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CAPSTONE RESEARCH PROJECT

ON
USAGE AND ATTITUDE STUDY IN SHOWER GELS AND SOAP CATEGORY IN
DUBAI WITH ANALYSIS OF IMPACT OF ACQUISITION OF THE BODY SHOP BY
LORAL

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement of


Master of Global Business (MGB)
(Contemporary Marketing Management)
Semester 2
Period of Study Nov12 to Apr13

Submitted By Neha Vishwas Shinde (MGB12CMM086)

Under the guidance of


Prof. Balakrishna Grandhi
Mrs. Jyothsna Singh
Mr. Anudeep Raghuthaman

S P JAIN SCHOOL OF GLOBAL MANAGEMENT


DUBAI

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I am sincerely thankful and indebted to all those who have helped me successfully complete this
research. First and foremost, I would like to thank our mentors, Prof. Balakrishna Grandhi and
Mrs. Jyothsna Singh, for their timely and valuable suggestions and feedback and Prof. Dhrupad
Mathur for his guidance and insistence on perfection and quality. This pushed me to work harder
and has helped me broaden my knowledge, both in terms of the topic and the approach one
should adopt when conducting any research. I am grateful to Mr. Umesh Kothari for the data
analysis and marketing research sessions that better equipped me to successfully complete my
research. His mentoring has taught us how to be good researchers and has inspired us to write
reports in a scientific manner.
Secondly, I would like to express our gratitude to Mr. Anudeep Raghuthaman who has been a
constant source of support and guidance throughout the course of this research. I greatly
appreciate the commitment and assistance he has shown with regard to all our research-related
clarifications.
Thirdly, I would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to my colleagues Akanksha Seth, Ashish
Jain and Shraddha Hegde who have made this the richest experience for me. I would like to
thank them for always being there for me.
Lastly, I would like to thank all the industry experts and store owners and keepers for their
time and for providing me with an in-depth opinion about the personal care industry in general
and bath and shower category in specific. Their insights on consumer behavior in the region have
proved invaluable in my understanding of the market for soaps and shower gels in Dubai.

Sincerely,
Neha Vishwas Shinde (MGB12CMM086)

S P JAIN SCHOOL OF GLOBAL MANAGEMENT


DUBAI
2

DECLARATION
I hereby declare that the matter included in this Capstone Research Project report entitled Usage
and Attitude Study in Shower Gels and Soap category in Dubai with analysis of impact of
acquisition of The Body Shop by LOral, is the result of study and interviews carried out by
me. I further declare that this is my original work and has not been published anywhere before.
This Project Work has been carried out for the sole purpose of submission in partial fulfillment
of Semester two of Master of Global Business (MGB) at S P Jain School of Global Management,
Dubai.
The above is true to the best of our knowledge and understanding.
We have read, understood and signed the code of Ethics.
COPYRIGHT ASSIGNMENT
For the good and valuable consideration, receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, the Project
researcher (Assignor), hereby irrevocably transfers and assigns to S P Jain School of Global
Management (Assignee), located at Dubai, Singapore, Sydney, its successors and assigns, in
perpetuity, all right (whether now known or hereinafter invented), title, and interest, throughout
the world, including any copyrights and renewals or extensions thereto, in Usage and Attitude
Study in Shower Gels and Soap category in Dubai with analysis of impact of acquisition of The
Body Shop by LOral.
In witness thereof, Assignor has duly executed this agreement.
Date :
Neha Vishwas Shinde (MGB12CMM086)

__________________________

Project Mentors
Prof. Balakrishna Grandhi
Mrs. Jyothsna Singh

__________________________
__________________________

S P JAIN SCHOOL OF GLOBAL MANAGEMENT


DUBAI
3

Table of Contents
Executive Summary ---------------------------------------------------------------------

1.

Introduction -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1.1

Personal care industry --------------------------------------------------------------------

1.2

Retail industry in the UAE ---------------------------------------------------------------

11

2.

Review of Literature --------------------------------------------------------------------

14

2.1

Independent variables ---------------------------------------------------------------------

14

2.2

Frameworks and models used -----------------------------------------------------------

20

3.

Research Methodology ------------------------------------------------------------------ 23

3.1

Statement of Purpose ---------------------------------------------------------------------

23

3.2

Research objectives -----------------------------------------------------------------------

24

3.3

Methodology used -------------------------------------------------------------------------

25

3.4

Data analysis techniques -----------------------------------------------------------------

27

3.5

Limitations and future scope of study --------------------------------------------------

27

4.

Data analysis and interpretation ------------------------------------------------------ 28

4.1

Usage and attitude study ------------------------------------------------------------------ 28

4.2

Observational research -------------------------------------------------------------------- 43


4

4.3

Insights from Industry experts -----------------------------------------------------------

43

4.4

Analysis of acquisition by L'Oral ------------------------------------------------------

47

5.

Conclusion ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

51

5.1

Key learning -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

51

5.2

Managerial Recommendations ----------------------------------------------------------

51

References ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

55

Code of Ethics ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

58

Appendix ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 60
A.1

Discussion guide for customers ---------------------------------------------------------

60

A.2

Discussion guide for experts -------------------------------------------------------------

61

A.3

Discussion guide to study the impact of acquisition ---------------------------------- 62

A.4

Questionnaire ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

63

A.5

Transcripts of expert interviews ---------------------------------------------------------

68

A.6

SPSS output --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

74

A.7

Meeting Log -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 87

A.8

Safe assign report -------------------------------------------------------------------------

88

List of Figures

Figure 1

Sales growth and profitability by region/country ---------------------------

Figure 2

Share of Top 250 Retail companies by region/country --------------------

10

Figure 3

Sales in non-grocery retailers by channel in the UAE ---------------------

11

Figure 4

McKinsey 7S Model ------------------------------------------------------------

20

Figure 5

Rotated component matrix Factor analysis --------------------------------

29

Figure 6

Behavioural map for the Variety Seekers ------------------------------------

30

Figure 7

Cluster 1 Age ------------------------------------------------------------------

31

Figure 8

Cluster 1 Nationality ---------------------------------------------------------- 31

Figure 9

Cluster 1 Monthly Income ---------------------------------------------------

Figure 10

Cluster 1 Usage ---------------------------------------------------------------- 31

Figure 11

Cluster 1 Occupation ---------------------------------------------------------

Figure 12

Cluster 1 Visits to malls per month ----------------------------------------- 32

Figure 13

Cluster 1 Monthly expenditure ----------------------------------------------

32

Figure 14

Cluster 1 Perception for The Body Shop ----------------------------------

33

Figure 15

Behavioural map for the Potential Brand Loyalists ------------------------

34

Figure 16

Cluster 2 Age ------------------------------------------------------------------

35

Figure 17

Cluster 2 Nationality ---------------------------------------------------------- 35

Figure 18

Cluster 2 Monthly Income ---------------------------------------------------

Figure 19

Cluster 2 Usage ---------------------------------------------------------------- 35

Figure 20

Cluster 2 Occupation ---------------------------------------------------------

Figure 21

Cluster 2 Visits to malls per month ----------------------------------------- 36

Figure 22

Cluster 2 Monthly expenditure ----------------------------------------------

36

Figure 23

Cluster 2 Perception for The Body Shop ----------------------------------

37

Figure 24

Behavioural map for the Compulsive Bathers ------------------------------

38

Figure 25

Cluster 3 Age ------------------------------------------------------------------

39

Figure 26

Cluster 3 Nationality ---------------------------------------------------------- 39

Figure 27

Cluster 3 Monthly Income ---------------------------------------------------

Figure 28

Cluster 3 Usage ---------------------------------------------------------------- 39

31

32

35

36

39

Figure 29

Cluster 3 Occupation ---------------------------------------------------------

Figure 30

Cluster 3 Visits to malls per month ----------------------------------------- 40

Figure 31

Cluster 3 Monthly expenditure ----------------------------------------------

40

Figure 32

Cluster 3 Perception for The Body Shop ----------------------------------

41

Figure 33

The print ad in the United Kingdom ------------------------------------------

46

Figure 34

The same print ad in the United Arab Emirates -----------------------------

46

Figure 35

Corporate strategy for The Body Shop and LOral ------------------------ 49

Figure 36

McKinsey 7S Model ------------------------------------------------------------

Figure 37

Blue Ocean Strategy The ERRC Grid -------------------------------------- 53

40

50

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The research entails a study of the products in bath-and-shower category, namely soaps and
shower gels. The research is restricted to retail and specialty stores in the United Arab Emirates.
Since, not much research has been done in this category of personal care products for this region,
and also, because the penetration as well as usage of personal care products is high. I have
focused my research on the popular retail brand called The Body Shop.
The Body Shop has a wide variety and range of shower gels as well as soaps. The brands
marketing efforts revolve mainly around the value proposition of being an ethical business, with
products not being tested on animals, involvement in various environmental and human rights
issues and use of skin-friendly and natural ingredients in the production of their products.
Usage and attitude study has been done for the category at large, with study of bathing and
shower habits and market segmentation on behavioral differences. Among the various segments,
one target segment was selected based on the correlation between what the brand has to offer and
what he selected segment offers.
To study the regional dynamics and dos and donts of marketing, advertising and promotional
activities in the United Arab Emirates, four expert interviews were conducted. These provided
practical and implementable insights in to the market place and cultural sensitivity that the
marketers need to be aware of. Also, insights on the image of The Body Shop among these
market experts provided a great value add to draft recommendations for the brand.
The Body Shop was taken over by the cosmetics giant LOral in the year 2006. Since the brand
values and propositions for the two brands are not only diverse, but also conflicting in some
cases, it was interesting to study the impact of the acquisition on the brand image of The Body
Shop. This was done through a brief qualitative research with in-depth interviews with
respondents. Also, excerpts from the expert interviews were used in this analysis.
Finally, managerial recommendations were made for The Body Shop culminating from the
research. These were divided in to two sections: one which required immediate action and the
other with long-term goals. KPIs to measure this progress have also been mentioned.

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 Personal care industry
The category of bath and shower under personal care industry has seen gradual and
steady increase over the past few years. It has been estimated at approximately 5% in the
United Arab Emirates. The sales are expected to grow to a whooping AED 585.5 million
by the year 2016 from the current AED 456.4.

Figure 1: Sales growth and profitability by region/country

The various factors contributing to the growth and success of this segment of retail in
Dubai is the escalating tourism (Goal to touch 20 million visitors by 2020 Vision 2020),
growing expat population, changing lifestyles of the expats as well as the nationals and
the prominent positioning of Dubai itself as the retail hub and a fun shopping destination.
The increasing awareness of looking good and being healthy has had a significant impact
on the way people perceive themselves and the amount of efforts and money they put in
to fill in the gaps. The innovative products high-end brands come up with cater to only

the wealthy or at times, to an exclusive set of consumers only. In these cases, brands like
The Body Shop play a very important role of not only catering to the rest of the segment
but also, caters to more or less the entire segment, which makes it a mass as well as a
prestige product-line.
Another important trend is the social responsibilities that these brands take up. The Body
Shop was introduced as cruelty-free and has stood by the philosophy of not testing on
animals ever since. The brand also associates itself with greening initiatives globally.
These initiatives give brands a new humane look which consumers relate to at an
emotional level.

Figure 2: Share of Top 250 Retail companies by region/country

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1.2 Retail industry in the United Arab Emirates


The retail industry has been relatively steady and consistent in term of growth and
revenue generation. Globally the market size of the industry is $13,164,096.7 million
(Euromonitor International, 2012). This makes it the fifth largest industry in the world
and has great potential of growing bigger. It contributes almost 14-15% to the GDP
across many developed countries. The European crisis has taken its toll on the world
retailing, affecting countries like the US, China, Japan, India and Brazil. In spite of this
slow down, since the industry is in the midst of customer empowerment and revolution,
the industry seems recession-free. (Deloitte U.S. , 2013)
The Global Retail Development Index (2013) by AT Kearney ranks the UAE fifth on list
of evolving markets for global retail investment.
This industry is divided into two broad categories in the UAE:
a. grocery retailing
b. non-grocery retailing

Apparel Specialist Retailers


1,924.40
7,505.80

Electronics and Appliance


Specialist Retailers

14,337.20

8,697.30
6,231.50
7,659.10

8,587.50

Health and Beauty Specialist


Retailers
Home and Garden Specialist
Retailers
Leisure and Personal Goods
Specialist Retailers
Mixed Retailers
Other Non-Grocery Retailers

Figure 3: Sales in non-grocery retailers by channel in the UAE

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The non-grocery retailing accounts for greater value. In the year 2012 it accounted for
nearly AED 54,942.70 million. This retailing category has shown tremendous growth of
31.3% within a span of five years starting from 2007 to 2012. (Business Monitor, 2012)
Among the non-grocery category, Apparel Specialist Retailers account for about 26%,
followed by Leisure and Personal Goods Specialist Retailers (16.4%) closely followed by
the Health and Beauty Specialist Retailers (close to 16%).
UAE, and specifically Dubai, looks very attractive for retail because of the financial
stability and market confidence. The country withstood the Global as well as Dubai
economic crisis strongly. The contribution of retail to UAEs GDP has been close to a
healthy 14%, in spite of the lull due to economic slump.
During the economic recession of the year 2008, the annual per capita disposable income
fell by 40% and consumer expenditure fell 42%. This hit the retail industry in Dubai
really hard. The financial crisis was so intense that the consumer behavior changed
almost overnight from spending to saving. A significant percentage of the expatriate
population also left the country because poor employment conditions.
However, the economy recovered because of the hike in prices of petroleum and steady
population growth. The national contribute just about 16-17% of the total population of
the country. Also, growth in the expat population has been seen since the economy
stabilized. The political disturbances in the region have further encouraged immigration
to the UAE. Dubai is perceived to be politically and economically quite stable. (CBRE
, 2012)
Although the internet penetration in the country is close to 90%, the retailers have not
been able to fully capitalize on this opportunity. There is huge potential for the industry
to diversify their business into online retailing making it convenient for the consumers.
Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter can be leveraged upon to promote the
brand and communicate the brand image in a more visual way.
Dubai is known to the world as a shopping destination with huge investments into
infrastructural developments of malls, an entire festival dedicated to shopping and a wide
variety of national as well as international brands. Currently Dubai caters to ten million
visitors every year.

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Liberalization on issuing of visa has promoted tourism to a great extent. Dubai has
become the third busies airport in the world connecting the eastern and western worlds.
The national airline, Emirates Airlines, has become the largest operating commercial
airline in terms of ownership of A380 (which is currently 35 and they have placed an
order of a whopping 80 more).

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2. REVIEW OF LITERATURE
2.1 Independent variables pertaining to my research

2.1.1 Fragrance
Fragrance constitutes one of the major ingredients of a personal care product,
especially soaps and shower gels. Smell is one of the five senses that can create a
lasting impression and also, a separate identity for a particular brand. (Ap.
Dijksterhuis, 2005). Studies have shown tha consumers can actually smell the
brand. Through fragrance, positive emotional responses can be invoked, like
cleanliness, freshness and so on. Moreover, the usage of natural ingredients in these
products is gaining popularity due to increase in the wellness demands. (Fragrances:
Looking beyond the scent, 2012)
Natural fragrances such as citrus fruits as well as indulgence fragrances such as
chocolate have become very popular in the bath and body category of personal care
products. The advent of aromatherapy and proliferation of spas have added to the
usage fragrant products like oils, moisturizers, shower gels and so on. Fragrances
particularly produced for the region are extremely popular; for example: the various
strong ouds.
Nonetheless, fruity and floral fragrances remain the most used in the region. The
Middle East, along with Latin America and Africa, has shown the strongest growth in
usage of fragrances in bath and shower category. (Fragrances: Looking beyond the
scent, 2012)
Shower gels are gaining share in bath and shower category, but use of bar soaps is
dominant. This can be attributed to the fact that soap is being used from generations
and is a much more familiar product as compared to shower gels. Consumers are
attracted to new product launches and a variety of fragrances. Hence, focus on
technology to bring in these changes will play a crucial role.

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2.1.2 Pricing and promotions


Although a segment of consumers are price-sensitive, majority of them give
importance to the experience they gain from using a particular product. Offers such as
Buy 1 Get 1 Free and so on are not very important when it comes to these products.
It is the brand that matters when making a purchase decision for bath and shower
products. (Khaled Mahmud, 2012). Nonetheless, promotional campaigns such as PR
events, have become popular.

2.1.3 Packaging and labelling


Consumers are known to make purchase decisions on the basis of packaging of
products. The colours, the fonts and the labelling used influence consumer behaviour
to a certain extent. John Lamb in his article Engaging Consumers states the
importance of paying attention to these packaging details for a brand. He mentions
that packaging is the first interface consumers have with a product or a brand. It needs
to standout in the shelf and attract consumers. Packaging also serves as miniadvertising for the product and adds to the image of a brand. In the process the
product becomes its own on-shelf advertisement. Sustainable packaging is gaining
popularity. Consumers look for packaging that provides the option of recycling or
refill, as psychologically it gives them the feel of contributing positively towards the
environment. Due to this trend, companies have switched from plastics to aluminium
and terracotta for recyclable or refillable packaging.
Dr. Vicky Lofthouse and Dr. Tracy Bhamra, through their investigation on packaging
and refills have found that refills consumers perceive refills to be less expensive than
the price of the actual product. Their study showed that consumers perceive refillable
packaging to be more environmentally friendly, quicker and easier to use and helps in
creating lesser wastage.

2.1.4 Brand familiarity, loyalty and advocacy


It has been studied that consumers that are loyal to a brand usually do not consider
price as a deciding factor for purchase, but rather the product quality and emotional
attributions. (Das, 2011)
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Another study conducted on brand loyalty for cosmetics showed that packaging,
country of origin, product quality, skin type and suitable products for the same,
recommendations from friends and family, advertisements and reputation of a brand
directly impact customer loyalty and advocacy. Packaging was shown to have the
highest significant influence on brand loyalty. (Akagun, Ozdemir, & Parilti, 2005)
In yet another study, the importance of competitive positioning was brought forth. A
brand needs to connect with its consumers not only on the functional and emotional
levels, but also in terms of a valid purpose that gives back to the society and
environment. Brands are known to have reaped good benefits from a strategic
positioning of this kind. (Du, Bhattacharya, & Sen, 2007)
Brand awareness is another factor that was studied by Ingrid Staisch in 2007. His
report on the brand audit of LOral showed that of the 93% consumers who were
aware of the brand, 83% used LOrals products. Many of the consumers showed
positive attitudes and perceptions towards the brand because of the functional
attributes of the product. But lack of emotional connect with the brand was evident
because the brand did not provide what the customers expect. Moreover, majority
of the respondents had about average loyalty towards the brand which just reiterates
the fact that if a brand does not cater to what the customer expects and keeps itself
relevant, it will lose loyalty, and probably not even be advocated.

2.1.5 Ambience of the retail outlet and face of the brand it showcases
Store design and interiors is very much handled by the retailers in the region. But a
lot of emphasis is given on living the brand. This means that along with the
showcasing the original values and features of a brand, effort goes into making the
brand relevant and sensitive to the region. A research conducted by Mohanty &
Sikaria (2011) showed that the ambience of a retail outlet has can make a large
difference to the performance of the outlet. It has also been studied that income and
gender did not influence this performance as much as ambience did. Age of the
respondent mattered to a great extent, which again bring in the point of relevance into

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this discussion. Window displays and store fronts had a huge impact on attracting
customers towards the retail outlet.
Another research conducted by Yalch (1990) showed through intensive study the
influence of music played in the store on consumer behaviour. Emphasis on
segmenting and dividing the store according to needs of particular age-groups nd
playing relevant music accordingly creates a stronger impact and connect subconsciously with the consumers.
In order to understand the relationship (if any) between store ambience based on the
signage, colours, designs on the door (right down to the handle and clutter) sales
person availability and to persuasion to buy the product, was conducted by Sharma &
Stafford (2000). It was found that prestige image as well as the salespersons role
was an atmospheric cue. Secondly, store salespeople are likely to be persuasive
simply as a function of how their working environment is perceived by customers.
Nicer environments simply appeared to enhance the scenarios available for further
study. Attractiveness, knowledge and expertise are found to be highly relevant.
2.1.6 Recommendations by peers and family
An attempt to understand the impact of social factors consumers buying behaviour
was done by Sudhakar & Suchitra (2012) where recommendations and pressures from
family and friends were studied. It is usually the family that influences a persons
buying behaviour in the case of personal hygiene products more than friends. The
same has been found from Mahmud & Gopes study.

2.1.7 Skin type


A study conducted in the greater Colombo region researched on the factors impacting
the demand of beauty soaps among female consumers in the region. The study
showed a significant relationship between price and product. Consumers looked for
products that suited their skin types and specific skin conditions in some cases as
discussed earlier. A noteworthy relationship between education and occupation with
brand preference was also researched. Older women ranging between the ages 25 and

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65 were concerned with skin type. On the other hand, women between the ages of 16
and 24 years cared more about fragrance as well as packaging.

2.1.8 Ingredients of the product


Patwardhan, Flora, & Gupta (2010) studied factors that influence consumers
purchasing behaviour for soaps. The 58 people who participated in the survey (all of
whom belonged to the moderate income strata) stated that the ingredients and
contents of the soap they used were crucial in decision making. Consumers look for
soaps suitable specifically to their skin types like oily, dry, sensitive etc. The study
also showed that the image of the ingredients that went into the product mattered. For
example: Aloe vera is known to be mild on the skin and has detoxifying agents, and
thus, should be appropriate for sensitive skin types. Choices also depended on
seasons. During summers, products with fruity and citrus content were preferred.
During winters, products with moisturizing and herbal content were preferred.

2.1.9 Corporate social responsibility


The debate over CSR activities and positioning of a brand on the same has been an
old one but is gaining importance lately. Du, Bhattacharya, & Sen (2010) have
conducted an extensive research on CSR activities and whether it can be strategically
used as a tool for competitive positioning to create a distinct brand image. The study
was conducted via the web and 1026 people responded. It was a study limited to
India. The findings were that if at all CSR initiatives are used and when they become
a more prominent element of consumers' consciousness in the marketplace,
marketers can consider positioning based on the same. Moreover, it should make
sense based on factors such as product versus market definition, competitive
structure, product life cycle and consumer knowledge and awareness.
A quantitative and deductive study has been conducted to study CSR in detail.
(Lundgren El-Salhy & Lundmark, 2009). The findings showed that the most

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important factors that influenced buying behaviour were price, quality and CSR
initiatives the brand was involved with. The study also showed that CSR activities
can and should be used to influence purchase decisions positively, if the CSR
activities are trustworthy.

2.1.10 Brand perception and image


Brand essence or brand mantra is one essential element around which the
fundamental marketing activities revolve around. This is how a company creates a
perception about its product and when it matches the image created in the target
segments mind, brand identity is created. This is also termed as brand concept
management. (Park, Jaworski, & Maclnnis, 1986)
As per their research, the method for maintaining this concept-image linkage
depends on whether the brand concept is functional, symbolic, or experiential. It is
very important to maintain this linkage to augment and enrich the market
performance of a brand.

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2.2 Frameworks and models used

2.2.1 Corporate strategy using the McKinsey 7S model


The McKinsey 7S model is a framework developed and introduced by Tom Peters
and Robert Waterman during the early 1970s. This framework helps analyse how
well a particular organization is prepared to reach the goals and objectives it set for
itself. It gives a comprehensive guideline to determine and strategize for issues like
future developments and changes in an organization, alignment of processes and
various departments of two organizations during an acquisition or a merger and
overall improvement of market performance of an organization. (Strategy Tools - The
McKinsey 7S Framework, 2012)

Figure 4: McKinsey 7S Model


The skills, staff and style are the softer areas of an organization which need to be
dealt with in a completely different manner from strategy, structure and systems of
the organization which are the hard areas. A smooth gearing of these six with each
other is what creates values that are strong, unique and shared by one and all within
an organization.

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I have used this framework to analyse the alignment of functions of The Body Shop
and LOral after LOral acquired The Body Shop and the impact of the acquisition
on the image of The Body Shop. The fact that this acquisition was not considered
ideal by brand management experts of the age because of the very diverse brand
values of LOral and The Body Shop got me interested to study it more in detail.

2.2.2 Blue Ocean Strategy


Blue Ocean Strategy is a comprehensive guide on business strategy of creating a
new demand in the uncontested market space, which yields disproportionate growth
in profits and market capitalization within the blue ocean. (Kim & Mauborgne,
2005)
This strategy has been used to gauge the potential for The Body Shop to create such
an uncontested market space for itself and make competition irrelevant in the region.
Based on the primary quantitative data analysis, a strategy canvas will be drawn for
The Body Shop to understand which features and buying behaviours should the brand
focus on to create a unique standing and revitalize the brand image. This is done
through analysing which attributes to eliminate, reduce, raise and create.
Also, the Six Paths Framework has been used to analyse the strategic decisions that
need to be taken towards attracting the three tiers of non-customers towards the brand
and making this proposition a commercially viable proposition.

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2.2.3 SWOT analysis for The Body Shop


Strengths

Environmentally sustainable brand


Well known and proven
Wide range of product lines
Globally present
First brand to not test on animals
Acquired by L'Oral

Weaknesses

Weak strategies to remain relevant


Weak brand image in the market
Promotional and advertising activities
that can generate more buzz and
footfalls
Brand associations not very strong

Opportunities

Threats

Making the brand more visible in the


growing retail space
Expanding the product lines to other
offerings that will resonate with what
the brand stands for
Innovating in the category of soaps and
shower gels as the product line has
been stagnant for some time now
Making their presence felt online as
well
Active e-presence
Economic recession globally
Brand image being tainted because of
acquisition by LOral
European and American crisis
Competition in the region from brands
like Bath & Body Works
Imitation of product offerings
Confusing brand image with other
competing brands

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3. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1 Statement of Purpose


My colleagues and I chose the retail industry and specifically the personal care category
for our research most importantly because the market under study is Dubai. Dubai is a
popular retail hub. Also, research conducted earlier has shown that the Middle East has
the worlds highest usage of personal care products and color cosmetics.
We even realized that not much research has been done earlier in this particular category
of retail in Dubai. Moreover, the changing consumer behavior towards usage of shower
gels from soaps has been seen to become prevalent in the recent times. This intrigued us
to study this trend in this part of the world.
The personal care products category has experienced a transition from being just an
FMCG product to becoming a specialized retail experience in the UAE. These
specialized retailers are gaining market share rapidly. Premiumization and dominance
of multinational brands have led to expansion of the personal care category in the region.
The overall performance of the personal care industry was good despite economic
downturn during the recent past. The rise in number of tourists and expats in the UAE
have led to further growth of this industry. This research helped us understand the
business model of specialized retail stores of personal care products. Not only did we
study the reasons for shift of consumer buying preferences from normal retail stores to
specialized retail stores but also understand the segmentation, target audience and
positioning of major players of the industry.
For my research I selected the brand The Body Shop. The Body Shop was founded by
Anita Roddick in Littlehampton, West Sussex, England in the year 1976. It has now been
acquired by the L'Oral corporate group.
The Body Shop has close to 2500 stores spread over 62 different countries. It was floated
on Londons Unlisted Securities Market in the year 1984 and opened at a mere 95p. It
went on to be listed on the London Stock Exchange and got the tag of shares that defy
gravity as its share price increased by over 500%.
This brand has catered to the expensive tastes but tight budgets of the population in the
UAE. Recently, The Body Shop has been facing stiff competition from contemporaries
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like Bath & Body Works that have managed to position themselves very similar to the
brand. It was amazing to study the efforts the brand takes from a marketing perspective to
maintain its brand image. The Body Shop has incrementally built on its reputation of
being a natural brand and has always portrayed itself as a brand for every woman. They
have never given emphasis on artificial or cosmetic beauty and this can be seen in each of
their marketing campaigns, be it Give Joy or Dreams Unlimited or Beauty with
Heart. Right from the models they use to the salesgirls at their stores, all are ordinary
and young women taking pride in the emotion and passion of the brand. Hence, my study
also includes a brief analysis on the repercussions of the acquisition of The Body Shop by
the cosmetics giant L'Oral.
My colleagues have chosen the brands LUSH, Marks & Spencer and Bath & Body
Works. These brands comprehensively define the retail market for the personal care
industry. The Body Shop is a brand that lives the values of ethics, human rights and
environmental sustainability. Marks & Spencer is known more for its apparel and
accessories. The fact that it functions in the personal care category was interesting to
study. Bath & Body works is a strong competitor of The Body Shop but has a distinct
brand image among its consumers. LUSH is a new entrant in the market and has built a
strong presence in Dubai in a short span of three years.

3.2 Research Objectives


3.2.1 To study consumer segments based on their psychographic needs and behavioral
attributes in the bath and shower category
3.2.2 To understand the various value propositions and unique features offered by The
Body Shop
3.2.3 To identify potential growth areas for The Body Shop in this category
3.2.4

To study the impact on the image of The Body Shop after it has been taken over by
LOral

25

3.3 Research Methodology


Initial steps of the research included collection of as much secondary data as possible to
thoroughly understand the dynamics of the retail industry globally as well as specifically
in Dubai. Further funneling the exploratory research to the personal care category and
narrowing it down to bath and shower products, the secondary literature gave a holistic
picture and formed as a guideline for progressing ahead with the research.
With the background of the secondary literature, objectives of our study were set to
conducting a usage and attitude study for bath and shower category. The first step
towards the study of this category was preparation of a discussion guide that included
questions specific to our respective brands as well as the category at large. Two separate
discussion guides were designed: one for the consumers and the other for the industry
experts. The discussion guide helped in getting great insight into consumer behavior and
attitudes towards this category and the competing brands as well. Having this as a base,
the questionnaire was refined and redesigned to suit objectives and align the study
towards foundational understanding of the target consumers already gained through the
secondary research.
Meanwhile, in-depth reading on the brand The Body Shop led to my interest in studying
the impact the acquisition by L'Oral had on the perception of The Body Shop by the
consumers. A qualitative research on the same was designed to briefly understand the
corporate strategy L'Oral and The Body Shop adopted and its repercussions for both the
brands in terms of consumer perception, brand awareness, brand loyalty towards The
Body Shop and consumer buying behavior.
Primary data collection with the refined questionnaire was conducted. Surveys were
taken primarily at Dubai International Academic City, followed by the Lamcy Plaza and
Mall of the Emirates. Also, the survey was circulated online to reach out to larger
customer base. Based on this primary data, analysis, using tools like SPSS and Microsoft
Excel, was done. Also, interviews with industry experts gave brilliant insights into the
market conditions of Dubai, the buying behavior of demographically diverse populace of
the place and most importantly, good knowledge of the abidance by and sensitivity
towards the culture and traditions in the region. These insights yielded and helped devise
effective marketing recommendations for The Body Shop.
26

Quantitative analysis of primary data collected through surveys helped reinforce as well
as augment the strategic implications of the recommendations for The Body Shop.

Sampling: Convenience Sampling


The method of convenience sampling was used. Convenience sampling is a statistical
method of drawing data by selecting those representatives who are willing to volunteer to
the survey and are present in locations of easy access. This sampling technique thus
makes data collection a comparatively quick process. Also, the reason behind selecting
this technique of sampling is in this part of the world, where language can be a barrier
with the Emirati and Expat Arab population it would be difficult to get representative
sample size.

Sample Size
121 responses were collected for the quantitative research. Further, expert interviews
with four industry experts and qualitative research with 25 women who have purchased
The Body Shop products in the past one year were done.

Target Consumers
Men and women are largely influenced by the UAE lifestyle and hence appearance is
very important for them. With the rise in globalization and increase in expat population,
the preference towards strong fragrances, international brands and premium products that
are perceived not to harm the skin is becoming more dominant. Several factors like
increased disposable income, large youth population, high presence of global bath and
shower category brands and expanding retail landscape in the form of bigger, better malls
are further driving its demand. Consumers are focusing on organic ingredients in their
products even though they are more expensive as the demand for natural skin care is on
the rise. (Euromonitor International, 2013)
Our main target segment for analysis was women in Dubai consisting of both Emiratis
and expat population.

27

3.4 Data Analysis Techniques


The quantitative analysis included factor analysis on the attitude battery followed by
cluster analysis to segment the respondents on psychographics. Factor analysis helped
funnel variables to certain specific factors which were easier to study. Furthermore,
clusters clearly defined targets to which The Body Shop may appeal and may be
marketed to according to the behavioral analysis. This was followed by cross tabulating
the clusters against demographics and other variables to have an in-depth psychographic
analysis for each cluster and derive marketing strategies for The Body Shop that would
target the most viable segment(s). These processes were carried out on SPSS.
General trends were derived using pivot tables and other tools of Microsoft Excel.
Qualitative research using the expert interviews and discussions with the respondents for
gauging brand image of The Body Shop post acquisition was analyzed manually. Certain
theoretical frameworks and consumer behavior models helped analyzing and deriving
inferences from this research.

3.5 Limitations and Future Scope of the Study


Sample size and the technique of convenient sampling may not result into a 100%
representation of the population. The time limit within which the research was conducted
may not have been sufficient to realize the complete potential and scope of the study. The
impact of the acquisition can be done in detail using quantitative analysis. Also, insights
from the management of The Body Shop within the region can be great value-add in
terms of understanding the nuances of operating within this region as compared to the
rest of the world.
The study is restricted to Dubai. A comprehensive study spanning over Abu Dhabi and
Sharjah additionally will give a holistic perspective about the market for bath and shower
products in the United Arab Emirates. Observational analysis at the specialty retail
outlets can also be done more comprehensively in terms of consumer buying behavior.
In future, the study can be further pursued to study the concept of Pulse stores that The
Body Shop has recently introduced globally. It is their first step towards experiential
marketing, and they have recently launched the first Pulse Store of the region in Mall of
the Emirates.
28

4. DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

4.1 Usage and attitude analysis for Soaps and Shower Gels
4.1.1 Factor analysis
The questionnaire comprehensively captured consumer attitudes and usage behaviour for
bath and shower category, specifically for soaps and shower gels. Factor analysis was
done on the attitude battery to form six distinct factors for analysing consumer behaviour,
namely pleasure-seeking, habitual, aesthetically attracted, stringent planner, experimental
and routine. Shown below is the rotated matrix component depicting the variable
constituting each factor and he weights of each variable within the respective factor.
Rotated Component Matrix
Component
3

Factors

Stress_buster
Relax
Pamper
Smell_nice
before_sleep
After_physical_activity
before_leaving_house
Before_work
More_than_once

0.846144
0.776844
0.579296
0.510962
0.499389
0.257051
-0.07275
-0.16592
0.300139

0.073201
0.050748
0.02794
0.067604
0.288948
0.753822
0.739455
0.703443
0.616158

good_packaging
Retail_store
Preplanned_list
Supermarkets
Fun
Variety
Me_time
Routine

0.162491 0.095267 0.753272 -0.10315 -0.08132


-0.0084
0.03719 0.737945 0.022781 0.321057
0.09348 0.083311 -0.01167 0.872997 -0.18078
0.145695 0.263697 -0.41296 0.602863 0.259401
0.287297 0.059006 0.27286 0.484811 0.317473
0.018038 -0.00073 0.090423 0.037023 0.791306
0.22287 0.036882 0.077622 -0.09237 0.650358
0.07798 0.047851 -0.07427 -0.02957 0.159058
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.
Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization.
Rotation converged in 8 iterations.

-0.0441
0.008513
0.405216
0.372958
0.122739
-0.2165
0.108158
0.12517
0.280238

0.049486
0.108835
0.057306
0.057128
0.058747
-0.20487
0.311488
0.240525
0.137852

-0.0193
0.114811
0.266458
0.222414
-0.2465
0.005277
0.084438
-0.0583
0.029632

6
Pleasure 0.101036 seeking
0.090952
0.056667
-0.20765
0.474835
-0.11348 Habitual
0.308223
0.439781
-0.14532
Aesthetic
-0.0422 attraction
0.087882
0.00476 Planner
-0.05465
0.454204
-0.04016 Experimental
0.277837
0.820137 Routine

Figure 5: Rotated component matrix Factor analysis

29

4.1.2 Cluster analysis - Segmentation


Further, cluster analysis was done to segment the respondents on psychographic nuances
and differences. Three major clusters came across on evident behavioural diversity.
These are variety-seeking behaviour, potential brand loyalists and compulsive behaviour.
Each of these clusters is depicted in the form of radar maps for easy visualization
followed by detailed explanation.
4.1.2.1 Cluster 1 The Variety Seekers

The Variety Seekers

Routine

Pleasure - seeking
1
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
-0.2
-0.4
-0.6

Experimental

Habitual

C1

Aesthetic attraction

Planner

Figure 6: Behavioural map for the Variety Seekers

The variety seekers are the people who behaviourally buy products they think are
innovative, provide variety and have certain individualistic or unique qualities they enjoy
during their me-time of bathing. They represent 33% of the respondents pool (39
respondents). The product attributes they expect to be present in their soaps and shower
gels are suitability for their skin type and lathering followed by colour, texture and good
packaging.
30

Age
0%

Nationality

0%

0%

<15 years
13%

13% 13%

16-25 years

Emirati

26-35 years
29%

58%

36-45 years
46-55 years

Expat Arab
34%

40%

Expat Asian
Westener

>55 years

Figure 7

Figure 8

Monthly Income

Usage
<10,000
10,000 - 15,000

8% 8%
18%

21%

8%
3%

Shower gel
alone

15,001 - 20,000

11%

20,001 - 25,000

42%

42%

25,001 - 30,000

Bath soap
alone

30,001 - 35,000

Both

35,001 - 40,000
18%
5%

40,001 - 45,000

16%

> 45,000

Figure 9

Figure 10

31

Occupation

Visits to malls per month


3%

9%
18%

43%

3%

Homemaker

Usually never
10%
26%

Full time
employment

13%

4-6 times

Part time
employment
30%

1-3 times

7-9 times

Student
45%

Figure 11

9-11 times

Figure 12
Monthly expenditure
3%
10%

<10

29%

11-20

21-30
32%

31-40
>40

26%

Figure 13

Majority of the variety seekers are young expat consumers aged between 16 and 35. A
cross-tabulation of their monthly household income along with monthly expenditure on
bathing products shows that they are not a price-conscious segment as long as they get
what they expect. 84% of them use shower gels, which again shows the increasing
popularity of using shower gels among young consumers. They are frequent visitors to
malls and usually buy their bath and shower products from retail outlets, instead of
supermarkets, hypermarkets or groceries. This means they do not buy the regular FMCG
products for their bathing needs and purposes.

32

Perception for The Body Shop

Variety offered

Knowledgeable staff

Innovative
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0

Ambience

Familiar

Eco Friendly

Easily accessible

Quality of the
product

Price

Sales promotions

Figure 14

The way The Body Shop is being perceived by the variety seekers actually poses an issue
of concern for the brand. The key strengths and attributes of The Body Shop are ecofriendliness, variety in the product lines and ranges they offer, innovations or
revitalizations and knowledgeable staff that provide suggestions on complementary
products buyers can buy along with what they are already intending to buy. From the
perception map for The Body Shop among the variety seekers, it can be gauged that the
existing strengths and attributes of the brand are not being communicated fairly well and
hence, The Body Shop has scored low on all of these. Almost 63% of the respondents are
aware of the brand but do not use its products for this category.

33

4.1.2.2 Cluster 2 The Potential brand loyalists

Potential brand loyalists

Routine

Pleasure - seeking
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
-0.2
-0.4
-0.6

Experimental

Habitual

C2

Aesthetic attraction

Planner

Figure 15: Behavioural map for the Potential Brand Loyalists

The second segment that prominently stood out was the potential brand loyalists. These
are the people that already have a pre-planned shopping list and hence, usually buy soaps
and shower gels from the supermarkets along with the monthly groceries. Their bathing
habits tend to seeking relaxation and rejuvenation. They have a bath to smell nice or to
bust stress or even have a good night sleep. They represent the largest chunk of the
respondents, which is about 48%. The product attributes important to them are suitability
to the skin type, lathering and texture of the soap or shower gel.
Factors like revitalization, innovation and variety are not considered influencers in their
decision making process. Also, aesthetically how the product looks or the ambience of
the retail outlets cannot attract these people. They represent 48% of the respondents pool
in this research.

34

Age

Nationality

0% 0%
<15 years

19%

17%

23%

16-25 years
43%

26-35 years

Expat Arab
6%

36-45 years

17%

Emirati

46-55 years

Expat Asian
Westener

54%

>55 years
21%

Figure 16

Figure 17

Monthly income

Usage
<10,000
10,000 - 15,000

9%
19%

15,001 - 20,000

9%

37%

20,001 - 25,000
13%

25,001 - 30,000

19%

Bath soap alone

50%

30,001 - 35,000
6%
15%

4%

6%

35,001 - 40,000
40,001 - 45,000

Shower gels
alone

Both
13%

> 45,000

Figure 18

Figure 19

35

Occupation

Visits to malls per month


2%
Homemaker

2%

Usually never
1-3 times

10%

25%
Full time
employment

40%

25%

34%

19%

4-6 times

Part time
employment

7-9 times

Student

9-11 times
33%

10%

12 times and
above

Figure 20

Figure 21
Monthly expenditure

6%
9%
33%

<10
11-20
21-30

33%

31-40
>40

19%

Figure 22

The potential brand loyalists are adults aged between 30 and 55 years of age. They
mainly represent the Expat Asian and Emirati population. 87% of them use shower gels
and monthly expenditure on bathing and shower products is from Dhs. 21 and above with
a large chunk spending Dhs. 40 and above. Their minimum monthly household income is
Dhs. 35,000 which mean these people can be made loyal to a brand because their
expenditure versus their income as well as the habit of making a pre-planned list for
shopping entails that they usually buy a particular brand of soaps and shower gels. On an
36

average these people visit malls 4 times in a month. These people usually buy from
supermarkets and hypermarkets like Carrefour and Spinneys. This is one major factor
that works to the disadvantage for The Body Shop.

Perception for The Body Shop

Variety offered

Knowledgeable
staff

Innovative
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0

Familiar

Eco Friendly
Series1

Ambience

Easily accessible

Quality of the
product

Price

Sales promotions

Figure 23

The perception of the brand attributes of The Body Shop is very dismal in this case as
well. Respondents are just familiar with the brand but not aware of the brand attributes
that are the key strengths of The Body Shop. Brand propositions such as variety offered,
quality of products and eco-friendliness should score higher on the radar. This may be
also because of the fact that respondents from this segment do not buy personal care
products from retail outlets or specialty brand stores. Almost 51% know the brand but do
not use its products for this category. The attributes they expect out of their shower and
bathing products are texture and suitability to the skin type.

37

4.1.2.3 Cluster 3 The Compulsive Bathers

The Compulsive Bathers

Routine

Pleasure - seeking
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
-0.2
-0.4
-0.6
-0.8
-1
-1.2

Experimental

Habitual

C3

Aesthetic attraction

Planner

Figure 24: Behavioural map for the Compulsive Bathers

The compulsive bathers are the people that bathe merely because it is a part of their
routine. There is no sort of emotionality or rationality behind making purchase decision
for their soaps and shower gels. These people are finicky about bathing before work or
leaving the house or after a physical activity or workout; basically keen on cleanliness
and hygiene, and not relaxation or variety offered. They do not even have a pre-planned
list for shopping, which means they impulsively and spontaneously decide on purchase of
a bathing product without giving it much thought. Hence, these people are not even
brand-conscious or brand-loyal. They represent about 20% of the respondents pool in
this research.

38

Age

Nationality

0% 0%
<15 years

13%

16%
26%

16-25 years
13%

45%

Expat Arab

36-45 years

Expat Asian
19%

Figure 25

Figure 26

Monthly income

Usage

Westener

<10,000
10,000 - 15,000

7%

15,001 - 20,000

14%

16%

Shower gels
alone

20,001 - 25,000
13%

25,001 - 30,000

30,001 - 35,000
30%

39%

>55 years

3% 3%

20%

26-35 years
46-55 years

29%

Emirati

10%

0%

29%

55%

Bath soap
alone
Both

35,001 - 40,000
40,001 - 45,000
> 45,000

Figure 27

Figure 28

39

Occupation

Visits per month to malls


Usually never

0%
0% 0%
Homemaker
32%

1-3 times
19%

29%

Full time
employment
13%

Part time
employment

58%
10%

Student

4-6 times
7-9 times
9-11 times

39%

12 times and
above

Figure 29

Figure 30
Monthly expenditure
3%

29%

<10
36%

11-20
21-30

31-40
>40
19%
13%

Figure 31

Compulsive bathers are young professionals aged between 16 and 35 years of age. They
are significantly spread over various nationalities and thus, do not represent any
particular geography. Peculiarly these people use soaps as much as shower gels unlike the
other two segments. These people fall in the mid-income range of Dhs. 15,000 to Dhs.
35,000. Hence, their monthly expenditure on bathing and shower category is also very
diverse and spread over the entire spectrum. This just augments the fact that these people

40

are not very particular or choosy about the products they buy. It is usually a spontaneous
decision.

Perception for TBS


Innovative
2
Variety offered

Familiar

1.5
1

Knowledgeable
staff

Eco Friendly

0.5

Series1

0
Ambience

Easily accessible

Quality of the
product

Price

Sales promotions

Figure 32

Compulsive bathers have a very distorted image of The Body Shop. There is not any
clarity on even a single product attribute which adds on to the fact that these buyers are
not very particular about the bathing and shower products they buy. The attributes
important to these people are easy availability of the product followed by price. They
perceive The Body Shop as an expensive brand. Majority of them spend no more than
Dhs. 40 on bathing products and this includes buying bathing products for the entire
household and not just an individual purchase.

41

4.2 Observational research and analysis

The Body Shop has a very dismal presence in the United Arab Emirates considering the
grandeur of the brand globally. It seems to be disconnected to its buyers at an emotional
level and buyers probably still buy from The Body Shop because of the great quality of
products it has to offer.
The stores and the front-line salesgirls at the retail outlets are great. They represent the
brand essence and provide a great experience when you are in-store. But the problem lies
with getting people in to the store. The products are arranged according to the one key
ingredient the range has; for example: the tea tree oil products like the tea tree night
cream, tea tree oil extract, tea tree face washes, tea tree based BB creams, tea tree based
foundation etc. are all placed together. The shower gels and soaps however, have a
separate section in the stores. The shower gels are placed at the eye level but soaps are
placed in baskets on lower shelves.
Products mixes are decided according to the locations of the malls. Usually Mall of the
Emirates and Dubai Mall, that have greater floor space for The Body Shop, have wide
mix of the product lines as well as ranges. Even the newer products are usually released
in these bigger malls that have greater footfalls of buyers with diverse backgrounds of
lifestyles and buying behaviours. Malls like the Lamcy Plaza, where the maximum
footfall is from Expat Asians, usually limited product ranges that are displayed.
Mall of the Emirates as well as Dubai Mall has mainly Emirati, Expat Arab and British
consumers buying from The Body Shop.
The brochures and catalogues distributed at The Body Shop outlets are dated 2012. This
indicates their lackadaisical approach towards marketing in the region. Moreover, the
content in their catalogues is not tweaked to make it relevant and appropriate for the
region. This has been further discussed in the next section.
Their online presence is bleak as well. The facebook page has mere 19,500 likes of which
only 777 are talking of the brand. The twitter page as well has meagre 473 followers. And
since, their inceptions, the tweets made by the brand are just 99. Considering the fact that
more than 80% of purchase decisions in the United Arab Emirates are made through
reviews by friends and family on social media platforms, The Body Shop needs to put in
42

great effort to make their online presence more active and evident. Their website needs
strategic planning to increase their relevance and connect in this region.
The catalogues that they distribute at their outlets have some pictures of models which
not be appropriate for the region and can be considered offensive if brought to the notice
of authorities here. This also, has been discussed in the next section.

43

4.3 Insights from Industry Experts

Along with the four industry experts I interviewed (transcripts included in the Appendix),
I have even spoke to three of the frontline salesgirls at the retail outlets at Dubai Mall,
Mall of the Emirates and Lamcy Plaza. The industry experts are people that hold
important marketing positions with Paris Gallery and Al Tayer Group. Paris Gallery
houses French luxury brands like Art Deco, Christian Dior, Estee Lauder, Giorgio
Armani, Givenchy, Lancome, Sisley and many more, while Al Tayer Group houses
Jimmy Choo, Fendi, Hermes, Burberry, Bulgari, Jaguar Fragrances and many others in
their cosmetics business. These interviews have yielded great insights in to the market
dynamics of the United Arab Emirates. The key insights and inferences derived from the
expert interviews are enlisted below:

Fragrances are very important in this geography.

Shower gels usually a part of gift packs or baskets.

Paris Gallery is a Destination store.

Consumers in this region are not really loyal to a brand.

Promotions during festivals as well as special occasions like Mothers Day are
important to keep relevance and connection with the audiences.

Extension of product lines and revitalizing the existing ones are done almost every
month. Details are kept secret always.

Sentiment in the economy matters, especially in luxury retailing.

Definition of promotions anything that changes your consumers buying behavior


towards the product offerings you have. Hence, even branding for that matter is a sort
of promotion.

Cultural sensitivity need to be very alert and careful.

It is not about what I say to them, but what they ultimately hear.

The Body Shop is all marketing blah blah. According to the expert, The Body
Shop claims to be an ethical brand, but sourcing natural ingredients from Vietnam
where deforestation is major issue is not ethical at all. Hence, The Body Shop
basically just communicates what the consumers will think is right and ethical.
44

They emphasized on the importance of living the brand with regional relevance and
consistency in terms of store design, front line salespeople and product lines.

Brand mix is always according to locations of retail outlets. Everything cannot be


placed everywhere.

Discounts are a big no. With established brands like the ones housed by Al Tayer
Group and Paris Gallery, discounts can tarnish the image of product quality to a great
extent.

They believe that The Body Shop is losing its competitive positioning in the market.
Being an ethical brand alone does not work in this part of the world.

Competitive product launches have to be dealt with lot of keenness on details and
nuances of differences.

New visuals need to be created for this market for advertising.


i.

No bare legs and shoulders.

ii.

No low cuts.

iii.

Saudis find dogs offensive.

iv.

Demos of make-up may have to be in separate enclosures within the retail


stores.

v.

Make-up artistes cannot be males.

vi.

No pictures depicting sexual connoations.

vii.

For example: a print ad that looks as follows in the United Kingdom (Figure:)
has been tweaked to the print ad in the region as shown in Figure:.

45

Figure 33: The print ad in the United Kingdom

Figure 34: The same ad in the United Arab Emirates


46

But as mentioned earlier, the catalogues circulated in the region have images with certain
connotations and hence, the management of The Body Shop needs to look into these
things with keenness.

47

4.4 Analysis of Acquisition by LOral Strategy and impact on Image of The Body
Shop
The Body Shop was acquired by LOral in March, 2006 for 562 million. The
acquisition came through when The Body Shop was in distress financially, while LOral
was (and is always) on the lookout for brands that complement their existing portfolio as
well as diversify it to meet the changing consumer demands and reach newer consumers.
It was a win-win situation for both the brands as The Body Shop could leverage upon the
expertise in marketing, research and development as well as the strong position that
LOral had globally in the cosmetics and personal care industry, while LOral could
add a brand with strong values and identity to its portfolio and learn from The Body Shop
to cater to environmental as well as human rights issues.

While strategically this seemed like the best move for both the companies, it attracted
great speculation and criticism due the fact that the brand values of The Body Shop and
LOral are very different. Also, among the brands that LOral already housed, The
Body Shop was significantly different in terms of positioning and brand image. This was
the reason this acquisition was not welcomed by the stakeholders of LOral as well.
Nonetheless, Jean-Paul Agon, the CEO of LOral and the management went ahead with
this acquisition instilling faith in the stakeholders saying that this was an addition to the
diversity of LOrals portfolio of brands.

Corporate strategy
Though LOral has a diverse/segmented portfolio, its main focus is in beauty & personal
care (skin care, hair care, and color cosmetics). Therefore, LOral can be said to follow a
differentiation strategy in each of the markets it serves and it caters to three segments
premium, mid-tier, and mass. LOrals goal is to drive sales growth through category
expansion and its primary objective is to increase its customer base from 1 billion to 2
billion by the year 2025. The company has also announced three environmental goals to

48

cut by half its greenhouse gas emissions, the waste generated in its factories and
distribution centers, and water consumption.
The Body Shop also follows a differentiation strategy with its strong ethical stance and its
embodiment of five core values protecting the planet, defending human rights, taking a
stance against animal testing, supporting community of fair trade, and activating selfesteem.

Figure 35: Corporate strategy for The Body Shop and LOral
For LOral, acquiring The Body Shop was a very good decision because it provided
LOral with an opportunity to enter the natural/organic category of beauty and cosmetics
with a strong brand. The takeover has also helped LOral build its credibility and brand
image that was earlier marred with criticism for testing of its products on animals. A
socially responsible company is perceived by consumers as having a great reputation and
provides a strong competitive advantage.

49

Figure 36: McKinsey 7S Model


Using the McKinsey 7S model to sum up, the central idea of shared values for the both
the brands are not in synchronization. This is not only because of the harder areas of
control (strategy, systems and structure), but more so because of the softer areas of
synergy, which is the staff, skills and style. There is a disconnect between the way one
would manage any other brand of LOral (or LOral itself) and the way The Body Shop
has been managed and marketed.
Qualitative analysis
According to my analysis conducted for 25 respondents who are frequent users of The
Body Shop, the consumers are generally not even aware of the acquisition. These
respondents were aged between 23 to 35 years of age.
The brand attributes in the opinion of majority of the respondents for LOral were high
chemical content, harsh on skin, no use of natural ingredients, great quality products, not
suitable for sensitive skin types, wide range of products, great color cosmetics. On the
other hand, the major brand attributes for The Body Shop were natural, fresh, ecofriendly, skin-friendly, mild.

50

When asked whether the respective respondents were aware of the acquisition, all of
them denied. Further questioning led to great insights for The Body Shop. The
respondents tended to extrapolate the image they had of LOral on to The Body Shop.
One of the respondents said I am unpleasantly surprised while another said That is
good for them, LOral is a great brand.
The respondents that gave a negative perspective on the acquisition were then told that
the acquisition has happened in the year 2006, and they have still continued to buy from
The Body Shop; they were asked whether they have felt any difference in the product
value, quality or any other attribute. The responses then were fairly in favor of The Body
Shop and the respondents said that they will continue buying the brand as it holds a
special place in their everyday life.

51

5. CONCLUSION

5.1 Key learning


This research has helped me study not only study the bath and shower category in Dubai
with focus on The Body Shop and purchasing behaviour of the buyers here, but also the
industry as whole and the market nuances and dynamics unique to this geography. The
Middle East has its own cultures and traditions. Blending and amalgamating business
practices into these important regional considerations was a very good learning from this
study.

5.2 Managerial Recommendations

Target segment - The Variety Seekers


After a thorough analysis of the three segments of respondents, I recommend that the
perfect segment to target for The Body Shop is the variety seekers. These are young
buyers and are not price-conscious as long as they get what they want. The brand
perception created by the marketers of The Body Shop does not synchronize with the
image it has created in the minds of the buyers. The reasons behind why The Body Shop
should target the variety seekers has been summarised in this section.
The brand strengths of The Body Shop (variety, innovation and products that suit and are
sensitive to different skin types) merely need to be communicated to the variety seekers.
These are the product attributes that the variety seekers want too. Eco friendliness and
other ethical attributes of the brand can be leverage to build a revitalized brand image in
the variety seekers eyes.
The Body Shop must protect its brand image as it is central to its success. They need to
focus on two major aspects, namely market penetration (introducing existing products in
the newer segments in the UAE) and product development (development of new
products).
The ERRC grid of the Blue Ocean Strategy has been used to analyze what The Body
Shop can do to attract the variety seekers and capture this potential segment in Dubai.
The Body Shop needs to focus on communicating as well as further working on
52

innovations and variety of products offered. They can even venture out into Arabic
fragrances and scents. They need to create the ambience that can be relevant and
engaging for customers. Elements of experiential marketing need to be inculcated to keep
these young and impulsive buyers to be associated with the brand and increase customer
lifetime value. They need to eliminate stressing over accessibility and quality as quality
of the products they offer is already great and accessibility through retail outlets is
already prevalent. They need to reduce selling on the value propositions of ecofriendliness and mildness of the products, as these are not important influencers to make
a buying decision in this part of the world.

Figure 37: Blue Ocean Strategy The ERRC Grid


The Body Shop should leverage on LOrals financial resources and marketing expertise
in the region to grow its business. At the same time, they need to maintain individual
brand identities as they always have so as to avoid extrapolations of ones brand image
on to the other.
Immediate steps that can be taken by The Body Shop are:

Increase consumer engagement in the brand.

Make brand presence active online and tailor it to the needs of buyers here.
53

Communicate what already exists: The brand attributes such as product aesthetics,
quality and advantages (effect) that are important factors for buyers to purchase
shower gels and soaps need to be effectively communicated to this segment.

Facebook, blogs, Twitter and YouTube: Use these social media platforms to increase
a two-way communication with the customers. The key performance indicators to
monitor the success of these strategies are engagement and reach through likes,
shares, tweets etc., social page views, unique and repeat visitors on the website,
online purchases and sales at retail outlets (conversion rate) and depth and duration of
visits on the website.

If these tasks are outsourced to a social media agency, the monthly expenses of
maintaining an active online presence would be approximately Dhs. 5000. Yearly this
would amount to Dhs. 60,000.
Considering the respondents pool is representative of the population of the United
Arab Emirates, the variety seekers constitute 33%, which is about 3 million people
(33% of 9 million). If The Body Shop is able to reach out to even 500,000 of these
through the initial efforts, and say 250,000 actually come to the outlets and buy one
shower gel in a month, the monthly revenue from shower gels alone will be Dhs. 10
million (on an average, shower gels cost Dhs. 40 in The Body Shop). Although these
are rough calculations, one can see the impact on finances through small marketing
efforts.

54

REFERENCES
(2012). Fragrances: Looking beyond the scent. Euromonitor International.
Strategy Tools - The McKinsey 7S Framework. (2012). Retrieved August 25, 2013, from Mind Tools:
http://www.mindtools.com
Ap. Dijksterhuis, P. K. (2005). The Unconscious Consumer: Effects of Environment on Consumer
Behavior. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 193-202.
Business Monitor. (2012). Business Monitor International.
CBRE . (2012).
Das, M. K. (2011). Brand Loyalty and Leveragibility: An empirical study on some selected brands of
soap. International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research, 162-172.
Deloitte U.S. . (2013). Global Powers of Retailing. New York: Deloitte.
Du, S., Bhattacharya, C., & Sen, S. (2007). Reaping relational rewards from corporate social
responsibility: The role of competitive positioning. International Journal of Research in
Marketing, 224-241.
Euromonitor International. (2012). Retail Industry in the UAE. Dubai.
Euromonitor International. (2013). Consumer Lifestyle in the United Arab Emirates.
Khaled Mahmud, K. G. (2012). Factors Influencing The Extent of Brand Loyalty of Toilet Soap Users in
Bangladesh: A Case Study on Dhaka City.
Lundgren El-Salhy, S., & Lundmark, A. (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility in Branding: A Study of
The Body Shop's Visitor's Attitudes and Purchase Decisions. Umea: UMEA University.
Park, W., Jaworski, B., & Maclnnis, D. (1986). Strategic Brand Concept - Image Management. Journal of
Marketing, 135-145.

(2012). Fragrances: Looking beyond the scent. Euromonitor International.


(2013). Global Powers of Retailing - Retail Beyond. Deloitte.
Akagun, E., Ozdemir, H., & Parilti, N. (2005). Brand Loyalty in the Cosmetics Industry: A field
study on Turkish womens Brand Loyalty. Journal of Business and Economics Research,
65-78.
Ap. Dijksterhuis, P. K. (2005). The Unconscious Consumer: Effects of Environment on
Consumer Behavior. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 193-202.
Das, M. K. (2011). Brand Loyalty and Leveragibility: An empirical study on some selected
brands of soap. International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research, 162-172.
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Du, S., Bhattacharya, C., & Sen, S. (2007). Reaping relational rewards from corporate social
responsibility: The role of competitive positioning. International Journal of Research in
Marketing, 224-241.
Khaled Mahmud, K. G. (2012). Factors Influencing The Extent of Brand Loyalty of Toilet Soap
Users in Bangladesh: A Case Study on Dhaka City.
Lamb, J. (n.d.). Engaging consumers.
Lundgren El-Salhy, S., & Lundmark, A. (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility in Branding: A
Study of The Body Shop's Visitor's Attitudes and Purchase Decisions. Umea: UMEA
University.
Mohanty, S., & Sikaria, C. (2011). Creating a Difference The Store Ambience in Modern Day
Retailing. Global Journal of Management and Business Research, 2-8.
Patwardhan, M., Flora, P., & Gupta, A. (2010). Identification of Secondary Factors that
Influence Consumers Buying Behavior for Soaps and Chocolates. The IUP Journal of
Marketing Management, 55-72.
Staisch, I. (2007). A Brand audit on the LOral Brand.
Sudhakar, A., & Suchitra, R. T. (2012). Social Factors Influence on the Buying Behavior of
personal care products.
Vicky Lofthouse, T. B. (2006). An investigation into consumer perceptions of refills and
refillable packaging. Loughborough, Leicestershire.
Alarcon, C. (2008). LOrals Other body Beautiful. Marketing Week Vol. 31 No. 13
p.19
Barney, J. B. (1995) Looking Inside for Competitive Advantage Academy of
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Bhattacharya, P. (2011) The Body Shop Gets Closer to Mass Market in India Global
Cosmetic Industry Vol. 179 No. 2 pp.22-24
Campaign (2011) Body Shop to Reposition Campaign (UK) Vols. 31/32 p.6
Costello, B. and Groves, E. (2006) Body Shop Oks LOral Bid WWD: Womens
Wear Daily Vol. 191 No. 59 pp.2-22
Johnson, G., Whittington, R. and Scholes, K. (2011) Exploring Strategy (9th edn.) FT
Prentice Hall, Harlow
Kotler, P. and Armstrong, G. (2012) Principles of Marketing (Global Edition) (14th
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Porter, M. E. (1979) How Competitive Forces Shape Strategy Harvard Business
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August p.1
Worthington, I. and Britton, C. (2009) The Business Environment (6th edn.) FT
Prentice Hall, Harlow

57

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58

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_______________________
Name: Neha Vishwas Shinde
Date: October 24, 2013
59

APPENDIX
A.1 Discussion guide for Consumers
1. Gender
2. Age
3. Do you prefer to use shower gel or bath soap?
4. Do you use shower gel or bath soap or both? If both, then why and how often?
5. What are the factors that influence your purchase of the same?
a. Hygiene
b. Long lasting benefits
c. Quality
d. Quantity
e. fragrance,
f. packaging, refills
g. eco friendly
h. price/value for money
i.

COO

j.

skin type

k. function (rejuvenate, relax, fresh, sporty, cleansing, moisturizing, multiple usage,


gel based or cream based)
l.

ease of use

6. Which brand of shower gel/soap do you use?


7. Do you purchase from specialty retail stores? Yes/ No- Why?
a. sales promotion, advertising,
b. customer service (knowledgeable staff)
c. ambience
d. Familiarity
e. CSR- animal testing, carbon emissions
f. Accessibility, store location
g. Brand,
h. Innovativeness
i.

Brand personality, symbol


60

8. Have you ever bought it to give it as a gift? Yes/No- Why?


9. How much do you spend on soap, shower gels and other shower related products, on a
monthly basis?
10. How often do you try new brands? What motivates you to try new brands?
11. Will you recommend the brand you use to others?
12. Any brands that you will not buy?
13. Do you use loofah while bathing?

61

A.2 Discussion guide for Experts

1. Why did you enter the Dubai market?


2. How profitable is shower gel category for your company? (percentage of overall sales)
3. What are the attributes and positioning of your brand?
4. What do you want your ambience to portray? What are the steps you have taken to
promote it?
5. Who are your target customers in terms of demographics/psychographics/behavioral
aspects?
6. What is your stock turnover time for shower gels?

a. Sales trend during the year? Peaks and troughs


Shopping Festivals affect your sales, since there are so many those that happen in
Dubai?
b. promotions
c. seasonality
7. Marketing strategies during these periods?
8. Do you see any potential product lines that you can expand into?
9. What are your future plans for brand extensions with respect to bath soap and shower gel
category? Why?
10. What do you foresee as the future sales trend of your current bath and shower products?
11. According to our research staff seems to make quite an impact on brand building and
sales? So you educate your staff on ingredients, quantity, etc. Of your bath and shower
gel category? What kind of training?
12. How immersed is your brand in environmental sustainability?
13. Could you elaborate on your marketing campaign in Dubai a little bit? Is it any different
from the other parts of the world?
14. Which nationalities do you see buying your bath soap and shower gel category the most?
15. When do you decide to retire or stop production of particular shower gel or bath soap?
16. Do you see social media as an important form of marketing?
17. What is your competition in the shower gel and bath soap category? Reasons?

62

A.3 Discussion guide to study the impact of acquisition of The Body Shop by L'Oral on
brand image of The Body Shop
1. What are the brand attributes for The Body Shop in your opinion?
2. What are the brand attributes for L'Oral in your opinion?
3. Are you aware that L'Oral has taken over The Body Shop?
4. Now that you know, what do you think of The Body Shop as a brand?
5. Will you still continue buying from The Body Shop?

63

A.4 Questionnaire
SECTION A:
1) Please specify your age
<15 years
1
16 25
2
26 35
3
36 45
4
46 55
5
>55 years
6
(Proceed if respondent answers 2 - 8, else terminate the questionnaire)
2) Do you use bath soap/shower gel/body washes?
Yes
1
No
2
(Proceed if respondent answers 1, else terminate the questionnaire)
3) Gender (recorded but, not asked)
Male
Female

1
2

4) Please indicate your nationality


Emirati
Expat Arab
Expat Asian
Westerner

1
2
3
4

5) What is your households monthly income? (in AED)


< 10,000
10,001 15,000
15,001 20,000
20,001 25,000
25,001 30,000
30,001 35,000
35,001 40,000
40,001 45,000
> 45,000

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

64

SECTION B:
6) Please rate the following statements on a scale of 1-5, (1-Strongly Disagree to 5- Strongly
Agree)
Strongly
Disagree

Disagree

Neutral

Agree

Strongly
Agree

I bathe to feel relaxed

I bathe after a long days work

I am particular about taking a bath before


leaving the house
I am used to taking a bath more than once
a day
I usually bathe after a physical activity like
workout, sports activity, etc.
I bathe to smell nice

I bathe to pamper myself

I purchase my bath and shower category


products from hypermarkets/supermarkets
I purchase my bath and shower category
products from specialty retail stores
I have a pre-planned list from where I
purchase my bath and shower products
I bathe because bathing is fun

I purchase a particular shower gel/soap


because it looks good in the washroom
I take a bath because I enjoy my me-time

I bathe to get a good nights sleep

I bathe because it is a part of my routine

I prefer changing the fragrances of my


soap/ shower gel because it keeps me
excited

7) Do you use shower gel or do you use bath soap or both?


Shower gel
Bath soap
Both

1
2
3

65

8) Why do you use soap? (If respondent uses soap)

Easy to use
Quick
Familiarity
Never realized/Not bothered

Strongly
Disagree
1
1
1
1

Disagree

Neutral

2
2
2
2

Agree
3
3
3
3

4
4
4
4

Strongly
Agree
5
5
5
5

4
4
4
4

Strongly
Agree
5
5
5
5

4
4
4
4
4
4
4

Strongly
Agree
5
5
5
5
5
5
5

9) Why do you use shower gels? (If respondent uses shower gel)

Hygienic
Easy to use
Long lasting benefits
Milder than soap

Strongly
Disagree
1
1
1
1

Disagree

Neutral

2
2
2
2

Agree
3
3
3
3

10) What are the key benefits that you look for in shower gel/bath soap?
a) Cleansing
b) Moisturizing
c) Fragrance
d) Refreshing
e) Relaxing
f) Exfoliating
g) Antiseptic/ Germ fighting
11) What are the key product features that you look for in shower gel/bath soap?

Good Packaging
Color of the shower gel/soap
Texture of the shower gel/soap
Suits my skin type
Lathering
Home made
Organic

Strongly
Disagree
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

Disagree
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

Neutral

Agree
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

12) Do you buy the body wash/shower gel/bath soap for only yourself or for others as well?
Only myself
Myself and others

1
2
66

SECTION D:
13) Which brands come to your mind when I say shower gel?
Brand
The Body Shop
Marks & Spencer
Bath & Body Works
Lush
Nivea
Victorias Secret
Hermes
J&J
Lux
Dove
Fa
Others

Top of Mind
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Spontaneous
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Aided
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

14) Which brand (brands) are you currently using?


________________________________________________________________________
15) Which brand do you consume most often?
________________________________________________________________________
16) Why do you consume it most often? (Rate between 1- Strongly disagree to 5- Strongly
agree)

Innovative
Familiar
Eco friendly
Easily Accessible
Product quality
Sales promotion
Price
Ambience
Knowledgeable staff

Bath and Body


Works
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

The Body
Shop
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

LUSH
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Marks &
Spencers
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

67

17) What is your level of familiarity and involvement with each of the brands or companies
listed below?
Never
heard of

Have heard
the name, but
know nothing
about them

Have used
their
products, but
not in the last
12 months

Have used
their products
in the last 12
months

2
2

Know
something
about them,
but never
used their
products
3
3

Lush
The Body Shop

1
1

4
4

5
5

Marks & Spencer


Bath & Body
Works

1
1

2
2

3
3

4
4

5
5

18) In a month, on an average, how much do you spend on body wash/shower gel/bath soap?
(in AED)
< 10
10 20
20 30
30 40
>40

1
2
3
4
5

19) Select your occupation?


Home maker
Student
Employed

1
2
3

20) How many times do you visit a mall in a month?


1-3
4-6
7-9
10-12
More than 12

1
2
3
4
5

68

A.5 Transcripts of the expert interviews


Transcript 1 Expert Interview
Asra Iftekari
Contact number: 050 4818321
Head of Marketing Operations
Paris Gallery, Dubai

Shower gels sold as a part of gift packs; major focus on fragrances

Attributes and positioning of your brand: Paris Gallery, the name itself is enough in
luxury retailing

What do you want your ambience to portray? What are the steps you have taken to
promote it? stores need to portray the essence of the brand and the country from where
it comes; very stringent selection of salespeople and trained staff, state-of-the-art interiors
and designs

Who are your target customers in terms of demographics/psychographics/behavioral


aspects by default, people who can afford and have purchasing power come to the
outlets mostly Emiratis and tourists, it also depends on the location of the outlets as
well

Promotional offers during Eid, Ramadan, DSF very important; sales during September
are usually low as people are getting back to routine from long holidays and are
financially exhausted

Delivery of corporate offers and promotions is a part of marketing efforts as well

Marketing strategies focussed and well thought out during these periods

Extension of product lines on the basis of trends and review of the existing portfolio as
well

Promotions through online media and integrated efforts are important in this region
which has a youthful and tech-savvy population

Promotions and marketing efforts should always add value. They are never instruments
of increasing awareness and knowledge of products or the brand alone!

Initiatives educational, syllabus design with a few colleges, help students with research,
strategic partner of Dubai Care, carbon footprint measures regulated strictly in office

69

The Body Shop is all marketing blah blah.

Many dont care about organic or eco-friendly products; all they care about is the effect
and how long it lasts

Cultural sensitivity very important very easy to tarnish already established brand
names

Its not about what I say, but what they ultimately hear.

Transcript 2 Expert Interview


Surekha Dsouza, General Manager of Marketing Operations, Nicola Fineran, Assistant
Marketing Operations and Marina DSouza, Secretary Marketing Operations
Al Tayer Group
Contact details - madsouza@altayer-trends.com
nfineran@altayer.com

Focus on beauty color cosmetics, fragrance, skin care

Support shower gels as complimentary products

What are the attributes and positioning of your brand? Live the brand! with emphasis
on regional relevance

Experience created national considerations, consistency and relevance.

Fragrance brands specific and tailored to this market

Skin care products in accordance to weather conditions here

Target customers in terms of demographics/psychographics/behavioural aspects: Mid


price, high end; a particular economic strata targeted which is usually aged between 25
45 years; Tourists are huge source of revenues.

Brand as well as product mixes according to location

Sales trend during the year: Peaks and troughs


Shopping Festivals affect your sales, since there are so many those that happen in Dubai

Festive season, tourist season, Chinese January, Saudis come during Ramadan and Eid

Promotions no discounts! freebies benefits fashion brands

70

The Body Shop: Image is very diluted not enough CSR. It is a competitive market, and
TBS is struggling

Focus should be on customer loyalty they killed it with the acquisition

Do you see any potential product lines that you can expand into?
Niche new launches very frequent, similar times, focus needs to be there, relevance
makes the decision for competing product launches during same times

New brands coming underway

How immersed is your brand in environmental sustainability? Gels bring back


packaging recycling cannot be key marketing strategy; Giving back to the local
community
Estee lauder breast cancer.

Could you elaborate on your marketing campaign in Dubai a little bit? Is it any different
from the other parts of the world?
a. Bare shoulders and bare legs no!
b. New visuals have to be created for this market, low cuts no!
c. Saudis find Dogs offensive
d. Phrasing sexual connotations
e. Demos of make up privately
f. No make up artists demonstrating on women
g. Images of sexual connotations big no

Social media as an important form of marketing updates every week best content
middle eastern pages activities and promotions

No online sales! whole different setup and operation required and they are retailers

No plans of going digital selling less important creation of a fun shopping experience
instead

What is your competition: Sephora, Debenhams

Loyalty schemes Amber scheme

71

Transcript 3 Expert Interview


Tariq Khan
Contact number: 050 4818321
Marketing Manager
Bath and Body Works
Alshaya Group, Dubai

Why companies discontinue certain product lines?


Because once consumers start liking a certain product line and it is discontinued after a
certain period of time, consumers feel more desperate to get their hands on that product.
In that bargain they end up visiting the store more often as they keep checking of the
product has been re-launched. Companies do run a risk of not catering to the existing
high demand of that product, but eventually consumers would get bored of that product
and would move on to other fragrances. Hence it is much better to discontinue the
product at its peak and introduce another fragrance to which customers will readily be
willing to shift.

Consumer attitude in UAE.


The bath and shower category is considered to be an indulgence worldwide but selling
products is much easier to consumer s in the UAE as they have large disposable incomes.
Also the mall visiting frequency of consumers in the UAE is more as compared to the rest
of the world which gives more opportunities for marketers to sell their product. This is
contradicted by the fact that there exists a gap between consumers and sales people here
as UAE residents consider sales people to be from lower social strata than them. Thus
they are not so open to sales people assisting them with their purchases.

Behavioral attributes in UAE


Arabs dont take bath as frequently as the rest of the nationalities. They prefer bathing
under running water. Thus consumers prefer shower gels more as compared to bath
soaps, bubble baths, etc.

Bath and Shower industry in UAE


This category is huge for all competitors in this side of the world. That because both men
and women are equally conscious about their skin. Due to the large demand present in the
72

market for shower gels, soaps is a very niche market. Sales of shower gels to soap would
be in the ratio of 50:1.

Impact of Summer surprises and shopping festivals.


DSF has now become Dubai Sales Festival as all stores end up giving huge discounts on
their products and the brand has to compromise considering competition. Brand
managers are not happy with the heavy discounts as they feel price is what attracts
customers to the brand and not the product. If given a chance they could possibly conduct
more testings, give-aways and contests.

73

A.6 SPSS Output


Factor Analysis
Correlation Matrix

Correlation Relax
Stress_buster
Before_work
before_leaving_hous
e
More_than_once
After_physical_activi
ty
Smell_nice
Pamper
Preplanned_list
Supermarkets
Retail_store
Fun
good_packaging
Me_time
before_sleep
Routine
Variety

before_leavi More_than_o After_physica


Before_work
ng_house
nce
l_activity
Smell_nice
.027
.139
.235
.168
.343
-.030
.085
.347
.178
.292
1.000
.719
.320
.276
-.010

Preplanned_li
Pamper
st
Supermarkets Retail_store
.435
.111
.170
.121
.370
.134
.143
.004
.038
.199
.186
.091

good_packagi
Fun
ng
.335
.105
.265
.132
.320
.036

Relax
1.000
.610
.027

Stress_buster
.610
1.000
-.030

Me_time before_sleep
.175
.269
.169
.421
-.002
.379

Routine
.153
.154
.267

Variety
.100
.084
.017

.139

.085

.719

1.000

.405

.330

.068

.113

.266

.274

.160

.334

.036

.095

.219

.268

.032

.235

.347

.320

.405

1.000

.306

.226

.199

.210

.082

.167

.225

.239

.160

.288

-.041

.102

.168

.178

.276

.330

.306

1.000

.110

.093

.005

.254

-.066

-.023

.060

.060

.239

.049

-.072

.343
.435
.111
.170
.121
.335
.105
.175
.269
.153
.100

.292
.370
.134
.143
.004
.265
.132
.169
.421
.154
.084

-.010
.038
.199
.186
.091
.320
.036
-.002
.379
.267
.017

.068
.113
.266
.274
.160
.334
.036
.095
.219
.268
.032

.226
.199
.210
.082
.167
.225
.239
.160
.288
-.041
.102

.110
.093
.005
.254
-.066
-.023
.060
.060
.239
.049
-.072

1.000
.452
.033
.003
.244
.274
.230
.195
.164
-.045
.149

.452
1.000
.012
.095
.365
.362
.297
.256
.308
.096
.203

.033
.012
1.000
.427
-.044
.317
-.016
-.057
.171
.030
-.083

.003
.095
.427
1.000
-.097
.216
-.197
.070
.094
.093
.112

.244
.365
-.044
-.097
1.000
.266
.413
.263
.046
.094
.198

.274
.362
.317
.216
.266
1.000
.132
.368
.348
.304
.245

.230
.297
-.016
-.197
.413
.132
1.000
.055
.163
.016
.090

.195
.256
-.057
.070
.263
.368
.055
1.000
.171
.225
.303

.164
.308
.171
.094
.046
.348
.163
.171
1.000
.235
-.079

-.045
.096
.030
.093
.094
.304
.016
.225
.235
1.000
.094

.149
.203
-.083
.112
.198
.245
.090
.303
-.079
.094
1.000

KMO and Bartlett's Test


Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of
Sampling Adequacy.
Bartlett's Test of
Sphericity

Approx. ChiSquare
df
Sig.

.704
579.951
136
.000

74

Anti-image Matrices

Anti-image
Covariance

Relax
Stress_buster
Before_work
before_leaving_hou
se
More_than_once
After_physical_acti
vity
Smell_nice
Pamper
Preplanned_list
Supermarkets
Retail_store
Fun
good_packaging
Me_time
before_sleep
Routine
Variety
Anti-image
Relax
Correlation
Stress_buster
Before_work
before_leaving_hou
se
More_than_once
After_physical_acti
vity
Smell_nice
Pamper
Preplanned_list
Supermarkets
Retail_store
Fun
good_packaging
Me_time
before_sleep
Routine
Variety
a Measures of Sampling Adequacy(MSA)

Relax
.542
-.233
.011

Stress_buste Before_wo before_leavi More_than_ After_physic Smell_nic


r
rk
ng_house
once
al_activity
e
-.233
.011
-.010
.009
-.047
-.069
.465
.103
-.018
-.136
-.001
-.029
.103
.359
-.226
-.047
-.030
.022

Pamper
-.102
-.034
.036

Preplanned_ Supermarket Retail_stor


list
s
e
.009
-.027
-.022
-.007
-.021
.084
.027 -8.70E-005
.003

Fun
-.073
.000
-.064

good_packa
before_slee
ging
Me_time
p
.033
.019
.039
-.016
.019
-.163
.011
.102
-.175

Routine
-.029
-.073
-.048

Variety
.023
-.036
-.048

-.010

-.018

-.226

.376

-.099

-.083

-.002

-.017

-.053

-.044

-.056

-.027

.031

-.024

.108

-.077

.047

.009

-.136

-.047

-.099

.602

-.109

-.031

.025

-.098

.076

-.036

.016

-.089

-.075

-.025

.169

-.067

-.047

-.001

-.030

-.083

-.109

.691

-.061

.004

.128

-.184

.086

.123

-.072

-.053

-.072

.008

.082

-.029
.022
-.034
.036
-.007
.027
-.021 -8.70E-005
.084
.003
.000
-.064
-.016
.011
.019
.102
-.163
-.175
-.073
-.048
-.036
-.048
-.465
.025
.690(a)
.251
.251
.610(a)

-.002
-.017
-.053
-.044
-.056
-.027
.031
-.024
.108
-.077
.047
-.022
-.043
-.614

-.031
.025
-.098
.076
-.036
.016
-.089
-.075
-.025
.169
-.067
.015
-.256
-.101

-.061
.004
.128
-.184
.086
.123
-.072
-.053
-.072
.008
.082
-.077
-.002
-.060

.710
-.160
-.010
.053
-.038
-.073
-.037
-.026
.012
.102
-.028
-.112
-.050
.044

-.160
.571
.066
-.065
-.133
-.058
-.079
-.009
-.101
.026
-.051
-.183
-.066
.079

-.010
.066
.643
-.267
.033
-.150
-.042
.097
-.042
.041
.120
.015
-.012
.057

.053
-.065
-.267
.641
.035
-.023
.141
-.020
.030
.008
-.125
-.046
-.038
.000

-.038
-.133
.033
.035
.651
-.043
-.227
-.107
.045
-.019
-.026
-.037
.153
.006

-.073
-.058
-.150
-.023
-.043
.523
-.008
-.153
-.070
-.084
-.089
-.137
.000
-.149

-.037
-.079
-.042
.141
-.227
-.008
.712
.085
-.045
-.018
-.039
.053
-.027
.022

-.026
-.009
.097
-.020
-.107
-.153
.085
.703
-.077
-.110
-.144
.031
.033
.202

.012
-.101
-.042
.030
.045
-.070
-.045
-.077
.549
-.059
.144
.071
-.322
-.395

.102
.026
.041
.008
-.019
-.084
-.018
-.110
-.059
.752
-.027
-.045
-.123
-.093

-.028
-.051
.120
-.125
-.026
-.089
-.039
-.144
.144
-.027
.778
.036
-.060
-.092

-.069
-.102
.009
-.027
-.022
-.073
.033
.019
.039
-.029
.023
.784(a)
-.465
.025
-.022

-.043

-.614

.683(a)

-.209

-.163

-.005

-.038

-.108

-.089

-.113

-.062

.060

-.046

.238

-.145

.087

.015

-.256

-.101

-.209

.756(a)

-.168

-.047

.043

-.157

.122

-.057

.029

-.136

-.115

-.044

.251

-.098

-.077

-.002

-.060

-.163

-.168

.636(a)

-.087

.006

.192

-.276

.129

.205

-.103

-.076

-.117

.011

.111

-.112
-.183
.015
-.046
-.037
-.137
.053
.031
.071
-.045
.036

-.050
-.066
-.012
-.038
.153
.000
-.027
.033
-.322
-.123
-.060

.044
.079
.057
.000
.006
-.149
.022
.202
-.395
-.093
-.092

-.005
-.038
-.108
-.089
-.113
-.062
.060
-.046
.238
-.145
.087

-.047
.043
-.157
.122
-.057
.029
-.136
-.115
-.044
.251
-.098

-.087
.006
.192
-.276
.129
.205
-.103
-.076
-.117
.011
.111

.844(a)
-.252
-.014
.079
-.056
-.120
-.051
-.036
.020
.140
-.037

-.252
.824(a)
.108
-.108
-.218
-.106
-.124
-.014
-.180
.040
-.076

-.014
.108
.565(a)
-.416
.051
-.259
-.062
.144
-.070
.060
.169

.079
-.108
-.416
.594(a)
.055
-.039
.208
-.030
.051
.012
-.176

-.056
-.218
.051
.055
.711(a)
-.073
-.333
-.158
.074
-.027
-.037

-.120
-.106
-.259
-.039
-.073
.809(a)
-.013
-.253
-.130
-.134
-.140

-.051
-.124
-.062
.208
-.333
-.013
.678(a)
.120
-.072
-.025
-.053

-.036
-.014
.144
-.030
-.158
-.253
.120
.689(a)
-.123
-.151
-.194

.020
-.180
-.070
.051
.074
-.130
-.072
-.123
.673(a)
-.092
.220

.140
.040
.060
.012
-.027
-.134
-.025
-.151
-.092
.699(a)
-.036

-.037
-.076
.169
-.176
-.037
-.140
-.053
-.194
.220
-.036
.600(a)

75

Communalities
Extractio
Initial
n
1.000
.639
1.000
.736
1.000
.793

Relax
Stress_buster
Before_work
before_leaving_hou
1.000
.763
se
More_than_once
1.000
.589
After_physical_acti
1.000
.736
vity
Smell_nice
1.000
.501
Pamper
1.000
.578
Preplanned_list
1.000
.811
Supermarkets
1.000
.695
Retail_store
1.000
.657
Fun
1.000
.703
good_packaging
1.000
.622
Me_time
1.000
.566
before_sleep
1.000
.638
Routine
1.000
.713
Variety
1.000
.638
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.

76

Total Variance Explained


Initial Eigenvalues
Extraction Sums of Squared Loadings
Componen
% of
Cumulative
% of
Cumulative
t
Total
Variance
%
Total
Variance
%
1
3.961
23.300
23.300
3.961
23.300
23.300
2
2.183
12.839
36.139
2.183
12.839
36.139
3
1.561
9.184
45.323
1.561
9.184
45.323
4
1.428
8.403
53.726
1.428
8.403
53.726
5
1.164
6.844
60.571
1.164
6.844
60.571
6
1.080
6.351
66.921
1.080
6.351
66.921
7
.813
4.783
71.704
8
.749
4.403
76.107
9
.738
4.341
80.448
10
.656
3.861
84.310
11
.576
3.386
87.696
12
.455
2.679
90.374
13
.414
2.436
92.811
14
.371
2.180
94.990
15
.346
2.035
97.025
16
.309
1.819
98.844
17
.196
1.156
100.000
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.

Rotation Sums of Squared Loadings


% of
Cumulative
Total
Variance
%
2.550
14.997
14.997
2.180
12.826
27.823
1.850
10.882
38.705
1.623
9.545
48.250
1.591
9.359
57.610
1.583
9.311
66.921

77

78

Component Matrix(a)

1
.682
.614
.604
.594
.589
.576

2
-.011
-.438
-.221
.139
-.184
.118

Component
3
4
.189
.359
-.075
-.013
-.453
.099
-.161
-.159
-.564
.016
-.029
-.400

5
.069
.042
-.100
-.376
-.190
.220

6
-.259
-.034
-.006
-.269
-.037
.185

-.131

.051

.105

-.127
.364
-.185
.420
-.133
-.486
.355
.204

.221
-.167
-.089
.347
.185
.106
-.589
.515

.069
.305
-.020
.192
-.105
-.226
-.149
-.431

-.378

-.138

.546

.404

.194

.435

Fun
Pamper
Relax
before_sleep
Stress_buster
More_than_once
before_leaving_hou
.565
.555
.323
se
Smell_nice
.482
-.420
-.149
Me_time
.423
-.285
.229
Before_work
.478
.607
.392
Supermarkets
.323
.444
-.244
Retail_store
.377
-.416
.529
good_packaging
.323
-.397
.248
Routine
.351
.154
.267
Preplanned_list
.316
.430
-.185
After_physical_acti
.351
.333
-.205
vity
Variety
.257
-.306
.297
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.
a 6 components extracted.

79

Rotated Component Matrix(a)

1
.846
.777
.579
.511
.499

2
.073
.051
.028
.068
.289

Component
3
4
-.044
.049
.009
.109
.405
.057
.373
.057
.123
.059

5
-.019
.115
.266
.222
-.246

6
.101
.091
.057
-.208
.475

-.205

.005

-.113

.311

.084

.308

.241
.138
-.103
.023
.873
.603
.485
.037
-.092
-.030

-.058
.030
-.081
.321
-.181
.259
.317
.791
.650
.159

.440
-.145
-.042
.088
.005
-.055
.454
-.040
.278
.820

Stress_buster
Relax
Pamper
Smell_nice
before_sleep
After_physical_acti
.257
.754
-.216
vity
before_leaving_hou
-.073
.739
.108
se
Before_work
-.166
.703
.125
More_than_once
.300
.616
.280
good_packaging
.162
.095
.753
Retail_store
-.008
.037
.738
Preplanned_list
.093
.083
-.012
Supermarkets
.146
.264
-.413
Fun
.287
.059
.273
Variety
.018
-.001
.090
Me_time
.223
.037
.078
Routine
.078
.048
-.074
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.
Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization.
a Rotation converged in 8 iterations.

Component Transformation Matrix


Componen
t
1
2
3
4
1
.620
.479
.325
.310
2
-.349
.565
-.491
.400
3
-.682
.138
.507
-.074
4
-.012
-.476
-.451
.388
5
-.165
.014
.242
.645
6
-.020
.454
-.366
-.415
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.
Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization.

5
.276
-.330
.355
.560
.156
.593

6
.328
.222
.357
.326
-.688
-.369

80

Component Score Coefficient Matrix

1
.342
.396
-.179

2
-.061
-.049
.302

Component
3
4
-.098
.002
-.126
-.048
.077
.038

5
-.006
-.099
-.065

6
.008
.030
.208

.083

.042

.082

.010

-.010

-.232

-.291

.061

-.175

.029
.004
.618
.351
.035
.278
-.045
-.141
-.069
-.130
.000

.081
.074
-.172
.217
.124
.100
-.161
.412
-.277
.040
.555

-.220
-.027
-.083
-.158
.006
.228
-.054
.135
.305
.585
-.113

Relax
Stress_buster
Before_work
before_leaving_hou
-.150
.329
.043
se
More_than_once
.052
.312
.121
After_physical_acti
.104
.464
-.207
vity
Smell_nice
.176
.010
.148
Pamper
.194
-.055
.149
Preplanned_list
-.005
-.110
.058
Supermarkets
.030
.077
-.278
Retail_store
-.129
-.013
.412
Fun
.018
-.131
.109
good_packaging
-.001
.027
.448
Me_time
.027
.003
-.080
before_sleep
.201
.029
.029
Routine
-.003
-.082
-.103
Variety
-.080
.029
-.048
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.
Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization.
Component Scores.

Component Score Covariance Matrix


Componen
t
1
2
3
4
1
1.000
.000
.000
.000
2
.000
1.000
.000
.000
3
.000
.000
1.000
.000
4
.000
.000
.000
1.000
5
.000
.000
.000
.000
6
.000
.000
.000
.000
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.
Rotation Method: Varimax with Kaiser Normalization.
Component Scores.

5
.000
.000
.000
.000
1.000
.000

6
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
1.000

81

Quick Cluster
Initial Cluster Centers

REGR factor
score 1 for
analysis 1
REGR factor
score 2 for
analysis 1
REGR factor
score 3 for
analysis 1
REGR factor
score 4 for
analysis 1
REGR factor
score 5 for
analysis 1
REGR factor
score 6 for
analysis 1

Cluster
2

-1.81860

1.53153

.38799

.44418 -1.17374

.71571

-1.73404

.38998

1.30243

.18285

1.58261 -2.49799

2.53799

-.72681 -2.13186

1.06015 -3.00525

1.13046

Iteration History(a)
Change in Cluster Centers
Iteratio
n
1
2
3
1
2.744
3.050
2.746
2
.153
.118
.133
3
.070
.090
.082
4
.000
.058
.088
5
.000
.077
.132
6
.076
.078
.081
7
.114
.071
.089
8
.110
.043
.094
9
.066
.088
.093
10
.127
.097
.064
a Iterations stopped because the maximum number of iterations was performed. Iterations failed to converge. The maximum absolute coordinate change for any center is .082. The current iteration is 10. The minimum distance between initial centers is 6.437.

82

Cluster Membership
Case
Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

Cluster Distance
2
2.663
3
2.142
2
1.071
2
2.192
3
2.552
2
1.178
2
1.794
2
1.073
3
3.260
2
3.365
3
4.429
3
2.289
3
1.574
3
3.207
3
1.544
2
2.696
3
2.244
3
2.044
3
1.609
2
1.797
2
1.156
2
3.156
2
2.347
2
1.140
2
1.332
2
2.212
1
2.945
1
2.165
2
2.409
1
2.672
3
1.716
2
2.338
2
1.607
2
2.352
1
1.271
2
2.339
1
3.314
3
1.913
1
1.590
1
3.263
2
.939
1
3.096
83

43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88

2
2
1
2
3
3
1
1
2
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
1
1
3
1
3
2
1
1
3
2
3
2
2
3
1
1

2.332
2.350
1.723
1.205
2.380
1.610
1.550
1.282
2.240
2.190
3.652
1.450
2.784
2.855
1.796
1.924
1.693
.311
2.087
3.215
2.269
1.744
1.744
1.744
1.744
2.584
.953
1.935
2.161
2.222
2.043
2.361
1.414
1.817
1.784
.701
2.612
1.141
2.272
1.628
1.664
1.223
1.608
2.057
2.073
1.366
84

89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121

2
1
1
2
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
3
1
1
1
3
3
2
2
2
2
3
3
2
2
3
1
1
3
1

1.423
2.674
2.349
2.411
2.101
2.618
1.360
1.746
2.542
1.223
.674
.943
2.348
4.013
1.534
2.082
3.088
2.419
1.588
2.261
2.241
2.923
2.268
2.426
2.221
2.887
2.516
1.890
1.923
1.777
1.620
1.400
3.261

85

Final Cluster Centers


Cluster
2

1
REGR factor
score 1 for
analysis 1
REGR factor
score 2 for
analysis 1
REGR factor
score 3 for
analysis 1
REGR factor
score 4 for
analysis 1
REGR factor
score 5 for
analysis 1
REGR factor
score 6 for
analysis 1

-.50512

.33399

.05894

.09032

-.38685

.53820

-.02492

-.18237

.33646

.21442

.47481 -1.05930

.96289

-.44303

-.43718

.13710

-.22800

.21440

Distances between Final Cluster Centers


Cluste
r
1
2
3

1
1.770
2.059

2
1.770

3
2.059
1.936

1.936

Number of Cases in each Cluster


Cluster 1
2
3
Valid
Missing

38.000
52.000
31.000
121.000
.000

86