes
the place a true knockout are the square one-room pavilions,
called flankers, that sprout from the four corners of the main
block. Each is equipped with a dramatic hipped bell roof crowned
with an iron vane, the weathercock bearing the buildings

Above: John James Audubon


bird engravings are
displayed in the living room,
which is appointed with
antique armchairs (at right)
covered in a Chelsea Editions
floral and a club chair
(at center) and sofa clad in a
Robert Kime print; the South
Carolina tall case clock
came with the house, as did
the Federal convex mirror.
Top right: Mark Hamptons
watercolor of Mulberry
Plantation shows the
residences distinctive
corner pavilions.
Right: A John Rosselli
Antiques lantern graces
the stair hall; the chairs
are original to the home.

Above: Surveyed by an 18th-century portrait,


the dining room is furnished with an
antique chandelier and an heirloom table
and chairs; the mantels porcelain
jars are from John Rosselli Antiques.

78

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

Right: The living rooms drop-leaf table, chest


of drawers, desk chair, and secretary bookcase are
Mulberry Plantation relics, and the sofa is upholstered in a Robert Kime fabric; a McLean Lighting
lantern hangs just outside the front doors.

One of the propertys ancient live oaks.

FOLKS
OF LESSER
MET TLE
MIGHT HAV E
TURNED TA IL
AND FLED
NOT SO THE
GILBERTS.

A boxwood
parterre opens to
the lush lawns.
Opposite: A live oak
shelters vintage
wrought-iron chairs
and a table set
with linens from the
Monogram Shop.

construction date. As viewed distantly from the former rice fields,


the towerlike flankers help explain why this unusual house
earned the early epithet of Mulberry Castle.
Fast-forward to 1987. The plantationa survivor of the Yamasee
War of 171517, which pitted colonists against Native American
tribes, as well as the War Between the States and a period of abandonment in the early 20th centurywas placed on the market, its
hundreds of acres threatened with possible subdivision and a golf
course. The Historic Charleston Foundation came to the rescue,
snapping up the estate with hopes of finding a sympathetic buyer.
In stepped S. Parker Gilbert, then the chairman of the New York
investment bank Morgan Stanley, and the rest is sweet history.
The financier, philanthropist, and sportsman had been contemplating retirement when Mulberry came to his attention, and he
and his wife, Gail, believed that the house would be a salubrious
gathering spot for family and friends. The first order of business
was to find a decorator, so the couple engaged the late, great Mark
Hampton, a longtime friend. His directive was seemingly simple:
Respect the historic fabric of the house while creating a comfortable home. The property came with numerous American
antiquesamong them some fine South Carolina piecesand
Hampton encouraged the Gilberts to make good use of them,
while mixing in leafy textiles, 19th-century American hooked rugs,
tasseled valances, and Parkers collection of miniature decoys.
This energetic and promising start was dealt a major setback
in 1989, with the arrival of Hurricane Hugo. While the house
was spared serious damage, the grounds were hard-hit. Folks

of lesser mettle might have turned tail and flednot so the


Gilberts. What followed was the couples determination not
only to bring the plantation back to its prehurricane beauty but
to bring it back better than ever. In short order the grounds and
gardensoriginally designed by noted landscape architect
Loutrel W. Briggs for Clarence Edward Chapman, a Manhattan
stockbroker who bought Mulberry in 1914were restored and
enhanced under Gails unerring eye. A guesthouse was built,
and, in 1991, the adjacent estate of South Mulberry, once part
of the plantations acreage, was acquired; its circa-1830 house
is now used for visitors, too.
The ensuing years have witnessed countless get-togethers of
children, grandchildren, and delighted guests. Shooting parties
and fishing trips have always married well with marvelous dinners, convivial picnics, and local sightseeing and shopping.
Mulberrys unmatched hospitality was summed up by Hampton
in the guest book, when, in extolling the Gilberts attention to
detail, he whimsically suggested that his shirts be laundered there
and shipped home to his New York City apartment.
It is not known who will be the next stewards of Mulberry
Plantation, though. Parker Gilbert died last year, and the family
has placed the beloved estate on the market. What is certain is
that he and his wife, in establishing an amazingly comprehensive
protective easement, have ensured that the future of this
American treasure is safe. And, as when the Gilberts bought the
place, some of Mulberrys furnishings are part of the package. As
this South Carolina landmark proves, continuity is king.

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

81

Above: A cheerful
print dresses an
antique South
Carolina rice bed and
Victorian settee;
the rug is by
Elizabeth Eakins.
Right: Another
Eakins carpet
coordinates with
a bedrooms
coverlets and curtains; an antique
candlestand serves
as a side table.

82

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

Mulberry Plantations
dock reaches into a
lake that was formerly
a rice field.

WAVE LENGTH

A black-plaster-lined pool, devised by


Bonetti/Kozerski Architecture and Design for
the New Paltz, New York, home of movie
director Shawn Levy and his family, overlooks
the Shawangunk Mountains. The expansive
terrace is sheathed in pietra dIstria, an
Italian limestone. For details see Sources.

Come on, jump in! These gorgeous


high-style pools invite you to make a splash
TEXT BY VICKY LOWRY
85

An integral part of its hillside setting,


the infinity pool at filmmaker Michael
Bays Los Angeles residence
was designed by architect Chad
Oppenheim and executed by
the firm Rios Clementi Hale Studios;
it features an oval inset hot tub.

While every pool is refreshing, a well-designed one can also


bring drama to the landscape, which may be why they have
played such memorable roles in cinema. In The Graduate, for
example, when young Ben (Dustin Hoffman) wasnt meeting
Mrs. Robinson in hotel rooms, he whiled away the days on a
float in his parents rectilinear suburban pool. In the James
Bond film Skyfall, a fit Daniel Craig swims laps at night in a
86

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

striking Shanghai rooftop pool. For the recently released


A Bigger Splash, a glittering tiled pool on an Italian island
captures the sexy, indolent mood of vacationers played by
Tilda Swinton and Ralph Fiennes.
The enduring allure of a pool couldnt be more simple and
pure: Its a cool and inviting respite from the heatand an
irresistible opportunity to kick off your sandals and play.

FROM LEFT: ROGER DAVIES;


DIEGO VILL ASEOR. PREVIOUS
PAGES: WILLIAM WALDRON

WHAT COULD BE MORE ENTICING IN SUMMER THAN A SWIMMING


POOL RIPPLING GENTLY IN THE AFTERNOON BREEZE?

Mexican architect Diego Villaseor


conceived this geometric Venetian-tiled
pool at a compound in Los Cabos to
take advantage of the sites spectacular
ocean views. The marble terrace
connects two copper-roofed pavilions.

FROM LEFT: LUKE WHITE; SCOTT FRANCES/OTTO

On a Croatian island in
the Adriatic Sea, a stonepaved pool by David
Kelly of Rees Roberts +
Partners melds seamlessly with the propertys
centuries-old walls.
Opposite: Chestnut
hedges flank a tranquil
stone-lined pool at the
Grove, the Oxfordshire,
England, estate of the
legendary David Hicks.
The chickens are newer
additions; they belong to
Hickss son, Ashley, also a
designer, who now lives
there with his wife, Kata.

89

Crystal Clear
High above the Hudson River, an architect hones
his vision of pared-down simplicity

Architect Steve Mensch designed a


house for himself on a bluff overlooking
the Hudson River in Rhinebeck, New York.
In the living area, white B&B Italia seating
is grouped with a Mies van der Rohe
cocktail table by Knoll and a sculpture by
Luis Domenech y Vicente. A black
leather sectional sofa by Design Within
Reach invites lounging by the Renaissance
Fireplaces hearth, which is set into a
steel-clad wall; the flooring is rift-sawn
oak. For details see Sources.

TEXT BY VICKY LOWRY


PHOTOGRAPHED AND PRODUCED
BY PIETER ESTERSOHN
STYLED BY HOWARD CHRISTIAN
91

ven minimalists can get the urge to downsize.


Two decades ago architect Steve Mensch
designed a clean-lined, Zenlike house for his
family next to a waterfall on 25 acres near
Rhinebeck, New York. Over the years the
property grew to include another half-dozen
pavilions on some 600 acres. When the nest
began to empty out, however, Mensch got
the chance to completely reimagine the way
he wanted to live with his partner, Greg Patnaude. Clean lines
would stay in the picture, just fewer of them. The main reason
to move was that it was too much property, too many buildings,
with only the two of us knocking around it. But that wasnt really
the whole story, Mensch says. I was beginning to feel like it was
my final resting place, and I wasnt ready to embrace that idea.
A windswept promontory above the Hudson River in
Rhinebeck proved the perfect setting to explore an even more
restrained vision of his spare architectural style. The 6.7-acre
piece of landoriginally part of the Wyndclyffe estate, whose
hulking 19th-century Gothic mansion, built for Edith Whartons
aunt, sits in ruin across the roadcame with a run-of-the-mill
1980s structure that was not to Menschs taste. It was a pleasure
to take it down, he says with a smile.
In its place he crafted an intimate yet airy two-floor residence that holds an abundance of surprises despite its minimalist aspect. The mystery begins out front, where a long, low-slung
concrete faade gives the impression of an impenetrable bunker.
Swing open the door, though, and youll discover an elegant box
with a 270-degree birds-eye view of the river. Sliding glass
doors run the length of the living area, and more light floods in
from clerestory windows. The roof appears to float, attached not
to the walls and ceiling but suspended from exterior steel beams
festooned with solar panels, 154 in total, creating a lacelike parasol over the building.
Mensch, who used to teach in the department of Design and
Environmental Analysis at Cornell University and now takes on a
limited number of projects as a self-described one-man band
a house for a New York filmmaker is under construction nearby
says he draws inspiration from Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, and Mies
van der Rohe. But his use of the solar-power source as a design element is pure 21st-century thinking. I wanted to make the solar
panels a real architectural feature, Mensch says of the south-facing
array, which produces more electricity than the couple can use. I
didnt want to try to hide them or put them off in a field somewhere.
I wanted to have them really characterize the building.
The furnishings, simple but polished pieces such as deep B&B
Italia sofas, play the quiet foil. In the living area, Mensch originally wanted to have just one set of seating, versatile enough that

Top: South-facing photovoltaic panels by Lumos Solar form a


canopy above the roof of the house; oak trees dot the property.
Bottom, from left: A skylight illuminates an interior staircase
distinguished by a concrete wall. The kitchen features ovens
by KitchenAid, a cooktop by Bertazzoni, and sink fittings by
Grohe; the counters are granite.

92

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

An African sculpture and an Adesso lamp


keep watch over a guest rooms Modloft
bed, which is dressed in a Room & Board
wool blanket. The Mies van der Rohe chair
is vintage, the side table is by B&B Italia,
and the rug is by Calvin Klein Home.
Below: The top floor of Menschs studio is
equipped with oak shelving and concrete
counters; the architect included the Kohler
tub in the rooms design because he finds
he is most creative when taking a bath.
Opposite: The concrete bench that runs
along the pool area offers captivating views.

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

95

IN DOING INTERIORS
FOR A GLASS ROOM,
YOU HAVE TO BE
NEUTRAL BECAUSE
THE OUTSIDE IS
ALWAYS CHANGING,
SAYS STEVE MENSCH.

it could be moved from the cozy steel-walled fireplace in winter


to the all-glass space off the kitchen in summer. But he bagged the
plan after falling down the rabbit hole of modular furniture: I
couldnt work it out so that the furniture was ideal for either, he
says. It would have been a compromise for both.
In the end it is all about a sympathetic, largely white palette
that puts the focus squarely on the main event, the river, which can
be placid as a Frederic Edwin Church painting or humming with
tugboats and barges. In a typical winter the river is completely
iced over, all white and grayit looks like Canada out there,
Mensch says. Whereas in the summer its blue and green and yellow. So in doing interiors for a glass room like this, you pretty much
have to be neutral because the outside is always changing.
The rest of the house unfolds behind concealed passageways,
among them a tunnel on the lower level that connects a trio of bedrooms to a fly-tie roomthe one request of the Vermont-born
Patnaude, an ardent fishermanand Menschs two-story studio. I
like the romance of a hidden tunnel, and when my grandkids come
here, thats what excites them the mostthey want to run up and
down the tunnel, he says. And I like getting up in the morning and
going to the studio. Even though youre only passing through a tunnel, it makes you feel as if you are going to a different place.
Mensch calculates that he spends about 14 hours a day in his
studio. Theres certainly plenty to do there. He has ample space not
only to work on his architectural projects and large-scale abstract
paintingsthey are one of the few sources of vibrant color in the
housebut also to bathe. A sleek Kohler tub has been fitted into the
center of a concrete counter that unites his desk and a built-in banquette on the top floor. I do a lot of designing and planning in the
tub, notes Mensch. I really do solve problems in there.

96

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

In the master bedroom, the


cantilevered oak bed with
integrated nightstands is a
custom design; the linens
and coverlet are by RH, and the
rug is by Calvin Klein Home.
Opposite: The side table in the
master bath is by B&B Italia.

Family
Affair

Decorator Steven Gambrel heads a dream


team that turns a 20-acre farm in the Hamptons
into a stylish weekend home for multiple
generations of an expanding East Coast clan
TEXT BY BRAD GOLDFARB

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIC PIASECKI

A sculpture by Nathalie
Decoster sits amid a garden
conceived by landscape
architect Edmund Hollander
for the Bridgehampton,
New York, home of Bobbie
and Lew Frankfort; the
residence was crafted by
architect Kevin Clark of
Historical Concepts and
designer Steven Gambrel.
For details see Sources.

99

ne of the challenges of a long-held family vacation home is that as time passes


and the number of occupants grows, it
becomes increasingly difficult to
squeeze everyone in. Such was the case
for Bobbie and Lew Frankfort, who
spent many summers with their three
children in a much-loved house in
Sagaponack, New York. The family
grew up, explains Lew, the chairman
emeritus of Coach. Kids got married and had children of their
own, Bobbies mother moved in with us, and the property just
wasnt sufficient anymore.
So the couple set out to get something biggerbut they came to
realize that would mean building something new. Learning that a
20-acre tract of the historic Topping farm in Bridgehampton had just
come on the market sealed the deal. And it helped that the person
who introduced them to the site was Michael Davisa longtime
friend and, as the head of Wainscott, New Yorkbased Michael Davis
Design & Construction, someone theyd worked with before.
The pair enlisted Davis to both erect the house and spearhead
a collaborative design process (a master builder role he and his
firm are known for). He suggested Steven Gambrel as the projects
creative enginea designer with a sensitivity to the local vernacular, not to mention a talent for devising warm, richly layered

100

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

Above: Kevin Clark


drew inspiration
from local historic
homes and Edwin
Lutyenss English
houses when
planning the paintedbrick-and-cedarclapboard dwelling,
which features
windows by Kolbe
Windows & Doors.

interiors. One of the first things we did after closing was to drive
around the property with Steven, Bobbie remembers. He stood
in the bed of our pickup truck, took in the landscape, and immediately saw where everything should go.
Everyone agreed that the envisioned main residencea kind
of spacious family clubhouseshould sit atop a low rise in the
land. Its a move that allowed the house to maximize the view
west toward, and beyond, an eight-acre parcel the Frankforts had
set aside as an agricultural reservethe sort of wide-open vista
thats increasingly rare in the Hamptons.
From this they were able to plot out the projects various
other buildings, including a sports barn with a lap pool and

A trio of sofas designed by Steven


Gambrel and manufactured by Dune
anchor the living room. The bronze
lanterns are by Vaughan, and the stools
are by Michael S. Smith for Jasper.

gym, an outdoor swimming pool and adjacent poolhouse, and


a garage. Its essentially a village, with a number of structures
dotting the landscape, notes Gambrel. As such, it was the perfect assignment for Historical Concepts, an architecture and
planning firm with expertise in fashioning communities.
Committed to creating something that would feel authentic to
the area, the team took inspiration from the nearby Nathaniel
Rogers house, a venerable Greek Revival beauty, as well as homes
by English architect Edwin Lutyens. We went with an alternative
to Shingle Style. The house is still classic American country and
very New York but uses elements like painted brick and lap siding, explains Historical Concepts principal Kevin Clark. To make

the vast structure less imposing, it was broken into individual sections that appear as if they were added on over time.
Inside, the team set about crafting spaces that can handle
large, often impromptu get-togethers (we entertain a lot,
Bobbie says) but still feel homey. The house has a service
kitchen designed solely for a chef, Gambrel says. But theres
also a family kitchen, which is used for more intimate meals
and gatherings. The dining room has a similar duality: Its four
custom-made dining tables can be combined to accommodate
big groups or separated for cozier occasions.
Despite its size, there is nothing cold or impersonal about the
homedue in large part to a soothing color palette that takes its

102

The Field Rooms


chesterfield sectional
sofa, designed by
Steven Gambrel and
manufactured by Dune,
is clad in a Rose
Tarlow Melrose House
fabric. The copper
lanterns are vintage,
the window treatments
are of a Schumacher
linen-cotton, and the wool
rug is a Gambrel design.
Opposite: Bobbies
office includes a vintage
brass-and-leather
Mastercraft desk and
Louis XVI side chairs
with leather upholstery.
The brass sconces are
from Nicholas Antiques,
and the silk rug was
created by Gambrel.

The kitchen mixes a collection


of vintage flush-mount lights with
custom-made enamel pendant
lamps by Ann-Morris. Stools by
Palecek join a Steven Gambrel
designed table; the custom-made
range is by Lacanche, the refrigerators are by Sub-Zero, and
the wall tile is by Walker Zanger.

cues from the surrounding views. This house is all about fabric
and layering, Bobbie says. The living room, for instance, is a study
in creamy neutralsthe colors of sand, oysters, and peaches,
says Gambrelfrom the plush upholstery to the walls (and piano)
painted to evoke the hue and texture of driftwood.
In the family room, meanwhile, where the view was less of a
dominant feature, Gambrel says he created a blue cocoon, with
an abstract cobalt-brushstroke canvas by James Nares overseeing
a cerulean sectional sofa and a vintage pair of teal leather ottomans. That sense of tranquillity suffuses the airy upstairs rooms
as well, where the clean lines of 20th-century piecesa brass
chandelier in one of the guest rooms, a 1970s Mastercraft desk in
Bobbies officeare offset by an array of soft upholstered furnishings in shades of pale blue, lavender, and wheat.

104

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

New York Citybased landscape architect Edmund Hollander,


brought in to take the extensive grounds from their agricultural
past to a more estatelike present, incorporated gardens, broad
sweeps of lawn, and groves of fruit trees. Close to the dwelling,
classic elements such as boxwood and hydrangea were called
into play, while the homes dramatic approach was lined with
plane trees. Its a landscape designed for socializing, says
Hollander, pointing to the multitude of gardens and terraces
where family and friends can congregate.
Its fitting, then, that within days of moving into the house
last August, the Frankforts hosted a party for 150 people in
honor of their 40th wedding anniversary. That date was a target
from the moment they broke ground. So, Lew says, we had to
finish on time.

Top right: A Joseph


La Piana artwork
surveys the dining room,
where vintage chairs
by Jay Spectre from
Homenature are grouped
with custom-made
tables; the light fixtures
are by Waldos Designs,
and a Schumacher ikat
curtains the windows.
Right: A white-oak
ladder by Putnam
Rolling Ladder Co.
makes the tall shelves
in the pantry easily
accessible; polishednickel pendant lamps by
Hudson Valley Lighting
illuminate the space.

Above: Bluestone
pavers surround the
saltwater pool. The
Munder-Skiles chaise
longues are cushioned
in a Perennials fabric.
Bottom row: A side
porch (far left) and the
poolhouses sitting
room (near left) both
feature brass lanterns
from Circa Lighting
and Munder-Skiles
furniture with Perennialsfabric cushions.

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

107

Despite its size, there is nothing


cold or impersonal about the
homedue in large part to a soothing
color palette that takes its
cues from the surrounding views.

Above: Overscale 1960s


table lamps flank a
Steven Gambreldesigned
bed dressed with
Pottery Barn sheets in
a guest room. The vintage
rattan mirrors came
from a Paris flea market.
Right: The master bath
boasts pendant lights by
Rejuvenation, a Ralph
Lauren Home sconce, and
a pair of vintage French
chairs from Aero; the sink
fittings are by Waterworks.
Opposite: A guest room
is clad in a Phillip Jeffries
woven wall covering. A
painting by Akos Biro
hangs above a desk and
chair by Arteriors, while a
Christine Boumeester
print is displayed over
the bed. The bench is
upholstered in an Osborne
& Little wool-linen.

109

Design Notes

The details that give this


new Hamptons beach house
warmth and personality

The Frankforts
pantry is stocked with
porcelain dinnerware
by Mud Australia.
Shown at near right
are Noodle bowls
in steel and pistachio
($71 each) and dinner
plates in blue and
ash ($55 each).
mudaustralia.com

Ive been inspired by butlers


pantries in house museums
throughout Europe for a
long time. I often think backof-house spaces are
more compelling than
formal rooms.

Above: Decorator Steven Gambrel


deployed summery hurricane
lamps throughout the house,
using light-gray candles to complement the homes muted palette. Egan hurricane in polished
nickel by Ralph Lauren Home;
from $375. ralphlauren.com

Who says a piano has to


be black? This Steinway baby
grand and its bench were
stripped and refinished by
decorative painter Peter Mucek
to evoke the weathered look
of driftwood. petermucek.com and steinway.com

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: STUART TYSON; ERIC


PIASECKI (2); COURTESY OF RALPH L AUREN HOME

Designer Steven Gambrel

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF THE URBAN ELECTRIC CO.; COURTESY OF CHARLES
EDWARDS; COURTESY OF VISUAL COMFORT; ANTONEL /GETTY IMAGES; BRAND X PICTURES/
GETTY IMAGES; STUART TYSON; COURTESY OF EDMUND HOLL ANDER L ANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

Left: Malplaquet
pendant in basilgreen by Steven
Gambrel for the Urban
Electric Co.; $3,760.
urbanelectricco.com

Gambrel is known for using


bold pendant lighting. It adds
a strong detail and the light far
surpasses that of recessed
or concealed lighting, he says.

Below: Brook Street


lantern in gilt with
frosted and blue glass
by Charles Edwards;
price upon request.
charlesedwards.com

Left: Patrick pendant


in polished nickel by
Thomas OBrien for
Visual Comfort; $1,470.
circalighting.com

You could fill  vases


from the gardens during the
summer and the property
would still be filled with flowers.

Landscape architect Edmund Hollander

Above: A rendering of a grape arbor, to be installed


near beds planted with peonies, lilies, and phlox.
The propertys romantic mix of blooms includes,
at right, snapdragon and salvia.

Left: Trays are


perfect for gathering
and displaying objects and
flowers on ottomans and tables,
Gambrel says. Rattan tray by Celerie
Kemble for Maitland-Smith; $1,497 from
Designers House. designershouse.com

111

NATURAL HIGH
Designer Shawn Henderson and architect Scott Lindenau
fashion a discreetly luxurious Aspen retreat
perfectly sited to appreciate the ravishing landscape
TEXT BY STEPHEN WALLIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICHARD POWERS
PRODUCED BY HOWARD CHRISTIAN
112

Interior designer
Shawn Henderson
collaborated with
Scott Lindenau
of Studio B
Architecture +
Interiors to create a
retreat in Aspen,
Colorado, for a
Hong Kongbased
family; the
structure is clad
in Japanese plaster
and reclaimed
teak. For details
see Sources.

heres a spot about ten miles


outside the village of Aspen, Colorado, some 9,400 feet up, where
the skies seem a brighter blue and the mountain views are almost
surreal in their majesty. A nearby stream rushes with a dulcet
murmur, and herds of elk roam amid slender white aspens whose
leaves turn magnificently gold each autumn. It was here that a
Hong Kong businessman bought a 24-acre plot several years ago,
determined to create his ideal refuge.
The log cabinstyle house that occupied the site was not what
he had in mind, however. So he enlisted a local firm, Studio B
Architecture + Interiors, to draw up concepts for a new home,
while the existing dwelling was removed and donated to Habitat
for Humanity. A divorced father of one at the time, the businessman soon remarried, and since his wife also had a child, the architects were tasked with thinking a bit more expansivelyyet also
modestly. We were very conscious of preserving the feeling of
unspoiled countryside, says the wife, who recently gave birth to
the couples twins. We could have built something larger, but the
setting is so perfect, the last thing we wanted was to ruin it with
an over-the-top house. It had to be quiet.
Studio B satisfied the brief with an 11,000-square-foot residence that projects an unexpectedly reserved attitude, thanks to
its low horizontal profile and the fact that the first of its two floors
is partially embedded in a slope. While the overall vibe of the
L-shaped structurewhich wraps around a rear courtyard and
pool terraceis minimal and modern, an unmistakable warmth
emanates from the homes materials. The husband spoke a lot
about the spirit and nature of wood, says Studio B founder and
design principal Scott Lindenau. We
used wire-brushed white oak and
Near right: A Theaster
Gates artwork overlooks
contrasted it with a beautifully
a vintage Vladimir Kagan
grained reclaimed teak on both the
sofa in a Holland & Sherry
interior and exterior. The thoughtful
suede and a Dunbar side
table; the vase on the
palette also includes hand-chiseled
Philip and Kelvin LaVerne
limestone and wara juraku a
cocktail table is by
Japanese-style plaster that incorpoMasamichi Yoshikawa.
rates straw to produce an exquisite
Opposite: The residence
organic texture.
offers majestic views.

114

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

The living rooms club chairs,


Jean Royreinspired sofa,
cocktail table, and carpet
were all custom designed
by Shawn Henderson. The
vintage Hans Wegner spindleback chair is from Wyeth.

When it came to furnishing the seven-bedroom home, the couple


initially decided to handle it themselves. Collectors of midcentury
design, they owned a number of quality piecesmostly American
and Scandinavianbut the wife concedes that they just couldnt pull
it all together. The house had a horribly empty feel, she recalls.
Then, by chance, they were introduced to New York designer
Shawn Henderson, whose discerning approach to texture and
color and sophisticated vintage and contemporary pairings
aligned perfectly with their own sensibilities. They had been
doing the interior piecemeal and wanted someone to come in and
do a complete program, Henderson explains.
While the designers handiwork is a study in lyrical restraint, the
home certainly has its showstopping moments. The coup de thtre
is the living room, the first space you encounter after ascending the
entrance hall stairs to the main floor. Measuring 25 by 40 feet, the
room is enclosed on two adjacent sides by floor-to-ceiling windows,
offering panoramic vistas across the valley to the Elk Mountains
beyond. I didnt want it to feel overly decorated, with a thousand
pieces, the designer says, so I decided to go with big gestures.
To anchor the larger of the living rooms two seating areas,
Henderson devised a sprawling 11-and-a-half-foot sofa based on
a Jean Royre design, a pair of club chairs deep enough to curl up
in, and a seven-foot-diameter cocktail tableall overlooked by a
supersize Sam Orlando Miller mirror, mounted above the fireplace. In this room, as throughout the house, Henderson upholstered the clients existing seating in rich monotone fabrics. For
me, the landscape is what provides the color, so I wanted to be
careful how I brought in other elements, he notes.
Among those other elements are a smattering of large-scale
artworksincluding the living rooms Theaster Gates composition
made with fire hoses and the stairwells Claudy Jongstra tapestry
as well as punchy Swedish carpets, which Henderson laid in the
tailored wood-and-stone master bath and the meditation room. The
latter, says the wife, is probably the most important space for my
husbanda Buddhist who meditates every morning. And because
its mostly windows, its where you really feel closest to nature.
That is if youre not counting the guest cottage, which stands in
a thicket just downhill from the main house. A later addition, also
by Studio B and Henderson, the simple gable-roofed structure is all
black, clad in a Japanese-style charred cedar that, Lindenau says,
picks up the dusky flecks in the bark of the aspen trees. Inside,
Henderson kept the furnishings uncomplicated, utilizing Danish
pieces from the clients collection and tying everything together
with a palette of soothing blues. Its amazing, the designer says of
the cottage. You and I would be thrilled to live in it.
In fact, the wife jokes about decamping to the cocoonlike
cabin with her husband, leaving the children to fend for themselves in the main house. But the cottage lacks two of the residences very important featuresthe inviting pool and the
rooftop terrace, where the stargazing never fails to serve up a
wonderful shock, as the wife puts it, for this family of city
dwellers: In Hong Kong we dont get that kind of front-row seat
to spectacular night skies, she says. It is truly breathtaking.

116

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

Clockwise from right:


The dining room features
a David Weeks Studio
chandelier, a set of 1950s
dining chairs cushioned in
an Edelman leather, a
wall-mounted Paul Evans
console from Todd Merrill
Studio, a Vico Magistretti
table lamp, and a rug by
ALT for Living; the photo
montage is by Tacita
Dean. In the kitchen,
a vintage Louis Poulsen
pendant light from Lost
City Arts hangs above
a Caesarstone-top island
and Orange Furniture
barstools upholstered in
an Edelman leather; the
hood is by Bulthaup,
the cabinetry is by Studio
B, the ovens are by
Gaggenau, and the sink
fittings are by Dornbracht.
The guest cottage is
clad in charred-cedar
siding and topped by an
anthracite-zinc roof.

We were very conscious of preserving the feeling of


unspoiled countryside, the wife says. We didnt want to
ruin it with an over-the-top house. It had to be quiet.

118

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

The centerpiece of the master bath is a custom-made


Japanese soaking tub with
Dornbracht fittings. The
walls are paneled in
Yangtze-river limestone.
Opposite: Studio B
designed the master suites
platform bed with
integrated nightstands.

S O U RC E S
Items pictured but not listed here are
not sourceable. Items similar to vintage
and antique pieces shown are often
available from the dealers listed.
(T) means the item is available only
to the trade.

MAINE CHANCE
PAGES 5263: Interiors by Suzanne
Kasler Interiors; suzannekasler.com.
Architecture by Cole & Cole Architects;
coleandcole.com. Landscape design by
Mohr & Seredin Landscape Architects;
mohrseredin.com. Doors and windows by
Marvin Windows and Doors; marvin.com.
PAGE 55: In breakfast area, cabinetry by
Christopher Peacock; peacockhome.com.
Newport rush-back dining chairs by
Charles Fradin; charlesfradin.com; with
cushions in Dundee linen by Clarence
House (T); clarencehouse.com. Vanderbilt
table by Jeff Soderbergh; jeffsoderbergh.com. Classic Ring chandelier and Cabinet
Makers picture lights from Circa Lighting;
circalighting.com. In living room, curtains
of Kashmir Delft linen by Raoul Textiles
(T); raoultextiles.com. Sectional sofa by
Hickory Chair; hickorychair.com; in Ageo
chevron acrylic by Kravet (T); kravet.com.
Parquet cocktail table and kilim-covered
bench by Wisteria; wisteria.com. Abaca
rug by Mary McDonald for Patterson Flynn
Martin (T); pattersonflynnmartin.com.
PAGES 5657: Custom-made Twig
chandelier by Paul Ferrante; paulferrante.com. Arbor seating, cocktail table, and
dining table by Janus et Cie; janusetcie.com. Curtains and throw pillows of
outdoor acrylic, in white, by Kravet (T);
kravet.com. Armchair and sofa cushions
in Stencil Paisley acrylic by Kravet (T).
Custom-made outdoor rug by Perennials
(T); perennialsfabrics.com. PAGES 5859:
In pool area, furniture by Munder-Skiles;
munder-skiles.com. In poolhouse kitchen,
Large Warehouse pendant lights by
Urban Archaeology; urbanarchaeology.com. Range by Thermador; thermador.com. For Town sink fittings by Michael
S. Smith for Kallista; kallista.com. Counter
stools by Drucker from Walters (T);
walterswicker.com. Roman shade of
Indian Flower hemp by Michael S. Smith
for Jasper (T); michaelsmithinc.com.
Backsplash tile by Waterworks; waterworks.com. On walls, Newburyport Blue paint
by Benjamin Moore; benjaminmoore.com.
Cabinetry by Cole & Cole Architects;
coleandcole.com. In poolhouse living
room, Cate slipper chairs by Victoria
Hagan Home Collection (T); victoriahaganhome.com. On slipper chairs and for
curtains, Poppies linen blend by GP & J
Baker from Lee Jofa (T); leejofa.com.
Eternity chandelier by Paul Ferrante;
paulferrante.com. Wicklow cocktail table
by Rose Tarlow Melrose House (T); rosetarlow.com. On terrace, furniture by MunderSkiles. PAGE 60: Large Gourd table lamps
from Circa Lighting; circalighting.com. Iron
bed by Charles P. Rogers; charlesprogers.com. On walls, Silver Blue Pearl paint by
Glidden; glidden.com. Pillow, bed skirt,
and curtains of Lockhart linen by Peter

Fasano (T); peterfasano.com. PAGE 61:


Feather wallpaper by Serena & Lily;
serenaandlily.com. On chairs, Eden Roc
Stripe linen-cotton by Ralph Lauren
Home; ralphlaurenhome.com. Custommade rug by Montagne Handwoven;
montagnehandwoven.com. PAGE 62:
Gilded-metal bench from Joseph Konrad;
josephkonrad.com. Josephine wing chair
by Suzanne Kasler for Hickory Chair;
hickorychair.com. Curtains and throw
pillow of Roses linen by Bennison (T);
bennisonfabrics.com. Ceiling fan by
Casablanca Fan Co.; casablancafanco.com.
Brittany floor lamp and Dorchester
swing-arm sconce from Circa Lighting;
circalighting.com. PAGE 63: Custommade mosaic tile by Waterworks;
waterworks.com. Ruhlmann chandelier
and Cabinet Makers picture light from
Circa Lighting; circalighting.com.

MALIBU REVIVAL
PAGES 6473: Interiors by
Waldos Designs; waldosdesigns.com.
Architectural renovation by Kovac
Design Studio; kovacdesignstudio.com.
Landscape design by Diamond
Landscaping Inc.; 818-509-9573.
PAGES 6869: In dining area, CL-Flyover
chandelier by Frederik Molenschot from
Carpenters Workshop Gallery;
carpentersworkshopgallery.com. On
bespoke chairs, Buffalo linen by de Le
Cuona (T); delecuona.com. In kitchen,
curtain panel of Acadia fabric by Cowtan
& Tout (T); cowtan.com. Sink fittings by
Kallista; kallista.com. PAGES 7071: On
master suite terrace, custom-made
teak table and Boomerang chairs by
Alwy Visschedyk for Summit Furniture
(T); summitfurniture.com. On chairs,
cushions in Sail Away fabric by Holly
Hunt (T); hollyhunt.com. In master
suite sitting room, on banquette,
Ambassador suede by Holly Hunt (T).
Cashmere carpet by Mansour Modern;
mansourmodern.com. PAGES 7273: On
poufs, Buffalo linen by de Le Cuona (T);
delecuona.com. Cashmere carpet by
Mansour Modern; mansourmodern.com.
Bespoke coverlet of Jarah Cream linen
by Lee Jofa (T); leejofa.com.

AMERICAN BEAUTY
PAGES 7483: Interiors by Mark
Hampton LLC; markhampton.com.
PAGES 7677: In living room, on antique
armchairs at right, Oak Leaves Vine
linen-cotton by Chelsea Editions (T);
chelseatextiles.com. On club chair at
center and sofa, Oxus silk by Robert
Kime (T); robertkime.com. In stair hall,
Gothic lantern by John Rosselli Antiques;
johnrosselliantiques.com. PAGES 7879:
In dining room, porcelain jars from John
Rosselli Antiques; johnrosselliantiques.com. In living room, on sofa, Oxus silk by
Robert Kime (T); robertkime.com.
Scalloped lantern by McLean Lighting;
mcleanlighting.com. PAGE 80: Table
linens from the Monogram Shop; themonogramshops.com. PAGE 82: In bedrooms,
custom-made Gracie Stripe rug (top)
and Swedish Grid carpet (bottom) by
Elizabeth Eakins; elizabetheakins.com.

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST AND AD ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF


ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT 2016 COND NAST.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.
VOLUME 73, NO. 7. ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST (ISSN 0003-8520) is published
monthly by Cond Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc.
PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Cond Nast, 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007.
S. I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman Emeritus; Charles H. Townsend, Chairman; Robert
A. Sauerberg, Jr., President and Chief Executive Ofcer; David E. Geithner, Chief
Financial Ofcer; Jill Bright, Chief Administrative Ofcer. Periodicals postage paid at
New York, NY, and at additional mailing ofces. Canada Post Publications Mail
Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No.
123242885-RT0001. Canada Post: Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to
P.O. Box 874, Station Main, Markham, ON L3P 8L4.

120

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

WAVE LENGTH
PAGES 8485: Pool design by Bonetti/
Kozerski Architecture and Design;
bonettikozerski.com. PAGE 86: Architecture and pool design by Oppenheim
Architecture + Design; oppenoffice.com;
and Rios Clementi Hale Studios;
rchstudios.com. PAGE 87: Architecture
and pool design by Diego Villaseor
Arquitecto; dva.com.mx. PAGE 89:
Landscape and pool design by Rees
Roberts + Partners; reesroberts.com.

CRYSTAL CLEAR
PAGES 9097: Architecture and
interiors by Steve Mensch; 845-876-6238.
PAGES 9091: White Charles sofa and
daybed by B&B Italia; bebitalia.com. Mies
van der Rohe Barcelona cocktail table by
Knoll; knoll.com. Albert leather sectional
sofa by Design Within Reach; dwr.com.
Rumford 1000 fireplace by Renaissance
Fireplaces; renaissancefireplaces.com.
PAGES 9293: Photovoltaic panels by
Lumos Solar; lumossolar.com. In kitchen,
ovens by KitchenAid; kitchenaid.com.
Cooktop by Bertazzoni; bertazzoni.com.
Sink fittings by Grohe; grohe.com.
PAGE 95: In guest room, Architect lamp
by Adesso; adessohome.com. Worth bed
by Modloft; modloft.com. Wool blanket by
Room & Board; roomandboard.com. Frank
side table by B&B Italia; bebitalia.com.
Shimmer Mineral rug by Calvin Klein
Home; calvinklein.com. In studio, tub by
Kohler; kohler.com. PAGES 9697: In
master bath, Frank side table by B&B
Italia; bebitalia.com. In master bedroom,
wool blanket by Room & Board;
roomandboard.com. Linens and coverlet
by RH; rh.com. Shimmer Mineral rug by
Calvin Klein Home; calvinklein.com.

FAMILY AFFAIR
PAGES 98111: Interiors by S. R.
Gambrel Inc.; srgambrel.com.
Architecture by Historical Concepts;
historicalconcepts.com. Landscape
architecture by Edmund Hollander Landscape Architects; hollanderdesign.com.
Windows by Kolbe Windows & Doors;
kolbe-kolbe.com. PAGES 100101:
Custom-made sofas by S. R. Gambrel
Inc.; srgambrel.com; fabricated by
Dune; dune-ny.com. Vincennes lanterns
by Vaughan (T); vaughandesigns.com.
Bridge stools by Michael S. Smith
for Jasper (T); michaelsmithinc.com.
PAGE 102: Brass sconces from
Nicholas Antiques; nicholasantiques.com.
PAGE 103: Sectional sofa by S. R.
Gambrel Inc.; srgambrel.com; fabricated
by Dune; dune-ny.com; in Riptide linenviscose by Rose Tarlow Melrose House
(T); rosetarlow.com. Window treatments
of Sikar Embroidery fabric by Martyn
Lawrence Bullard for Schumacher (T);
fschumacher.com. PAGES 1045: In
kitchen, custom-made Rover
pendant lamps by Ann-Morris Inc. (T);
ann-morris.com. Panama stools by
Palecek; palecek.com. Custom-made
range by Lacanche; lacanche.com.
Refrigerators by Sub-Zero;
subzero-wolf.com. On walls, Milk
Crackle field tile by Walker Zanger;

POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL


AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to ARCHITECTURAL
DIGEST, P.O. Box 37641, Boone, IA 50037- 0641. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS,
ADDRESS CHANGES, ADJUSTMENTS, OR BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please
write to ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST, P.O. Box 37641, Boone, IA 50037 -0641,
call 800 -365-8032, or email subscriptions@archdigest.com. Please give both
new address and old address as printed on most recent label. Subscribers: If
the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during
your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine becomes undeliverable, you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will
receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription
will be mailed within four weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial,
business, and production correspondence to ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST,
1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007.

walkerzanger.com. In dining room,


vintage Jay Spectre chairs from
Homenature; homenature.com. Light
fixtures by Waldos Designs;
waldosdesigns.com. Curtains of
Kilimanjaro cotton by Schumacher (T);
fschumacher.com. In pantry, white-oak
ladder by Putnam Rolling Ladder Co.;
putnamrollingladder.com. Hudson Falls
pendant lamps by Hudson Valley
Lighting; hudsonvalleylighting.com.
PAGES 1067: In pool area, chaise
longues by Munder-Skiles;
munder-skiles.com; with cushions in
outdoor fabric by Perennials (T);
perennialsfabrics.com. On side porch and
in sitting room, Sussex lanterns from
Circa Lighting; circalighting.com. Furniture by Munder-Skiles; with cushions
in outdoor fabric by Perennials (T).
PAGE 108: On walls, tweed wall covering by Phillip Jeffries (T); phillipjeffries.com. Cain desk and Caden chair
by Arteriors; arteriorshome.com. On
bench, Brodie wool-linen by Nina
Campbell for Osborne & Little (T);
osborneandlittle.com. PAGE 109: In
guest room, sheets by Pottery Barn;
potterybarn.com. In master bath,
pendant lights by Rejuvenation;
rejuvenation.com. Sackett
sconce by Ralph Lauren Home;
ralphlaurenhome.com. Vintage French
chairs from Aero; aerostudios.com.
Henry sink fittings by Waterworks;
waterworks.com.

NATURAL HIGH
PAGES 11219: Interiors by Shawn
Henderson Interior Design;
shawnhenderson.com. Architecture by
Studio B Architecture + Interiors;
studiobarchitects.net. PAGES 11415: In
living room, custom-made carpet by
Shawn Henderson for ALT for Living;
altforliving.com. Vintage Hans Wegner
Peacock spindle-back chair from
Wyeth; wyeth.nyc. On vintage Vladimir
Kagan curved sofa, Flannel suede by
Holland & Sherry (T); hollandsherry.com.
PAGES 11617: In dining room,
chandelier by David Weeks Studio (T);
davidweeksstudio.com. On dining chairs,
Wild Hide leather by Edelman Leather
(T); edelmanleather.com. Vintage Paul
Evans console from Todd Merrill Studio;
toddmerrillstudio.com. Atollo table lamp
by Vico Magistretti for Oluce; oluce.com.
Rug by ALT for Living; altforliving.com.
In kitchen, vintage white pendant light
by Kurt Nrregaard for Louis Poulsen
from Lost City Arts; lostcityarts.com.
Countertops by Caesarstone;
caesarstoneus.com. Barstools by Orange
Furniture; orangefurniture.com; in Wild
Hide leather by Edelman Leather (T).
Hood by Bulthaup; bulthaup.com.
Cabinetry by Studio B Architecture +
Interiors; studiobarchitects.net. Ovens by
Gaggenau; gaggenau.com. Sink fittings
by Dornbracht; dornbracht.com.
PAGE 118: Platform bed with integrated
nightstands by Studio B Architecture +
Interiors; studiobarchitects.net.
PAGE 119: Tub fittings by Dornbracht;
dornbracht.com.

For reprints, please email reprints@condenast.com or call Wrights Media,


877-652-5295. For reuse permissions, please email contentlicensing@condenast.com or call 800-897-8666. Visit us online at archdigest.com.
To subscribe to other Cond Nast magazines, visit condenastdigital.com.
Occasionally we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that offer products and services that we believe would interest our readers.
If you do not want to receive these offers and/or information, please advise us at
P.O. Box 37641, Boone, IA 50037-0641 or call 800-365-8032.
ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RETURN OR LOSS OF, OR FOR
DAMAGE OR ANY OTHER INJURY TO, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, UNSOLICITED
ARTWORK (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, DRAWINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS), OR
ANY OTHER UNSOLICITED MATERIALS REGARDLESS OF MEDIA IN WHICH IT IS
SUBMITTED. THOSE SUBMITTING MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ARTWORK, OR
OTHER MATERIALS FOR CONSIDERATION SHOULD NOT SEND ORIGINALS UNLESS
SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED TO DO SO BY ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST IN WRITING. MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND OTHER MATERIALS SUBMITTED WILL NOT BE RETURNED.

OBERTO GILI

Encore

For the 18th-century villa he purchased some 30 years ago,


Valentino cofounder Giancarlo Giammetti craved an Anglocentric landscape, with roses tumbling here and delphinium
spiking there. But garden maestro Paolo Pejronea fan of subtler effectscannily suggested focusing on the basics: Lets
get a bit of green first, and then well decide what flowers to
have. Few blooming plants, it turns out, ever appeared. Instead,

122

A R C H D I G E S T. C O M

verdure sets off La Vagnolas pale stone buildings (the orangerie


near the swimming pool is shown). Black-green cypresses
shadow swaths of gray-green foliage, boxwood balloons out of
clay pots, and vines engulf weathered faades. Serenity reigns.
Pejrones chromatic subterfuge was a lesson well learned,
Giammetti has acknowledged, saying, The best color in a garden, especially in Tuscany, is green. MITCHELL OWENS

OBERTO GILI

VILLA VAGNOLA, TUSCANY, 1989

Оценить