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I went to the University of California and All I Got


Was This Stupid Thermo-nuclear Weapon
By Darwin BondGraham
The United States military
possesses 10,500 nuclear weapons.
Many of these are contained on
the tips of ballistic missiles that are
stowed in the launch tubes of 14
nuclear powered submarines that
move beneath the waters of the
Atlantic, Pacic, and Arctic Oceans.
Many more are deployed in missile
silos ranging across Montana, Wyoming, and the Dakotas. More still
are stored at Air Force bases in the
United States and many foreign nations.

a yield warheads (bombs that can


explode with as little or as much
force as desired). All of these and
more exist in the US arsenal.

and UC President select all of the


leadership at these labs, and steer
the UCs tremendous scientic
resources into each weapons labs
orbit.

How have warmongers in the


Pentagon, White House, and the
Congress managed to build and deploy such an overwhelmingly large
and absurdly sophisticated nuclear
weapons arsenal? By asking the
University of California to build it
for them.

The UC has managed these labs


since their inception. Los Alamos
was founded in 1943 by Berkeley
physicist Robert Oppenheimer, and
General Leslie Groves. Livermore
was founded almost a decade later.
Currently both labs have budgets
of over 2 billion dollars. While
both conduct a variety of scientic
work (still mostly related to miliThe UC manages both the Los
Each of these weapons is capable
Alamos and Lawrence Livermore
tary projects), their main mission
of killings millions in mere seconds. National Laboratories,
remains nuclear
This is what they were designed
the
weapons. Nuclear
for. Since the atomic
weapons activities
bombings of
account for over
the vast majority
Hiroshima
of each labs work
and Nagasaki
(see the National
in 1945, U.S.
war planners
Nuclear Security
have preAdministrations
budget http://
pared for every possible
www.nnsa.doe.
scenario in
gov/). The NNSA
which nuclear
budget line for
weapons
total weapons acVarious submarine launched graduates of the UC nuclear weapons labs
might be used
tivities accounted
again. In addition to the massive
two primary sites for the research for $1.27 billion at Los Alamos, and
overkill targeting of Russian and
and design of nuclear weapons.
$928 million at Livermore in 2004.
Chinese cities, U.S. leaders have
Both sites have also manufactured
contemplated using nuclear weapcomponents for the nuclear weap- While they have traditionally been
weapons design labs, they are
ons in wars against Korea,Vietnam, ons complex on a limited basis.
increasingly sites of production
Cuba, and elsewhere. They have
for nuclear weapons components,
What does it mean that the UC
also explored using nuclear weapespecially Los Alamos. UCs Los
ons in more hypothetical scenarios. manages these labs? It means
Alamos lab has been producing
This has led to an enormous
that the operations of these sites
plutonium bomb cores for several
falls under the authority of the
demand for numerous nuclear
years now. Last year the governweapons designs, and even more
UC Regents and UC administranumerous modications to these
tion. It means that every bomb
ment paid UCs LANL $217 million
to manufacture plutonium bomb
weapons including everything from designers paycheck comes from
earth penetrating models, to dial the UC. It means that the Regents cores for nuclear weapons.

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Bidding for the Bomb Lab

UC is not guranteed its contract to manage the bomb labs anymore. By December 1st, 2005 the DOE
will select LANLs next manager. Competing against the UC is a team headed by Lockheed Martin Corp.
and the University of Texas.
To take on this pair (the worlds largest weapons contracting corporation, and the university
of Bushs home state) the UC has formed a partnership with the Bechtel, BWX Technologies Inc., and
Washington Group International, corporations all intimately involved in the whole nuclear cycle. Among
many other things Bechtel manages the Nevada Test Site where the US tests its nuclear weapons. BWXT
operates the Pantex Facility in Texas, where all US nuclear weapons are assembled. WGI operates nuclear
waste disposal sites and handles other aspects of the nuclear cycle for private and government entities.

On wednesday May 25, 2005 over 50 UC students converged on the Regents meeting at UCSF. The students called
for the abolition of nuclear weapons, and democratization of the University. After the Regents vote to bid for the
contract to manage Los Alamos the students disrupted the meeting until UC police forced them from the room.

This is not all that these labs produce. Each is also a


powerful source of a particularly militaristic ideology.
Senior ofcials at both labs have historically promoted
increasing budgets for nuclear weapons activities in
addition to more aggressive weapons policies. Many
at the labs are at the forefront of promoting biological
and chemical weapons research in the U.S.
Both labs have also produced tons of radioactive
toxins. Livermore Lab has released tritium into local
groundwater, while Los Alamos has released nearly
every known radioactive substance into the atmosphere. Both sites store large quantities of plutonium,
uranium, and other deadly elements. Daily operations
at both labs create piles of radioactively contaminated
equipment, clothing, and materials. These labs are
environmental disasters.
Both labs are at the forefront of the renewed nuclear
weapons complex. With new weapons designs, new
arsenals, new targets, and new roles for nuclear weapons planned for by the Bush administration and many

16

in the US congress, both labs are eager to begin


work. Nuclear weapons spending is higher now than
it was during the Cold War. Unless it is challenged
the UC is likely to remain a willing participant in this
irrational and inhuman arms race.
There is opposition to the status quo. The Coalition to Demilitarize the UC is a group of students,
community members, and non-prot organizations
working to see that the UC is no longer complicit in
the production of weapons of mass destruction. We
share a larger vision of a world free of nuclear weapons and war. Were working not only to end the UCs
role in nuclear proliferation, but for a much saner,
sustainable, and just world. This is one step along the
way. To get involved with the Coalition contact any of
the following members.
Will Parrish Nuclear Age Peace Foundation:
wparrish@napf.org
Tara Dorabji Tri-Valley CAREs:
tara@trivalleycares.org
Jackie Cabasso - Western States Legal Foundation:
wslf@earthlink.net
Darwin BondGraham - Fiat Pax: darwin@riseup.net

WHO RULES THE


$

UNIVERSITY?
By Darwin BondGraham

Who Are the


UC Regents?
The Regents of the University of
California are the governing body that
oversees the UC system, UC managed DOE national laboratories, and its
numerous other research stations. They
are solely responsible for making key
policy decisions regarding everything
from afrmative action to nance and
construction. The Governor of California appoints eighteen of the regents for
12-year terms. The other seven UC Regents are ex ofcio members. These
are: the Governor, Lieutenant Governor,
Speaker of the Assembly, Superintendent
of Public Instruction, president and vice
president of the Alumni Associations of
UC, and the UC president. One regent
is always a UC student, appointed by the
other regents.
The Regents are best understood as a
body of corporate elites, and bureaucratic, technical, or managerial leaders
whose inuence and power is put to
use by shaping policy within the economic mill that is the University of
California. Many of the Regents have
nancial stakes in the operation of the
UC through either direct investments,
or through indirect interest in the operations of the school and the general
economic benets it brings to their
enterprises. Many of the Regents serve
on the boards of some of California, and
the nations largest corporations. Most
of the rms controlled by members of
the UC Board of Regents are powerful
transnational corporations worth billions of dollars.
The Regents are basically the board
of directors of the corporation UC.

Like any other corporation, the UC


is interested in expanding its power
and prestige. The UC is also a locus of
important activities including research,
and technology transition, recruitment,
and education, all of which function to
stimulate the economy and serve the
interest of large rms, the economic
elite, and the military-industrial complex.
The Board of Regents is also a politically contested body. Republican and
Democratic governors tend to stack the
board with political allies when given
the chance. Many of these appointees
were major contributors or close
friends of the governor. For instance,
Ward Connerly was appointed to the
board by former Republican Gov. Pete
Wilson. Wilsons anti-immigrant sentiments and conservative perspectives
are well known. Connerly went on to
lead the conservative attack that led
the UC to drop its afrmative action
policy. For in-depth information on
diversity in the UC, see the web site of
By Any Means Necessary - http://www.
bamn.com. Democratic governors have
been just as quick to appoint donors
and political allies to the board. Members of the current Board of Regents
have donated hundreds of thousands
of dollars to various political campaigns
in recent years. John J. Moores, probably the wealthiest UC Regent, with
a personal net worth of $750 million,
spent $105,000 on politics since 2001.
He was also the largest individual funder
of Proposition 54. Gerald Parsky, currently Chairman of the UC Regents
has bankrolled Republican campaigns
and political action committees (PACs)
with well over $200,000 of his personal
fortune since 2001. Vice-Chair Richard
C. Blum has spent nearly half a million
dollars on campaigns and PACs in the

same timeframe.

A Short History of
the UC Regents
What is distinctive about the UC (like
many other public universities) is that
wealthy elite businessmen have always
dominated its governing body. Most
private colleges and universities were
governed by clergymen well into the
rst decades of the 20th century. Public
universities, however, were overseen from
day one by a group of men with goals of
prot and power, in addition to education
and enlightenment. The Regents are, and
always have been, primarily concerned
with the role of the university as an instrument of economic growth via scientific and technological development, and the
training of an educated workforce. They
act as the leadership for the power elite
to determine the larger strategic roles of
the university that will serve transnational
corporations, the military, and the state.
The very rst UC Regents personied
the major economic activities of California, circa 1868. Nearly all of them had
acquired interests in mining, farming, railroad, and ranching operations after having
immigrated to the state during and after
the famous Gold Rush of 1849. Most
were prominent bankers, lawyers, merchants, and mining and real estate tycoons.
Charles Reed, a UC Regent from 1868 to
1872 traveled to California from Vermont
where he had been an engineer for the
Vermont Central Railroad. He eventually became a manager of the California
Quicksilver Mining Co., and a major stockholder in the massive Southern Pacic
Railroad (the railroad that built Leland
Stanfords fortune). Samuel Merritt, a Regent for the Universitys rst three years
of existence was a director of the Bank of
Oakland, and a major real

17

estate developer in San Francisco, Oakland,


and Washington State. Merritt is credited with constructing over 100 buildings
in Oakland. Lake Merritt in Oakland was
named after Samuel Merritt built the damn
that separats the bay from the estuary that it
originally was.

warships. At its height, Union Iron Works


was the largest industrial plant on the West
Coast. Scotts factory built many battleships
for the U.S. Navy, including Admiral Deweys
agship, the U.S.S. Olympia, and much of
the Pacic eet that destroyed the Spanish
Navy and sailed into Manila in 1898, beginning the U.S. colonization and occupation of
the Philippines. Scotts
Union Iron Works also
built ships for the rising
imperial Japanese Navy.
In the same year that the
United States was putting
down Filipino freedom
ghters, Scott traveled to
St. Petersburg to advise
the Russians on retooling
their industries to build
warships and weapons.

Regent Scotts Union Iron Works of San Francisco building the


USS Wisconsin, c. 1900.
The land holdings and business activities
of the rst UC Regents were by no means
limited to the territory of the United States.
For instance, Regent Thomas Doyle, a lawyer
and Shakespearean scholar was the general
agent for the American Atlantic and Pacic
Ship Canal Companys ill-fated attempt to
cut a canal through Nicaragua in 1852. This
failed foray into Latin America was followed
by his successful work to recover nearly $1
million from the Mexican government for the
Catholic Church of California.
The most famous member of the rst board
of Regents is probably William C. Ralston.
Ralstons elaborate nancial empire organized
through the Bank of California was invested
in shipping, commodities, construction, public
utilities, but most importantly in silver mining
and other precious metals in the Sierra Nevada. Ralstons robber baron style eventually
led to an Enron-like meltdown of his bank,
after which Ralston committed suicide by
swimming out into the cold waters of the San
Francisco Bay.
Other Regents of the University in its early
days included Irving Murry Scott and Isaias
Hellman. Both are good examples of the
kinds of men who oversaw the University in
its infancy.
Scotts Union Iron Works was one of the
largest producers of industrial machinery
used in mining the Comstock Load. Union
Iron Works ultimately shifted from industrial machinery and construction iron to

18

Regent Isaias Hellman


arrived in California from
Germany to run a dry
goods business in the mid 1800s. In little
time he expanded to banking. In 1890 he
established Wells Fargo Bank, now the fourth
largest bank in the United States, and also the
institution that handles banking for the UCs
nuclear weapons laboratory in Los Alamos,
NM. Hellman went on to sit on the boards
of numerous corporations.

The UC Regents remain a board composed


mostly of wealthy businessmen, lawyers,
bankers, along with the occasional educator or civil servant. The overall role of the
university has changed little since its founding. Changes in the economic base and
leading industries of California are reected
in corporations that the current Regents
direct, mostly software, electronics, media,
nance, military-industrial, and real estate.
The current board of Regents are senior level
executives or directors of a total of at least
55 major corporations, and banks. Some of
the most recognizable include Northwest
Airlines, Walt Disney Company, San Diego
Padres Baseball Club, Westwood One, and
Gottschalks Inc.

Cal and the Westward


Course of Empire
The University of California was founded on
the 23rd of March 1868 by an act of the State
Legislature. This paralleled other states efforts to establish public colleges and universities via the U.S. Congresss Morrill Act land
grant act that gave property over to states

for the purpose of establishing universities.


These new public schools stood in contrast
to the entrenched private universities located
mostly in the Northeast. Whereas many
of the private universities would remain
ecclesiastical institutions to educate and
socialize the sons of the upper class, the new
public universities were intended to further
the development of technical and scientic
knowledge for American industrial enterprise.
Public universities had an applied focus from
day one.
Public schools were also more inclusive from
the start. Although access to the UC and
similar institutions for women and minorities
was still a hard fought goal made difcult by
discrimination, sexism, and institutional inequalities, public schools still stood shoulders
above the lily-white male academies like Yale,
Harvard, and Princeton. This was especially
true for opening colleges up to women.
Californias 1879 constitution stated that; No
person shall be debarred admission to any of
the collegiate departments of the university
on account of sex.
From Florida to Washington State, public
schools were chartered for the explicit
purposes of educating a generation who
would propel the U.S. economy to a position of hemispheric dominance in agriculture,
industry, and commerce. Unabashed talk
of manifest destiny, American empire, and
unquenchable economic growth were legion
in these early universities. California and the
United States were rising among the powerful
states of the modern world system through
territorial expansion, economic growth, and
military conquest during this era. The founding of public universities was an effort to
bolster the scientic and technical might of
the nation, while educating the future political
leaders and business owners of the rapidly
growing system of American monopoly capitalism. The UC was an archetypical college in
the new American political economy.
The rst UC campus was located to a sloping
rural hillside just north of the city of Oakland.
As the town site around the University began
to grow it was named Berkeley in honor
of British philosopher and Bishop George
Berkeley. In 1729 Berkeley had traveled to
the United States hoping to establish a missionary school to prosthelytize and civilize
the primitive aboriginal native peoples of
the New World. His dream to save the indigenous from themselves went unfullled in his
lifetime, but the founders of the UC named
the rst campus in honor of Berkeley and his

values. Daniel C. Gilman, second president


of the University ennobled Bishop Berkeley
and the ideals he represented in his inaugural
address to the university in 1872:
I hail it as a omen of good, both for religion
and learning, that the site of this University
bears the name of Berkeley, the scholar and
the divine. It is not yet a century and a half
since that romantic voyage which brought to
Newport, in Rhode Island, an English prelate,
who would found a college in the Bermudas-the Sandwich Islands of the Atlantic--for the
good of the American aborigines. He failed in
seeing his enthusiastic purpose accomplished.
He could not do as he would; he therefore
did as he could. He gave the Puritan College
[Yale University], in New Haven, a library and
his farm, and endowed in it prizes and scholarships which still incite to the learning of
Latin. There, his memory is ever kept green.

Bishop George Berkeley whose name and


ideals were adopted by the founders of the
UC.
... His fame has crossed the continent, which
then seemed hardly more than a seaboard
of the Atlantic; and now, at the very ends of
the earth, near the Golden Gate, the name
of Berkeley is to be a household word. Let us
emulate his example. In the catholic love of
learning, if we cannot do what we would, let
us do what we can. Let us labor and pray that
his well-known vision may be true:

Westward the course of empire


takes its way;
The four rst acts already past,
A fth shall close the drama with
the day;
Times noblest offspring is the last.
The course of American empire had by the
closing of the 19th century led to the edge of
the continent, to the conquest of the Spanish
colonial possessions of the Philippines, to the
taking of Hawaii, the looting of Latin America,
and the American occupation of strategic

Image taken from URS Corporations web site www.urscorp.com. Current UC Regent Richard Blum is Vice Chairman of URS Corp.
island outposts across the Pacic Ocean
too numerous to list. The course of American empire was oriental, and the UC was
instrumental in this drama. California was
envisioned as times noblest offspring, and the
UC, as its early presidents, regents, many faculty, and patrons would ensure, was a servant
of this burgeoning American empire, as much
as it was anything else.
As a school for the advancement of mechanical arts, agriculture, and mining, Berkeley
excelled in educating several generations of
miners and engineers who transformed the
western landscape, and amassed fortunes in
the process. Early UC graduates went on
to mine precious metals from the hills of
Nevada to South America, to exploit mineral
deposits throughout the Pacic Basin, to
engineer massive water projects, among many
other things. The University also provided
for the personnel and technical skills to build
up many edgling California businesses into
some of the most powerful transnational
corporations like Bechtel and Wells Fargo
Bank, among many others. The engineers and
entrepreneurs educated at Berkeley in these
early years were the vanguard of American
capitalisms colonization and transformation of Latin America, Asia, and the Western
North America.
The Universitys role in the larger political
economy of global trade, warfare, and politics
has only grown over time. As the largest university in the United States, with enormous
scientic and educational resources, the UC
stands among the elite circle of American
academic institutions that help to shape state
policy, carry out the intellectual and scientic work of military and state authorities,
educate the future economic, military, and
business elites, and train the upper stratums
of managerial and technical workers for state
and corporate enterprises. These structural
roles fullled by the University are ensured

by the careful management of those who


oversee the long-term direction and growth
of its resources and personnel; the Regents
of the University of California.
[Darwin BondGraham is a graduate student
in sociology]

Further Reading
Fiat Pax. The Direction of Higher Education. www.atpax.net/dohe.htm
Searchable web page of all UC Regent
biographies from 1868 to the present:
http://sbdisorientation.org/regentbios1868-2005.htm
UC Berkeley Professor Charles
Schwartzs web site on the UC
http://ist-socrates.berkeley.edu/~schwrtz/
Gray Brechin. Imperial San Francisco:
Urban Power, Earthly Ruin. UC Press,
1999.
University of California History Digital
Archives. http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/uchistory/
Upton Sinclair. The Goose Step: A Study
Of American Education. Haldeman-Julius
Publications, c1923.
Jennifer Washburn. University, Inc. : the
corporate corruption of American higher
education. Basic Books, c2005.
Benjamin Johnson, Patrick Kavanagh, and
Kevin Mattson (Eds.). Steal this university
: the rise of the corporate university and
the academic labor movement. Routledge, 2003.

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23

Regent Proles
Richard C. Blum

Gerald L. Parsky

military-industrial com-

By Darwin BondGraham
Richard C. Blum
A wealthy nancier
and Democratic Party
insider, Regent Blum
is married to Senator
Dianne Feinstein, and
has provided cash and a
funding network that has
fueled her rise in politics
over the last two decades. Blums net worth
is probably in the level of
several hundred million dollars. Blum is the quintessential power
elite. His nancial contributions to the Democratic Party and
related political action committees often exceeds $100,000 in
a given year. He also serves on the boards of several inuential
policy organizations such as the Brookings Institution.
His nancial holdings are primarily leveraged through
his Blum Capital Partners, and Richard C. Blum and Associates
capital investment corporations based in San Francisco. Through
these entities Blum invests in numerous global corporations and
business ventures. Blum holds considerable stock in CBRE, the
largest commercial real estate rm in the world. Blum is also an
owner of the Korean banking outt, Korea First Bank, Northwest Airlines, and Playtex Products.
Blum holds millions in stock and serves as vice president for URS Corporation, a major military-industrial company
that holds innumerable contracts with the U.S. military and is
currently making millions of dollars off the rebuilding of Iraq
through its Perini Construction, EG&G, and other subsidiaries.
URS is the corporate parent of Lear Siegler Services and EG&G
Inc., two companies that URS acquired from the Carlyle group.
The deal handed $170 million in URS stock over the Carlyle
group, making the Washington D.C. based merchant bank a major shareholder in URS along with Regent Blum. Carlyle sold of
its stake in URS in 2003 (Engineering News Record, 5/31/2004).
The exit of Carlyle has not reduced URS and Blums stake in the
military-industrial sector.
Through URS, Blum remains a major player in the

24

r
Paul A. W a c h t e

plex. One notable example is URSs contract for


construction services at the UC managed Los Alamos nuclear
weapons laboratory (LANL). As a UC Regent Blum is responsible for overseeing the overall operations of LANL, a non-prot
public service
Sample Contracts Held By
according to Blum
Blums URS Corp., and Perini
and the Board
Corporation with the US Military.
of Regents. As a
Perini Corp. - $52,083,473 rm-xed-price
Vice President and
contract for design and construction of an Afmajor shareholder
ghan National Army Regional Brigade facility.
in URS, Blum is
URS Corp. - Cost plus contract to provide
responsible for
Tactical Control System (TCS) software
engineering to support Raytheon in the Navy
increasing prots
Fire Scout unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)
through contracts
integration onto the Littoral Combat Ship.
secured with the
URS Corp. - Awarded a $25 million per year
U.S. military and
contract to provide engineering design and
construction services at the U.S. Department other clients like
of Energys Los Alamos National Laboratory
LANL. In July of
in New Mexico.

2000 URS was


awarded a contract for design
and construction services at the U.S. Department of Energys
Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. This veyear contract (with a ve option year extension) will enrich
URS and Richard C. Blum by $25 million per year. It also builds
up the U.S. nuclear weapons complex to the prot of many men
like Blum. The line between Blums management of the University and his prot driven management of URS is blurred beyond
distinction.
From www.urscorp.com & denfenslink..mil

Gerald L. Parsky
At the UC Regents board
meeting on May 25, 2005, Regent
Parsky was asked by a group of
UC students to dene the word
peace. The students were referring to the ultimatum he had just
given them: you students can only
stay in this room and observe
the board meeting if you remain
peaceful. He was threatening to

remove the students by force if they continued to speak out


against the UCs management of nuclear weapons labs. What
do you mean by peaceful? asked the students. Regent Parsky
replied, Peace means you dont speak!
Perhaps Regent Parsky gets his denition of peace from
his friends in the Republican Party. Peace and Security is increasingly dened by the Bush administration and its allies as the
severe restriction of civil rights, a perpetual war on terror, and
unprecedented buildups of state military forces at the expense of
nearly everything else. To put it simply, war is peace, freedom is
slavery, ignorance is strength.
If Regent Parsky and President Bush seem to share
the same denition of peace, thats because theyre close allies. Parsky is Bushs main man in California. In 2000 and 2004
Parsky chaired George W. Bushs California election committee.
This primarily meant that Parsky was responsible for tapping
the states wealthy republican donors. Parsky raised enormous
amounts of money for Bushs campaign through his network of
business associates and friends in high places. Parksy was a Bush
Pioneer in 2000, and Bush Ranger in 2004. This means he successfully raised $100,000 for Bush in 2000, and $200,000 in 2004.
Regent Parsky got his start in politics in the Nixon
administration working in the Federal Energy Ofce (FEO). The
FEO was charged with managing the fuel crises of the 1970s
caused by Arab oil embargos against the United States. In little
time Parsky was promoted as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury
where he worked under George Schultz (who would leave the
post to become an executive at Bechtel Corporation). After this
stint in government Parsky joined forces with William French
Smith to found a legal practice specializing in the transnational
movement of capital. (The Daily Princetonian.com 11/5/04).
Not coincidentally, William French Smith would also become an
executive at the Bechtel Corporation. Parsky and Smiths legal
practice was located in Los Angeles but had ofces in places as
far away and intriguing as Saudi Arabia. This period of Parsky
career is worthy of more research.
Nowadays Parsky owns and manages Aurora Capital Partners. His Holdings in Aurora Capital are chartered in
Delaware and the Cayman Islands. It is very likely that California
sees few tax dollars from his business enterprises. Incorporating in Delaware is nothing unusual in American business, but the
Cayman Islands remains a relatively more uncommon practice,
mostly one designed to avoid all taxes whatsoever. Several
branches of Aurora Capital are chartered in the Cayman Islands
in order to avoid U.S. federal and state taxes, as if Delaware
hadnt set the bar low enough. Parsky sits on the boards of
several corporations owned in part by Aurora Capital.

Paul Wachter
If ever a seat on
the Board of Regents was
a kickback for the governors
most loyal cronies, Paul Wachter
proves it. To say that Wachter and
Schwarzenegger are close friends
is a gross understatement. To say
that theyve done a little business
together is equally off the mark.
According to Daniel Weintraub,
political columnist for the Sacramento Bee, within Schwarzeneggers inner circle, the most
important are his wife, Maria, and longtime friends Paul Wachter
and Bonnie Reiss. Weintraub notes that Wachter is, Schwarzeneggers personal nancial adviser, [and] has known him since
1981, when they met through Marias brother Bobby. Wachter
began managing the actors nancial portfolio in the mid-1990s
and served as his spokesman on personal nancial issues during
the campaign. But his inuence now extends beyond money.
(Weintraub. Sacramento Bee, October 19, 2003).
Paul Wachter is Schwarzeneggers money-man. Before
Schwarzeneggers run for governor the two were business partners on innumerable deals. Wachter currently manages the blind
trust into which all of Schwarzeneggers investments were liquidated when he became governor. Blind trusts are required of
elected ofcials to avoid conicts of interest. But given Wachter
and Schwarzeneggers buddy-buddy relationship its hard to see
how Wachter acts as an independent disinterested manager of
the governors assets. Schwarzeneggers nancial holdings were
briey and partially disclosed during the recall campaign in 2003.
They revealed a nancial empire of tens of millions of dollars
invested in securities, private equity funds, and over 100 business
ventures, many in parternship with Wachter.
In addition to Wachters position as the governors most
trusted advisor, Schwarzenegger has also appointed Wachter to
his state Commission for Jobs and Economic Growth to serve
alongside the Rand Corporations Chairman Ron Olson, billionaire investor F. Warren Hellman, and the Gaps Chairman Donald
Fisher.
Wachters nancial company, Main Street Investment
Partners, has managed Schwarzeneggers money for decades. A
particularly incestuous aspect of Wachter and Schwarzeneggers
relationship is that Wachters rm is actually located in a building
owned by Schwarzenegger. Called Main Street Plaza, the building
nets Schwar-

25

CONTACT

PHONE

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37

CCOF
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38

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756-1862
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Lin King

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752-0466
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edu/craftcentertop.html
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www.sierraclub.org/ico
www.ccr.ucdavis.edu

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www.farmland.org
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www.sarep.ucdavis.edu
756-2258

Amnesty International
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Eve

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mec@pacic.net
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www.pacicsites.com/~mec/
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echen@ucdavis.edu
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steac@mother.com
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www.strawbuilding.org
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BOOKS
Naturalist
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TRAVEL
The Green Tortoise
Outdoor Adventures

1-800-867-8473
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dajohnson@ucdavis.edu

Hosteling International

415-863-1444

hiayh@norcalhostels.org

MEDIA
AS PAPERS
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Roshani Parekh

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410-243-2471
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415-848-6767
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400-1974

HEALTH
Davis Holistic Health Center

758-7525

HOMEOPATHY
The Homeopathic Alternative

758-8656

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edu/outdooradventures.html
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bpmnews@aol.com
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lapalabra@ucdavis.edu
atland@dcn.davis.ca.us

www.davisatlander.com
www.fullcoverage.yahoo.com

homeopathic_
alternative@pacbell.net

39

WESTERN MEDICAL STUFF


Cowell Student Health Center
Planned Parenthood
Aquarian Effort Medical Clinic, Minority Drug Treatment, Heroin Detox
Davis Free Clinic
COUNSELING
Department of Consumer Affairs
Health Education and Promotion
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752-2300
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LEGAL
ASUCD
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752-1990
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ANIMAL HEALTH
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752-2957
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CHILD CARE
Davis Parent Nursery School
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School
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SPIRIT
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The Belfry
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Bahai
HOW TO BE INVOLVED WITH
REORIENTATION
Campus Center for the Environment

40

www.plannedparenthood.org

elephus@softcom.net

www.enviroweb.org/paws/

757-5377
758-2940
757-5370
753-6662

Michelle Marchand
Steve Simmons
Iman Abedini

758-1440
758-8583
756-5216
758-0842
756-1550
753-2581
759-9455

752-9624

www.thebelfry.org
erabedini@ucdavis.edu

cce.ucdavis.edu