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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction: The Basics


5 Chapter 5: Magic
129
5
Before You Begin
Casting Spells
129
Creating a New Character 6
Designing Spells
131
What is the Vexith ?7
Spell Effects
134
Tutorial: Vorgrel the Ogre 8
Animated Minions
171
175
Bardic Songs
17
Chapter 1: Faculties
Attributes17 Chapter 6: Compendium 183
Stats18
Playable Species
183
Disciplines19
Languages246
Professions27
Divinity249
Lycanthropy251
Chapter 2: Traits
31
Vampirism254
Disadvantages33
Creeds40 Chapter 7: Game Master 259
Advantages42
Managing the Game
259
260
Running Adventures
Chapter 3: Equipment
59
Designing Adventures
261
Currency59
The Campaign
266
Armor61
Designing Creatures
270
Shields62
Creature Traits
272
Weapons64
Animal Templates
287
Provisions & Services
78
Magical Items
90 Appendix302
Glossary302
Chapter 4: Gameplay
99
Index304
Combat Rules
102
Sheets & Templates
310
Combat Actions & Tactics 108
General Rules
116

THEBASICS

INTRODUCTION
THE BASICS

he Vexith Roleplaying Game is a unique dice-based tabletop


roleplaying system that allows you and your friends to tell
a collaborative, interactive story, set in a magical world of high
fantasy and adventure. Each player creates his own unique characteran imaginary personaand then attempts to roleplay that
characters personality and abilities accordingly. Each choice that
a character makes affects the game in different and often unexpected ways, which drives the story forward.
One person assumes the role of the Game
Master (GM for short) who, instead of creating her own character, is responsible for
roleplaying the various enemies, monsters, and non-player characters (NPCs
for short) that inhabit the game world. The
GM also acts as the storys narrator by describing each scene and situation to the
players as the tale unfolds. At times
the GM must also serve as a judge
or referee, and is responsible for
interpreting the games rules from a
neutral, unbiased perspective.
Together, the GM and the players tell
a story with an immeasurable range of different outcomes and possibilities. Over the course
of their adventures the player characters (PCs for short)
hone their skills and grow in power, but the imaginary
world in which they live and adventure is also changed,
whether for good or for ill.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

In order to play the Vexith Roleplaying Game you need to


have a few basic things:
Game Master and Players: The game requires one person
to be designated as the GM. This person designs the adventures, controls the game world and the creatures within it, and acts as the judge for the game. At least one player
is also required, but having 35 players is best.
Character Sheets and Pencils: Each player needs their own
character sheet to record and keep track of their characters information.
Scrap Paper: Scrap paper is handy for taking notes, drawing
maps, and jotting down other information not related to
ones character.

Dice: At least one set of polyhedral dice is needed, but one


set per person is preferable. Each set should include one
die of the following types: four-sided (d4), six-sided (d6),
eight-sided (d8), ten-sided (d10), and twelve-sided (d12).
Movement Board: A mat, board, or other type of playing
area divided into 1-inch squares is required. A movement
board allows the GM to set up combat encounters to aid
the players in visualizing the scene. A surface that is
compatible with dry-erase markers is probably the
best option.
Miniatures or Counters: Each player should
have a unique miniature or visual counter to
represent their character on the movement
board. The GM should have counters to represent the various NPCs and monsters that
the characters engage in battle.
Character Status Mats: All players should have a status mat for their
character to help keep track of health,
stamina, and fortune tokens.
Vexith Initiative App (optional): Having access to the free Vexith Initiative App
via computer, tablet, or smart phone is highly recommended but not required.
Colored Tokens: Each player should have access to
colored tokens, such as glass gems or plastic beads, that
can be used to represent the following quantities:
Red (Health): Health points are used to keep track of
your characters general wellbeing.
Blue (Stamina): Stamina points measure your characters state of physical exhaustion.
Green (Fortune): Fortune points are used by your character to influence an event or change its outcome
(NPCs and monsters do not use fortune points).

Learning How to Play

Tabletop roleplaying games can seem overly complex to


someone who has never played one, especially upon first glimpsing the hundreds of pages of rules. However, most of the games
bulk is simply due to offering a variety of choices, such as different species to play, different traits to select for your character, and
different spell effects to cast. While it is certainly helpful to at
least skim the book prior to playing for the first time, the truth of
the matter is that new players do not need to read the book from

INTRODUCTION
cover to cover in order to play the game. Instead, try focusing on
those rules and chapters that are relevant to your own character.
Where to Start: New players will probably benefit most
from simply reading this Introduction and each of the beginning
sections from the various chapters. These sections cover the
fundamental rules of the game, while the rest of each chapter is
typically devoted to offering additional character options. Skimming the various character options may be helpful when deciding
which ones you want to select for your first character, but many
involve specific rules that can be initially ignored.
The most important chapter to read is probably Chapter 4:
Gameplay since it describes the bulk of the games combat mechanics and its general rules. Most players can opt to skip Chapter
7: Game Master since it is geared more toward offering advice to
GMs (the creation of custom adventures and campaigns, rules for
designing new creatures, etc.)GMs, especially those who are
new to the role, would certainly do well to read that chapter in
greater depth!

CREATING A NEW CHARACTER

The Vexith Roleplaying Game utilizes a point-buy system,


referred to as character points, which allow you to improve and
customize your character. New characters start the game with a
varying number of unspent character points according to their
species, and new character points are earned over the course of
the game to allow for continued growth and development.
The exact process for creating a new character often differs
from player to player. One player may prefer to select his characters species first so that he might then use that choice as the stepping stone to develop the rest of his characters concept. Another
player may instead prefer to base her characters concept around
a specific trait, spell, or game mechanic, thereby postponing the
choice of her characters species until afterwards so that she can
find one that is more suited to her chosen style of play. In other
words, there is no one right way to build a new character.

Five Essential Aspects

While there may not be one specific path that must be followed when creating a new character there are five essential aspects that every new character must possess:
1. Species: There are 37 different sapient playable species
from which your character can be created, not counting
those with additional subspecies or other variations. Each
species grants special benefits and flaws that affect your
character during play. Species descriptions are located in
Chapter 6: Compendium.
2. Faculties & Languages: You may spend a portion of your
character points improving attributes, disciplines, and
professions. Stats are derived from attributes and the
number of languages that your character knows is derived
from his Intellect attribute rank. Faculties are detailed in
Chapter 1 and languages are detailed in Chapter 6.
3. Traits: Disadvantages cause your character to suffer penalties during play but grant additional character points
to spend. Creeds are belief systems that your character
strongly adheres to, but they are entirely optional and

do not cost or grant character points. Advantages impart


unique benefits and abilities to your character, but they
must be purchased by spending character points. Traits
are primarily described in Chapter 2, but species traits and
creature traits can be found in their respective chapters.
4. Equipment: You may spend gold to equip your character
with armor, weapons, and gear. Doing so may help your
character better survive the many dangers of adventuring.
Equipment is detailed in Chapter 3.
5. General Characteristics & Background: It is necessary
to determine your characters name, gender, age, height,
and weight. You may also want to create a fictional background for your character, including a detailed account of
your characters history, a list of siblings and other relatives, religious beliefs, allegiances, and so forth. Average
benchmarks for age, height, and weight may vary greatly
according to each species and can be found in Chapter 6.

Starting Values

These are the starting values for every new character, prior
to the selection of a species or spending character points:
Attributes/Disciplines/Professions: Rank 0
Money: 50 gold pieces
Fortune Points: 1
Character Point Value (CPV): After you have selected
your characters species you must calculate how many character
points he has to spend on attributes, disciplines, professions, and
advantages. All new characters begin the game with a total CPV
of 125 (except for shades), but a characters species value must
be subtracted from this total to determine his number of unspent
character points. The species value is located in brackets within
the species box of each playable species.
For example, if your character is a dwarf he would have
a species value of 33, which would give him a CPV of 92/125.
In other words, he would have 92 unspent character points with
which to increase his faculties and buy advantages. Please refer
to General Rules: Character Points in Chapter 4: Gameplay for
additional examples and information.

Using a CPV Planner

Making use of a CPV planner (included in the Appendix) is


a good strategy for allocating character points prior to recording
information on your character sheet. A CPV planner allows you
to efficiently calculate how many character points are being spent
on attributes, disciplines, professions, and advantages.

Regarding Balance

Most roleplaying games attempt to balance their rules so that


different characters with similar amounts of experience are comparative to one another in overall power. The Vexith Roleplaying
Game is no different and uses character point values to help balance all aspects of the game. One distinction that should be made,
however, is that combat is not the only benchmark for gauging
how effective a character can be. Adventurers come in all shapes
and sizes, and with varying talents and abilities. Sword-wielding
warriors and fire-flinging mages are not the only kinds of characters that can prove effective during play. A skilled diplomat

THEBASICS
may be able to talk his way out of a fight and might even gain
other benefits for doing so, whereas a talented scout may be able
to avoid a fight altogether by sneaking past undetected, thereby
gaining a tactical advantage later on.
Furthermore, all of the various playable species are also
balanced using character point values to evaluate their inherent
traits and qualities. For example, as far as new characters are concerned, a minotaur is equivalent in power to a pixie, but after
viewing their differences it is easy to see that minotaurs tend to
make better warriors. A minotaurs greater size allows it to dish
out considerably more damage and also allows it to withstand
more damage from hostile attacks. Several of the minotaurs traits
are also geared toward physical combat. Nevertheless, the pixie
is not without advantages of its ownit can fly, it can blast opponents with arcane energy, and its tiny size makes it more accurate
and defensive. While pixies do not tend to make the most effective brutish-type warriors they can still be designed to be effective in battle, even in melee combat with the right combination of
faculties and traits. The same is true of every species, and while

some are going to be more suited to certain roles than others they
are all still equivalent regarding overall power.
The point to remember is that power in battle is not the only
kind of power. Over the course of an adventure, and especially
throughout a full campaign, characters of all types should encounter plenty of situations where they can each make use of their
unique strengths, whether combat-oriented or otherwise.
Min-Maxing & Tradeoffs: One thing to keep in mind when
making a new character is that there are always going be tradeoffs
involved with the different choices you make. If your character
focuses too much in one area he is going to suffer in another. If
he spends too many character points on attributes he is going to
have fewer points to spend on disciplines and advantages. Thats
the beauty of the games point-buy system, in that it allows you
to design your character in virtually any way you want, but every
choice you make has consequences that must also be considered.
To better illustrate this point please refer to the example character
that follows, Vorgrel the Ogre, to see just how serious neglecting
certain areas can prove to be.

What is the Vexith ?

MYSTERY

Extending deep beneath the surface of the world of Arlakor, perhaps even to its very core,
is a dungeon so vast that its full expanse eludes mortal comprehension. Known simply as the
Vexith , it has existed since time immemorial and seemingly predates even the most ancient
of historical events, including the arrival of the gods themselves. Despite whatever manner of
intelligence or force of will is ultimately responsible for the dungeons creation and perpetual
upkeep its true purpose remains unknown.

CHAOS

The Vexith is as unpredictable as it is magical. Confusing puzzles and deadly traps fill its
numerous chambers and winding corridors, which are themselves known to change over time.
New entrances appear in unexpected places and those that have existed for centuries sometimes disappear without a trace. The dungeons myriad of levels and mazelike passageways are
home (or prison) to countless denizens, both civilized and savage, many of whom are unable
to recall exactly how they got there in the first place.

ADVENTURE

There is no greater promise of riches, fame, and power than what can be found within the
Vexith , but the degree of danger that must be undertaken to attain such rewards is more than
most are willing to risk. Few adventurers who choose to brave its depths return unscathed, and
many never return at all. Of those who do, some are lucky enough to bring back great treasures
for their efforts, and even those who are less fortunate probably have at least a few intriguing
stories to recount at the local tavern.

INTRODUCTION

TUTORIAL: VORGREL THE OGRE


The following tutorial will demonstrate how one player,
Sam, decides to go about designing a new character from
scratch, as well as highlighting some of the tradeoffs
he makes for focusing too much in certain areas.
As mentioned previously, the order of steps for
creating a new character can vary from one player
to another, so the choice of where to start will always depend on your characters unique
concept. Therefore, as long as all five
of the essential aspects are addressed
you can proceed in whatever order
you prefer.

Sams Concept

Sam decides that he wants


to play a hulking character named
Vorgrel, who is well suited to physical combat but who also dabbles with spellcasting. He imagines Vorgrel to be a sort of
warrior-caster hybrid, focusing more on the warrior side of things for now but with aspirations of
becoming a more capable spellcaster in the future.
Finding the Right Species: Sam begins by searching through the various playable species for any that
are large in size, built for physical combat, and that
also possess at least a fair potential for casting
spells. He rules out centaurs because hed prefer to play a bipedal character, and he also
rules out rolgareks since hed rather not
have wings. A bugbear (a subspecies
of goblinoids) seems interesting at
first, especially with its inherent Vanishing ability, but Sam ultimately settles
on an ogre.
Ogres have impressive physical qualities, not to mention four
health points, and the Pain Suppression trait that lets them ignore
health loss contributions to fatigue.
He also notices that ogres may select the Magical Savant optional
trait that grants a +1 bonus to
one spellcasting discipline of
their choice, which will allow
his character to gain a slight edge
as a spellcaster later on. On the other
hand, ogres tend to be about as dumb
as rocks due to having difficult Intellect aptitudes. They even suffer penalties
of 1 to Intellect and Concentration, plus they
are woefully susceptible to mental damage. Despite
these downsides, Sam figures that Vorgrels muscles will
more than make up for his lack of brains and even decides to

take the Barely Sapient optional trait for good measure (incurring
additional penalties of 1 to Intellect and Fortitude).

A Brief Background

Sam begins by writing a brief account of Vorgrels past to


help explain how the ogre came to possess his peculiar mix of
traits and abilities:
When Vorgrel was very young his village was razed by a
rival ogre clan and he alone managed to survive by fleeing into
the forest. Completely lost, he wandered frightened and starving
for several days before finally happening upon the secluded home
of an elderly dryad couple. The husband and wife took pity on the
young ogre and raised him as their own.
Although none too bright, Vorgrel used his
impressive size and strength to assist
with chores and to help defend
their forest home. At first,
he struggled to keep his
more violent tendencies
in check, but over time
he learned to temper his
aggression with compassion. Vorgrel also developed
a particular knack for cooking,
and he was often charged
with preparation of the
familys meals, a rather
convenient arrangement
since he tended to consume
more food than both of his
adoptive parents combined.
His stepfather taught
him how to survive in the
wild and instilled in Vorgrel a deep connection to
the forest and the natural world,
while his stepmother instructed him
in basic spellcasting. Once, while practicing his magic, Vorgrel accidentally happened
to imbue one of his pet rats with a strange sort
of mystical bondShiv has been his loyal friend
and companion ever since.
In time, as is customary for dryads that are nearing the end of their lives, Vorgrels stepparents chose to
permanently merge their essences into a pair of sapling
trees near their home. Although saddened by their absence, Vorgrel continued to live in the forest for several
years, keeping watch over the saplings as they grew
larger, while he himself grew into adulthood.
Eventually, the time came for Vorgrel to leave his
forest home and to seek his own path somewhere out in the
wider world. He said his goodbyes, gathered his belongings, and
with Shiv in tow he set off to seek adventure!

THEBASICS

Name/Creature

Vorgrels CPV Planner

Vorgrel the Ogre

Faculties

Rank

Accuracy [D]

d8

12
7

Die & Mods

Melee Pre. [D]

+1

Ranged Pre. [D]

Species Value 34

Cost

or

Creature Size
Health
Stamina

Spell Pre. [D]

+1

Charisma [D]

d4

Advantages

Cost

Intimidation [M]

Magical Savant

Investigation [E]

Enchanted C. (R1)

Mysticism [D]

Spellcast: Nat (R1)

Persuasion [M]

Creed: Warden

Dexterity [M]

d6 1

Agility [M]

Flying [M]

Running [M]

Stealth [M]

Swimming [E]

+1

Endurance [E]

d8

Constitution [M]

+1

Perseverance [E]

Toughness [E]

0 +1

Intellect [D]

d4 1 1

Creature Lore [E]

+1

Healing [M]

Social Kno. [E]

Sorcery [D]

Tinkering [M]

Perception [M]

d8

3
Total 13

Spells/Songs

Cost

Chilling Blast

Appraisal [E]

Awareness [M]

Geomancy [D]

0 +1

Initiative [M]

Survival [E]

+1

Disadvantages

Total

1
Cost

Tracking [M]

Barely Sapient

Strength [E]

d10 +1

Violent (R1)

Climbing [E]

Do-Gooder

Jumping [E]

Might [M]

+1

+2

Cook [ E ]
[

Deep Sleeper

Total 10

Total 86

Notes

(10 point limit)

1 Fortitude

CPV Allocation

1 Run Speed

Species Value or Size/Health/Stamina

34

+1 Brute Force

Faculties

86

1 Concentration

Advantages (positive traits)

13

Spells/Songs
Disadvantages (negative traits)

Totals

1
10

Total Points Spent 124

Vorgrels CPV Planner

Next, Sam uses a CPV planner to help him determine exactly how he wants to allocate Vorgrels character points. Since
ogres have a species value of 34, his characters beginning CPV
is 91/125. This means that he has 91 character points to spend on
faculties and traits. He can also earn up to 10 additional character
points by selecting disadvantages.
The red text emphasizes Sams writing on the sheet. He
takes the following steps in order to complete the planner:
1. Species Value: Since Vorgrel is one of the standard playable
species he is assigned a species value, which can be found
at the top of the ogres species box in Chapter 6. Sam
enters 34 into the top right box on the sheet. He leaves
the Creature Size, Health, and Stamina boxes blank since
these aspects are already included as part of the species
value for each playable species (i.e. the ogres large size
and its additional health point are already factored into its
species value, along with the costs of its various traits).
2. Faculty Ranks & Costs: Sam begins by recording the ogres
aptitudes after each corresponding attribute for reference,
as indicated in the ogres species box (D for Difficult, M
for Moderate, and E for Easy). He then assigns ranks for
each of Vorgrels attributes and disciplines, and he adds
the Cook profession at the bottom of the list. Sam records
a 0 in the Rank column for every attribute and discipline
that he doesnt select (0 is the starting rank for all creatures). For the time being, Sam postpones filling in the
Die & Mods column since it is likely that some of his selections will need to be adjusted later as he tries to balance
out Vorgrels character point allocation. However, he does
fill in the Cost column for each attribute and discipline
with a rank of 1 or greater, as well as the Cook profession.
He then adds up all of the costs and records the sum in the
Total box at the bottom.
3. Advantages & Creeds: Based on Vorgrels background,
Sam knows that his character will need to select the Magical Savant ogre optional trait. He will also need to take
the Enchanted Companion (R1; bestial) and the Spellcasting: Nature (R1) mystical advantages. Lastly, he selects
the Warden creed. Later on, if Vorgrel has any unspent
character points leftover then Sam may choose to increase
the ranks of these advantages or he may wish to purchase
other advantages, but for now it is best to select only those
advantages that are necessary until he knows exactly how
many character points will be needed for Vorgrels faculties and spells.
4. Disadvantages: Sam takes a look at the list of common disadvantages for ogres (Crude, Unforgiving, and Violent)
and decides that Violent (R1) is really the only one that
fits with Vorgrels personality. Normally, Violent (R1)
has a value of 1 for most characters, but for ogres it has
a value of 2 since it is so common among members of
their species. Sam has already decided to take the Barely
Sapient ogre optional trait, and he then browses through
the disadvantages in Chapter 2 before settling on Deep
Sleeper and Do-Gooder. It should be noted that all characters are bound by a 10 point limit for disadvantages,

INTRODUCTION
so even though Vorgrel has selected disadvantages worth
11 points he still only gains 10 character points (essentially, he is taking on more disadvantages than he is being
compensated for). Even so, Sam decides that he is satisfied with his choices for Vorgrel and is willing to accept
this minor point discrepancy. Players can always choose
to take on additional disadvantages beyond the 10 point
limit, particularly for roleplaying purposes.
5. Spells: Vorgrels background indicates that he was only
taught a limited knowledge of spellcasting, and since
he only has Spellcasting: Nature (R1) he only knows
one spell effect. He can purchase as many spells as he
wants that use this effect, but until his Spellcasting rank
is increased he is stuck knowing just one effect. Sam has
designed Vorgrel to be primarily focused on combat, so
he selects the Damage: Cold spell effect since this will
give his character a ranged attack that has the potential of
reducing an enemys Speed so that Vorgrel can more easily close to within melee range or prevent an enemy from
escaping. Sam also figures that Vorgrel will only need one
single target spell for the time being, so he names his spell
Chilling Blast and records its cost (all spells cost 1 character point each unless they are Freeform [F], which instead
cost 3 points each).
6. CPV Allocation: The bottom of the CPV planner allows
Sam to calculate how many character points Vorgrel has
spent overall. All new characters start with 125 character
points, so 125 is the target number that Sam is trying to
reach after he adds up each of the totals and subtracts the
10 points from disadvantages. If the total is 126 points
or higher then that means Sam must reduce how many
points he has spent on faculties or advantages. If the total
is 124 points or lower (as is the case) then that means Sam
still has additional character points to allocate, if he so
chooses. As it turns out, Sam has spent a total of 124 character points, which makes his CPV 1/125. Sam decides to
keep his 1 unspent character point for the time being since
there is nothing that he really wants Vorgrel to have that
can be purchased for only 1 character point. Instead, Sam
plans to save it for when Vorgrel earns additional character points during play.
7. Filling In Die Rolls & Modifiers: Now that Sam knows for
certain what Vorgrels faculty ranks will be, he can begin
filling in the Die & Mods column. First, he references the
respective tables in Chapter 1 and records the die for each
attribute and the modifier for each discipline and his Cook
profession (note that the profession modifiers are different, per rank, than those of disciplines). Next, he refers
to the ogre inherent traits in Chapter 6 and applies Vorgrels attribute and discipline modifiers (+1 Toughness,
1 Dexterity, +1 Strength, 1 Intellect), as well as those
from the Barely Sapient and Magical Savant ogre optional
traits he selected (1 Intellect, +1 Geomancy). Sam also
records the ogres stat modifiers in the Notes section for
easier reference later when he begins the process of filling
in Vorgrels actual character sheet (1 Fortitude, 1 Run
Speed, +1 Brute Force, 1 Concentration).

10

Vorgrels Character Sheet

Sam is now ready to create Vorgrels character sheet. He will


need to refer to various chapters in order to reference different
rules and tables. The following steps highlight Sams strategy for
completing the character sheet:
1. Attributes, Disciplines, & Professions: Sam begins by
carefully copying over the attribute aptitudes, ranks, die
rolls, and modifiers from Vorgrels CPV planner. He will
need to add a few additional adjustments later on due to
Vorgrels creature size and potential encumbrance. Regarding the Modifiers columns, it is recommended to start
at the left side and to record each modifier separately for
ease of reference. For instance, Vorgrels Toughness discipline has a modifier of 0 from his discipline rank and a
modifier of +1 from his Ogre Heritage trait.
2. Species Information: Sam now turns to the Ogres section
in Chapter 6. He selects Vorgrels age, height, and weight
(Vorgrel is fairly strong and has slightly above average
height/weight for an ogre). Based on the campaign, Sams
GM informs him that Temdarish is the recommended regional language, and this fits with Vorgrels story since he
was raised by dryads from a young age and never learned
to speak Ogre (Vorgrel only knows one language due to
his low Intellect rank). Sam indicates Vorgrels large creature size, 4 health points, and 3 stamina points. Lastly,
Sam records all of the ogres inherent traits and the two
optional traits he selected. Those marked with symbols
indicate that the trait is magical in nature. Sam decides
to write only trait names on his character sheet since an
ogres traits are fairly simple to remember, but other players may find it convenient to include more detailed trait
information and may even wish to keep a separate sheet
for trait rules, particularly for playable species with more
complicated abilities (ettins, imps, shades, etc.).
3. Stats and Creature Size: Sam can now begin the process
of calculating Vorgrels stats, which are derived from attribute and discipline ranks. He turns to the Stats section
of Chapter 1, where each of the stat formulas are detailed,
and refers to the Creature Size Modifiers and Multiples
table as needed, as well as the Notes portion of Vorgrels
CPV planner when he calculates Brute Force, Concentration, Fortitude, and Run Speed. The Creature Size table
also provides additional modifiers to Vorgrels Accuracy
attribute and Stealth discipline, which Sam records. Note
that the Encumbrance Factor stat (EF) is located on the
back of the character sheet.
4. Equipment: Like all characters, Vorgrel begins the game
with up to 50g worth of equipment. Sam uses a scrap sheet
of paper to jot down a list of armor, weapons, and gear
from Chapter 3. He notes each items weight, but he must
then multiply each value by Vorgrels weight multiple of
x3, except for Shivs tack, which is sized for a tiny creature (x0.1); note also that the tacks weight is not included on Vorgrels character sheet since it is actually being
worn by Shiv. Sam must also adjust the cost for each item
by Vorgrels cost multiple of x2, except for Shivs tack,
which again should be adjusted for a tiny creature (x0.5).

THEBASICS
Name
Size

Species

Vorgrel

Gender

Large

Accuracy

Apt

Discipline

Rank

Melee Precision [D]

2
0
2

Ranged Precision [D]

Spell Precision [D]

Charisma

Apt

Discipline

Rank

Intimidation [M]
Investigation [E]
Mysticism [D]
Persuasion [M]

0
0
0
0

Dexterity

Apt

Discipline

Rank

Agility [M]
Flying [M]
Running [M]
Stealth [M]
Swimming [E]

0
0
1
0
2

Endurance

Apt

Discipline

Rank

Constitution [M]
Perseverance [E]
Toughness [E]

2
1
1

Rank Die & Mod

Apt

Total

Discipline

Rank

+1
1
+1

Creature Lore [E]


Healing [M]

2
0
0
0
0

+1
1
+1

Rank Die & Mod

d4

Modifiers

Total

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1

Rank Die & Mod

d62

Modifiers

Total

1
1
0
1 1
+1

1
1
0
2
+1

Rank Die & Mod

2
Modifiers

+1
0
0 +1

Attacks/Weapons

d8
Total

Sorcery [D]
Tinkering [M]

Apt

Discipline

Rank

Appraisal [E]
Awareness [M]
Geomancy [D]
Initiative [M]
Survival [E]
Tracking [M]

0
1
1
1
2
1

Strength

Apt

Discipline

Rank

Climbing [E]
Jumping [E]
Might [M]

1
0
2

Professions

Rank

Cook

Resil

Unarmed

[E]
[ ]
[ ]

d42

Modifiers

Total

+1
1
1
1
1

Perception

+1
0
+1
Range

Rank Die & Mod

Social Knowledge [E]

Weight

10 ft 8 in

Intellect

d81

Modifiers

Height

Male

+1
1
1
1
1

d8

Modifiers

Total

1
0
0 +1
0
+1
0

1
0
+1
0
+1
0

Rank Die & Mod

d10+1

Modifiers

Total

0
1
+1

0
1
+1

1 / 125

Age

1,121 lb

17

Health

Stamina

Fate

Taps

Defense | Block

Rank Die & Mod

Concentration

Fortitude

Base Resilience

Total Resilience

Brute Force

+5

Combat Man.

+1

Space/Threat

2x2

Run Speed

Swim Speed

Flight Speed
4

Notice

Miscellaneous Modifiers

Die & Mod

d8 +2
d8
d8

Precision

Damage

d8

d4+5

Buckler*

d8

d4+5

Mace

d8

d8+5

Torch

d8

d4+5 unlit

Details/Qualities
may not inflict critical damage
Attached (cannot be disarmed); durability 3
Battering (+2 damage vs. objects)
+2 heat damage if lit; critical hits set targets on fire (d8+2
heat damage)

Combat Notes

Damage

* In combat, actions performed using buckler's hand suffer -1 penalty; attacks with

Acid
Arcane
Cold
Divine

the buckler itself are not penalized if its hand is free

CPV

Ogre

Res/Weak

Damage
Electricity
Heat
Mental
Shadow

Res/Weak

Weak +4

Vorgrels Character Sheet, Front

11

INTRODUCTION
Advantages & Positive Traits

Disadvantages & Negative Traits

Weight Multiple

x3

Pain Suppression

Ogre Heritage

Encumbrance Factor (EF)

90

Raw Power

Weak-Minded

Free Limit (EF x 5)

450

Magical Savant: Geomancy

Weakness: Mental +4

Current EF Penalty*

Enchanted Companion (R1; bestial)

Barely Sapient

Spellcasting: Nature (R1)

Deep Sleeper

Equipment

Wt.

Do-Gooder

light armor

30

Violent (R1)

buckler

12

mace

18

backpack (9 cu ft)

belt pouch (0.9 cu ft)

0.9

bedroll

flask (water; 3 swigs)

4.5

vial (cooking oil; 32 portions)

1.5

flint and steel

torch x2 (40 ft; 2 hours each)

cooking equipment

15

standard rations (2 meals)

simple gold earrings (pair)

0.06

tack (leash x2); carried by Shiv

Languages
Name
Temdarish

* Applies to Dexterity & Speeds

Base
Fayen

Number of Spells
Standard

Free Form

Background & Other Details


Warden Creed: Seeks to maintain balance with nature and to preserve the environment's
natural state; hunts only out of necessity

Currency (0.01 lb per coin/gem)

Wt.

Gold

0.01

Silver

10

0.10

Gems
Total Weight Carried

Vorgrels Character Sheet, Back

12

106.07

THEBASICS
The following pieces of equipment warrant special notice:
Light Armor: Due to Vorgrels large creature size,
Sam doesnt have much of a choice when it comes
to armor selection. He goes with light armor, at least
for the time being, since medium armor would have
cost most of Vorgrels money. Eventually, once
Vorgrel earns additional wealth, he might choose to
purchase medium or heavy armor if he is willing to
accept a penalty to Defense and the added weight.
Buckler: Sam decides to equip Vorgrel with a buckler so that he can gain the additional Block value
offered by a shield (+1 in this case) and still retain
the use of his hand for casting spells and performing other tasks. However, actions that are attempted
with the bucklers hand during combat suffer a 1
penalty; attacks with the buckler itself are exempt
from this penalty if its hand is free, as are actions
that are performed outside of combat. Sam jots this
rule under the Combat Notes section of his character sheet since it will often come into play.
Containers: Vorgrels backpack and belt pouch are
also large in size and have their volume capacities
multiplied by his weight multiple of x3.
Custom Equipment: Some of Vorgrels items are not
listed in Chapter 3, so Sam must get the GMs approval before he can purchase them. The GM will
also determine their costs and weights. Vorgrels
cooking equipment is ruled to be identical to alchemy equipment in cost and weight (adjusted for large
size) but contains pots, pans, and utensils for cooking rather than alchemy tools. His vial of cooking
oil is ruled to have 32 portions with a cost of 1s
per portion for a medium size creature, so Vorgrel
must pay 2s per portion (plus 4s for the vial itself).
Lastly, the GM decides that a pair of simple golden
earrings should cost about 3g and weigh about 0.02
lb for a medium size creature, so in Vorgrels case
the pair costs 6g and weighs 0.06 lb.

Spell Name
Type

Tack: Tack that is sized for a tiny creature costs 75s


and weighs 0.5 lb, but Vorgrel has opted for a double
length leash. Therefore, both values are increased
by 25% to 94s (paid for by Vorgrel) and 0.625 lb
(carried by Shiv). The GM has also agreed that
Vorgrel may keep the leash fastened to his armor
without having to hold it with one of his hands since
Shiv is so small in comparisonthis allows Shiv
to freely move around Vorgrels occupied space up
to 10 ft in any direction, but the leash prevents him
from being able to go any further.
5. Encumbrance: Now that Sam has purchased all of Vorgrels
equipment and calculated the total weight (106.07 lb) he
discovers that it exceeds one multiple of Vorgrels EF (90
lb). This means that Vorgrel suffers a 1 penalty to his
Dexterity attribute and Speed stats, which Sam records on
the front of the character sheet. This penalty can fluctuate according to how much weight Vorgrel is carrying (no
penalty if 90 lb or less, 1 penalty if over 90 lb and up to
180 lb, 2 if over 180 lb and up to 270 lb, etc.).
6. Attacks/Weapons: The final step that Sam must complete
is to list Vorgrels various attacks and weapons for easier
reference during combat. He adjusts the Resilience values for the buckler, mace, and torch by +2 since these are
all large size weapons. Be aware that although Vorgrels
Accuracy attribute is listed as d81, all of his attacks use
Melee Precision (+1) and are therefore listed as d8.

Vorgrels Spell Sheet

Sams next task is to refer to Chapter 5 and design Vorgrels


one spell. He has already selected the Damage: Cold spell effect
so that Vorgrel will have a method of attacking at range. Sam now
selects one of each of the spells general options (single target and
distance; the Damage spell effect always has an instant duration).
Sam chooses not to include any special qualities. Vorgrels large
creature size gives the spell a range increment of 6 squares and
allows it to inflict d8+3 cold damage. Sam also records the spells
special benefit in the Description/Notes box.

Spell Effect

Chilling Blast

Nature

Discipline

Spell Descriptors
Free Form [F]
Mental [M]
Reagents [R]
Stamina [S]

Spell Precision

CM

Damage: Cold
SV

Defense

Description/Notes
Cold Damage: d8+3

General Options
Target Area

Single Target

Range

Distance: 6

Duration

Instant

If a target suffers health loss then a 2 penalty is imposed to his Speed


stats (all forms) on his next turn, plus an extra 2 penalty is also
applied to his sprinting checks, if attempted.

Vorgrels Spell Sheet

13

INTRODUCTION

Shivs CPV Planner

Since Vorgrel has purchased the Enchanted Companion (R1)


advantage Sam must now design Shiv, Vorgrels pet rat. Shiv is
mystically bonded to Vorgrel and is exceptionally loyal, despite
otherwise having the bestial mind of a rat (to be fair, Shiv is probably still a bit smarter than Vorgrel).
All enchanted companions must be designed from scratch.
In other words, players cannot simply use existing creature templates due to the fact that enchanted companions are built using
different rules and may not match up point-for-point. However,
they can still select many of the same qualities and have similar faculties to common animals of their type, if desired. Players
should at least attempt to select traits that properly reflect their
companions specific body type, such as the Additional Appendages: Legs and the Awkward Form: No Arms traits for quadrupeds (like Shiv), or the Flight: Wings trait for birds.
Sam follows much the same process with Shivs CPV planner as he did for Vorgrels. One of the main differences is that
Shiv does not have a species value, so instead, Sam must select
Shivs creature size and record its cost. This time he refers to the
Creature Size Modifiers and Multiples table located in Chapter 7,
which lists the character point costs for each size tier (this is the
only difference between this table and the one with the same title
in Chapter 1). Sam would still prefer Shiv to be tiny like other
rats, so he records 28 in the Creature Size box. He then records 0
costs in both the Health and Stamina boxes since these values are
automatically assigned for enchanted companions (players may
choose to give their companions either 3 points for both quantities, or 4 points for one quantity and 2 points for the other).
Other differences this time around include having all moderate attribute aptitudes (required for all enchanted companions;
Accuracy is always difficult) and being able to select creature
traits from Chapter 7. For the most part, Sam decides to stick with
many of the same traits of common rats, but he designs Shiv to be
stronger and hardier so that he can assist Vorgrel in melee combat without having to worry too much about getting squashed.
However, hes still just a big rat, which is why Vorgrel chooses to
keep him on a leash. It should also be noted that some of Shivs
disciplines are marked-out. This is due to Shivs bestial mental
state and his Awkward Form: No Arms trait, which prevent him
from even being able to attempt these disciplines.
Enchanted companions do not gain extra character points by
selecting disadvantages, but they can gain extra character points
by selecting negative creature traits from Chapter 7 (independent
of the character points gained if selecting small or tiny creature
sizes). Therefore, Sam has also decided to take the Aversion to
Sunlight and Voracious Appetite traits. Most negative traits list an
inherent cost and an optional costenchanted companions must
always use the optional cost if one is listed.
Lastly, since Vorgrel only possesses the first rank of the Enchanted Companion advantage, that means Shiv must be designed
as a 40 character point creature (unlike player characters that have
125 character points). Later on, if Sam wishes to increase Shivs
faculties further or to purchase new traits then Vorgrel himself
must first increase his Enchanted Companion rank, which would
grant additional character points for Shiv to spend (increasing his
character points to 70 and 100, respectively).

14

Name/Creature

Shiv the Rat (Enchanted Companion)

Faculties

Rank

Accuracy [D]

d8 +1

12
3

Die & Mods

Melee Pre. [D]

Ranged Pre. [D]

Spell Pre. [D]

Species Value

Cost

or

Creature Size 28
Health

Stamina

Charisma [M]

d4

Advantages

Cost

Intimidation [M]

Add Appen: Legs

Investigation [E]

EUA: Bite d8

HS: Dark Sight [P]

Mysticism [D]
Persuasion [M]

Dexterity [M]

d10

15

Agility [M]

Flying [M]

Running [M]

Stealth [M]

0 +1

Swimming [E]

Endurance [M]

d10

15

Constitution [M]

Perseverance [E]

Toughness [E]

Intellect [M]

d4

Creature Lore [E]

Healing [M]

Social Kno. [E]

Total 12

Sorcery [D]

Spells/Songs

Tinkering [M]

d4

Initiative [M]

Perception [M]

Cost

Appraisal [E]
Awareness [M]
Geomancy [D]

Total

Survival [E]

Disadvantages

Cost

Tracking [M]

Aver to Sunlight

Strength [M]

d8 +1

Climbing [E]

Jumping [E]

Might [M]
[

Notes

Aw Form: No Arms 4
Vor Appetite

Total 9
Total 65

(10 point limit)

CPV Allocation

Totals

Species Value or Size/Health/Stamina

28

Faculties

65

Advantages (positive traits)

12

Spells/Songs
Disadvantages (negative traits)

Total Points Spent

Shivs CPV Planner

0
9

40

THEBASICS

Shivs Template Sheet

With all of Shivs character points having been distributed


Sam can now begin creating the rats template sheet. Template
sheets are what GMs normally use when designing creatures,
monsters, and NPCs. They are more succinct than normal character sheets, which is convenient when trying to keep track of
multiple creatures details at once. Template sheets also work well
for enchanted companions since they tend to be less complicated
than most PCs.
Once again, Sam follows a similar process to the one that
he used when completing Vorgrels character sheet, except that
Chapter 7 is referenced more extensively when describing Shivs
creature traits (rather than Chapter 2 for advantages and disadvantages, which the rat lacks). Sam also marks several of Shivs
Intellect disciplines with asterisks due to the rats bestial mental
state, which severely limits the kinds of intellectual actions that
he is able to attempt.
Next, he records Shivs potent enhanced bite attack, which is
actually how the rat earned his name. Shivs only piece of equipment is his tack, and despite the fact that he only has an EF of 2.5
lb the tack is light enough not to impose an encumbrance penalty.
Sam wraps up by recording the most relevant details of each of
Shivs creature traits at the bottom of the template sheet for easier
reference during play.

Name/Creature
Being

Living

Size
Def 7

40

Sp/Thr x

Health 4

Stam 2

Conc 3

Fort 3

B Resil 5

T Resil 3

Notice 2

Run 4

Swim 2

2.5

Block
Com 2

CPV

Bestial (docile)

EF

Tiny

Brute 1

Shiv the Rat (Enchanted Companion)


Mind

Fly

Attribute / Discipline

Rank

Die/Mod

Attribute / Discipline

Rank

Die/Mod

Accuracy [D]
Melee Precision [D]
Ranged Precision [D]
Spell Precision [D]
Charisma [M]
Intimidation [M]
Investigation [E]
Mysticism [D]
Persuasion [M]
Dexterity [M]
Agility [M]
Flying [M]
Running [M]
Stealth [M]
Swimming [E]
Endurance [M]
Constitution [M]
Perseverance [E]
Toughness [E]

2
1
0
0
0
0
0

d8+1
0
1
1
d4
1
1

0
0
0
0

d4
1*
1*
1*

d4

0
3
1
0
1
1
1
3
1
1
1

1
d10
0
1
0
+1
0
d10
0
0
0

Intellect [M]
Creature Lore [E]
Healing [M]
Social Knowledge [E]
Sorcery [D]
Tinkering [M]
Perception [M]
Appraisal [E]
Awareness [M]
Geomancy [D]
Initiative [M]
Survival [E]
Tracking [M]
Strength [M]
Climbing [E]
Jumping [E]
Might [M]

0
0
0
2
1
0
0

1
1
1
d8
0
1
1

Resistances

Weaknesses
Attacks

Bite: d81 damage; grappling benefits; Vicious


tack (leash double length: 10 ft)

Equipment
Total Weight: 0.625

Traits

EF penalty: 0

Additional Appendages: Legs (4 total): +2 when resisting tripping attempts while on land
Aversion to Sunlight: 1 to discipline, profession, and damage checks in direct sunlight
Awkward Form: No Arms: Requires Agility check of SV 5+ to manipulate objects; must
receive assistance to equip armor, apparel, and basic gear
Enhanced Unarmed Attack: Bite: d8 damage; grappling attempts inflict automatic damage
if their called shots succeed; Vicious (+1 severity; additional +2 damage with crits)
Heightened Sense: Dark Sight [Partial]: Visual darkness penalties reduced to 1
Voracious Appetite: Requires twice as much food; easily motivated by promise of food

Shivs Template Sheet

CHARACTER EVALUATION

Now that Sam has finished designing his character, lets examine some of his choices more closely to see how focusing too
much in certain areas might not have been such a good idea.

The Good

Well start with the good news first. Vorgrel is undoubtedly


an impressive melee combatant. He is very strong, so when he
hits his enemies they will surely feel it. Vorgrel himself actually
feels very little thanks to his Pain Suppression trait. He also has 4
health points and a respectable Resilience stat to soak up damage.
Vorgrels Chilling Blast spell also allows him to make acceptable ranged attacks at distant enemies. Lastly, he can count
on his loyal enchanted companion, Shiv, who is able to offer up
some impressive melee damage of his own (especially for a rat).

The Bad

Having focused so much on bolstering his melee capabilities, Vorgrel is somewhat limited when it comes to his list of
non-combative options. Basically, unless his party is engaged
in battle or competing in a chili cook-off, Vorgrel brings almost
nothing else to the table.
His Charisma and its respective disciplines are virtually nonexistent, so his attempts at talking his way out of trouble will
often have the opposite effect. Actually, this might prove to be a
good thing for Vorgrel with his penchant for combat but perhaps
not so much for the other party members.
Vorgrels Dexterity attribute is below average to begin with,
but being an ogre (1 penalty) and carrying heavy equipment (an
extra 1 penalty) means that hes going to have a difficult time
when attempting any Dexterity-based disciplines. To illustrate
this point, his Stealth check is an abysmal d64, which means that
he will have to max his roll just to have a chance at succeeding.

The Stupid

Without question, Vorgrels greatest weakness is his lack of


brains (almost literally). It is difficult to convey just how dumb
he actually is, even by ogre standards, but his Intellect attribute
is d42, and all of his Intellect disciplines (except for Creature
Lore) impose a further 1 penalty. He might as well not even
attempt them since he would have to max his roll twice to succeed. Vorgrels minimum Intellect and Charisma attributes, combined with additional penalties, means that his Concentration
and Fortitude stats are alarmingly low (both stats are 2). Vorgrel
will be in serious trouble if he goes up against spellcasters since
he has almost no defenses against their spells. To make matters
even worse, his extreme weakness to mental damage could easily
prove to be his downfall since such an attack would be compared
against his Fortitude stat, likely resulting in a critical hit, and this
would be combined with the additional +4 points of damage from
his mental weakness. However, thanks to his Pain Suppression
trait, at least he wont feel it.
In conclusion, while it may be fun to play a min-maxed character, chances are that sooner or later he is going to encounter
a situation that gets him killed, gets his party members killed, or
both. Every choice has a tradeoff, so be sure to choose wisely!

15

FACULTIES

CHAPTER 1
FACULTIES

aculties consist of the following four quantities: Attributes,


Stats, Disciplines, and Professions. They provide a method
for gauging how effective your character is when performing specific tasks, while still allowing for some degree of chance to affect
the outcome.
Attributes determine the die rolls that your character makes
when attempting actions. Stats are passive values that are derived
from your characters attribute and discipline ranks. Disciplines
are each associated with a specific attribute and apply a modifier
to its die rolls. Professions are not associated with specific attributes and instead apply a modifier to a standard d8 roll.

ATTRIBUTES

Attributes represent the seven universal qualities that most


creatures possess. They are sorted into ranks with Rank 2 (d8)
representing average ability. As an attributes rank increases, so
too does its die roll, up to a maximum of d12.
The highest rank, Rank 5, merits special notice. Rather than
increasing the die roll beyond d12, this rank allows the die to max
whenever an 11 or 12 is rolled. Refer to Rolling the Dice: Maxing
in Chapter 4 for details.
New Characters: All of your characters attributes begin at
Rank 0 but may be increased by spending character points. The
cost of increasing an attribute depends on your characters species, which assigns an aptitude for each of his attributes (easy,
moderate, or difficult).

Attribute Costs per Rank

(cumulative costs are listed in parenthesis)

Rank

Die Roll

Easy

Moderate

Difficult

d4

d6

1 (1)

3 (3)

5 (5)

d8

3 (4)

5 (8)

7 (12)

d10

5 (9)

7 (15)

9 (21)

d12

7 (16)

9 (24)

11 (32)

9 (25)

11 (35)

13 (45)

d12
Max on 11+

Accuracy

Accuracy represents your characters ability to hit a target


with weapons and other damaging effects. No stats are derived
from Accuracy, which makes it unique among the other attributes,
though no less important.
Difficult Aptitude: Accuracy always has an aptitude of difficult, regardless of species or creature type.

Charisma

Charisma represents your characters force of personality


and social grace. It allows your character to influence others. The
Fortitude stat is derived from Charisma.

Dexterity

Dexterity represents your characters nimbleness and avoidance. It allows your character to perform feats of agility. The Defense stat is derived from Dexterity.

Endurance

Endurance represents your characters tolerance for sustaining damage and withstanding fatigue. It also allows your character to resist and recover from injuries and ailments more swiftly.
The Base Resilience and Total Resilience stats are both derived
from Endurance.

Intellect

Intellect represents your characters knowledge, mental


competence, and language proficiency. It allows your character to
recall and utilize information. The Concentration stat is derived
from Intellect.
Languages: Your character knows a number of native or regional languages equal to his Intellect rank + 1. New native or
regional languages are learned as your characters rank increases.

Perception

Perception represents your characters senses. It allows your


character to notice details and act before others during combat.
The Notice stat is derived from Perception.

Strength

Strength represents your characters muscle mass (relative


to his creature size). It allows your character to perform feats of
might and determines encumbrance. The Brute Force and Encumbrance Factor stats are derived from Strength.

17

CHAPTER 1

STATS

Stats are numerical values that are derived from your characters attributes and disciplines. Most stats have specific formulas
that reference the rank of a particular attribute or discipline. For
instance, if your characters Intellect is Rank 4, then the formula
for Concentration, which is stated as Intellect rank + 3, would
be equal to 4 + 3, for a total value of 7. Several stat formulas
also reference a size modifier that corresponds to your characters
creature size, as indicated in the table at the bottom of this page.
Minimum/Maximum Values: Some stats have minimum
and/or maximum values that cannot be exceeded by any means
(not even by spells or magical items):

Stat
Brute Force
Combat Maneuvers
Concentration
Defense
Encumbrance Factor
Fortitude
Notice
Resilience (both types)
Speed (all forms)

Minimum
Value

Maximum
Value

Creature
0
1
Size
Tiny
1.5
2
Small
4.5
6
Medium
15
20
Large
45
60
Huge
150 200
Enormous 450 600
Gigantic 1,500 2,000
Colossal 4,500 6,000

Strength Rank
2

2.5
7.5
25
75
250
750

3
9
30
90
300
900

3.5
4
10.5
12
35
40
105
120
350
400
1,050 1,200

2,500 3,000 3,500

4,000

7,500 9,000 10,500 12,000

Fortitude represents your characters mental evasion and


willpower.

5 x Weight Multiple

Brute Force = Strength rank + size 1

Brute Force represents your characters physical power. It


is applied to all unarmed and weapon damage checks (except for
weapons that possess the mechanical quality).

Combat Maneuvers = (refer to table below)

Combat Maneuvers represents your characters ability for


performing and resisting certain combat actions like disarming,
tripping, and grappling attempts.

Concentration = Intellect rank + 3

Concentration represents your characters internal focus


when resisting magical spells and effects.

Defense = Dexterity rank + size + 3

Encumbrance Factor (EF for short) represents your characters weight limit in pounds prior to becoming encumbered. It is
determined by your characters Strength rank and creature size:

Fortitude = Charisma rank + 3

0
varies by size
0
1
0
0

Encumbrance Factor

Defense represents your characters ability to dodge physical attacks and damaging spells.

Notice = Perception rank + 2

Notice represents your characters passive ability to perceive


the environment.

Resilience

Base Resilience = Endurance rank + 2


Total Resilience = Base Resilience + size + armor

Base Resilience represents your characters base capacity


for withstanding damage. Total Resilience represents your characters total capacity for withstanding damage taking into account
any modifiers from creature size and armor. Note that it is actually
possible for Total Resilience to be lower than Base Resilience for
some characters.

Speed

Run Speed = Running rank + size + 4


Swim Speed = Swimming rank + size + 2
Flight Speed = Flying rank + size + 6

Speed represents your characters standard rate of movement during one round of combat. Having a Speed of 0 equates
to being unable to move via that particular form. Flight Speed is
unavailable for characters who lack the means to fly.

Creature Size Modifiers and Multiples


Creature
Brute
Combat
Speed
Total
Space/
Cost
Weight
Accuracy
Defense
Stealth
(all forms)
Size
Force Maneuvers
Resilience Threat Multiple Multiple
Tiny
+1
2
2
+1 (min 2)
1
+1
2
x
x 0.5
x 0.1
Small
0
1
1
0 (min 2)
0
+1
1
1x1
x 0.6
x 0.3
Medium
0
0
0
0 (min 1)
0
0
0
1x1
x1
x1
Large
1
+2
+1
1 (min 1)
+1
1
+2
2x2
x2
x3
Huge
1
+4
+2
1 (min 1)
+1
1
+4
3x3
x5
x 10
Enormous
2
+7
+4
2 (min 0)
+2
2
+7
4x4
x 15
x 30
Gigantic
2
+10
+6
2 (min 0)
+2
2
+10
5x5
x 50
x 100
Colossal
3
+14
+9
3 (min 0)
+3
3
+14
6x6
x 150
x 300

18

FACULTIES

DISCIPLINES
Disciplines represent your characters specific areas of study
and training. Each discipline is associated with a specific attribute
that is used when checking for success.
For instance, the Healing discipline uses Intellect as its attribute, so your characters Intellect die is rolled whenever a Healing check is attempted. The Healing disciplines modifier is then
applied, along with any additional miscellaneous modifiers. The
result is then compared against the Success Value (SV for short)
to determine the degree of success or failure. Refer to Rolling the
Dice in Chapter 4 for more information.
Disciplines are sorted into ranks with Rank 2 (+1 modifier) representing professional proficiency. As a disciplines rank
increases, so too does its modifier, up to a maximum of +2. This
modifier is always added to the discipline check.
All of your characters disciplines begin at Rank 0 but may
be increased by spending character points. The cost of increasing
a discipline depends on its aptitude (easy, moderate, or difficult),
which is listed in parenthesis after its title. Unlike attribute aptitudes that vary by species, discipline aptitudes are the same for
all creatures.
Secretive Checks (GM): As an optional rule the GM may
sometimes prefer to roll a PCs discipline check personally, and in
secret, so that its true result remains a mystery. This is particularly
useful for discipline checks that can potentially reveal false information when their attempts are unsuccessful. Such disciplines include Appraisal, Creature Lore, Investigation, Social Knowledge,
and Survival (direction sense and herb lore). Other disciplines
may also warrant secretive checks in certain situations.

Discipline Costs per Rank


(cumulative costs are listed in parenthesis)

Rank

Modifier

Easy

Moderate

Difficult

1 (1)

2 (2)

3 (3)

+1

2 (3)

3 (5)

4 (7)

+2

3 (6)

4 (9)

5 (12)

ACCURACY
Melee Precision (Difficult)

Melee Precision is used whenever your character makes


a melee attack, such as when attacking with melee weapons or
when fighting while unarmed.

Ranged Precision (Difficult)

Ranged Precision is used whenever your character makes


a ranged attack, such as when attacking with ranged weapons or
when throwing objects.

Spell Precision (Difficult)

Spell Precision is used whenever your character makes a


magical attack, such as when casting the Damage spell effect or
when performing the Damage bardic coda.

CHARISMA
Intimidation (Moderate)

Intimidation is used whenever your character tries to make


an opponent lose his cool through the use of taunting words,
threatening gestures, or inherent traits. The characters result is
compared against the opponents Fortitude stat.
Success causes your opponent to become distracted until the
end of the following round, plus he suffers a 2 penalty on his
next action within the encounter. Achieving a critical success also
forces your opponent to make a fear check.
Creature Size: Attempting to intimidate a smaller target
grants your check a +1 bonus per each tier of difference in creature size; however, bigger targets impose a 1 penalty to your
check for each tier of difference.
Intimidation vs. Groups: Attempting to use Intimidation
against a group of opponents is also possible but is generally more
difficult. Doing so incurs a 2 penalty to your characters check.
Larger groups, unruly crowds/riots, or communication barriers
can sometimes impose even greater penalties (GMs call).
Intimidation vs. Bestial Opponents: Animals and other
bestial creatures are more difficult to intimidate using language
or gestures since they have trouble comprehending your characters meaning. In such cases, your characters attempt suffers a 2
penalty. Other methods of Intimidation, such as a kreevogs Mesmerizing Gaze or a gnolls Unnerving Growl are not penalized.
Intimidation vs. Mindless Opponents: Mindless opponents are immune to all Intimidation attempts.

Investigation (Easy)

Investigation is used whenever your character wants to ask


around for information, pick up general rumors, and/or seek out
details about a particular subject through social interactions.
The sensitivity of the information being sought determines
the difficulty. An SV 5 represents common information, whereas
an SV 8 or 12 might correspond to more volatile or even illegal
topics. Your characters reputation with those involved may impose further modifiers to the check at the GMs discretion.
Failure means that your character was unsuccessful. Suffering a critical failure on the Investigation check or getting a result
that is at least 3 points lower than the SV leads to undesirable
consequences, depending on the nature of the information (angering the people you spoke with, being overheard by your enemies,
being reported to the authorities, etc.).
Note that this discipline is strictly geared toward gathering
information in the form of a broad sweep, such as from all the
patrons of a tavern or from interacting with various people on the

19

CHAPTER 1
street. In situations where specific individuals or small groups are
being questioned it is strongly recommended that the Persuasion
discipline be used instead.

Mysticism (Difficult)

Mysticism is used whenever your character casts divine or


mental spells. It also governs the use of magical items and other
abilities that utilize divine or mental powers.

Persuasion (Moderate)

Persuasion is used whenever your character attempts to convince an NPC of something. The characters result is compared
against the NPCs Fortitude.
The use of this discipline is only possible if an NPC could
conceivably agree to your characters point of view. If your characters suggestions or demands are too extreme for a given situation then the attempt automatically fails.
Bluffing/Lying:
Attempting to lie while under suspicion incurs a 2 penalty to your
characters Persuasion check. Being
under suspicion means that an NPC
either has sufficient reason to suspect
that your character is being dishonest
or is otherwise aware of information that contradicts your characters version of events.
NPCs Attitude: A +1 bonus can be applied to
your characters check against an NPC that is agreeable or friendly. Checks against indifferent NPCs receive
no modifier. A 2 penalty is applied to your characters
check when attempting to persuade angry
or hostile NPCs.
Language Barriers: A penalty of
2 is applied to your characters Persuasion checks whenever communication via a shared language is not possible
(having a translator eliminates this penalty).
Persuasion vs. Groups: Attempting
to use Persuasion against a group of NPCs
is also possible but is generally more difficult. Doing so incurs a 2 penalty to your characters check.
Larger groups and unruly crowds (riots, combat) can impose even
greater penalties according to the situation (GMs call).
Persuasion vs. PCs: Persuasion can be used against other
PCs in very special cases, such as when settling disputes between
party members. However, keep in mind that the other players are
roleplaying their characters and have their own free will, so this
rule should only be used sparingly with the GMs approval.
Persuasion vs. Bestial Creatures: Persuading bestial creatures is more difficult since they have trouble understanding your
characters meaning. Such attempts suffer a 2 penalty unless the
creature has been trained to perform a specific task. This penalty
does not stack with the language barrier penalty, and it is always
negated if your character can communicate with bestial creatures.
Persuasion vs. Mindless Creatures: Mindless creatures are
immune to all Persuasion attempts.

20

DEXTERITY
Agility (Moderate)

Agility is used whenever your character attempts to perform


moves that require finesse, such as tumbling, maintaining balance, or catching tossed objects.
Resisting Combat Actions: Your character may sometimes
opt to use Agility to resist various combat actions like disarming,
tripping, or grappling, instead of using the Might discipline.
Resisting Falling Damage: Your character can make a free
Agility check of SV 5 to attempt to avoid some of the damage
from falling, assuming that his movement is unrestricted (rolling
to distribute the force, diving into water, etc.). Each success and
critical success reduces the falling damage by 5 points. Refer to
General Rules: Falling Damage in
Chapter 4 for details.

Flying (Moderate)

Flying is used whenever your character attempts to sprint while in flight.


Each success and critical success against
an SV 5 grants a +6 bonus to your characters
Flight Speed for the round. Winged creatures
who suffer a critical failure automatically fall
d6 x 20 feet before being able to right themselves, thereby risking falling damage if they hit
the ground, after which they are considered prone.
Creatures that are flying due to mystical means never
risk falling but may still suffer other consequences for critical failures.
This discipline may only be trained
by creatures that can fly or glide, either by
using wings or via magic.
Flight Speed Stat: Your characters Flight Speed stat is
derived from his Flying rank.

Running (Moderate)

Running is used whenever your character attempts


to sprint while on land. Each success and critical success
against an SV 5 grants a +4 bonus to your characters Run Speed
for the round. Suffering a critical failure causes your character to
stumble d41 spaces in a random direction and fall prone.
Run Speed Stat: Your characters Run Speed stat is derived
from her Running rank.

Stealth (Moderate)

Stealth is used whenever your character wishes to hide,


sneak, steal items, conceal items/tracks, or perform other actions
in secret. It is almost always used to oppose the Awareness checks
of ones opponents (the person or creature using Stealth is always
considered to be the initiator) .
Hiding/Sneaking: Your character must have complete concealment from all opponents senses before he can attempt to hide
or sneak, meaning that he must be out of the line-of-effect of all
enemies and that his general whereabouts must be unknown. No
Stealth check is required when beginning to hide or sneak, but
once your character could conceivably be detected a free Stealth

FACULTIES
check is made against your opponents Awareness checks (assuming that a detection check permits them). A new opposed check
must be made again each round thereafter for as long as there
are any opponents that could conceivably detect your characters
presence (GMs call).
Your character can only move at half his base Speed while
sneaking (rounded down). Making an attack, sprinting, speaking
above the level of whisper, or taking any action that would draw
sufficient attention automatically brings your character out of
stealth after the action has been attempted, regardless of its success or failure. Multiple actions can still be attempted, but only
the first action is considered to have occurred while Stealth was
active (concerning surprise).
Typically, your character can only begin sneaking or hiding
while out of combat. Doing so while in combat is difficult and
requires very special circumstances, including the loss of line-ofeffect from all potential opponents and making sure that all such
opponents are unable to pinpoint his general whereabouts. Simply stepping behind a column or ducking into a shadowy corner
is not good enough since his opponents obviously know where
he went.
Stealing/Pickpocketing: Attempting to steal from a victim
while within their natural threat range, or when reaching into or
through their natural threat range, incurs a 2 penalty on your
characters Stealth check. Pickpocketing always incurs this penalty since your character has to be within reach, but stealing may
or may not be affected according to the situation.
Creature Size: Your characters creature size applies an additional modifier to all Stealth checks. Refer to the Creature Size
Modifiers and Multiples table earlier in this chapter for details.

Swimming (Easy)

Swimming is used whenever your character attempts to


sprint while in water. Each success and critical success against an
SV 5 grants a +2 bonus to your characters Swim Speed for the
round. Suffering a critical failure ends your characters turn and
causes her to become distracted until her next turn.
Swimming Rank & Turbulent Water: While swimming, if
your character has a Swimming rank of 0 then she must always
make a free Swimming check against an SV 5 each round in order
to move or act (Ranks 1 and higher represent swimming competency and do not require such checks). This same check applies
to all creatures when attempting to swim in turbulent water, each
round, regardless of their Swimming rank.
Failing this particular Swimming check momentarily stuns
your character, which prevents all movement and actions for the
round and causes her to sink 5 feet deeper. Additionally, if she
is at the surface then she must also begin holding her breath. If
your character suffers a critical failure or if her result is at least 3
points lower than the SV then she is unable to hold her breath and
begins to drown.
Holding Your Breath: Your character can attempt to hold
her breath for a variety of different reasons (swimming underwater, trying not to inhale poisonous gas, etc.). She must make a free
Constitution check of SV 3 after every 30 seconds that she holds
her breath. Each new check, regardless of success or failure, imposes a cumulative penalty of 1 to all further breathing checks

until she is able to breathe freely. Failure forces your character to


attempt to breathe (filling her lungs with water, exposing her to
poisonous gas, etc.), but there is no additional penalty for suffering a critical failure. If your character is still unable to breathe she
immediately begins to drown or suffocate (inhaling poisonous gas
still counts as breathing and does not typically cause suffocation).
Drowning/Suffocating: Beginning to drown or suffocate
shortens the time between Constitution checks to every round (instead of every 30 seconds). Cumulative penalties are still applied
and continue to accrue each round. At this point, failure causes
your character to fall unconscious, but there is no additional penalty for suffering a critical failure. A character that falls unconscious will die after 5 minutes unless she can be resuscitated by
the successful use of the Healing discipline, which requires that
she first be moved to safety (pulled from the water, sufficiently
able to breathe, etc.).
Creatures that possess the Extended Breath trait receive a
+3 bonus to their Constitution checks that are made for holding
their breath. Creatures that possess the Amphibious or Awkward
Form: Aquatic traits cannot drown, but they may still suffocate
(those that possess the Awkward Form: Aquatic trait risk suffocation if they leave the water). Non-living creatures cannot drown
or suffocate.
Underwater Penalties: When underwater, all of your characters Precision checks and damage checks suffer 1 penalties
and all of her range increments are halved (rounded down).
Awareness checks may be required and even penalized, per the
GMs discretion, due to obscurement from murky water, muffled
sounds, and other environmental conditions. Speech and auditory
forms of communication also tend to be distorted. Purely aquatic
creaturesthose with the Awkward Form: Aquatic traitdo not
suffer most underwater penalties, but their range increments are
still halved.
Swim Speed Stat: Your characters Swim Speed stat is derived from her Swimming rank.

ENDURANCE
Constitution (Moderate)

Constitution is used whenever your character suffers from


a disease, poison, bleeding effect, or other physical ailment. It is
also used to check for general hardiness and to determine your
characters natural rate of recovery. Refer to General Rules: Diseases and Poisons and General Rules: Healing in Chapter 4 for
more information.

Perseverance (Easy)

Perseverance is used whenever your character loses all of


his stamina points. The result determines how severely your character is exhausted. Refer to General Rules: Stamina in Chapter 4
for details.

Toughness (Easy)

Toughness is used whenever your character loses all of her


health points. The result determines how severely your character
is injured. Refer to Combat Rules: Health in Chapter 4 for details.

21

CHAPTER 1

INTELLECT
Creature Lore (Easy)

Creature Lore is used whenever your character attempts to


recall information about a specific type of creature or its abilities,
typically as a free action. The SV increases according to the rarity
of the creatures type, but an SV 5 should suffice in most cases.
Success allows your character to recall commonly known
facts about the creatures capabilities, its habitat, and basic qualities. Each critical success provides your character with one specific detail about the creatures abilities, such as its vulnerability
to cold damage, details about its poisonous bite, and so forth.
Failure indicates that your character is unfamiliar with the
creatures type, but suffering a critical failure on the Creature
Lore check or getting a result that is at least 3 points lower than
the SV provides your character with false information instead.
Additionally, once Creature Lore has been attempted for a particular creature type it cannot be checked again until your character gains a new rank in the discipline or has an opportunity to
research the creature, such as by visiting a library.
Discerning CPV: Your character may also use Creature
Lore to discern the relative power of a specific creature or NPC
but only after direct observation or interaction. With a success
the GM will provide you with a general CPV range, measured in
intervals of 50 (150, 51100, 101150, 151200, 201250, and
so forth). With a critical success the GM will inform you of the
targets exact CPV. This application of Creature Lore is particularly useful when your character wants to size-up an opponent,
but it is also important for shades when attempting to determine
the suitability of potential hosts.

Healing (Moderate)

Healing is used whenever your character attempts to treat


wounds, diseases, poisons, and other medical conditions. Doing
so may accelerate the patients recovery process. Each success
and critical success against an SV 5 applies a +1 bonus to the
patients daily Constitution check. Self-treatment is also possible
but is more difficult to accomplish (SV 8). Note that bonuses from
multiple attempts do not stack, but assisting others is possible.
Bleeding: Your character may stop an adjacent target from
bleeding by succeeding against an SV 5, but the targets total
bleeding penalty must be applied to the check. Your character
may also self-treat her own bleeding, but doing so is more difficult to accomplish (SV 8).
Disease & Poison: The periodic Constitution checks that
victims must attempt when recovering from diseases and poisons can be increased by +1 for each success and critical success
against an SV 5 if treating others or against an SV 8 for self-treatment. Be aware that this bonus is only applied to the Constitution checks for the affliction that is specifically being treated, but
the bonus persists until the disease/poison is cured or the victim
perishes. Regarding diseases and poisons, bonuses from multiple
attempts do not stack, but assisting others is possible.
Rouse from Unconsciousness: Your character may rouse an
unconscious victim with a Healing check of SV 5. Note that this
does not work for sleeping creatures (who must instead succeed
on an Awareness check of SV 5 to waken) or those that have fall-

22

en unconscious from drowning or suffocation (see below). Some


conditions that result in unconsciousness may also impose additional restrictions, such as falling unconscious due to stamina loss
or from being drunk.
Resuscitate from Drowning/Suffocating: Your character
may attempt to resuscitate victims that have fallen unconscious
due to drowning or suffocating, assuming that they can first
be moved to safety (pulled from the water, sufficiently able to
breathe, etc.). Resuscitation requires a Healing check of SV 5, but
each minute that has passed since the victim lost consciousness
imposes a cumulative 1 penalty to your characters check (more
than one minute 1, more than two minutes 2, etc.), but after
five minutes the victim automatically perishes. Only one attempt
at resuscitation may be made per victim, but assisting others is
allowed. Obviously, self-treatment is not possible.
Healing Supplies: The use of healing supplies grants a +1
bonus to any one specific Healing check, including checks for
self-treatment, but doing so consumes one application of the supplies even if the attempt fails. Note that only one application of
supplies may be used when assisting others and that the +1 bonus
is applied to the primary result rather than to individual checks.

Social Knowledge (Easy)

Social Knowledge is used whenever your character attempts


to recall information concerning history, politics, religion, or other social facts/rumors, typically as a free action. The SV increases
according to the obscurity of the topic, but an SV 5 should suffice
in most cases.
Success allows your character to recall commonly known
facts about the particular topic. Each critical success provides
your character with one specific detail of relevance. For example, assume that your character wants to know about the political
connections of a local lord. Success might reveal the names of his
subordinates and provide details about his public business dealings of note, whereas a critical success might reveal rumors that
he sometimes meets with the leader of the local thieves guild.
Failure indicates that your character is unfamiliar with the
specific topic, but suffering a critical failure on the Social Knowledge check or getting a result that is at least 3 points lower than
the SV provides your character with false information instead.
Additionally, once Social Knowledge has been attempted for a
particular topic it cannot be checked again until your character
gains a new rank in the discipline or has an opportunity to research the topic, such as by visiting a library.

Sorcery (Difficult)

Sorcery is used whenever your character casts arcane or


shadow spells. It also governs the use of magical items and other
abilities that utilize arcane or shadow powers.

Tinkering (Moderate)

Tinkering is used whenever your character attempts to manipulate a mechanical device, such as picking locks and disarming or setting mechanical traps. Magical traps cannot be disarmed
with this discipline unless your character has purchased the Runebreaking advantage. Generally, the use of this discipline causes
your character to become distracted until his next turn.

FACULTIES
Disarming Traps: Your character must first be aware of the
presence of a trap before it can be disarmed (refer to the Awareness discipline on the following page). A set of thieving tools is
required, which grants the following modifiers according to its
quality: 1 for lowgrade, 0 for common, or +1 for highgrade;
makeshift tools and implements can be used as well, but doing so
incurs a 2 penalty.
Each trap has its own SV according to its design. A successful check disarms the trap and renders it safe until it is rearmed
(see below). A critical success allows your character and his
group to safely bypass the trap without disarming it in order to
leave it armed, if desired. Suffering a critical failure on the Tinkering check or getting a result that is at least 3 points lower than
the SV automatically triggers the trap.
Lastly, if your character is the traps maker or assembler he
gains a +4 bonus to his attempts at disarming it.
Setting Traps: Your character may use this discipline to assemble or rearm mechanical traps, including trap kits, assuming
that he has the necessary componentsmagical traps cannot be
rearmed with Tinkering. Generally, a trap requires an SV 5 to
assemble, or SV 8 if attempted hastily (requiring only half the
time). A cumulative 1 penalty is applied for each tier difference
in creature size between your character and the corresponding
creature size for which the trap was designed. Suffering a critical
failure or getting a result that is at least 3 points lower than the SV
breaks one of the traps components (selected randomly).
Trap kits tend to have an SV 3 concerning the targets Awareness check, unless your character tries to conceal or camouflage
the trap. Doing so requires a Stealth check of SV 5, modified by
the conditions of the environment (2 if difficult to conceal, +2
if easy, etc.). Success increases the Awareness difficulty to SV
5, while a critical success increases it to SV 8. Permanent traps,
like those found in dungeons, also tend to follow these rules, but
the craftsmanship of the traps surrounding structure may apply
additional modifiers to the builders Stealth check (GMs call).
Triggering a trap kit varies according to its design. Tripwire
traps can span a line equal to twice the length of the traps occupied space for its equivalent size (5 feet for tiny, 10 feet for small/
medium, etc.). Foot-hold assembly traps occupy a space equal to
the occupied space for their equivalent size (1/4 square for tiny, 1
square for small/medium, etc.). If the target steps across the tripwire line or steps into the foot-holds space then the trap is triggered. It should be noted that flying creatures rarely trigger mechanical traps unless a tripwire is purposefully suspended above
the ground. Permanent traps, especially magical varieties, include
their own unique rules that are detailed in their descriptions.
Picking Locks: Picking a lock works in much the same way
as disarming a trap. A set of lockpicks is required, which grants
the following modifiers according to its quality: 1 for lowgrade,
0 for common, or +1 for highgrade; makeshift tools and implements can be used as well, but doing so incurs a 2 penalty.
Each lock has its own SV according to its design. A successful check unlocks the lock. Suffering a critical failure on the
Tinkering check or getting a result that is at least 3 points lower
than the SV jams the lock. Jammed locks cannot be picked or
even opened with their designated keys and must either be broken
open or repaired by a locksmith.

23

CHAPTER 1

PERCEPTION
Appraisal (Easy)

Appraisal is used whenever your character wishes to gauge


an objects approximate value and whether it is authentic or a
forgery. It can also identify the properties of magical items.
Approximate Value: An items rarity determines how difficult it is to appraise, but SV 5 is sufficient for most mundane
items and gems. Magical items usually require an SV 8. Success
provides your character with an approximate value of either 25%
above or below the items true gold-piece value, as determined
randomly by the GM. Achieving a critical success reveals the
items exact value.
Failure convinces your character that the items value is
within +/ 50%. Suffering a critical failure on the Appraisal check
or getting a result that is at least 3 points lower than the SV convinces your character that its value is within +/ 100%. Additionally, once Appraisal has been attempted for a particular item it
cannot be checked again until your character gains a new rank in
the discipline or has an opportunity to research the item, such as
by visiting a library.
Identifying Magical Items: All magical items and spell
foci require identification before their triggered effects may be
used. Potions and the passive effects of magical items still function without identification, but your character may be unable to
discern their specific effects. Note that instructions for an items
proper use can also be relayed to a new user, rather than requiring
them to have to make their own Appraisal check, but such information may not always be trustworthy.
The SV for identification varies according to an items tier,
as indicated by the table below. Success reveals all of the items
properties. Failure means that your character is unable to identify
the items properties, but suffering a critical failure on the Appraisal check or getting a result that is at least 3 points lower than
the SV provides your character with false information instead.
Additionally, once Appraisal has been attempted for a particular
item it cannot be checked again until your character gains a new
rank in the discipline or has an opportunity to research the item.

Item Tier or Type


Lesser Items, Holy Water,
Mage Staff (attunement)
Potions, Spell Crystals/Scrolls
Greater Items, Scepters/Wands
Relics

SV
3
5
8
12

Cursed Magical Items: In the case of a cursed magical


item, a standard success actually reveals false properties according to its specific type of curse. A critical success is required to
identify its true properties, thereby revealing its cursed nature.

Awareness (Moderate)

Awareness is used by your character to perceive his surroundings, typically as a free action. The use of this discipline is
almost never initiated by players themselves but rather is requested by the GM in various situations. Your characters Notice stat
often determines if an Awareness check is permitted in a given

24

situation. Refer to General Rules: Detection Checks in Chapter 4


for more information.
Your character and most other creatures make use of the five
basic senses: sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. An SV 5 is
generally sufficient for success, but the GM may adjust this value
according to the situation. Detecting creatures that are using the
Stealth discipline measures success against their opposed Stealth
checks instead.
Impaired Senses: Your characters Awareness check suffers
a 1 penalty if one of his senses is impaired, or a 2 penalty if the
sense is completely lost or negated but only if that sense would
have made a significant contribution to the chance of success.
For example, darkness imposes a 2 penalty on Awareness checks
involving visibility, just as the loud background noise from heavy
combat might impose a 2 penalty for checks involving hearing.
Penalties also stack if multiple senses are impaired or lost, such
as how a patch of dense smoke would likely impair both sight and
smell. Tasks that rely solely on a single sense that has been lost
are usually rendered impossible.
Waking from Sleep: If your character is asleep he may attempt an Awareness check of SV 5 each round in which significant noises, smells, or movement/touching occurs (usually each
round during combat). Being damaged automatically rouses your
character. Note that being unconscious is not the same as being
asleep and in order to be roused your character instead requires
a successful use of either the Constitution or Healing disciplines.
Detecting Traps: Successfully detecting a trap almost always requires a detection check first (from the GM), and then
if warranted, an Awareness check (from your character)only
in very rare circumstances, such as when your character is truly
alone, is the detection check able to be skipped. The SV required
to detect the presence of a trap varies according to each traps
unique design. Magical traps tend to be more difficult to detect
than mechanical varieties due to having fewer physical components and fewer revealing clues, but creatures with the Sensory
Augmentation: Magic Sight spell effect or the Heightened Sense:
Magic Sight trait gain a +2 bonus to their Awareness checks when
attempting to spot magical traps.

Geomancy (Difficult)

Geomancy is used whenever your character casts elemental


or nature spells. It also governs the use of magical items and other
abilities that utilize elemental or nature powers.

Initiative (Moderate)

Initiative is used whenever your character engages in combat to determine how quickly he can take his turn. Refer to Combat Rules: Initiative in Chapter 4 for more information.

Survival (Easy)

Survival is used whenever your character traverses and explores natural environments. It can allow your character to find
food, fresh water, and shelter, as well as providing knowledge of
herb lore, direction sense, terrain, and weather.
Direction Sense: Your character may attempt to discern the
approximate direction of north by observing natural conditions
(generally SV 5). Suffering a critical failure or getting a result that

FACULTIES
is at least 3 points lower than the SV convinces your character
that a different direction is actually north. This application of the
survival discipline may only be attempted above ground.
Finding Food or Water: Your character can attempt to locate food or fresh water (as separate checks). Doing so typically
requires an SV 5, but the difficulty can vary greatly according
to the type of terrain, climate, and other environmental factors.
The volume of food or water may also vary greatly and may not
always be sufficient to accommodate numerous creatures and/or
those of larger sizes (GMs call).
Regarding different kinds of food, the gathering of edible
plants and insects can often be obtained without the use of tools
or weapons but tends to provide lesser amounts. Fishing or hunting can often produce more abundant food but requires the use
of tools, ranged weapons, or a suitable trap kit, in addition to the
successful use of a secondary discipline check (Agility, Ranged
Precision, Stealth, etc.), as determined by the GM. Only a single
secondary check is needed for success.
For example, if your character successfully uses Survival
to locate a deer the GM might then request a Ranged Precision
check against an SV 5 to see if his aim is true. Your character
would not actually have to defeat the deer in combat but would
only have to succeed on the check to provide ample meat for himself and his companions.
Herb Lore: Surviving in the wilderness often necessitates
being able to identify plants and fungi, including knowing where
they grow and recognizing their inherent properties. The SV varies according to the type of plant and its rarity, but an SV 5 should
suffice in most cases.
Success allows your character to recall general information
about the plant, such as where it commonly grows, whether or
not it is safe to consume, and other basic qualities. Achieving a
critical success provides your character with more advanced information, including how it is best cultivated and what kinds of
professional applications it may be suited for (medicinal, poisonous, mystical, etc.).
Failure indicates that your character is unfamiliar with the
plant, but suffering a critical failure on the Survival check or getting a result that is at least 3 points lower than the SV provides
your character with false information instead. Additionally, once
Survival has been attempted for a particular plant type it cannot
be checked again until your character gains a new rank in the
discipline or has an opportunity to research the plant, such as by
visiting a library.
Ignoring Rough Terrain/Weather: Your character can attempt to ignore the slowing effects of rough terrain and/or weather in regards to traveling time. Doing so generally requires an
SV 8. If successful, this benefit is extended to your characters
group, but particularly large groups like armies may require multiple successful checks. Refer to General Rules: Traveling Times
in Chapter 4 for more information.

Tracking (Moderate)

Tracking is used whenever your character wishes to determine if creatures have moved through an area, and if so, to track
their movements. The SV for this discipline varies greatly according to environmental conditions, such as the time since the tracks

were made, the number of creatures being tracked, and weather.


Generally, Tracking requires an SV 5 if the tracks were made that
same day and if the ground was soft enough to have left behind
traces. Otherwise, the GM will adjust the SV accordingly. Darkness or other forms of obscurement can also impose a 2 penalty.
Scent: Some playable species and creatures may possess the
Heightened Sense: Scent trait. Such creatures receive a +1 bonus
to all scent-based Tracking checks.
Urban Settings: It is virtually impossible to track a target
through an urban setting. Only if additional clues were left behind
should Tracking be allowed, such as if the target was wearing
heavily scented perfume or was bleeding and leaving behind traces of blood.

STRENGTH
Climbing (Easy)

Climbing is used whenever your character wishes to scale a


vertical surface. The SV varies according to the specific climbing
surface, but additional modifiers may also be applied based on
other factors, such as slipperiness, strong winds, etc.

Climbing Surface
Ladder
Rigging or Knotted Rope
Unknotted Rope
Vertical Surface (with grips)
Vertical Surface (without
significant grips)

SV
1
(trivial)
3
5
8
12

Each success and critical success allows your character to


move a distance equal to her occupied space (2 ft for tiny size,
5 feet for medium size, etc.). Failing a Climbing check simply
means that no progress was made, but suffering a critical failure
or getting a result that is at least 3 points lower than the SV causes
your character to fall. Refer to General Rules: Falling Damage in
Chapter 4 for more information.
Climbing Gear: A set of climbing gear can be purchased,
which grants a +1 bonus to Climbing checks when climbing natural surfaces (no bonus is gained when climbing man-made objects
and surfaces like ladders, knotted ropes, etc.). Additionally, once
a particular surface has been successfully scaled it can then be
secured with ropes so that its SV is reduced to 3 for anyone else
who attempts to climb it (assuming that a sufficient length of rope
was used and knotted).

Jumping (Easy)

Jumping is used whenever your character wishes to leap horizontally and/or vertically. Using SV 5 as the general difficulty
your character may jump horizontally, with a running start, a distance equal to his occupied space (2 ft for tiny size, 5 feet for
medium size, etc.)each critical success adds additional distance
equal to half his occupied space again, if desired. Vertical jumps
may only attain half these distances but may be performed along
with a horizontal jump freely.

25

CHAPTER 1
Failing a Jumping check means that your character didnt
quite make it, but he may still be able to prevent himself from
falling by succeeding on a free Agility check of SV 5, usually by
grabbing onto the opposing ledge if he was able to clear enough
of the distance (GMs call). An Agility check is not allowed if
your character suffers a critical failure on the Jumping check or
if he gets a result that is at least 3 points lower than its SV, which
automatically causes him to fall. Refer to General Rules: Falling
Damage in Chapter 4 for more information.
Stationary Jumping: Your character may also jump horizontally from a stationary position, meaning without a running
start, but a 2 penalty is applied to the check. Stationary vertical
jumps are not penalized.

Might (Moderate)

Might is used whenever your character attempts to perform


actions using raw muscle, such as lifting or moving heavy objects
or forcing open barred doors.
Free Limit: Your character may freely lift or manipulate an
amount of weight equal to his EF x 5, without having to succeed
on a Might check. The weight of his own equipment must still be
factored into this amount.
For example, lets assume that your character is medium
size and that his EF is 20 pounds. His free limit would therefore
be equal to 20 x 5, or 100 pounds. This means that he could freely
lift or manipulate a total amount of weight up to 100 pounds without having to make a Might Check. If he is already wearing 61.5
pounds of armor and gear then he can still lift or manipulate an
additional 38.5 pounds for free.
Additional Weight: A Might check of SV 5 is necessary in
order to lift or manipulate additional weight beyond your characters free limit, and a new Might check must typically be made
each round for ongoing tasks. Each success and critical success
grants an additional weight value according to whether he is on
land, swimming, or in flight. It is much easier to lift or manipulate
additional weight while on land than it is to do so while swimming or flying.

Position
Land
Swimming
Flying

Free Additional Weight


(per success/critical)
Limit
EF x 5
EF x 5
EF x 5
EF x 3
EF x 5
EF x 1

Following the example above, your character could lift


or manipulate 100 pounds for free. With a standard success he
could lift or manipulate up to 200 pounds while on land, up to
160 pounds while swimming, or up to 120 pounds while flying.
With one critical success he could lift or manipulate up to 300
pounds while on land, up to 220 pounds while swimming, or up to
140 pounds while flying. Achieving additional critical successes
would increase the weight limits even further.
Whenever your character attempts to manipulate weight beyond his free limit his Speed is automatically reduced to 1 square,
assuming that he is still able to move at all due to Encumbrance
penalties, and he may not sprint. Failing a Might check means
that your character is unable to lift or manipulate the additional

26

weight, and he must abandon the attempthe may freely discard


all of the excess weight beyond his free limit unless it has somehow become attached. Suffering a critical failure on the Might
check or being unable to discard the attached weight causes your
character to fall prone if on land, sink 5 feet deeper if swimming,
or suffer falling damage if flying.
Forcing Open Barred Doors: Rather than attacking a door,
your character can attempt to force it open by making a standard
Might check to determine how much weight he can force against
it, plus his free limit and body weight (his equipment weight is
already included as part of his free limit). For each method that
a door is secured it requires an equivalent amount of weight to
force open. Being locked and/or secured with a crossbar each
adds an amount of weight corresponding to the doors equivalent
size (based on the size of creatures it is meant to accommodate).
Successfully forcing open a locked or secured door causes portions of the door or its frame to break so that it cannot be locked
again or re-secured without first being repaired.

Door Size
Tiny
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Enormous
Gigantic
Colossal

Required Weight
(locked/secured)

50 lb
150 lb
500 lb
1,500 lb
5,000 lb
15,000 lb
50,000 lb
150,000 lb

Furthermore, a door can be held shut by placing objects


against it, in which case their combined weights are added to the
amount required to force it open. Creatures may also attempt to
push against it, in which case they may make their own opposed
Might checks, adding their results (including free limits and body
weights) to the amount of force being pushed against the door. All
of these factors may be stacked with one another freely.
For example, lets assume that your party is attempting to
force open a locked door that is designed for a medium size creature. Since the door is locked it requires 500 pounds of weight
to force open. However, it also has 100 pounds of barrels and
crates stacked against it on the other side, which increases the
total weight needed to force it open to 600 pounds. If your party
consists of a pixie (1.6 lb), a gnome (31 lb), and a human (174
lb), with a combined free limit of 157.5 pounds, then they would
already have a total weight of 364.1 pounds to force against the
door prior to attempting their Might checksyour party would
still require 235.9 additional pounds to force the door open.
Assisting Others: Unlike other actions that limit assistance,
Might values may be combined together to achieve greater feats.
Multiple characters working together simply add up the weights
from their own Might checks. Obviously, bigger characters usually contribute much greater amounts, but every little bit helps.
Resisting Combat Actions: Your character may sometimes
opt to use Might to resist various combat actions like disarming,
tripping, or grappling, instead of using the Agility discipline.

FACULTIES

PROFESSIONS
Professions encompass overarching careers and occupations
that are geared more toward providing a livelihood for your character outside of adventuring. They work in a similar manner to
disciplines, except that a d8 roll is always used for checks instead
of being tied to a particular attribute. The total result of a profession check is still compared against the Success Value (SV) of the
activity being attempted. Refer to Rolling the Dice in Chapter 4
for more information.
Professions are sorted into ranks, like disciplines, with Rank
2 (+2 modifier) representing professional proficiency. However,
the modifier for each rank is greater than those of disciplines so
that more weight for success or failure is shifted to your characters professional training. This means that those who are unskilled in a particular profession are almost guaranteed to fail,
whereas those who are better trained in the profession are much
more likely to succeed.
All professions begin at Rank 0 but may be increased by
spending character points. The cost of increasing a discipline depends on its aptitude, easy (E) or moderate (M), which is listed
after its title. Professions never have difficult aptitudes.
Note that professions are entirely optional and many players
often choose to forgo them altogether for their characters since
adventuring is usually a full-time occupation on its own.

Profession Costs per Rank


(cumulative costs are listed in parenthesis)

Rank

Modifier

Easy

Moderate

1 (1)

2 (2)

+2

2 (3)

3 (5)

+4

3 (6)

4 (9)

COMMON PROFESSIONS

There are a huge variety of different professions, far more


than can possibly be included here. The following list simply
highlights some of the most common professions:
Alchemist (M) herbs, poisons, and potions
Animal Trainer (M) training bestial creatures
Architect (M) buildings and structures
Artist (E) drawings and paintings
Beggar (E) begging for money
Brewer (E) alcoholic beverages

27

CHAPTER 1
Cartographer (E) maps and charts
Cook (E) food and non-alcoholic beverages
Courier (E) delivers messages, news, and shipments
Courtesan (E) companionship and seduction
Enchanter (M) magical items and spell foci
Farmer (E) crops and livestock
Fisher (E) fish and seafood
Fortune Teller (E) predictions and divination
Gambler (E) games of chance
Gladiator (E) arena combat
Hunter (E) wild game and trapping
Interpreter (E) translating languages
Jester (E) comedy, acrobatics, and juggling
Jeweler (M) gems and jewelry
Leatherworker (M) hides, tanning, and leather goods
Lumberjack (E) logging and wood cutting
Merchant (E) buying, selling, and trading
Metalworker (M) blacksmithing and metal arms/items
Miner (E) mineral and ore excavation
Musician (M) playing musical instruments and singing; bards also require this profession for their songs
Orator (E) acting, storytelling, and public speaking
Physician (E) healing and medicinal remedies
Racketeer (E) counterfeiting and criminal activities
Sailor (E) operation of seagoing vehicles
Scribe (E) writing and literary research
Shipwright (M) construction of seagoing vehicles
Soldier (E) military and/or mercenary duties
Stoneworker (M) stone masonry and sculptures
Tailor (M) clothing and textile goods
Taxidermist (M) animal/monster trophies and totems
Woodworker (M) wooden items and land vehicles

Earning Money

Professions allow characters to attempt to earn additional


income in between adventures or during periods of downtime
throughout a campaign, and there are two ways to do so: earning
wages for daily work (available for all professions) and crafting
(available for some professions).
Custom Professions: There are many more professions beyond those listed above. Characters are free to select custom professions of their choosing, per the GMs approval. When deciding
on a professions aptitude, first determine if it allows for crafting
(not all professions do). If it does not, or if its crafted items arent
particularly valuable or useful, then its aptitude should probably
be easy. If a profession does allow for crafting and its crafted
items would be fairly valuable or useful then its aptitude should
be moderate. The Musician profession is an exception to this rule.
Discipline Precedence: Professions are almost exclusively
used for earning income and should never be used in the place
of discipline checks. For instance, even though a character has
the Hunter profession he would still use the Survival discipline
during an adventure when trying to hunt for game to feed his
companions. He would only make Hunter profession checks
when trying to earn income in between adventures or when no
other discipline checks would be suitable to a given task. To be
clear, discipline checks always take precedence.

28

Note that there are a few exceptions to this rule. Some professions are used at special times in the place of disciplines when
performing highly-specialized tasks, such as Alchemist, Musician
(for bards), Taxidermist, and crafting professions when repairing
damaged items, but these exceptions are described specifically in
the rules when their use is warranted.
Assisting Others: The potential bonus modifiers that can be
gained from Assisting Others, as described under General Rules
in Chapter 4, are not allowed for profession checks. Multiple
workers earn wages individually according to their own profession checks, whereas crafting tasks that require multiple workers
rely solely on the profession check of the primary crafter and simply pay wages to all assistants.

WAGES

All professions allow for a character to earn wages. Generally, one profession check can be made per day of game time if a
character was able to devote a sufficient portion of the day toward
working, usually between 6 and 10 hours. The SV varies according to the nature of the work being performed, but SV 5 should
suffice for most common jobs.
Earnings: Success earns 1g, and each critical success earns
an additional 50s. Failure still earns your character about 50s for
the days work, but failing with a result that is at least 3 points
lower than the SV earns no money (perhaps due to unforeseen
expenses). A critical failure should also hinder your character in
other ways suitable to the specific profession (suffering a wound,
social complications, etc.), as determined by the GM.
Unskilled Labor: Jobs that require no professional training
do not have an associated professions check. Instead, the GM
should probably insist on a suitable discipline check, such as Perseverance or Might, to determine how productively your character performs the job, which also determines his wage earnings.
However, the total earnings amount is halved.

Wage Requirements

Almost every profession requires a suitable working location, which includes either being employed or having permission
to do the work. The specifics vary greatly from one profession
to another, but profession checks shouldnt be permitted without
first addressing exactly how a character is attempting to earn the
money. Even professions that appear more freelance than others
can have unforeseen consequences when theyre performed without permission.
For example, a lumberjack who decides to start cutting
down and selling trees from a noblemans land without permission would likely face serious consequences if caught. At the very
least he would probably have his materials and any profits confiscated. He might also face more severe punishments such as additional fines, community service, imprisonment, orin extreme
caseseven death.
Multiple Professions: A character may acquire multiple
professions, but only one may be used per day to attempt to earn
wages. Even so, there can be benefits to being trained in multiple
professions, such as a wider variety of employment opportunities,
the ability to craft different items, and so forth.

FACULTIES

CRAFTING

In addition to earning wages, some professions also allow


a character to produce, construct, and/or repair specific types of
items and materials. The SV varies according to the grade of the
item being crafted (lowgrade, common, or highgrade) and the
complexity of the task being performed. Note that all enchantments (magical items and spell foci) require SV 8.

Item/Task Complexity
SV
Lowgrade Items or Basic Tasks
3
Common Items or Moderate Tasks 5
Highgrade Items or Advanced
8
Tasks; all Enchantments
Multiple Workers: Larger or more complicated tasks may
sometimes require more than one worker. The GM will determine
if having to hire additional workers is necessary, according to the
scope of each task, which may include unskilled laborers to help
when performing the more menial aspects of the job. Skilled laborers are generally paid full wages according to their individual
profession results, whereas unskilled laborers are usually paid
only half this amount (as detailed on the previous page).

Crafting Requirements

A character who wishes to craft or repair an item must first


meet the following three criteria:
1. Sufficient Time: This requirement varies greatly according
to the item being crafted or the task being performed.
Some items or tasks may only require a few minutes or
hours (sewing-up a hole in a shirt, cooking a meal), some
could take days or weeks (forging a suit of armor, training
a mount), and some tasks might even require months or
years to complete (building a castle, growing crops). The
GM will determine a suitable time frame for each situation, but items or tasks that require longer periods of time
may even need to be performed outside of standard game
time, such as in between adventures. The GM might also
insist on multiple crafting checks for lengthier projects,
such as crafting a suit of armor piece by piece or building
a castle room by room. Enchanting magical items warrants more specific rules. Spell scrolls and spell crystals
typically require a couple of hours to enchant, per item,
while scepters and wands can each take up to a full day.
Lesser magical items typically require about a week to enchant and greater magical items can require up to a month.
Relics are a special case and may require much longer to
fully enchant (years or even longer), along with the GMs
approval and guidance.
2. Specialized Tools & Equipment: Each crafting profession
requires unique tools and access to proper equipment in
order to attempt most tasks. A suitable location to work
may also be necessary for more complicated jobs. As is
true for the time requirement above, the kinds of tools and
equipment that are needed can vary greatly according to
the specific task being performed. For instance, a metalworker often requires a smithing hammer, anvil, and forge
in order to craft or make repairs, which severely limits

where he is able to perform his work. Other professions,


such as artists and tailors, are able to perform some of
their crafting tasks with simpler tools and in almost any
location, but sometimes they too require access to a studio
or workshop in order to craft specific items or perform
more complicated tasks.
3. Base Materials: Generally, crafting consumes base materials equal in value to a percentage of the items listed price
(66% for a standard success). Attempting to repair an item
consumes fewer materials and has lower percentage (20%
for a standard success). Failed attempts waste half of the
base materials, while suffering a critical failure or getting
a result that is at least 3 points lower than the SV wastes
them all. Note that wasted materials cannot be salvaged or
reusedthey are either spoiled in the attempt or the time
and cost that would be required to salvage them significantly outweighs the benefit of doing so.

Result
Critical Success
Success
Failure
Failure (by at least 3 points)
or a Critical Failure

Crafting
Percentage
50%
66%
33%

Repair
Percentage
15%
20%
10%

66%

20%

Crafting Profits

Generally speaking, a character can expect to sell newly


crafted items for 75% of their listed prices. In comparison, used
items that are still in good condition tend to sell for about 50% of
their listed prices. Economic factors and events can modify this
price accordingly. Real estate, such as a home or building, can
usually be sold for its full value.
Character-Owned Businesses: A character who runs his
own shop or business can expect to sell his crafted items for the
full 100% of their listed price, but this also assumes that he is
able to devote the necessary time to running his business. Unfortunately, the chaotic life of an adventurer rarely allows for such
extensive free time, which means that entrepreneurial characters
must often hire assistants to maintain their shops in their absence.
Owning and operating a shop or other business may involve additional overhead costs that can significantly impact a characters
potential profit margins.
New Characters & Starting Equipment: Characters wishing to craft their own starting equipment must either wait until the
game has actually begun (no rolling prior to the start of the game)
or they can simply roleplay that they personally crafted some of
their starting gear (despite having paid full prices). This rule exists to make the games starting point equal for all characters,
regardless of professions. However, once the game has begun, a
new character is certainly welcome to try to save money by crafting some of his own gear, per the GMs approval, and assuming
that he is able to meet the three requirements outlined above. Unfortunately, if such a character fails in his attempts he may not be
able to fully equip his character, which will likely cause his initial
adventures to become decidedly more challenging.

29

TRAITS

CHAPTER 2
TRAITS

hus far, your character has been assigned attributes, stats,


and disciplines, which all help to establish his boundaries
and limits. They provide him with a framework and highlight areas where he either excels or falls short, but they dont really tell
you what kind of person he actually is. You, as a player, probably
have a good idea of who your character is, but faculties alone are
not enough. That is where traits come in!
Traits are the defining qualities of your character that set him
apart from everyone else. They are the tragic faults, odd quirks,
and amazing abilities that transform a collection of numbers into
a fleshed-out and memorable character! There are three types of
traits: Disadvantages, Creeds, and Advantages.
Magical Traits (): Traits that are magical in nature are
marked with a blue star for ease of reference. Certain spells and
powers may affect or react differently to magical traits, so this
helps to identify which abilities are affected.

DISADVANTAGES

Disadvantages are your characters negative traits, also referred to as detrimental traits. Selecting a disadvantage grants
extra character points to help offset the hardships it incurs. The
extra character points are added to your characters unspent CPV
(total CPV remains unchanged) and can be spent to improve your
characters faculties or to purchase advantages. However, the
amount of points gained is typically equal to only about half of
the actual value of the disadvantages detrimental cost to your
character. Disadvantages may only be selected during the character creation process.
Each disadvantages value is colored red and is listed in parenthesis following its name or ranks. Each rank grants a separate
amount of unspent character points and lower ranks are prerequisites for higher ranks.
For example, if a disadvantage has Rank 1 (2) and Rank
2 (3) then your character would already have to possess Rank
1 before he could select Rank 2, but the total number of unspent
character points that he would gain for selecting both ranks
would be 5.
Character Point Limit: A combined 10 point limit exists
when selecting disadvantages. This means that your character
may only gain up to 10 extra unspent character points from all
of his disadvantages, which also includes any optional detrimental traits and common disadvantages available to members of his
species. For example, selecting the Crippled Arm (R2) 6 and

Pacifist 5 disadvantages would only grant an extra 10 unspent


character points even though the total value is equal to 11. Additional disadvantages and optional detrimental species traits may
still be selected beyond the 10 point limit, if desired, purely as
flavor or for roleplaying purposes.
The Elder disadvantage is an exception to this rule. New
characters who select this trait receive its value of 6 character
points for free, beyond the 10 point limit, since they represent
the accumulated wisdom of later life. Furthermore, selecting this
disadvantage grants your character the option of selecting the first
ranks of Blind and/or Deaf, also for free (for a potential combined
value of 12 points beyond the 10 point limit).

Species Common Disadvantages

Each playable species has a list of three common disadvantages, which are typically possessed by its members. Each common disadvantage that is selected grants one additional character
point beyond its standard valuethe extra points are already included in each disadvantages cost as indicated in the characters
species box. These extra points are still restricted by the 10 point
limit, however. Ranked disadvantages only grant a bonus point
for their first rank, even if subsequent ranks are also taken.
For example, in this chapter, you can find the following disadvantages with their standard values listed in parenthesis: Inquisitive (1), Lazy (2), and Minimalist (R1 1). However, the
huldrian species box lists Inquisitive (2), Lazy (3), and Minimalist (R1 2) as common disadvantages, with each being worth
one extra character point. If a centaur were to select any of these
disadvantages he would receive their standard values, but a huldrian would receive one extra character point each, up to the 10
point limit. A huldrian character would gain 2 character points
for selecting the first rank of Minimalist, but the second rank
would still only grant its standard value if also selected.

Awkward Combinations

Certain combinations of disadvantages should be considered very carefully before being selected. Sure, you could choose
to play a Blind Child with a Crippled Leg, but first consider the
other players and how your character will function as part of an
adventuring party. You should attempt to design your character
so that he is able to mesh with the other party members without
being a burden or a constant source of conflict. A little conflict can
be entertaining, but debilitating combinations of disadvantages
can wear thin pretty fast.

31

CHAPTER 2
Contradicting traits should generally be avoided as well, such
as Cruel Do-Gooders or Violent Pacifists. Such combinations are
either difficult to roleplay or make no sense when paired together. Disadvantages function as a means for encouraging roleplaying by granting incentives (extra character points) to characters
that willingly take on flaws and personality quirks, which must
be roleplayed. Ignoring some of your characters disadvantages
or being unable to roleplay them as they were intended defeats
their purpose, and so your character should not be able to receive
incentives for selecting them.
Forbidden Disadvantages: Your character cannot select
or acquire disadvantages that would make no sense to possess,
such as a yuellok selecting Crippled Armyuelloks already have
useless arms. Additionally, selecting a disadvantage during character creation does not grant extra unspent character points unless
all of its detrimental effects can be applied. For instance, if your
characters Fortitude stat is already at its minimum value (0) then
he would not gain any character points for selecting the Uncharismatic disadvantage. This is because it would impose a 1 penalty to his Fortitude stat, which cannot be decreased any further,
despite the fact that its other penalty would have been applicable
(a 1 penalty to his Charisma attribute). However, such disadvantages may still be selected for roleplaying purposes, if desired.

Buying-Off Disadvantages

Most disadvantages that are selected during the character


creation process can be bought-off at a later time if approved by
the GM, but they must have their values repaid in full, including
any extra point(s) that were gained from your species common
disadvantages. Additionally, if a disadvantage is cured, somehow
negated, or is designated as roleplaying and is rarely played then
your character must repay its value as soon as he earns new character points. To be clear, buying-off a disadvantage always requires that its value be paid in full, even if it was selected purely
for roleplaying purposes (beyond the 10-point limit).
Acquiring Disadvantages Later: Injuries, magical ailments, and other in-game events may cause your character to
acquire a disadvantage, but character points are never gained as
compensation (except in the cases of the Elder disadvantage and
subsequently the Blind and/or Deaf disadvantages). The values of
disadvantages that were acquired due to in-game events are never
bought-off if cured since no character points were gained.

CREEDS

Creeds are overarching belief systems that greatly impact


how your character thinks and behaves. Creeds neither cost nor
grant character points, and are entirely optional. They do not
grant abilities but can impact your characters reputation and often dictate how your character should be roleplayed. Creeds have
certain prerequisites that your character must possess before they
can be selected, and most creeds also serve as prerequisites themselves for subsequent advantages.
For example, in order to select the Priest creed your character must first possess at least Charisma (R2), Mysticism (R1),
and Persuasion (R1). The Priest creed itself serves as one of the
prerequisites for the Cleric vocational advantage.

32

Multiple Creeds: Your character may select multiple creeds


but should only do so after careful consideration. One creed alone
can be challenging to roleplay, so attempting more than one can
be exceptionally tricky. The GM should be consulted before selecting multiple creeds.

Belief Systems

Each creed imparts a unique belief system that requires your


character to adhere to a strict moral code or set of tenets. You
should roleplay your character accordingly in order to maintain
the creeds associated reputation. A Knight, for instance, is often
regarded as a hero by common folk and is looked upon with respect and admiration.
Violations of Code: Failing to adhere to ones code can
cause a reversal of your characters reputation, which may even
result in him being ostracized, shunned, or even persecuted by
those that know of his ill deeds. The GM has final say as to what
actions violate your characters code. In such cases your character loses access to any subsequent advantages that are dependent
upon the creed (Cleric, Crusader, Druid, etc.) until he atones for
his sins and/or transgressions. Even if atonement is successful
the negative effects on his reputation may still linger for quite
a while according to the specific situation and events within the
campaign, per the GMs discretion.

ADVANTAGES

Advantages are beneficial traits that typically grant access to


specialized training, magical powers, and other unique abilities.
They may be purchased by spending character points in much the
same way as faculties. An advantages cost is colored green and
is listed in parenthesis after its name or ranks. Most advantages also list prerequisites that your character must first possess in
order to select them or their ranks. Additionally, lower ranks are
prerequisites for higher ranks.
For example, if you wish for your character to select the first
rank of the Backstab advantage he would need to possess at least
Melee Precision (R2) and Stealth (R2) and would have to spend
3 character points. If he also wanted to select the second rank of
Backstab he would need to possess Stealth (R3) and would have
to spend an additional 3 character points, or 6 points altogether
for both ranks.
Flexible Prerequisites: Some advantages have flexible prerequisites that allow your character to meet their requirements in
different ways. For instance, the Heightened Athletics mystical
advantage includes the following prerequisites: Dexterity (R2) or
Strength (R2), Mysticism (R1). In order to select this advantage
your character has to meet either the Dexterity prerequisite or the
Strength prerequisite but not both. He still has to meet the Mysticism prerequisite in both cases.
Non-Refundable Costs: Unlike disadvantages, which can
usually be bought-off, character points that are spent purchasing
advantages cannot be refunded. Therefore, players are strongly
encouraged to review an advantage carefully before selecting it.
Some players may even find it helpful to develop a long term plan
for exactly which advantages their characters will eventually acquire, assuming that they survive long enough to do so, of course.

TRAITS

DISADVANTAGES
Disadvantages are sorted into three distinct categories:
Faculty Penalties, Handicaps, and Roleplaying Quirks. Faculty
Penalties reduce your characters attributes and stats. Handicaps
impose various physical, mental, or social limitations on your
character. Roleplaying Quirks encompass negative aspects of
your characters personality that should be roleplayed.

FACULTY PENALTIES
Dimwitted (5)

Your character suffers a 1 penalty to his Intellect attribute


and Concentration stat.

Feeble (5)

Your character suffers a 1 penalty to his Endurance attribute and Base Resilience stat.

Imperceptive (4)

Your character suffers a 1 penalty to her Perception attribute and Notice stat.

Inaccurate (4)

Your character suffers a 1 penalty to his Accuracy attribute.

Unathletic (3)

Your character suffers a 1 penalty to her Combat Maneuvers stat and Speed stats (all forms).

Uncharismatic (5)

Your character suffers a 1 penalty to her Charisma attribute


and Fortitude stat.

Uncoordinated (5)

Your character suffers a 1 penalty to his Dexterity attribute


and Defense stat.

Weak (5)

Your character suffers a 1 penalty to his Strength attribute


and Brute Force stat. He also suffers a penalty to his Encumbrance Factor stat according to his creature size: tiny 0.5, small
1.5, medium 5, large 15, huge 50, enormous 150, gigantic
500, and colossal 1,500.

HANDICAPS
Adolescent (4)

Your character is an adolescent. Adjust her age according


to her species to reflect this disadvantage. Her Endurance and
Strength attributes are each capped at a maximum rank of 3 (d10).
Although your character does not suffer a specific penalty
to Charisma, the GM should take into account how an adolescent

is perceived and treated by others. In many situations adults will


ignore your character or regard her as inferior. Others might take
pity on her or spoil her. The GM may impose Charisma bonuses
or penalties as the situation dictates.
Once your character reaches adulthood this advantage must
be bought-off. After the cost is fully repaid your characters Endurance and Strength caps are removed and she is considered an
adult member of her species.
Characters with the Child disadvantage must upgrade to Adolescent once they reach the corresponding age for their species.
Doing so requires your character to spend 6 character points. Once
the difference in costs has been repaid the characters Endurance
and Strength caps increase to a maximum rank of 3, she gains 1
extra health point, and her creature size increases one tier. Tiny
children do not increase in size, but instead apply a 1 penalty
to Stealth, gain a +1 bonus to Brute Force, Total Resilience, and
Combat Maneuvers, and increase their weight multiple to x0.1.
This disadvantage may not be taken if your character has the
Elder disadvantage. Imps, rolgareks, valdarins, and yuelloks may
not select this disadvantage since they appear upon the world as
fully-grown adults.

Alcoholic (3)

Living Creatures Only


Your character has an addiction to alcohol and rarely passes
up an opportunity to have a drink. He drinks too much and spends
a considerable portion of his time being drunk, being unconscious, or urinating, and occasionally all three at the same time!
Your characters addiction requires him to maintain an alcohol level that is greater than 0. He must do so at all times or
he suffers symptoms of withdrawal. These symptoms manifest
as a 1 penalty to all discipline and profession checks (damage
checks are unaffected), irritability, and restlessness, which should
be roleplayed accordingly. Symptoms persist until he consumes
at least one drink so that his alcohol level increases above 0.
Despite the negative aspects of this disadvantage your character does gain two benefits. First, his body is so used to alcohol
that all penalties for being drunk are lessened by 1 point each
(all other effects of being drunk remain unchanged)this benefit may be stacked with the Drunken Prowess optional trait of
certain playable species. Second, he applies a +2 bonus to his
Constitution checks for resisting hangovers (this bonus is not applied to other Constitution checks regarding the consequences of
drinking), but his withdrawal penalty is still applied on top of this
bonus if he starts his day with an alcohol level of 0.
Lastly, before this disadvantage can be bought-off your character must first endure withdrawal symptoms for two consecutive
weeks. In situations where he is confronted with the temptation to
have a drink the GM should subject your character to a willpower
check. If he gives in and has a drink then the time frame resets
back to two weeks. Withdrawal symptoms persist until he successfully endures two consecutive weeks without having a drink,
after which time the disadvantage may be bought-off.

33

CHAPTER 2

Blind (ranked)

Rank 1 (5)
Your character is partially blind, either from having only one
eye or from having impaired vision in both eyes. He suffers a 1
penalty to all discipline checks and profession checks involving
visual tasks, including all Precision checks and spellcasting discipline checks, except for those that only target your character;
tasks that do not rely on vision are never penalized. Disciplines
that are usually penalized include: Agility, Awareness, Climbing,
Healing, Initiative, Jumping, Survival, Tinkering, and Tracking.
Rank 2 (5)
Your character is completely blind. His penalty is increased
to 2. Note that certain visual tasks may even be ruled as being
impossible unless your character receives assistance (GMs call).

Child (10)

Your character is a preadolescent child. Adjust his age according to his species to reflect this disadvantage. His Endurance
and Strength attributes are each capped at a maximum rank of 1
(d6). His maximum number of health points is also reduced by 1.
Lastly, your characters creature size is decreased one tier below
adult members of his species (adjust his faculties accordingly).
The children of tiny species have unique adjustments since
no smaller size tier exists. They receive an additional +1 bonus to
Stealth but suffer a further 1 penalty to Brute Force, Total Resilience, and Combat Maneuvers. They also have a reduced weight
multiple of x0.03 but are still considered tiny in regards to their
occupied space and natural threat range.
Although your character does not suffer a specific penalty to
Charisma, the GM should take into account how a child is perceived and treated by others. In many situations adults will ignore
your character or regard him as inferior. Others might take pity
on him or spoil him. The GM may impose Charisma bonuses or
penalties as the situation dictates.
Once your character grows into an adolescent he must upgrade to the Adolescent disadvantage. Refer to its description for
details about converting your characters faculties and values.
Note that this disadvantage grants far fewer character points
than its actual detrimental cost that is imposed on your character.
This disadvantage may not be taken if it would reduce your characters maximum number of health points to 0, nor may it be taken if your character has the Adolescent or Elder disadvantages.
Imps, rolgareks, valdarins, and yuelloks may not select this disadvantage since they appear upon the world as fully-grown adults.

Crippled Arm (ranked)

Rank 1 (3)
Your character has one arm that is impaired. It is still functional, but all discipline, profession, and damage checks that are
attempted with the injured arm suffer a 1 penalty (including
two-handed actions). A shield that is wielded by your characters
impaired arm also provides 1 less point of block value.
Lavossi and yuelloks may not select this disadvantage since
they lack standard arms.
Rank 2 (3)
Your characters arm is busted, malformed, or has been severed, and is now rendered completely useless. Basic actions can

34

still be attempted if a hook or other prosthetic device is used,


but doing so often requires an Agility check (the SV varies accordingly). Actions that require two hands are usually impossible.
The GM may still permit certain actions that typically require two
hands, such as Climbing checks, but at a penalty befitting the situation (often 2 with a hook or 4 without a hook). Obviously,
shields may not be wielded by your characters useless arm, even
if a hook or other prosthetic device is employed.
The cost for a hook or other common prosthetic device is
typically 1g.

Crippled Leg (ranked; special)

Rank 1 (8; only 2 for flying characters)


Your character has one leg that is impaired. It is still functional, but her Running, Swimming, Climbing, and Jumping
checks all suffer a 1 penalty. Her Defense, Run Speed, and Swim
Speed stats also suffer a 1 penalty. Note that if your character is
capable of flight the penalty to Defense only applies while on land
or in water, and if your character has the Flight trait then the value
of this rank is reduced from 8 to 2 since most of its penalties
can often be avoided.
Lavossi, xsessyri, and yuelloks may not select this disadvantage since they lack legs.
Rank 2 (2)
Your characters leg is busted, malformed, or has been
severed, and is now rendered completely useless. Her Running,
Swimming, Climbing, and Jumping checks all suffer a 2 penalty.
Her Defense, Run Speed, and Swim Speed stats also suffer a 2
penalty. Note that if your character is capable of flight the penalty
to Defense only applies while on land or in water.
Creatures with only one remaining good leg require a crutch
or peg leg in order to walk (creatures with additional legs may
ignore this restriction). The cost for a crutch, peg leg, or other
common prosthetic device is typically 1g. Without such a device
certain disciplines may be further penalized or even ruled to be
impossible (GMs call).

Crippled Wing (ranked)

Rank 1 (3)
Your character has one wing that is impaired. Your characters Flying checks suffer a 1 penalty. His Defense and Flight
Speed stats also suffer a 1 penalty. Note that the penalty to Defense is only applied while flying, not while on land or in water.
Obviously, only species with the Flight: Wings trait may select this disadvantage.
Rank 2 (7)
One or both of your wings are busted, malformed, or have
been severed. Flight is no longer possible.

Deaf (ranked)

Rank 1 (1)
Your characters hearing is partially impaired. She suffers a
1 penalty on all Awareness checks that involve hearing.
Rank 2 (3)
Your character is completely deaf. She suffers a 2 penalty
on Awareness checks that rely partially on hearing and automatically fails all Awareness checks that rely solely on hearing.

TRAITS

Deep Sleeper (2)

Living Creatures Only


Your character tends to sleep very soundly and has a hard
time waking up. He suffers a 4 penalty on Awareness checks that
are made to wake up, and once awake he suffers a 1 penalty to
all discipline and profession checks for the first minute (damage
checks are not affected).

Delayed Initiative (3)

Your character tends to react more slowly in combat. When


determining turn order she always makes two Initiative checks
and takes the lesser result. If your group is using the free Vexith
Initiative App simply indicate this disadvantage in your characters dropbox by selecting Delayed.

Elder (6)

Your character is an elder. Adjust his age according to his


species to reflect this disadvantage. He suffers a 1 penalty to his
Dexterity and Strength attributes.
Adult characters that reach their elder years automatically
acquire this disadvantage. They also have the option of selecting
the first ranks of the Blind and/or Deaf disadvantages, if desired.
Character points are granted for each of these disadvantages, beyond the 10 point limit, including for Elder itself, and reflect
your characters physical failings and heightened wisdom of later
life. This exception to the rule also extends to new characters who
select this disadvantage. However, Blind, Deaf, and Elder may
never be bought-off or cured since they are the results of old age
rather than afflictions or injuries.
This disadvantage may not be selected if your character already has the Child or Adolescent disadvantages. Elves and yuelloks are may not select this disadvantage due to being ageless.

Illiterate (1)

Your character is unable to read and write. However, he may


still speak and understand any language he knows.

Insomniac (2)

Living Creatures Only


Your character has a difficult time falling asleep naturally.
He must succeed on a willpower check in order to do so. If failed,
he may attempt a new check every three hours thereafter.

Klutz (ranked)

Rank 1 (3)
Your character is especially unlucky and has a greater
chance of suffering critical failures. After rolling a 1 on the die
for a discipline or profession check your character suffers a critical failure if the secondary roll lands in the lower half of the dies
range (essentially a 50% chance).
For example, assume that a 1 is rolled using a d10. A critical
failure would then occur if the secondary roll is between 15. A
secondary roll of 610 would not result in a critical failure.
Rank 2 (6)
Your character always suffers a critical failure when a 1 is
rolled on the die for any discipline or profession check. No secondary roll is required!

35

CHAPTER 2

Less Health (5)

Your characters maximum number of health points is reduced by 1. This disadvantage may not be taken if it would reduce
your characters maximum number of health points to 0.

Less Stamina (5)

Your characters maximum number of stamina points is reduced by 1. This disadvantage may not be taken if it would reduce
your characters maximum number of stamina points to 0.

Lycanthropy (0; special)

Your character is afflicted with lycanthropy, a mystical disease that forces him to transform into a werewolf during the three
consecutive nights of the full moon every month, starting at dusk
and ending at dawn (each of the three nights).
Additionally, your character suffers from an acute vulnerability to silver. In particular, silver weapons inflict +2 damage
against your character when hes in his standard species form or
+4 damage when hes transformed into a werewolf. Refer to Lycanthropy in Chapter 6 for more information.
Note that selecting this disadvantage does not grant character points despite imposing significant risks and penalties upon
your character. However, it does allow your character to purchase werewolf-only advantages (Chapter 6), if desired.

Magical Deficiency (3)

Your character is only able to benefit from one greater magical apparel item at once, rather than the standard allowance of two
items. Elves who select this disadvantage reduce their limit of
such items to two. Once selected, this disadvantage is permanent
and can never be bought-off or cured.

Mute (4)

Your character is unable to speak, perhaps due to a disability,


from having suffered extreme trauma, or because of deliberate
self-discipline (having taken a strict vow of silence). Vocal and
mouth-related sounds cannot be deliberately produced, such as
whistling or coughing to gain attention.
All spellcasting attempts suffer a 2 penalty, except for spell
effects that are marked with the mental casting spell descriptor
[M]. However, spellcasters can acquire the Silent Spellcasting
mystical advantage to help overcome this handicap.
Bardic songs are also restricted by this disadvantage, which
prohibits vocal performance styles. The instrument only performance style can still be employed (with its standard penalty of
1) or the wind instrument style can be used since the instrument
itself is technically responsible for producing the sounds. Bardic
songs gain no benefit from the Silent Spellcasting advantage.

Nightmares (2)

Living Creatures Only


Your character suffers from intense nightmares and restless
sleep. Perhaps a terrible childhood event or a near-death experience has left him mentally scarred. Whatever the cause, your
character has difficulty sleeping. Each attempt at restful sleep requires a Constitution check of SV 5. If successful, your character
has a relatively peaceful night and suffers no ill effects. Failure

36

means that your character spends the night tossing and turning,
and awakens groggy and sluggish, thereby doubling the required
time for him to recover lost stamina points to one point every
four hours (instead of one point every two hours), which persists
until a full and peaceful nights rest is received. Suffering a critical failure imposes a further penalty of 1 to all of his discipline
checks and profession checks, which also persists until a full and
peaceful nights rest is able to be achieved. Damage checks are
not penalized.
Note that tranquil dreams from the Dream Craft spell effect
still grant a +2 bonus to your characters daily healing check but
only if the sleeping Constitution check succeeds first.
Ettins that select this disadvantage (considered individual)
only apply its penalties to the affected minds actionsits twins
actions are not affected. A critical failure on the Constitution
check still slows the ettins rate of stamina recovery, despite the
fact that stamina is a shared value.

Obese (2)

Your character is obese. His weight tends to be at least 25%


greater than the average value for his species and gender. His Flying, Running, and Swimming disciplines have their SV values
for sprinting increased to SV 8 (instead of the standard SV 5).
Additionally, rolling a 1 on any of these checks causes your character to become winded, whereby he suffers a 1 penalty to all
other discipline, profession, and damage checks until the end of
his next turn. Lastly, suffering a critical failure on any sprinting
check results in the immediate loss of one stamina point. This
disadvantage cannot be combined with Skinny.

Skinny (2)

Your character is skinny. Her weight tends to be at least 25%


less than the average for her species and gender. Her Might discipline has its SV for lifting and manipulating heavy objects increased to SV 8 (instead of the standard SV 5). Her Encumbrance
Factor stat is also reduced by an amount equal to 5 x her weight
multiple. This disadvantage cannot be combined with Obese.

Stolen Fortune (4)

Player Characters Only


Your character no longer possesses the ability to use fortune
points. He does not begin the game with one and may not acquire
them during play.

Vampirism (0; special)

Requires GM Approval!
Your character is afflicted with vampirism, a mystical curse
that has transformed her into a vampire. She is considered to be
non-living (undead) and gains a variety of creature traits.
Additionally, your character suffers from a host of acute
vulnerabilities to garlic, holy water, holy symbols, and wooden
weapons/ammo. Direct sunlight is especially dangerous to your
character and inflicts d8 damage each round that she stands in or
moves through it (compared against her Total Resilience stat); a
cumulative +1 bonus is also applied for each consecutive round
that sunlight damage is rolled. Refer to Vampirism in Chapter 6
for more information.

TRAITS
Note that selecting this disadvantage does not grant character points despite imposing significant risks and penalties
upon your character. However, it does allow your character to
purchase vampire-only advantages (Chapter 6), if desired. The
GM must approve of this trait before it can be selected since it
can drastically limit how the other party members conduct their
adventures, particularly in regards to exploring and traveling
during the daytime.

ROLEPLAYING QUIRKS
Arrogant (1)

Your character believes that he is somehow better or more


deserving than other people. His disdain might be aimed at only
certain species, a different social class, a specific gender, or any
combination thereof. Your characters mannerisms and comments
clearly show his egotistical views.

Crude (1)

Your character just doesnt seem to understand the concept


of manners. He is unsophisticated, rude, and offensive, whether
intentional or not.

Cruel (1)

Your character is downright mean. She shows no mercy to


her opponents and even takes pleasure from their misery. She
doesnt spare peoples feelings, nor does she go out of her way to
help others, at least not without adequate compensation.

Deceitful (1)

Your character is a liar and a cheat. His word is practically


worthless and people that know him dont really trust him.

Diligent (1)

Your character tends to do a thorough job, but she usually


takes way too long to complete it. She checks everything multiple
times and is painfully meticulous.

Do-Gooder (2)

Your character is always eager to help those in need, even


if doing so puts your character in danger. He is selfless and will
go out of his way to protect the innocent, assist the weak, and
combat evil.

Envious (1)

Your character is rarely content with her own station in life


and tends to be resentful of others for their belongings, celebrity,
or abilities. Her jealousy often gets the better of her, regardless of
whether her feelings are displayed openly or kept secret.

Fanatical (2)

Your character fiercely believes in a particular ideology with


unwavering determination, such as a political viewpoint, religious beliefs, or similar ideas. She is unwilling to compromise on
her beliefs and often reacts aggressively toward anyone that does
not share them.

On the plus side, your character is more resistant against


Persuasion attempts as far as her beliefs are concernedher Fortitude stat receives a +2 bonus in such cases. However, she is also
far more likely to be cooperative and agreeable toward ideas that
support her beliefs, which imposes a 2 penalty to her Fortitude
stat instead, assuming that she even needs convincing at all.

Fearful (2)

Your character has an intense phobia of one or more things.


Possible fears could include spiders, dogs, enclosed spaces,
heights, ghosts, crowds, or darkness. You should come up with at
least one significant fear or several lesser fears in order for your
character to qualify for this disadvantage, per the GMs approval.
Whenever your character must confront one of her phobias she
must endure a fear check. Refer to General Rules: Fear Checks
in Chapter 4 for more information.

Forgetful (1)

Your characters memory isnt one of his strong points. Perhaps he is easily distracted or maybe hes suffered one too many
blows to the head. In any case he has trouble remembering names,
minor details, and obligations.

Generous (1)

Your character places little value on material wealth and


is charitable toward others. He freely dispenses excess money
and resources without concern for personal compensation. This
doesnt mean that hes constantly broke, but rather that he feels
no desire to hoard wealth for its own sake.

Greedy (1)

Your character can never seem to get enough money, possessions, or power. Whats in it for me? is her foremost thought
whenever she must make decisions.

Headstrong (1)

Your character is bullheaded and overconfident. She rarely


listens to reason and often becomes even more stubborn when
argued with.

Impulsive (1)

Your character tends to act first and think about the consequences of her actions later, if at all. Sometimes things can work
out to her advantage, but more often than not her brash actions
lead to complications.

Inquisitive (1)

Your character is very curious and nosy. He absolutely has


to know everything about, well, everything. His inquisitive nature
tends to get him (and his companions) into trouble.

Kleptomaniac (2)

Your character has the uncontrollable urge to take things that


dont belong to her. She probably collects or hoards trivial items
and pays little heed to their value or importance. She may not
even be aware of what shes doing, at least in terms of right and
wrong (players call).

37

CHAPTER 2

Lazy (2)

Your character prefers to live a sedentary lifestyle. Work is


not something that he is accustomed to doing and hard work is
something that he avoids at all costs. Often times your character
will go out of his way to convince others to do things for him or
hell try to find ways to procrastinate as long as possible. Sometimes the GM should even request Perseverance checks to determine if your character can muster enough effort to complete his
duties, like staying awake during his shift for the nightly watch.

Lustful (1)

Your character has insatiable romantic desires toward members of a chosen gender. He has a rather difficult time attempting
to restrain his advances while in the presence of individuals he
finds attractive.

Merciful (1)

Your character is compassionate and shows mercy, even to


his enemies. He refuses to kill someone in cold blood and abstains from employing questionable tactics like the use of poison
or torture.

Minimalist (ranked)

Rank 1 (1)
Your character prefers to travel lightly, taking with him no
more than what is absolutely necessary. This can sometimes get
him into trouble when unexpected needs arise since he rarely
plans for emergencies. His financial affairs remain unhindered
and he may still desire to accumulate wealth, but he either keeps
most of his money stored somewhere safe or he prefers nonmaterial forms of wealth (titles, favors, business dealings, etc.).
Ettins that select this disadvantage (considered individual)
may be forced to endure considerable conflict due to their twins
differing preferences (especially if Rank 2 is selected). This is
fine as long as the disadvantage is sufficiently roleplayed, but if
it becomes a problem, such as from an overbearing twin, then it
should probably be bought-off.
Rank 2 (2)
Your character abhors the use of armor and being encumbered. He refuses to wear any type of armor, including bulky
clothing and accessories, except in the most extreme of circumstances. Additionally, he attempts to remain unencumbered at all
times and avoids carrying more than his first Encumbrance Factor
multiple in weight whenever possible.

Mischievous (1)

Your character loves playing pranks, making jokes, and


causing mischief. For the most part his antics are harmless, but
sometimes he takes things a bit too far and gets into trouble.

Multiple Personalities (4; special)

Your characters mind is fragmented into two or more distinct personalities. Each personality should be assigned its own
set of roleplaying quirk disadvantages. Character point gains are
not cumulative when selecting disadvantages for each of the various personalities, but rather the personality with the least combined value is all that counts (in addition to the cost of this disad-

38

vantage). For instance, if one personalitys disadvantages have a


combined value of 2 and anothers have a combined value of 5
then the value for selecting this disadvantage would be 6 character points (4 for selecting Multiple Personalities plus 2 for the
personality with the least combined value).
Different situations and triggers tend to bring one of your
characters personalities to the forefront, such as moments of
stress, encountering different stimuli (smelling a specific odor,
hearing a specific sound/word/name, etc.), or perhaps theyre
triggered by other disadvantages. For instance, maybe your character is Fearful of spiders, which causes one of her personalities
to come forth whenever spiders are encountered. Triggers can be
predictable or seemingly random, such as having to make periodic willpower checks to see if your characters current personality
can remain in control. Such methods and their frequency should
be discussed with and approved by the GM.
Furthermore, depending on how you wish to roleplay your
characters various personalities, some of them may not even be
aware that the other personalities exist, though this can make
roleplaying this disadvantage even trickier. Concerning your
characters disciplines, professions, advantages, and other traits,
it is generally assumed that all personalities can make use of
your characters abilities unless you wish to deliberately limit
your character even further. Due to this disadvantages complexity, you and your GM should work together to devise a suitable
structure for how it functions. It is perhaps the most challenging
disadvantage in the game to roleplay successfully.
Typically, this disadvantage has a value of 4 character
points when selected, but the GM may choose to adjust this value
if he feels that the hardships and/or frequency of personality shifts
would warrant additional character points.

Nervous (2)

Your character is easily excitable and is not very good at


hiding it. Perhaps her eyes dart about too quickly or her voice
trembles or stutters. Maybe she just sweats a lot. Regardless, she
also suffers a 1 penalty on Intimidation checks.

Ostentatious (1)

Your character loves the attention of others and will often go


to great lengths in order to be recognized, whether for good or ill.
This quality manifests itself in a variety of ways, such as boasting
about ones deeds to anyone who will listen, wearing flashy attire,
or even committing deliberate social faux pas to garner notice.

Pacifist (5; special)

Your character objects to violence and must be truly desperate before he will make attacks or use lethal abilities. He much
prefers to avoid violent conflict if at all possible, preferring instead to resolve such situations with words or nonlethal means.
In addition to the obvious roleplaying consequences, your
characters utter reliance on defensive techniques provides a +1
bonus to his Defense, Concentration, and Fortitude stats. However, your character can never initiate damaging or lethal attacks/
abilities against opponents. He can fight back, once attacked, but
even then he suffers a 1 penalty to his discipline, profession, and
damage checks (only for damaging or lethal actions). Note that

TRAITS
this condition and its penalties do not apply when attacking objects, but they do apply when attacking elementals, undead, and
other kinds of non-living creatures.
Even your characters minions and servants cannot be commanded to initiate attacks, but if such creatures are capable of
acting independently they may still choose to do so according
to their own free will, per the GMs discretion. Regardless, the
actions of minions and servants do not share your characters discipline or damage penalties.
Ettins that select this disadvantage (considered individual)
do not gain the +1 bonus to Defense unless it is purchased by both
minds. However, the traits value is adjusted accordingly: 7 if
one mind selects it (no bonus to Defense) or 6 each if both minds
select it (+1 bonus to Defense).

Paranoid (1)

Your character is extremely suspicious toward other people


and tends to think everyone is out to get him. He frequently reads
more into a situation than is actually the case and has a hard time
trying not to take things personally. For instance, if he sees someone laughing, then surely they must be laughing at him!

Perfectionist (1)

Your character always has to have everything be a certain


way. He tends to be very neat and highly organized but can become agitated quite easily when confronted by the disorderly
habits of others.

Pessimistic (1)

Your character usually has a rather gloomy and depressing


outlook. Even when met with favorable tidings she tends to focus
on the negative aspects of a given situation.

Proper (1)

Your character is sophisticated and he conducts himself in


accordance to specific moral standards. He is a gentleman, has
an unwavering sense of honor, and goes out of his way to keep
his word.

Rebellious (1)

Your character has a strong disdain for authority figures and


most organized institutions. He dislikes taking orders and prefers
to follow his own agenda.

Secretive (1)

Your character tends to keep things to herself and never volunteers personal information. What little tidbits she does disclose
are usually cryptic or only half-truths.

Sissy (3)

Your character whines and pouts whenever he gets hurt.


In fact, his negative outlook has a tangible effect on his actions.
Whenever your character has lost at least one health point he suffers a 1 penalty to all discipline, profession, and damage checks
(in addition to any fatigue penalties). Regarding ettins, only the
specific mind that selects this disadvantage (considered individual) suffers the penalties.

Somber (1)

Your character rarely smiles or laughs. She takes everything


very seriously. At times she even seems a little sad or depressed.
Perhaps shes this way because of intense training or conditioning, a terrible and troubling past, or because she still grieves for a
loved one that met a tragic end.

Spendthrift (3)

Your character has a knack for losing or wasting his money.


He starts the game with 25% less money (37g, 50s) and loses
the same percentage of any money and loot acquired during play.
Money and valuables that are shared or earned as a team arent
reduced until your characters own share is paid out. You are free
to roleplay the loss of value however you wish.
While the Generous disadvantage compels a character to be
more giving toward others, Spendthrift simply represents a loss.
Money or valuables may not be given to teammates or friends,
nor may they benefit your character in any way whatsoever. If
combined, the effects of the Generous disadvantage must occur
after the 25% loss from Spendthrift has been subtracted.

Strange (1)

Your character is considered odd by most other people. Perhaps he has wacky ideas, annoying habits, or maybe he has an
irrational personality that make no sense to anyone else.

Submissive (2)

Your character is easily influenced by others and tends to


back down from most social confrontations. She rarely assumes
positions of leadership, but even when fulfilling such roles she
tends to be easily swayed and manipulated.
In addition to this disadvantages various roleplaying implications your character suffers a 1 penalty to her Fortitude stat
when attempting to resist Intimidation and Persuasion checks.

Talkative (1)

Your character has a hard time keeping his mouth shut. He


often speaks his mind and tends to get on peoples nerves. Staying
quiet and keeping secrets are usually beyond his ability, at least
for any extended period of time.

Unforgiving (1)

Your character is easily offended and takes everything personally. He holds a grudge for a long time and seeks revenge for
even minor affronts.

Violent (ranked)

Rank 1 (1)
Your character has no problem about causing violence, and
truth be told he kind of enjoys it! This isnt to say that hes evil
or overly cruel, but showing mercy just isnt his style. Your character tends to solve his problems with force rather than words.
Rank 2 (1)
Your character has a thirst for killing. Simply hurting his
enemies just isnt enoughthey must be obliterated! And sometimes, just to make sure theyre good and dead, hell mutilate or
desecrate their bodies.

39

CHAPTER 2

CREEDS
There are five standard creeds that are available in most
campaigns: Knights, Nobles, Priests, Templars, and Wardens.
Many campaigns are likely to offer additional creeds that are tailored to their particular settings. Check with your GM for details.
Keep in mind that creeds are entirely optional and that most
characters do not possess them.

Knight

Armor Expertise, Riding Expertise, Charisma (R2)


Knights are romanticized warriors that embody chivalry
and honor. They are expert soldiers
who adhere to a strict moral code
that dictates their actions both in
battle and in social settings. Although each knights personal code
may vary according to his or her
kingdom or political affiliation, the
following three tenets must always
be upheld:
Give respect to ones leaders and
follow orders dutifully and
with honor
Protect the innocent and show
mercy to the weak
Conduct ones affairs and interactions with honesty, dignity,
and courtesy
While these tenets do tend to
lend themselves to the path of good,
knights of a more sinister nature are not
uncommon. Dark knights must still follow these tenets with fervor but may
perhaps do so for entirely different
reasons or motivations. Rather than
inspire heroism they endorse villainy, and instead of garnering respect
they invite fear.
Many knights, especially those
who are acting on their own without a liege, choose to carry a
banner or other easily recognizable symbol. This usually depicts
their familys crest (if also a Noble) or a
personalized icon to help distinguish them from their peers. Doing so is simply a common practice that aids in helping to spread
recognition of the knights deeds, but it is not a formal necessity.
Knights who choose to serve in more official or political capacities often carry banners depicting the colors and crests of their
kings, lords, countries, or the organizations that they represent.
Benefits: Knights are generally held in high regard by those
who have heard of their deeds. Experienced knights are the heroes (or villains) of their respective realms and news of their valor
tends to spread like wildfire among commoners and nobles alike.

40

Additionally, this creed may serve as a prerequisite for entry into


special orders of knighthood and other prestigious affiliations or
military organizations.

Noble

Charisma (R2), Social Knowledge (R2)


Nobles are the privileged social class of monarchal societies
that are often viewed as being superior to those of common blood.
This elevated social status generally ensures a pampered lifestyle
of civility, convenience, and comfort.
Nobles must often observe stringent social standards and
customs. While these vary between the nobility of different kingdoms and species they generally include the following practices:
Always conduct oneself in a courtly manner when among
nobility and strive to maintain an air of nobility when
among commoners
Obey and show subservience to nobles
of higher ranks
Maintain as opulent a lifestyle as ones
means allow (see below)
Nobility is often hereditary and is
passed along at birth or extended through
marriage, though it may also be bestowed
upon commoners by a king or queen in
special cases. In many kingdoms the
rights to rule and to own land are also
guaranteed by noble birth. Titles often accompany such positions and are typically
ranked accordingly:
King/Queen
Duke/Duchess
Count/Countess
Baron/Baroness
Lord/Lady
Only the four highest ranks indicate the right to own land. The lowest
rank of Lord/Lady may or may not
indicate the right to own land; it can
also be used as a formal title when
referring to a noble of any rank, such
as when addressing a king or a count
simply as my lord.
Beginning characters who select the Noble
creed are assumed to be either a lord or a lady. The higher ranking
titles are forbidden for beginning characters but may be bestowed
over the course of a campaign. Experienced characters may not
select this creed unless they are first elevated in status directly by
order of a monarch.
As noted above, maintaining an opulent lifestyle is viewed
as a status symbol. Nobles purchase only the finest goods and services, when able. Highgrade weapons and armor, wealthy clothing, and similar items are paramount to ones image. Retaining
a personal servant or two is also customary for those who can

TRAITS
afford it. In other words, noble characters should never settle for
average or common but should instead seek out the best quality
of equipment, food, accommodations, and services that they can
reasonably afford.
Benefits: Nobles can typically expect to be well-received by
most commoners in civilized regions, especially by those within
their own kingdom. Such positive interactions may or may not be
sincere, however. Nobles may also expect unique privileges when
dealing with other nobles that commoners would likely be denied,
such as being granted an audience with the Duke or receiving an
invitation to the Counts Winter Ball.

Priest

Charisma (R2), Mysticism (R1), Persuasion (R1)


Priests are strict observers of a single religion and its practices. They dedicate their lives to serving as spiritual leaders for
their chosen faith. Regardless of each faiths unique customs all
priests must abide by these general tenets:
Extol the virtues of ones deity
Administer religious rites and ceremonies, as required, and
observe traditions
Custom Tenets: Each priest must also design one or more
additional tenets that are tailored to his particular sect or
denomination (see below)
There are nine greater divine beings that are known and
worshiped across Arlakor, along with numerous lesser deities and
demigods. Refer to Divinity in Chapter 6 for more information.
Most religions have multiple sects and denominations, each
with their own interpretations and tenets. Players are encouraged
to customize their characters own religious beliefs, tenets, and
descriptive details (associated colors, a favored weapon, holy
symbol depictions, etc.), per the GMs approval.
Priests and other followers of a specific religion may or may
not be on amicable terms with those who claim to share their
faith. The concepts of good and evil are not strictly applied to the
whole of any particular religion (except perhaps in the worship of
the demon lords) but instead tend to vary according to the unique
beliefs of each sect or denomination. Priests who fall out of favor
with their deity must either seek atonement for their actions, the
details of which are handled by the GM according to the severity of their sins or transgressions, or abandon their faith entirely.
However, in certain situations it may also be possible for a priest
to convert to a different faith (GMs call).
Benefits: Priests are viewed as authority figures and spiritual
representatives by those who share their faith. Most people tend
to at least respect the role of a priest, unless their own faith lies in
opposition. Additionally, this creed serves as a prerequisite for the
Cleric vocational advantage.

Templar

Strength (R2), Mysticism (R1), Toughness (R1)


Templars are religious warriors that serve as the military
arm for their respective churches. Like priests, templars dedicate
their lives to the service of their deity, though they act instead as
armsmen and guardians instead of spiritual leaders. Regardless
of each faiths specific customs all templars must abide by these
general tenets:

Extol the virtues of ones deity


Protect the interests of the church and observe traditions
Custom Tenets: Each templar must also design one or more
additional tenets that are tailored to her particular sect or
denomination (see below)
There are nine greater divine beings that are known and
worshiped across Arlakor, along with numerous lesser deities and
demigods. Refer to Divinity in Chapter 6 for more information.
Most religions have multiple sects and denominations, each
with their own interpretations and tenets. Players are encouraged
to customize their characters own religious beliefs, tenets, and
descriptive details (associated colors, a favored weapon, holy
symbol depictions, etc.), per the GMs approval.
Templars and other followers of a specific religion may or
may not be on amicable terms with those who claim to share their
faith. The concepts of good and evil are not strictly applied to
the whole of any particular religion (except perhaps in the worship of the demon lords) but instead tend to vary according to the
unique beliefs of each sect or denomination. Templars who fall
out of favor with their deity must either seek atonement for their
actions, the details of which are handled by the GM according to
the severity of their sins or transgressions, or abandon their faith
entirely. However, in certain situations it may also be possible for
a templar to convert to a different faith (GMs call).
Benefits: Templars are viewed as authority figures and defenders of the faith by those who share their beliefs. Most people
tend to at least respect the role of a templar, unless their own faith
lies in opposition. Additionally, this creed serves as a prerequisite
for the Crusader vocational advantage.

Warden

Endurance (R2), Survival (R2)


Wardens are stalwart protectors of the natural world. For
whatever their reasons, wardens feel a symbiotic bond with nature and its denizens. Most tend to view themselves as guardians
of the wild places of the world, with the goal of defending such
interests where they are able. All wardens live according to the
following core tenets:
Maintain balance with nature
Seek to preserve the environments natural state
Hunt only out of necessity, never for sport, such as hunting
for food or to rid an area of a dangerous predator in order
to protect other creatures or habitats
Like the other creeds the path of a warden is not inherently aligned with either good or evil, nor is it predisposed toward
specific viewpoints. For instance, some wardens accept and even
encourage cooperation between nature and the urban development of civilized species, whereas other wardens harbor deep resentment and hatred toward those who would dare to disturb the
worlds natural state.
Benefits: Wardens do not tend to be as easily recognized as
the members of other creeds, except perhaps by those who share
their deep respect for nature. Even so, most wardens do not flaunt
their roles or seek special considerations but simply strive to
maintain the balance of the natural world for its own sake. Additionally, this creed serves as a prerequisite for the Druid and
Ranger vocational advantages.

41

CHAPTER 2

ADVANTAGES
Advantages are sorted into five distinct categories: General,
Combat, Combat Techniques, Mystical, and Vocational. The General category is a sort of catch-all grouping for those advantages
that do not fit into one of the other categories. Combat advantages
benefit your character in battle, while Combat Techniques allow
him to execute specific augmented melee and ranged attacks.
Mystical advantages are those that are inherently magical in nature. Vocational advantages encompass overarching skill sets that
identify with certain adventuring roles.

GENERAL
Dodge (ranked)

Rank 1 (4)
Your character gains a +1 bonus to Defense.
Rank 2 (5)
She gains an additional +1 bonus to Defense.

Extra Health (10)

Endurance (R2), Toughness (R3)


Your characters maximum number of health points is increased by 1.

Extra Stamina (10)

Endurance (R2), Perseverance (R3)


Your characters maximum number of stamina points is increased by 1.

Fast Healing (2)

Constitution (R2)
Your character tends to heal naturally more quickly than others. She gains a +3 bonus on Constitution checks made for daily
healing, mending broken bones, and restoring damaged faculties.
Other Constitution checks do not receive this bonus, such as those
for bleeding, diseases/poisons, or the free checks that are granted
in combat for creatures with the Regeneration trait (like trolls).

Focus (ranked)

Rank 1 (4)
Your character gains a +1 bonus to Concentration.
Rank 2 (5)
He gains an additional +1 bonus to Concentration.

Light Sleeper (2)

Living, Awareness (R1), Constitution (R1)


Your character tends to sleep very lightly and has an easy
time waking up. He gains a +2 bonus on Awareness checks made
to wake up. Additionally, once awake, his senses are temporarily
heightened and he gains a +1 bonus to Concentration, Notice, and
Awareness until the end of the following round.
This advantage cannot be selected if your character has the
Deep Sleeper disadvantage.

42

Lip Reading (3)

Awareness (R2)
Your character is able to interpret and understand the lip
and mouth movements of others when they speak without having
to hear what is being said. Doing so requires a successful visual
Awareness check. The SV varies according to the distance to the
speaker. Lip reading at a distance beyond 100 feet is generally impossible, but the use of a spyglass or the Scrying spell effect can
overcome this issue (the GM should adjust the SV accordingly).

Viewing Distance
up to 25 feet
2650 feet
5175 feet
76100 feet

SV
3
5
8
12

The creature size of the speaker in relation to your character also applies a cumulative modifier to your Awareness check.
For each creature size tier that the speaker is smaller than your
character apply a 1 penalty; for each creature size tier that the
speaker is larger than your character apply a +1 bonus. Lastly,
your character must know the language being spoken in order to
actually understand what is being said, but he can still make out
syllables and basic pronunciations even if he is unable to speak it.
Note that this trait is useless when used against creatures
that lack mouths, such as lavossi. However, creatures that possess
lipless mouths are still usually able to be understood (ikranids,
kreevogs, revornae, etc.).

Resolute (ranked)

Rank 1 (4)
Your character gains a +1 bonus to Fortitude.
Rank 2 (5)
She gains an additional +1 bonus to Fortitude.

Riding Expertise (2)

Agility (R1), Creature Lore (R1)


Your character is well-trained at riding mounts and handling
them in combat situations. A +1 bonus is granted to your mounts
Defense stat while your character is mounted. Additionally, your
character gains a +2 bonus to his Agility checks that are made to
resist falling off the mount.
Imps who select this advantage gain its benefits when using
their Power of Suggestion trait, which treats victims as mounts
for the duration.

Safe Fall (4)

Agility (R2), Jumping (R2)


Your character is more capable than most of lessening the
impact of falling damage. If an Agility check is permitted then
each success and critical success reduces the damage by 10 points
(instead of the standard amount of 5). If an Agility check is not
allowed then the damage cannot be reduced.

TRAITS

COMBAT
Armor Expertise (3)

Awareness (R3)
Your character gains an additional +1 bonus to Total Resilience when wearing light, moderate, or heavy armor.

Backstab (ranked)

Rank 1 (3): Melee Precision (R2), Stealth (R2)


Your character is able to deliver deadly melee attacks against
surprised opponents, inflicting +3 melee damage.
Rank 2 (3): Stealth (R3)
Your characters bonus melee damage is increased to +6.

Blind Fighting (1)

Awareness (R2), Melee Precision (R2)


Your character is expertly trained and his melee attacks tend
to connect even when his vision is impaired. Blindness, darkness,
and other forms of obscurement (including physical forms), as
well as invisibility, have their Precision penalties reduced by 1
point (all other penalties persist). Ranged Precision and Spell Precision checks do not benefit from this advantage.

Cheap Shot (2)

Perception (R2), Initiative (R2)


Your character is able to exploit her opponents lapses in attention by inflicting additional damage. Whenever an opponent
is distracted your character receives a +1 bonus to all damage
checks (against that particular opponent).

Combat Expertise (ranked)

Rank 1 (3): Melee or Ranged Precision (R1)


Your character gains a +1 bonus to Combat Maneuvers.
Rank 2 (4): Melee or Ranged Precision (R2)
He gains an additional +1 bonus to Combat Maneuvers.

Combo Attacks (3)

Accuracy (R2), Agility (R2)


Your characters capacity for inflicting damage increases
with each successful consecutive attack that hits her target. The
first attack inflicts its standard damage, the second attack inflicts
+2 damage, and the third attack inflicts +4 damage. Each consecutive successive attack thereafter also inflicts +4 damage until the
combo ends.
In order for the combo sequence to be maintained each consecutive attack against the target must occur either during the
same round as the previous attack or in the following round. Skipping a whole round between attacks, missing an attack, switching
to a different target, or attempting a non-attack action immediately ends the combo and resets your characters damage bonus to 0.
Moving or sprinting does not interrupt her combo.
Combo attacks may take any form (melee, ranged, spells,
mental, etc.), including different attack forms within the same
combo, as long as they are single target, require Precision checks
(or a Mysticism check in the case of the Damage: Mental spell effect), and are capable of inflicting damage. Standard attack rules
still apply and multiple action penalties are still accrued normally.

Crippling Blow (3)

Perception (R2), Creature Lore (R2)


Your characters knowledge of pressure points allows him
to deliver attacks that are also capable of reducing his opponents
mobility. Such an attack is treated as a specialized called shot
and incurs a 2 penalty to your characters Precision check, but
it does not target a specific location or allow for combat actions
like disarming or tripping attempts, nor can it be stacked with
such maneuvers. Instead, if the attack hits and inflicts health loss
then your opponents Speed stats (all forms) and sprinting results
are halved (rounded down) until the end of the following round.
Any form of attack is permitted as long as it is single target,
requires a Precision check, and is capable of inflicting damage.
Unfortunately, this excludes the Damage: Mental spell effect and
similar abilities that rely on Mysticism checks. Lastly, multiple
uses of this ability on the same target simply cause its duration
to be renewed instead of reducing the targets mobility further.

Evasive (3)

Dexterity (R2), Awareness (R2)


Your character has a talent for dodging out of the way of
large-scale attacks. Her Defense, Concentration, and Fortitude
stats are all increased by +1 when defending against area-effect
attacks, spells, and bardic codas (bardic melodies are exempt).

Fearsome Fighting (3)

Intimidation (R3)
Your character is incredibly fearsome in combat. Whenever
one of his attacks or spells drops an opponenteither by rendering him incapacitated/unconscious due to health loss or by
destroying/killing him outrightyour character may make an
immediate free Intimidation check against any other opponents
within line-of-effect, up to 50 feet away. The Intimidation check
may be performed against a single target or against a group (your
choice), but it is still subject to the standard restrictions and penalties. Only one free Intimidation check may be attempted each
round, despite dropping multiple opponents.

Lucky Defense (2)

Your characters luck often grants him a defensive bonus


during combat. In addition to the standard benefits, each time he
receives a lucky break he also gains a +2 bonus to his Concentration, Defense, and Fortitude stats for the round.

Lucky Mobility (1)

Your characters luck often grants him increased mobility


during combat. In addition to the standard benefits, each time he
receives a lucky break he also gains a +2 bonus to his Speed stats
(all forms) for the round and may freely move across rough terrain or through hostile zones of control without requiring double
the number of squares.

Lucky Offense (2)

Your characters luck often allows her to inflict more grievous injuries to her opponents. Each time she receives a lucky
break she gains a +4 bonus to all discipline, profession, and damage checks for the round (the standard bonus is only +2).

43

CHAPTER 2

Lucky Recovery (2)

Your characters luck often allows her to recover more


quickly during combat. In addition to the standard benefits, each
time she receives a lucky break she also recovers one health or
stamina point that was lost during the combat encounter (her
choice). Only those points that were lost during the encounter are
able to be recovered, but points that have been entirely depleted
cannot be recovered by receiving a lucky break, such as from
being wounded (health) or becoming exhausted (stamina).

Melee Expertise (2)

Melee Precision (R3)


Your character gains a +1 bonus to all melee damage checks.

Piercing Shot (ranked)

Rank 1 (3): Ranged Precision (R2), Stealth (R2)


Your character is able to deliver deadly ranged attacks
against surprised opponents, inflicting +3 ranged damage.
Rank 2 (3): Stealth (R3)
Your characters bonus ranged damage is increased to +6.

Quick Initiative (6)

Perception (R2), Agility (R2)


Your character tends to react more quickly in combat. When
determining turn order she always makes two Initiative checks
and takes the greater result. If your group is using the free Vexith
Initiative App simply indicate this advantage in your characters
dropbox by selecting Quick.

Quick Stand (1)

Agility (R2)
Your character is able to quickly stand up from being prone.
Doing so only costs half of his Speed for the round (rounded
down), instead of all of his Speed.

Ranged Expertise (2)

Ranged Precision (R3)


Your character gains a +1 bonus to all ranged damage checks.

Shield Expertise (4)

Agility (R1), Might (R2)


Your character gains an additional +1 bonus to her shields
block value (for any shield) and her shield attacks have their
damage increased to d6. She may also choose to throw her shield
without suffering the standard 2 penalty to its Ranged Precision
checks and damage checks. Shields have a base range increment
of 2 (adjust for creature size).
Ettins that select this advantage (considered individual) may
only gain its benefits if a shield is being wielded in the possessing minds respective arm. No benefits are gained if a shield is
equipped in its twins arm.

Springboard (3)

Dexterity (R2), Agility (R2)


Your character gains a temporary burst of momentum and
speed whenever she makes a successful melee attack against an
opponent that inflicts health loss. Immediately after the attack she

44

may move up to two squares via any form of movement that she
possesses. This bonus movement is wasted if any other actions
are attempted before it is used.
This effect can occur multiple times per round. Melee attacks
that are made while your characters movement is restricted, such
as when disabled or prone, do not grant additional movement.

Unarmed Expertise (2)

Agility (R2) or Might (R2)


Your characters standard unarmed attacks are now capable
of achieving critical hits. They are also considered fast and reduce
any multiple action penalties that would normally apply to their
Precision checks by 1 point. This reduction only applies to standard unarmed attacks. All other actions in the round suffer the full
multiple action penalty that has been accrued.
Note that Enhanced Unarmed Attacks (bites, claws, hind
kicks, horns, etc.) do not benefit from this trait, so species that
already possess such attacks may not find this advantage to be
particularly useful.

COMBAT TECHNIQUES

These advantages allow your character to execute special


combat techniques that augment his standard melee and ranged
attacks. Several techniques even imbue your characters attacks
with magical power and are treated as magical abilities. Magical
techniques are marked with a blue star ().
Risk of Stamina Loss: Every time your character uses a
combat technique there is a risk of stamina loss. Whenever his
Precision roll is a 1 he immediately loses one point of stamina,
regardless of the modified result and whether or not the technique
was successful.
Melee vs. Ranged: Each technique may be freely applied to
either melee or ranged attacks, at will, but spells and other abilities cannot be augmented with combat techniques.
Multiple Attacks: Your character may still attempt multiple
attacks in the same round, including multiple combat techniques.
Multiple action penalties are still accrued normally. Only one
combat technique may be attempted per each attack, however.

Augmented Damage: Type (6; special)

Accuracy (R2), Spellcasting Discipline (R1; see below)


Your character may augment his standard attack with magical energy, thereby gaining a +1 bonus on his damage check if the
attack succeeds. This bonus damage is of a specific type, which
also grants a unique benefit to the attack. Concerning your targets potential resistances, immunities, or weaknesses, only the
damage bonus itself is of the selected damage type (the attacks
base damage and standard modifiers remain unaltered).
This advantage may be purchased multiple times. Each additional technique must select a different damage type. The character point cost for acquiring the initial technique is listed above,
but the cost is reduced to 1 point for each additional technique.
Acid (Geomancy): A +1 bonus is granted to your characters Precision check due to splashing and spraying, but
the techniques damage check suffers a 1 penalty for the
very same reason (1 point is still treated as acid damage).

TRAITS
Arcane (Sorcery): An additional +1 arcane bonus is granted to your characters damage check (+2 overall).
Cold (Geomancy or Sorcery): If this attack inflicts health
loss then a 2 penalty is imposed to the targets Speed
stats (all forms) on his next turn, plus an extra 2 penalty
is also applied to his sprinting checks, if attempted.
Divine (Mysticism): If this attack achieves a critical hit
against the target an additional bonus of +2 is applied to
the damage check (+7 total). All severity checks are also
increased by +1, regardless of achieving a critical hit.
Electricity (Any): If this attack inflicts health loss then a 1
penalty is imposed to the targets Concentration, Defense,
and Fortitude stats until the end of his next turn.
Heat (Any): If this attack achieves a critical hit the target
catches fire for one round, even if no health loss is inflicted. If the targets turn occurs prior to your characters
next turn he may attempt to put out the flames by making
an Agility check of SV 5. If he is unsuccessful, or if your
characters turn occurs first, then he automatically suffers
another d8 points of heat damage plus a modifier according to your characters size: tiny 2, small 1, medium 0,
large +2, huge +4, enormous +7, gigantic +10, or colossal
+14. The result is compared against the targets Total Resilience stat. Afterwards the flames automatically die out
on their own. The particular environment in which this
technique is used may produce a different visual effect,
such as boiling water, intense steam, or similar alternatives, like when the technique is used while underwater
(its rules and gameplay mechanics remain unchanged).
Shadow (Sorcery): If this attack inflicts health loss then a
2 penalty is imposed on all of the targets damage checks
on his next turn. However, shadow attacks are weaker
when performed in direct sunlight, based on your characters position, and impose a 1 penalty to your characters
Precision checks. Artificial light and indirect sunlight do
not impose this penalty.

Healing Surge (ranked)

Rank 1 (6): Endurance (R2), Sorcery (R1)


Your character can heal his recent wounds by inflicting damage on his foes. If the attack inflicts health loss then your character recovers one of his own lost health points. Additionally, a
health point can only be restored if one was lost in either this
round or the previous roundthis technique cannot be used to
heal older injuries. For instance, inflicting the loss of 2 health
points on your opponent restores 1 of your own missing health
points but only if it was lost in this round or the previous round.
This technique only functions against hostile, living targets
that possess CPVs of 100 or greater. Friendly and neutral targets,
in regards to your character, cannot be affected, and it cannot be
used against non-living targets.
Rank 2 (3): Constitution (R2)
Your character can opt to channel the healing energies of
this technique to heal a nearby target, rather than healing himself.
The selected target must be within 5 squares (25 feet) and line-ofeffect of your character and must have lost a health point in either
this round or the previous round.

Knock-Back (5)

Strength (R2), Might (R1)


Your characters attack can knock his target backwards. If
the damage check equals the targets Total Resilience then the target is knocked-back 1 square (5 feet) away from your character,
plus an extra square for every additional four points of damage
inflictedthe total distance is halved when performed underwater or in similarly restrictive environments. The target must also
succeed on a free Agility check of SV 5 or he falls prone.
Diagonal knock-back is counted in the same manner as standard movement. Solid obstacles or other creatures in the targets
path can prevent further knock-back. Creatures in the targets
path can each attempt a free Agility check of SV 5 to move aside
to the nearest unoccupied space, which avoids collision. Failing
to move aside or deliberately remaining in the path results in collision damage being applied to both the target and any creatures
or obstacles in the way. Damage is equal to d8, plus a modifier
based on the targets size (compared against Total Resilience):
tiny 2, small 1, medium 0, large +2, huge +4, enormous +7,
gigantic +10, or colossal +14. Creatures involved in the collision
that are equal in size or smaller than the target must also make
another free Agility check of SV 5 or they fall prone (larger creatures do not risk falling prone).

Metabolic Shift (8)

Endurance (R2), Geomancy (R1)


Your characters attack can siphon her targets metabolic energy. If the attack inflicts health loss then the target is unable to
attempt more than a single action on his next turn and may not
sprint (ettins may attempt only one action per mind). On your
characters next turn she ignores the first multiple action penalty
incurred and can even perform the same action twice (making
two attacks with the same weapon, casting two spells, etc.). Additional actions beyond the first start accruing multiple action penalties as usual. This technique may not be stacked with either the
Hasten or Slow spell effects, or with itself multiple times through
multiple successful attacks. However, other kinds of multiple action abilities may still be stacked, such as those granted to Archers, Wizards, and nerrefs.

Phantom Strike (6)

Perception (R2), Mysticism (R1)


Your character can make a spectral attack at greater range
just as if he were attacking normally, but if the attack succeeds its
damage check suffers a 1 penalty. Called shots and combat actions are permitted as well (except for grappling). This technique
also varies according to which attack type is being used:
Melee Attacks: Melee attacks are capable of striking an
enemy at a distance of up to 5 squares (25 feet) beyond
their standard reach. There is no range increment penalty,
but other penalties may still apply, such as those imposed
by cover and obscurement. Weapons are not thrown but
instead create a phantom force that attacks the target.
Ranged Attacks: Ranged attacks ignore up to 2 penalty
points from range increments, which grants them greater
range and precision. For instance, attacking a target that
is within three increment tiers would incur no penalty, but

45

CHAPTER 2
attacking a target between the third and fourth tiers would
incur a 1 penalty, and so on. Launched weapons do not
fire their ammunition and thrown weapons remain in your
characters hand, whilst phantom projectiles are launched
or thrown in their stead. However, this technique cannot
be attempted unless your character is actually holding the
weapon in his hand and has sufficient ammunition available (a bow with no arrows cannot be used to perform a
phantom strike). Holy water, poison pouches, and other
consumable weapons can also be used with this technique, but their contents are still consumed normally.

Reactive Defense (4)

Dexterity (R2), Awareness (R1)


Your character is able to build momentum from successful
attacks that help to enhance his own defensive capabilities. If the
attack inflicts health loss then your character gains a temporary
+2 bonus to his Defense stat until the end of the next round. This
effect cannot be stacked with itself from multiple attacks, but
rather its duration is simply renewed.

Shockwave: Template (5; special)

Dexterity (R2), Mysticism (R1)


Your characters attack is amplified so that it affects all targets within a designated area-effect template: rectangular prism,
sphere, thin cone, or wide cone. However, a penalty is applied to
your characters Precision check according to the templates size,
small (2) or large (3), which may be adjusted per each attack.
Note that called shots and special combat actions like disarms and
grapples cannot be attempted when using this technique.
The templates point of emanation must be positioned within
reach of melee attacks or within the desired range
for ranged attacks. In the case of melee and
close range attacks your own character remains unaffected, even if the template
overlaps with his occupied space.
However, neutral and friendly targets
remain vulnerable to such attacks.
This advantage may be purchased multiple times. Each additional technique must select a
different area-effect template. The
character point cost for acquiring the
initial technique is listed above, but
the cost is reduced to 1 point for each
additional technique.

Stunning Blow (6)

Strength (R2), Creature Lore (R1)


Your characters attack inflicts significantly less damage if
successful, but it can momentarily stun her target. A 3 penalty
is applied to the damage check and if health loss is still inflicted
then the target loses his next turn and cannot move or act. However, he can still defend himself. Targets that are flying, climbing,
or swimming remain as they were and do not fall, sink, or suffer
adverse consequences unless environmental factors are also an
issue (large waves, strong winds, etc.).

46

MYSTICAL
Blood Magic (ranked)

Rank 1 (3): Constitution (R2), Sorcery (R1)


Your character may willingly substitute health points in the
place of stamina points whenever stamina would be lost or tapped
while casting spells or using other magical abilities. The choice
of whether to use health or stamina may be made on the spot each
time a point is lost or tapped. Tapped health tokens are moved into
the fatigue row when released, just like tapped stamina tokens.
Health points that are lost in this manner are considered to be
old wounds and cannot be healed by spells or abilities that have
a limited time frame for recovery, such as Quick Heal or Healing
Surge. They may still be recovered by other sources of healing
(natural healing, Regeneration, Restore: Health, Siphon: Health,
etc.), but natural healing and the Regeneration trait are both suspended for 1 hour after this ability is used.
Rank 2 (6): Constitution (R3)
Your characters knowledge of the mystical properties of
blood allows him to share his own suffering with his enemies.
For every health point he has lost he gains a cumulative +1 bonus
to all damage checks (if 2 health points are lost he inflicts +2 damage). This bonus changes immediately as points are lost/restored.

Enchanted Companion (ranked)

Rank 1 (varies): Creature Lore (R2), Geomancy (R1)


Your character has somehow managed to attract the dutiful
companionship of a living animal or monster, which may even
possess abilities and magical qualities beyond those of standard
members of its species. A magical imprint of your characters
psyche is empathically bonded with her enchanted companion,
which ensures that it possesses exceptional degrees of
loyalty and devotion.
Your character gains the ability to
relate mental commands to her companion, as free actions, but doing so
requires line-of-effect. This method
of communication is strictly oneway, from your character to her
companion. You may control your
characters companion in battle,
but keep in mind that its actions
are not being directly controlled
by your character and that it may
still act independently if it desires
(GMs call). In other words, your
characters commands actually function
more like strong suggestions.
During combat an enchanted companion shares your characters initiative order, including any lucky or tough breaks. Player
characters may also use their fortune points to aid their enchanted
companion, if within line-of-effect. This includes using a fortune
point to force an enemys discipline reroll if the action would
have directly affected the companion.
This rank of the advantage grants an initial CPV of 40/40
character points. The companions state of mind determines the
cost that your character must pay for selecting this advantage:

TRAITS
Bestial (4): This companion is bestial. When not being directed by your character it behaves in a manner befitting
its species, typically concerning itself with biological and/
or instinctual needs. However, the GM should consider
the creature as being at least somewhat domesticated,
such that it will often attempt to control its aggression
and less desirable behaviors according to how its been
instructed while in your characters presence. Therefore,
bestial companions automatically respond as if they had
received all forms of training (combat, mount, etc.). Note
that bestial companions may be upgraded to gain sapience
at a later time if your character spends the additional 6
character points. Doing so allows you to select disadvantages to develop the enchanted companions personality,
but no character points are gained as compensation.
Sapient (10): This companion is fully sapient and is capable of acting and thinking on its own. When not being
directed by your character it is free to pursue whatever
goals or interests it desires, according to its personality.
However, it is still loyal to your character and is incapable
of deliberate betrayal.
Refer to Designing Creatures in Chapter 7 to begin designing your characters enchanted companion, but remember to adhere to the following restrictions:
Attributes Aptitudes: Companions must always possess a
moderate aptitude in every attribute except for Accuracy,
which must always be difficult.
Health & Stamina: Enchanted companions do not spend
or gain character points for selecting these quantities.
Instead they either possess 3 points in both quantities or
4 points in one quantity and 2 points in the other (your
choice when first designed).
Creature Size: Companions may select any creature size.
Tiny and small sizes grant additional character points to
spend, independent of the 10 point limit for selecting
detrimental traits (see below). Large and greater creature
sizes cost character points, accordingly.
Disadvantages & Creeds: These may be selected freely, but
disadvantages do not grant any additional character points
as compensation.
Advantages: General and combat advantages may be selected freely. Combat techniques, mystical, and vocational
advantages may only be selected if your character already
possesses the advantage in question and the enchanted
companion is sapient.
Creature Traits: These traits may be selected freely, unless
otherwise noted in their descriptions. Unlike for standard
disadvantages, character points are granted for selecting
detrimental creature traits. However, the companion can
only gain up to 10 character points from all of the selected
traits. Most detrimental traits list an inherent value and an
optional valueenchanted companions must always use
the optional value if one is listed.
No Creature Templates Allowed: Every companion needs
to be designed from scratch rather than using preexisting
creature templates that can be found in Chapter 7 (dogs,
horses, etc.). This is because many such creatures ignore

the standard 10 point limit for selecting detrimental


traits, possess differing health or stamina totals, or violate
other restrictions that are imposed on enchanted companions. It is okay to base your companions concept on a preexisting template by selecting many of the same traits and
disciplines, but be sure to tweak your companions design
as necessary in order to adhere to its unique limitations.
If an enchanted companion is ever released from its service
or is killed then a new companion can be attracted after 10 hours
of session time have passed. A new companion can either be completely redesigned from scratch or it can be nearly identical to
the previous one (regarding faculties and traits), but it should be
understood that the new companion is a unique individual with
its own personality, behaviors, and memories. Alternatively, your
character may opt to have her original companion brought back
to life via the Resurrection spell effect. Sapient companions that
are released from service gradually revert to a bestial mental state
if such is inherent for their species.
As a general rule, PCs may not control more than one pet,
enchanted companion, animated minion, or summoned creature
during a battle (mounts do not count). If your character has multiple creatures and minions then one must be chosen to assist
during battle and it should be assumed that the others are occupied with non-combative tasks (guarding the partys rear, waiting
in reserve, etc.). Note, however, that GM-controlled monsters and
NPCs are not required to follow this rule.
Rank 2 (10): Creature Lore (R3)
Your companion gains an additional 30 character points to
allocate, thereby granting it a total CPV of 70 character points.
Rank 3 (10): Geomancy (R2)
Your companion gains an additional 30 character points to
allocate, thereby granting it a total CPV of 100 character points.

Generous Fortune (8)

Player Characters Only


Your characters potential for affecting his own destiny is
exceptionally strong. He receives one extra fortune point (for a
total of 2 points). Only one fortune point may be used per turn.
Both fortune points are restored together whenever his total CPV
reaches or surpasses intervals that are evenly divisible by 10 (130,
140, 150, etc.).

Heightened Athletics (15)

Dexterity (R2) or Strength (R2), Mysticism (R1)


Your characters athletic capabilities have somehow been
augmented with magic. She permanently gains all of the following benefits:
Climbing: Each success and critical success on your characters Climbing checks allow her to move a distance
equal to double her occupied space (double the standard
distance). If your character has the Enhanced Climbing
species trait then the distance is equal to triple her occupied space.
Jumping: Your characters jumping distances are effectively
doubled, both for horizontal and vertical jumps. For ease,
simply calculate the distance normally and then multiply
by 2. Your character also ignores the first 5 feet of falling

47

CHAPTER 2
damage when making Jumping checks. If your character
has the Leaping species trait then her jumping distances
are tripled (just calculate normally and multiply by 3) and
she ignores the first 10 feet of falling damage when making Jumping checks.
Sprinting (all forms): Each success and critical success on
your characters sprinting checks grant a bonus of +3 for
Swimming, +6 for Running, and +9 for Flying (standard
values are +2, +4, and +6, respectively). If your character has the Enhanced Sprinting species trait then her total
adjustment is +4 for Swimming, +8 for Running, or +12
for Flying, depending on which version of the species trait
she possesses.

Lend Fortune (4)

Player Characters Only


Your character is able to use his own fortune points to affect other nearby allies within his line-of-effect, including forcing
an enemys discipline to be rerolled if the action would directly
affect an ally. Additionally, whenever a fortune point is used to
affect an ally there is a 25% chance that it is instantly regained.

Lesser Arcana (1)

Any Spellcasting Discipline (R1)


Your character is able to manifest simple magical effects using any one of her spellcasting disciplines of at least Rank 1 (her
choice: Geomancy, Mysticism, or Sorcery). Effects are very minor, purely for roleplaying purposes only, and cannot inflict damage, duplicate standard spell effects, negatively affect or hinder
ones opponents (distraction, tripping, etc.), or directly influence
gameplay mechanics.
Your characters discipline check is always compared
against SV 5, never against an opponents defensive stats, and
like standard spellcasting it requires verbal commands and the
use of at least one free hand (purely mental effects [M] cannot
be produced). However, unlike normal spellcasting checks stamina is never lost for rolling a 1. Furthermore, there are no consequences when suffering a critical failure, nor are there benefits for
achieving a critical success.
The target area for this ability may vary just as it does for
standard spells, which applies a CM to the discipline check. The
range always uses the distance option (range increments and penalties are applied normally). The duration is either instant or an
effect may be maintained indefinitely as long as your character
continues to concentrate her attention to the task at handdoing
so counts as an action each round, but no additional spellcasting
check is necessary until the current effect is interrupted or a new
effect is produced.
The following examples highlight the kinds of magical effects that can be performed. Many other effects are also possible,
but the GM has final say as to whether or not an effect is allowed:
Clean and/or dry an object or creature
Freeze or chill a very small volume of liquid (~1 quart)
Generate a spark to ignite candle wicks, torches, or lanterns
Warm or cool an area to make it slightly more comfortable
but not enough to alleviate or reduce the risks of exposure
to extreme temperatures

48

Move or levitate an object weighing no more than ~1 pound,


as adjusted for your characters creature size
Produce simple visual effects, such as floating colored lights,
swirling mists, etc. (such visual effects are incapable of
providing adequate illumination or creating obscurement)

Living Weapon (1)

Unarmed Expertise or Enhanced Unarmed Attack(s)


Your character may have his body enchanted (via the Enchanter profession) as if it were a greater magical weapon with
a total enchantment value of up to 2 points. Selected magical
qualities apply to all of his physical unarmed attacks (hands,
feet, claws, bite, etc.). The monetary cost to enchant ones body
is equal to 75% of the standard price of enchanting a weapon.
Your character can overwrite an existing magical quality with a
new one (up to the 2 point total enchantment value), but the new
qualitys cost must still be paid and any overwritten qualities are
lost without any form of compensation.
Note that the following weapon magical qualities are not
permitted: Awareness, Repairing, Resizing, Returning, or Unlimited Ammunition.

Magical Tap (ranked)

Rank 1 (10)
Your character may hold one magical tap at a time (species
with the Inborn Tap trait may hold two taps). A tap is a build-up
of magical energy that is held by your character to maintain an
ongoing, duration-based spell effect or magical ability, thereby
keeping it active indefinitely. A tapped effect ends only when it
is willfully released or if it is dispelled via the Suppress Magic
spell effect. Taps even persist through sleep and unconsciousness.
The downside to holding a tap is that its discipline check
cannot critically succeed. Any benefits of achieving a critical success are ignored. This limitation only applies to the tapped effect
itself and not to any subsequent abilities that may be allowed due
to holding the tap. For instance, Evokers (R2) may still critically
succeed when casting their tapped Damage spell effect.
Any duration-based spell effect or magical ability (marked
with ) may instead be held with a tap, including those that are
produced by triggered magical items and spell foci, but the choice
to do so must be made prior to actually casting the spell or using
the ability. Instant duration spells and spell effects marked with
the stamina loss spell descriptor [S] can never be tapped.
Tapped spell effects and abilities do not risk stamina loss for
rolling a 1, but a stamina token is automatically moved into the
tap row if successful or into the fatigue row if the casting attempt
fails. When a tap is released the stamina token is moved into the
fatigue row.
If your character is currently holding a tap and then attempts
to cast a new tapped effect she may keep her existing tap until
the new one succeedsshe does not have to drop her existing
tap before attempting the new one. Characters that are capable of
holding multiple taps can even select which of their taps to keep
and which to discard after a new tapped effect has been successfully cast.
Concerning ettins, this advantage is considered individual
and can be selected by one or both minds. Each mind maintains

TRAITS
its own taps separately, despite using stamina (which is shared).
One mind may not access or control its twins taps.
Rank 2 (10)
Your character can hold up to two magical taps at a time
(species with the Inborn Tap trait may hold three taps).

Magically-Receptive (5)

Your character is able to benefit from 3 pieces of greater


magical apparel at the same time (the standard limit is 2 pieces).
Elves that select this advantage may benefit from 4 pieces, and the
same is true of ettins that possess the Additional Magical Apparel
species trait.

Mystical Barrier (9)

Perseverance (R2), Sorcery (R2)


Your character may attempt to erect a mystical barrier around
himself to reduce incoming damage from attacks and spells. Mental damage is not affected, nor is damage that is suffered from
falling or other similar dangers.
Erecting the barrier requires a Sorcery check of SV 5, and
a point of stamina is lost on a roll of 1. The barrier absorbs 5
points of damage with a standard success, or 8 points of damage
with a critical success, which must first be overcome before your
character can be injured. The barrier lasts until the end of the current round plus 2 additional rounds or until it absorbs its limit of
damage. Multiple uses of this ability cannot be stacked, but a new
barrier can be created to replace one that has been weakened or
that is soon to fail.
For example, if your barrier had 5 absorption points and
your character was hit by an attack for 4 points of damage then
the barrier would have absorbed all of the damage and still had 1
absorption point remaining. Alternatively, if your character had
been hit by an attack for 7 points of damage then the barrier
would have been destroyed and 2 points of damage would have
gotten through, which would then need to be compared against
your characters Total Resilience stat.

Psychic Awareness (3)

Intellect (R2), Awareness (R2)


Your character is particularly sensitive to sources of psychic
energy and mental magicall spells and abilities that are marked
with the mental casting spell descriptor [M]. He can make an
Awareness check of SV 5 to detect ongoing mental spells and
abilities, as well as those that were recently used (within 1 hour).
Success simply alerts your character to the current presence
of such spells or abilities, or their recent activity, but nothing else.
A critical success allows him to discern the specific nature of such
effects, including their names (spell effects) and functions. This
ability has a maximum range of 30 feet, but its use is completely
unhindered by physical barriers.

Quickened Fortune (8)

Player Characters Only


Your character regains her spent fortune points more quickly
than other characters. She regains all of her fortune points whenever her total CPV reaches or surpasses intervals that are evenly
divisible by 5 (130, 135, 140, etc.).

Repel Undead (5)

Priest Creed or Templar Creed, Mysticism (R2)


Your characters unwavering faith grants her the ability to
repel undead creatures. She may purchase and cast spells that utilize a special version of the Fear spell effect (at a cost of 1 point
each); the Mysticism discipline is also used for their spellcasting
checks. This version of Fear only works against undead creatures,
including mindless varieties, vampires, and shades.
Unlike the standard Fear spell effect this version does not include the mental casting spell descriptor [M]. It also requires your
character to present a holy symbol or other religious artifact as a
token of her faith, rather than requiring a free hand. Your character may still attempt to repel undead without such an item (using
a free hand), but a 2 penalty is applied to her Mysticism check.
Lastly, the terrified outcome of the fear check differs from
the standard version. Normally, such targets must succeed on a
Constitution check of SV 5 or they acquire a permanent phobia.
However, in the case of undead, a Perseverance check of SV 5 is
required and undead targets that fail this check are instantly and
irrevocably destroyed.

Runebreaking (2)

Any Spellcasting Discipline (R1), Tinkering (R2)


Your character is able to disarm magical traps by using the
Tinkering discipline. Normally, magical traps cannot be disarmed
since they often lack mechanical components, but your character
has mastered secret techniques that allow him to do so. However,
he must first possess a set of runebreaking thieving tools (makeshift tools and implements cannot be used to disarm magical
traps). Runebreaking thieving tools include all of the necessary
items required for disarming both mechanical and magical traps.

Shadow Transfer (3)

Spellcasting: Shadow (R1), Constitution (R2)


Your character is freely able to transfer the benefits of his Siphon Faculty and Siphon: Health/Stamina spell effects to an ally,
instead of himself. The ally must be within 5 squares (25 feet) and
line-of-effect of your character at the moment of transfer.

Shatter Silence (2)

Bard (R1)
Your character can take a special action that tries to dispel
the Silence: Negation Field spell effect. This action produces a
single piercing note that shatters the silence and immediately
ends the spell. To do so, the bard must make a Musician check
of SV 8, and a point of stamina is lost on a roll of 1. The bard
must either be inside the field or no more than 25 feet beyond its
edge in order to use this ability. Also, the choice of performance
style still applies the same modifier to this check that it does to
standard bardic songs (1 if only using an instrument, 2 if only
using vocals, etc.).
Note that this ability is not a bardic song but rather is just a
single piercing note. It cannot be combined with melodies, maintained for multiple rounds, or followed by a coda. Lastly, this
ability offers no benefit against the Silence: Mute spell effect, but
it can still be attempted if the bard is muted (1 penalty for only
using an instrument or no penalty if using a wind instrument).

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CHAPTER 2

Silent Spellcasting (2)

Spellcasting: Any (R1)


Your character has mastered the art of non-vocal spellcasting. She may freely cast all spells without the need for verbal
components and ignores the standard 2 penalty when doing so.
Note that bardic songs, spell foci, and other magic abilities that
rely on sound gain no benefit from selecting this advantage.

Spellcasting: Type (ranked)

Rank 1 (5): Spellcasting Discipline (R1)


Your character is an apprentice spellcaster or a dabbler of
one of the six spellcasting types: Arcane, Divine, Elemental,
Mental, Nature, or Shadow. Her spellcasting type determines
which spellcasting discipline is used when casting spells, plus it
serves as the prerequisite for spellcasting ranks:

Spellcasting Type
Arcane
Divine
Elemental
Mental
Nature
Shadow

Discipline
Sorcery
Mysticism
Geomancy
Mysticism
Geomancy
Sorcery

Next, she must choose one known spell effect from her
spellcasting type. She may then purchase and cast any number
of spells that make use this effect, including any of its allowed
sub-effects (listed in blue text), if applicable.
This advantage may be purchased multiple times, but your
character must choose a different spellcasting type for each selection. Ranks are purchased separately for each advantage.
Rank 2 (8): Spellcasting Discipline (R2)
Your character is a journeyman spellcaster and may choose
two additional known spell effects from her selected spellcasting
type (three total) to be used when purchasing and casting spells.
Rank 3 (12): Spellcasting Discipline (R3)
Your character is a master spellcaster and gains complete
access to all spell effects from her selected spellcasting type.

VOCATIONAL
Archer (6)

Perception (R2), Ranged Precision (R2)


Your character is highly-skilled at making ranged attacks
with launched weapons. She adds a +1 bonus to the range increments for all launched weapons. She may also perform up to two
attacks from a single launched weapon in the same round, but
doing so still accrues multiple action penalties normally. Archers
under the effect of the Hasten spell effect and nerrefs may perform up to three attacks (hastened nerrefs can perform up to four).

Bard (ranked)

Rank 1 (10): Charisma (R2), Musician (R1)


Your character is able to perform bardic songs that produce
a variety of magical effects but may only use basic melodies and
codas. Refer to Bardic Songs in Chapter 5 for more information.

50

Rank 2 (10): Charisma (R3), Musician (R2)


Your character may perform bardic songs using basic and/or
advanced melodies and codas.

Beast Master (6)

Enchanted Companion (R3)


Your characters bond with his enchanted companion is so
strong that he may now freely spend any amount of his own unspent character points to improve his companions faculties and
traits. There is no limit to the amount of points that can be spent
on your characters companion, but doing so essentially reduces
your own characters growth and power.
A special value called Beast Master Points (BMP) must be
recorded to help keep track of how many character points have
been spent on your characters companion, beyond the 100 points
that it already started with for having attained the third rank of
the Enchanted Companion mystical advantage. Every point your
character spends increasing his BMP also increases his companions CPV (both the unspent points and the total value). For ease
of reference, BMP can always be calculated as follows:
BMP = Companions Total CPV 100
For example, lets assume that your character has a CPV
of 3/160 (meaning that he has 3 unspent character points with a
total CPV of 160 points) and that his enchanted companion has a
CPV of 0/100. If your character receives 5 additional character
points for a particular gaming session he would then have a CPV
of 8/165 (his companions CPV would remain unchanged). Your
character could then choose to spend any number of his unspent
character points improving his BMP. If he chooses to spend them
all then his own CPV would become 0/165, his BMP would increase to 8, and his enchanted companions CPV would become
8/108. Lastly, if the companion spends 7 of its unspent points its
CPV would change to 1/108.
Your characters BMP serves as a reference for how many
character points have been invested in his companions growth.
This is useful for measuring where his character points have been
spent, much like how he spends points on other advantages and
faculties, but it is also necessary for determining the CPV of a
new companion if the current one dies or is released from service
(see below). Note that once character points have been spent increasing the beast masters BMP they cannot be refunded.
The rules and restrictions of this trait follow those described
in the Enchanted Companion mystical advantage, except that
the beast masters companion is no longer restricted to only being able to select advantages that are already possessed by your
character. However, enchanted companions with bestial states of
mind are still unable to select combat techniques, mystical, or
vocational advantages, and all creature trait restrictions must still
be observed.
Lastly, this advantage also reduces the amount of time required to obtain a new enchanted companion to 5 hours of session
time if it is killed or released from service. A new companion may
be designed with a total CPV that is equal to your BMP + 100
points. For instance, if your BMP is 38 then your new companion
would have a total CPV of 138.

TRAITS

Berserker (6)

Strength (R2), Constitution (R2)


Your character is able to draw upon a source of reckless fury
to induce a berserker rage. Perhaps he calls upon his tribes ancestral spirits to lend him their strength, or maybe a touch of demonic
blood flows through his veins. Regardless of its source his ferocity in combat is truly a sight to behold.
Becoming enraged first requires your character to willingly
sacrifice one of his stamina points on his turn in order to attempt
a free Constitution check of SV 5, which if successful grants your
character a +2 bonus to Base Resilience, Brute Force, and Might.
Achieving a critical success increases the bonus to +3 instead.
This effect lasts until the end of the current round plus 2 additional rounds. Multiple effects cannot be stacked, but rather the
duration is simply renewed.

Cleric (9)

Priest Creed, Spellcasting: Divine (R2)


Your character gains additional benefits when casting the
following spell effects:
Cure: Your character automatically cures diseases and poisons with a standard success, according to the spells type,
instead of only slowing their frequencies.
Improve Faculty: Your character may change the sub-effect
for this spell during her daily spell preparation (normally,
a spells sub-effect is a permanent choice).
Quick Heal: Your character gains one extra round in which
her Quick Heal spells may be used to heal targets.

Crusader (ranked)

Rank 1 (6): Templar Creed, Augmented Damage: Divine


Your character is a holy warrior in the service of a particular
divine being. His faith is absolute and he wields his divine gifts
to further the cause of the religion he so dutifully serves. Crusaders are often known by different names according to their moral
leanings: Paladins (good), Inquisitors (neutral), or Reavers (evil).
Your characters words literally convey the power of his
convictions and he may force someone to speak the truth by
making a Persuasion check against their Fortitude stat. Success
prevents the target from attempting to lie, though they can still
choose to hold back information or to refrain from speaking at all.
However, achieving a critical success forces the target to speak
the full truth. This effect generally persists until the conversation
ends (GMs call). Crusaders are immune to the use of this effect,
even by rivals of differing faiths.
Additionally, when words alone are not enough, your characters Augmented Damage: Divine combat technique inflicts an
extra +1 point of divine damage (+2 overall).
Rank 2 (3): Healing Surge (R1)
Your characters Healing Surge combat technique can also
be used against undead targets (normally, it affects only living targets). Furthermore, whenever a health point is restored your character (or an allied target, with Healing Surges second rank) gains
a +1 bonus to Base Resilience until the end of the next round.
This bonus cannot be stacked with itself, but one attack could be
used to grant the bonus to your character and another attack could
grant it to an allied target (again, only if using the second rank).

Defender (ranked)

Rank 1 (3): Dexterity (R2), Awareness (R2)


Your character can help protect a nearby allied or neutral target during combat by attempting to parry enemy blows and alerting them to incoming attacks. On her turn, as a free action, your
character may declare one target within her natural reach who
then gains a +2 bonus to Defense until the start of your characters
next turn. However, doing so diverts your characters attention
and imposes a 2 penalty to her own Defense until her next turn.
Furthermore, your chosen target only receives this benefit while
he remains within your characters natural reach. The bonus ends
immediately if he leaves, but it resumes if he returns. Your own
penalty persists regardless.
Each round you must declare either to protect the same target or to protect a new one. You may even declare protection for
a target that is currently beyond your natural reach so that he can
move into your protected area during his own turn.
Rank 2 (6): Initiative (R2)
Your character is able to take a special action when using a
shield that attempts to intercept and block one incoming attack
aimed at an ally or neutral target within her natural reach. This action occurs outside of your characters turn. Monks (R3) who select this rank may attempt to perform this action without a shield
but only if unarmored.
Essentially, you interrupt the attack by making an immediate
free Initiative check of SV 8. If successful, the attack is compared
against your characters total block value (Defense stat + shields
block value), and if it fails to equal or surpass that number then its
damage is inflicted against her shield (or against the monks bolstered Total Resilience). If your Initiative check is unsuccessful,
or if the attack equals or surpasses your total block value, then the
attack is compared against its original target normally.
This ability may only be used to block single target attacks
and damaging spells and abilities that are compared against Defense. It is limited to one attempt per round, unless your character
is under the effects of the Hasten spell effect and/or is a nerref,
which allows it to be attempted on up to two attacks per round (or
three for hastened nerrefs). This ability cannot be attempted in the
same round as the redirect ability of the Rogue (R2) advantage
(unless under the effects of Hasten and/or a nerref).
Ettins that select this advantage must equip a shield in the
respective minds arm in order to utilize this ability. If both minds
select this advantage then each must have a shield equipped in its
respective arm, but each may also attempt its own interception
once per round against separate attacks.

Diviner (6)

Spellcasting: Arcane (R2), Perception (R2)


Your character gains additional benefits when casting the
following spell effects:
Scrying: Your characters scrying attempts also allow for
auditory and olfactory details to be discerned. Other creatures that are near the diviner may also perceive these details, just as visual details can be sensed.
Sensory Augmentation: Your character ignores the standard
spellcasting type restrictions of sensory augmentation and
gains full access to all of its sub-effects (each sub-effect

51

CHAPTER 2
still requires its own separate spell). Your character also
uses Sorcery as her spellcasting discipline unless she also
has access to the sub-effect via another spellcasting type,
in which case she must select which discipline to use as
part of each spells design (this choice is permanent).

Druid (ranked)

Rank 1 (6): Warden Creed, Spellcasting: Nature (R2)


Your character gains additional benefits when casting the
following spell effects:
Charm: Bestial: Achieving a standard success allows your
character to command a charmed bestial target to perform
any types of actions, including suicidal actions, and she
is always regarded as its close friend (achieving a critical
success is no longer required). However, suicidal actions
still grant the target willpower checks to break free.
Plant Control & Weather Control: Your character may cast
duplicated spell effects by applying a CM of 1 (instead
of the standard 2).
Rank 2 (4): Constitution (R2)
Your characters Shapechange spell effect is easier to cast
and allows for transformations into more powerful creatures. Use
the following table to determine the spells base CM according to
the creatures CPV (ignore the spell effects original table):

CPV Range
175
76150
151225
226300
301350

CM Totem Value
+2
10g
+1
25g
0
50g
1
100g
2
250g

Rank 3 (7): Constitution (R3)


Your character gains several perks whenever she is affected
by the Shapechange spell effect, regardless of whether she casts
the spell herself or is targeted by another casters spell.
First, she retains the ability to cast her spells that utilize the
Charm: Bestial, Plant Control, Shapechange (her totems always
remain usable), and Weather Control spell effects since they are
intrinsically tied to her druidic essence. When casting these spells
she uses the new forms Perception die and modifier, but she applies her original forms Geomancy modifier to the checks. Note
that she also retains the ability to cast these spells even when
shapechanged into forms that possess the Awkward Form: No
Arms creature trait, which normally prohibits spellcasting.
Second, any shapechanged form she assumes applies additional inherent bonuses to its faculties, even if transformed
against her will (lycanthropy, a witchs polymorph, etc.). She may
select one of the following categories (this choice is permanent
and cannot be changed after it is made):
Accurate: +1 Accuracy
Charismatic: +1 Charisma and +1 Fortitude
Dexterous: +1 Dexterity and +1 Defense
Enduring: +1 Endurance and +1 Base Resilience
Intelligent: +1 Intellect and +1 Concentration
Perceptive: +1 Perception and +1 Notice
Strong: +1 Strength and +1 Brute Force

52

Drunken Master (ranked)

Rank 1 (6): Dexterity (R2), Constitution (R2)


Your character has studied obscure martial fighting techniques that enhance his combat prowess when he becomes drunk.
Being drunk affects him in the following ways (ignore the Effects
of Being Drunk table from General Rules: Alcohol in Chapter 4):

Faculties

Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3


[35] [68] [9+]

Concentration, all
profession checks,
and all Charisma,
Endurance, and
Intellect discipline
checks (except for
Toughness)

Combat Maneuvers,
Defense, Fortitude,
and Toughness

+1

+2

Additionally, he may consume one alcoholic drink per round


as a free action, whether drunk or sober, assuming that he has
a free hand with which to do so. He may even imbibe a second
alcoholic drink (or one swig from a potion) as a trivial action, but
he may not consume any additional drinks or swigs unless he is
affected by the Hasten spell effect and/or is a nerref.
Rank 2 (4): Constitution (R3)
Your characters combat prowess becomes even more impressive when he is drunk. Whenever his alcohol level is 6 or
higher (tiers 2 or 3) he gains the following additional benefits:
He is no longer distracted by multiple melee opponents.
When prone he ignores the 1 penalties to Defense, physical
actions, and physical damage checks, but his movement
is still restricted.
Whenever your character is missed by a melee attack he receives a +1 bonus to all of his own Precision checks (all
types) against that particular foe on his next turn. Multiple
missed attacks from the same foe do not stack, but those
from different foes do apply if your character is willing
to risk multiple action penalties to attack each foe on his
next turn.

Elementalist (ranked)

Rank 1 (9): Spellcasting: Elemental (R2), Perception (R2)


Your character gains additional benefits when casting the
following spell effects:
Animate Minion: Elemental: Your characters elemental
minions receive 15 additional character points to allocate
when animated.
Air/Fire/Stone/Water Control: Your character may cast duplicated spell effects by applying a CM of 1 (instead of
the standard 2).
Rank 2 (3): Awareness (R2)
Your character has chosen to specialize in a particular element: Air, Fire, Stone, or Water. His Geomancy check gains a +1
bonus whenever he casts his chosen Control spell effect (if Fire

TRAITS
Control is chosen then a +1 bonus to heat damage is also applied
to the Damage: Heat duplicated spell effect). Additionally, his animated minions of the chosen type receive 5 extra character points
to allocate when animated.
However, his sole devotion to his chosen element bars the
use of its opposing element (air opposes stone, water opposes
fire). He can never select the Control or Animate Minion spell
effects of the opposing element. If your character already has any
spells that use either of these effects then their costs are immediately refunded. Note that other spell effects that make use of air,
fire, stone, and/or water do not benefit from and are not limited by
selecting a specialization (Creation, Damage, etc.).

Enthraller (ranked)

Rank 1 (6): Spellcasting: Mental (R2), Charisma (R2)


Your character gains additional benefits when casting the
following spell effects:
Charm: Your characters Charm spell effect has a base CM
of 0 (instead of the standard CM of 2).
Root: Your characters Root spell effect is so overwhelming
that affected targets also suffer a 1 penalty to all physical
actions while rooted. Mental spells [M] and other purely
mental actions are not penalized.
Rank 2 (15): Persuasion (R2)
Your character gains the ability to completely dominate the
mind of one sapient creature, thereby keeping him as a permanent
thrall. To obtain a thrall she must first achieve a critical success
using the Charm spell effect. Your character must also willingly
suspend one of her own stamina points. The point is permanently
kept in her fatigue row and may not be recovered until the thrall
is released, after which time it may then be recovered normally.
Only one thrall may be enslaved at a time, but standard castings
of the Charm spell effect are still permitted normally while a
thrall is active.
The thrall is given orders in the same manner as described
within the Charm spell effects rules. Your character can willfully
choose to release a thrall at any time or the magic can be dispelled
via the Suppress Magic spell effect. The effect also ends if either
your character or her thrall is killed. Lastly, the effect is severed
if your thrall is charmed by another caster, but doing so requires
that a critical success be achieved and imposes an additional 2
penalty to the casters check.
New player characters who select this rank do not automatically start the game with a thrall but must instead acquire one
during the course of regular play. Lastly, note that as a general
rule, PCs may not control more than one thrall, pet, enchanted
companion, animated minion, or summoned creature during a
battle (mounts and charmed targets do not count). If your character has multiple creatures and minions then one must be chosen
to assist during battle and it should be assumed that the others
are occupied with non-combative tasks (guarding the partys rear,
waiting in reserve, etc.). Note, however, that GM-controlled monsters and NPCs are not required to follow this rule.
Ettins that select this rank must still suspend one stamina
point when a thrall is enslaved, even though stamina is a shared
quantity. If both minds select this rank then two stamina points
must be suspended if two thralls are enslaved.

Evoker (ranked)

Rank 1 (3): Spellcasting: Any (R2), Accuracy (R2)


Your character applies an additional +1 bonus to the damage
checks of the following spell effects: Damage, Damage Aura, and
Damage Field.
Rank 2 (6): Magical Tap (R1) or Inborn Tap
Your character may perform a special action that allows him
to tap any of his existing spells that use the Damage spell effect,
despite having instant durations. This special action requires a
spellcasting discipline check of SV 5 (using the discipline and
CM that corresponds to the selected damage spell). If successful,
and for as long as the tap is held, your character may cast the
chosen spell without risking further stamina loss by rolling a 1.

Healer (4)

Perception (R2), Healing (R2)


Your characters Healing discipline checks all have their SV
goals reduced by one tier. The following applications are noted
for easier reference:
Bolstering Daily Constitution Checks: SV 3 (SV 5 for
self-treatment)
Bleeding: SV 3 (SV 5 for self-treatment)
Diseases/Poisons: SV 3 (SV 5 for self-treatment)
Rouse from Unconsciousness: SV 3
Resuscitate from Drowning/Suffocation: SV 3

Illusionist (9)

Spellcasting: Mental (R2), Perception (R2)


Your character gains additional benefits when casting the
following spell effects:
Dream Craft: Your character imparts additional physical effects to the target whenever a critical success is achieved.
Tranquil dreams give the target a calmed sense of focus
and grant a +1 bonus to all actions for the first hour after
waking. Nightmares have the opposite effect and impose a
1 penalty to all actions during this time. Neither modifier
is applied to damage checks.
False Memories: Your characters False Memories spell effect has a base CM of 0 (instead of the standard 1). He
also gains a +2 bonus to Stealth checks that are made to
disguise his manipulation of the targets memories.
Illusion: Your character may cast duplicated spell effects by
applying a CM of 1 (instead of the standard 2). His illusions are also more convincing and apply a +2 modifier
to all willpower checks that are made to disbelieve them.

Leader (6)

Charisma (R2), Persuasion (R2)


Your character may take a special action to issue tactical
orders to his allies that can serve to motivate them during combat. He must first succeed on a Persuasion check of SV 5. Each
success and critical success grants tactical benefits to one ally of
your characters choosing. Obviously, your character cannot benefit from his own tactical orders.
Each affected ally gains a +1 bonus to all Precision checks,
damage checks, Concentration, Defense, and Fortitude until the
end of the following round. Multiple applications of this ability

53

CHAPTER 2
cannot be stacked, even if they were issued from different leaders,
but rather the duration is simply renewed.
Since this ability is auditory it is susceptible to conditions
that limit or suppress sound. These include loud background noises, per the GMs discretion, or the Silence spell effect, which can
completely prevent your character from using this ability.

Linguist (ranked)

Rank 1 (2): Intellect (R2), Social Knowledge (R2)


Your character is skilled at understanding the complexities
of language. She gains one additional native or regional language
and one ancient language of her choosing. Note that selecting this
advantage is the only way to learn an ancient language.
Furthermore, she may attempt to decipher meanings from
any native or regional language that is based off of any ancient
language she knows (Rank 2 grants a second ancient language).
For instance, if your character knows the Runic ancient language
then she can attempt to decipher Avarrish, Dwarf, Goblin, and
any other of its derived native or regional languages. Doing so
requires a Social Knowledge check of SV 5. Success allows her
to make out a few basic words from a short passage of text or a
briefly spoken dialogue, whereas a critical success allows her to
fully translate the passage/dialogue. Suffering a critical failure or
failing this check by at least 3 points results in a mistranslation.
Rank 2 (2): Social Knowledge (R3)
Your characters knowledge of the intricacies of languages is without equal. She gains one additional native or regional
language and one additional ancient language of her choosing
(bringing her total number of ancient languages to two).
Your character can now attempt to decipher meanings from
any native or regional language that shares the same ancient language of another native or regional language that she already
knows, even if she doesnt know the ancient language itself. For
instance, if she knows Dwarf she could attempt to decipher the
meaning of Goblin even if she doesnt know the Runic ancient
language (Dwarf and Goblin are both derived from Runic). Doing
so requires a Social Knowledge check, as outlined above.

Lore Master (4)

Intellect (R2), Appraisal (R2)


Your character gains a +2 bonus on Appraisal checks for
identifying magical items and a +2 bonus on Social Knowledge
checks concerning history, myths, and legends. His Creature Lore
SV goals are also reduced by one tier (to SV 3 for most cases).

Mentalist (9)

Spellcasting: Mental (R2), Intellect (R2)


Your character gains additional benefits when casting the
following spell effects:
Mind Scanning: Your characters Mind Scanning spell effect has a base CM of 0 (instead of the standard 2).
Mind Reading: Your characters Mind Reading spell effect
reveals double the amount of information concerning the
targets thoughts. She may ask two questions per each
success and critical success (instead of just one per). Your
character also gains a +2 bonus to Stealth checks that are
made to disguise her intrusions into the targets mind.

54

Telepathy: Your characters Telepathy spell effect grants a


+1 bonus to the Fortitude stats of all members of a particular mental link for as long as the spell remains active
(including the caster, if targeted). Bonuses from multiple
mental links cannot be stacked.

Monk (ranked)

Rank 1 (6): Dexterity (R2), Mysticism (R2)


Your character may enhance his unarmed attacks by selecting a combination of special qualities, much like how weapons
are able to be customized. He may choose up to 3 points worth of
qualities at one time, which are then applied to all of his physical
unarmed attacks (hands, feet, claws, bite, etc.). All such attacks
are also made capable of achieving critical hits, if not already
capable. Available special qualities include:
Battering [+1]: Your characters unarmed attacks inflict +2
damage against objects (including weapons and shields)
and solid-form elementals. This quality can be stacked
with the bonus granted by the Striker advantage.
Defensive [+3]: Your character is able to fight more defensively at certain times. During any round in which he
makes a physical unarmed attack he gains a +1 bonus to
Defense until his next turn, regardless of whether or not
the attack is successful. Bonuses may not be stacked from
separate attacks. Additionally, whenever your character
takes a defending combat action he receives a +2 bonus to
Defense (instead of the standard bonus of +1; Concentration and Fortitude bonuses remain unchanged).
Disarm [+1]: Your characters disarming attempts add +1 to
his opponents SV to resist the maneuver.
Grapple [+1]: Your character adds +1 to his opposed grappling checks.
Increased Damage [+3]: The damage dice for all of your
characters unarmed attacks are each increased by one die
tier (from d6 to d8, from d8 to d10, etc.).
Trip [+1]: Your characters tripping attempts add +1 to his
opponents SV to resist the maneuver. This quality does
not stack with the bonus gained from the Enhanced Unarmed Attack: Tail Swipe species trait.
Vicious [+2]: Your characters unarmed attacks are particularly brutal and inflict an additional +2 points of bonus
damage whenever a critical hit is achieved. All severity
checks are also increased by +1 for injuries caused by his
unarmed attacks, regardless of achieving a critical hit.
This quality does not stack with the bonus gained from
the Enhanced Unarmed Attack: Bite/Stinger species trait.
The various qualities may be changed each day through
meditation, similar to how spellcasters can adjust their spells via
daily spell preparation. Doing so requires a full nights rest (at
least 6 hours of sleep).
Concerning ettins, these enhancements only apply to the attacks made by the mind that possesses this trait.
Rank 2 (3): Awareness (R2)
Your characters heightened senses grant a +1 bonus to his
Defense stat but only while wearing no armor. Weapons, gear,
and other types of apparel are permitted, but the bulkiness and
restrictive nature of armor negates this benefit.

TRAITS
Concerning ettins, the Defense bonus is granted for each
mind that possesses this rank (stacking at +2).
Rank 3 (3): Agility (R2)
Your character can sometimes block attacks using his body
to soften the blow but only when he is wearing no armor and
has no shield equipped. He essentially gains a block value of 2
against all attacks, which functions exactly as a shield. However,
unlike a shield, whenever an attack is successfully blocked
your character simply adds a +2 bonus to his Total Resilience
stat against the attackin other words, the damage is still
compared directly against your character, but he is able to
soften the blow.
Concerning ettins, if both minds possess
this rank then the block value is increased to
3 and the ettin adds +3 to its Total Resilience
against successfully blocked attacks.
Note that a shield cannot be equipped
in either of the ettins arms for this ability
to function.

Necromancer (9)

Spellcasting: Shadow (R2), Intellect (R2)


Your character gains additional benefits
when casting the following spell effects:
Animate Minion: Undead: Your characters undead minions receive 15
additional character points to allocate
when animated.
Death: Your character no longer suffers
health loss when attempting to cast
the Death spell effect. Stamina is still
lost, however.
Siphon: Health: Your character gains
a temporary +1 bonus to his Base
Resilience stat whenever he successfully siphons health from an
opponent, which lasts until the end
of the next round.

Ranger (4)

Warden Creed, Creature Lore (R2)


Your characters presence has a
powerful effect on bestial animals,
thereby allowing her to ignore the
standard 2 penalty for attempting
to use the Persuasion discipline on animals. If she can already
speak to animals, such as via the Commune: Bestial spell effect
or the Communicate: Animals creature trait, then she gains a +1
bonus as well. Sapient animals are immune to this ability.
Additionally, your character is highly adept at traversing the
wild places of the world and has a wealth of knowledge concerning herbal lore. All of her Survival SV goals are lowered by one
tier. The following applications are noted for easier reference:
Direction Sense: SV 3
Finding Food or Water: SV 3
Herb Lore: SV 3
Ignoring Rough Terrain/Weather: SV 5

Rogue (ranked)

Rank 1 (4): Backstab (R1), Cheap Shot


Your character gains an additional +2 bonus to melee damage checks against surprised opponents (in addition to the bonus
already granted by Backstab). He also gains an additional +1 bonus to all damage checks made against distracted opponents (in
addition to the bonus already granted from Cheap Shot).
Rank 2 (6): Agility (R2)
Your character is able to take a special action that
attempts to redirect one personal incoming attack at a
different target within his natural reach (even at an
ally, if desired). This action occurs outside of your
characters turn.
Essentially, you interrupt the attack by
making an immediate free Initiative check of
SV 8. If successful, the attack is compared
against your selected target instead. However, if your Initiative check is unsuccessful
then the attack again threatens your character and even gains a +1 bonus to both its
Precision check and damage check due to
his ineptitude!
This ability may only be used against
single target attacks and damaging spells
and abilities that are compared against Defense (the Damage: Mental spell effect
cannot be redirected). It is limited to one
attempt per round, unless your character
is under the effects of the Hasten spell
effect and/or is a nerref, which allows it to
be attempted on up to two attacks per round
(or three for hastened nerrefs). This ability
cannot be attempted in the same round as the
intercept ability of the Defender (R2) advantage (unless under the effects of Hasten and/
or a nerref).
Ettins that select this advantage may attempt to redirect one separate incoming attack
per round for each mind that possesses it.

Sentinel (6)

Perception (R2), Constitution (R2)


Your character is able to draw upon a
source of inner focus to induce a state of
enhanced clarity and heightened reflexes.
Perhaps he attains this state through intense personal discipline,
or maybe he has an unusually strong connection to the spiritual
realm. Regardless of its source his prowess in combat is impressive to say the least.
Attaining this level of focus first requires your character to
willingly sacrifice one of his stamina points on his turn in order
to attempt a free Constitution check of SV 5, which if successful
grants your character a +2 bonus to Defense, Combat Maneuvers,
and Awareness. Achieving a critical success increases the bonus
to +3 instead. This effect lasts until the end of the current round
plus 2 additional rounds. Multiple effects cannot be stacked, but
rather the duration is simply renewed.

55

CHAPTER 2

Shadow Weaver (ranked)

Rank 1 (6): Spellcasting: Shadow (R2), Dexterity (R2)


Your character gains additional benefits when casting the
following spell effects:
Entangle: Your characters Entangle spell effect drains one
point of stamina from targets each time they attempt to
break free and fail. Drained stamina points are simply
lost, not siphoned. Note that entangling fields do not cause
targets to become grappled until after they fail their initial
Agility or Might checks, so the risk of stamina loss does
not occur until afterwards.
Obscurement: Darkness: Your characters Obscurement:
Darkness spell effect is formed of semi-tangible shadows
that impose a 1 penalty to all damage checks of creatures
within the field, except for mental spells and abilities [M].
Attacks that are made into or through the field from outside also suffer this penalty. Being able to see in the dark
or being able to ignore obscurement does not alleviate this
penalty since it is caused by a tangible force. However,
your characters own damage checks are never penalized.
Rank 2 (varies): Stealth (R2)
Your character gains the ability to see perfectly in the dark.
He no longer suffers any visual penalties due to darkness, per the
Heightened Sense: Dark Sight [Full] creature trait.
He also gains the ability to teleport himself and his belongings between areas of darkness. To do so, he must make a Sorcery
check of SV 5, and a point of stamina is lost on a roll of 1. This
ability has a CM of +2. It is limited by line-of-effect and has a
maximum range of 50 feet. Additionally, your character may not
teleport through barriers (nets, prison bars, glass windows, etc.)
unless he could also squeeze through them physically.
This rank has a variable cost depending on several factors.
If your character is a species without the Heightened Sense: Dark
Sight [Partial] trait then the cost is 12 points, but if your character
already has this trait then the cost is only 9 points. If your character is a gremlin then the cost is only 5 points since your Limited
Teleportation ability is already superior to the one gained from
selecting this rank. For rethenod elves and creatures that possess
the Heightened Sense: Dark Sight [Full] creature trait then the
cost is only 4 points.

Skirmisher (9)

Dexterity (R2), Initiative (R2)


Your character gains a +1 bonus to Speed (all forms). He
is also able to divide and spend his movement during any portion of his turn, such as in between other actions. This includes
base movement and sprinting results. For instance, he could move
three squares, make an attack, move one square, make another
attack, then move another two squares, if he so desired.

Sniper (ranked)

Rank 1 (5): Piercing Shot (R1), Cheap Shot


Your character gains an additional +2 bonus to ranged damage checks against surprised opponents (in addition to the bonus
already granted by Piercing Shot). He also gains an additional +1
bonus to Ranged Precision checks against distracted opponents
(in addition to the base distraction bonus).

56

Rank 2 (6): Awareness (R2)


Your character is able to take a special extended action that
attempts to line up a perfect shot against a specific target using
Ranged Precision. This attack requires your character to begin
preparing it one round before it is actually attempted. During
this round your character is considered distracted and he cannot
move or take any other actions. He may still defend himself, but
the attack automatically fails if he loses health, falls prone, or
is otherwise disrupted. If he can remain uninterrupted until his
next turn he can attempt the attack, which gains a +1 bonus on its
Ranged Precision check and inflicts +3 damage. This attack must
be attempted prior to moving or taking other actions, and it is still
subject to multiple action penalties.
Concerning ettins, if one mind attempts this ability the ettin
is not automatically distracted but is only easier to distract than
normal (requiring only two or more melee combatants). The other
mind may take actions normally, but the ettin is still restricted
from moving. If both minds possess this advantage and attempt
to use it in the same round then distraction occurs automatically.

Striker (6)

Magical Tap (R1) or Inborn Tap, Sorcery (R1)


Your character may empower his unarmed attacks (hands,
feet, claws, bite, etc.) with mystical energy. This ability requires
your character to make a Sorcery check of SV 5 using a CM of
+2 and requiring a tap. If successful, his unarmed attacks are all
made capable of achieving critical hits and inflict +2 damage
against objects (including weapons and shields) and solid-form
elementals; this bonus can be stacked with the Monks Battering
quality, if desired. While the tap is held he also gains a +2 bonus
to Total Resilience but only while he remains unencumbered (i.e.
if the total weight of his equipment and gear is equal to or less
than his EF). All other benefits still apply if he is encumbered.
Your character may also opt to allow his hands or other body
parts to emit a faint colored glow while this ability remains active.
The color of the energy is unique to each striker and produces
light equivalent to that of a candle (OS x 10 ft). This aspect of the
ability is optional but cannot be enabled or suppressed until the
current tap is released and a new one is held.
Concerning ettins, the damage bonus only benefits the mind
that purchased this advantage. Even if both minds possess this
advantage the bonuses to Total Resilience cannot be stacked.

Summoner (4)

Spellcasting: Arcane (R1), Endurance (R2)


Your characters Summon Creature spell effect is easier to
cast and may also summon more powerful creatures. Use the following table to determine the spells base CM according to the
creatures CPV (ignore the spell effects original table):

CPV Range
175
76150
151225
226300
301350

CM Totem Value
+2
10g
+1
25g
0
50g
1
100g
2
250g

TRAITS

Trap Master (4)

Perception (R2), Tinkering (R2)


Your character is quite skilled at detecting, disarming, setting, and concealing traps. He gains a +1 bonus to all of the following applications:
Awareness checks for detecting traps
Tinkering checks for disarming or setting traps
Stealth checks for concealing or camouflaging his traps
Damage checks for all of his traps that can inflict damage

Venomist (6)

Endurance (R2), Creature Lore (R2)


Your character is an expert at handling and applying poisons.
All of his own poison applications have their potencies enhanced
by an additional 1, making them more deadly (this modifier also
applies to inherent poisonous attacks of your characters species,
if applicable). Furthermore, he may apply a dose of poison to a
weapon as a free action, once per round, assuming that he has a
free hand with which to do so. Lastly, your characters close proximity and frequent exposure to a variety of poisons has strengthened his bodys tolerance by granting a +2 bonus to all Constitution checks that are made to resist poisons.

Witch (ranked)

Rank 1 (6): Spellcasting: Shadow (R2), Perception (R2)


Your character is particularly accomplished at cursing her
foes and applies an additional CM of +1 to the Bad Luck, Silence
(both sub-effects), and Siphon Faculty spell effects. Furthermore,
she may also change the sub-effects of her Siphon Faculty spells
during her daily spell preparation (normally, a spells sub-effect
is a permanent choice).
Rank 2 (3): Creature Lore (R2)
Your character may create a fetish that she can then link to
a specific enemy in order to affect them with her spells at greater
range. Linking the fetish is an action that requires a Sorcery check
of SV 3 (no risk of stamina loss) and line-of-effect to target.
Once linked, and while your character holds the fetish in
her hand, her single target spells treat the target as if he were 10
squares closer than his actual position would indicate (both for
reach and distance spells). A fetish remains linked to its target
indefinitely until it is re-linked to a different target. Multiple fetishes can even be created for various targets, but their benefits
only apply to the witchs own spells.
A fetish weighs ~0.5 lb and can be created out of simple materials (wood, stone, clay, etc.) in about an hour, but its creation
consumes 25g worth of magical reagents. Magical reagents are
not consumed when linking or re-linking a fetish.
Rank 3 (3): Spellcasting: Shadow (R3), Creature Lore (R3)
Your character can attempt to polymorph a single target into
a tiny size animal of her choosing, the type of which may be adjusted per each casting. Doing so requires a Sorcery check with a
CM of 3, compared against the targets Concentration stat, and
always imposes the loss of a stamina point whenever the ability
is attempted. Additionally, the use of this ability consumes 25g
worth of magical reagents but only when it is successfully cast.
If your characters check is successful then the target is instantly polymorphed, but his equipment and carried items are not

transformed. However, if a critical failure occurs then your character must remake the exact same check against her own Concentration stat, applying all of the same modifiers, to see if she
herself is polymorphed instead!
The polymorph effect is permanent, but it can be reversed,
either by the same witch or by a different one. Doing so simply
requires the ability to be cast again, but magical reagents are still
consumed and stamina is still lost. The Suppress Magic spell effect is useless against this ability since the polymorphed state is a
permanent transformation.
The kinds of animals that can be selected for the polymorph
effect must of a type that is relatively harmless, such as a toad, rat,
weasel, non-poisonous snake, crow, bat, or newt. Such creatures
must have a CPV of no more than 25 points and must possess
a bestial state of mind. While polymorphed, the targets mental
awareness is dulled so that he has no memory of his former existence. For all intents and purposes the target acts as a standard
specimen of the chosen type. If the polymorph effect is later reversed then the targets mental awareness is returned to normal
and he is able to recall vague memories of his experiences that
transpired while he was polymorphed.

Wizard (ranked)

Rank 1 (4): Spellcasting: Any (R2), Intellect (R2)


Your character is formally trained as a master spellcaster and
maintains a detailed spellbook that helps to augment her spells.
Her spellbook must be held in one hand and used as a reference
when casting. Its pages can be turned magically purely by your
characters thoughts, but a different hand must still be used to
actually cast the spell. Using the spellbook while casting grants
a +1 bonus to your characters spellcasting check (Geomancy,
Mysticism, Spell Precision, and/or Sorcery). A spellbook cannot
be used in a hand that is also wielding a buckler or an Attached
weapon, but it can be held and used by a prehensile tail.
Only your characters actual spells may be augmented by her
spellbook. Magical abilities, potions, spell foci, and bardic songs
do not qualify. Even magical abilities that are produced by the
Spell-Like creature trait receive no benefit. If your character has
multiple spellcasting types (arcane, divine, shadow, etc.) then she
may use her spellbook for all of their spells equally.
Upon selecting this advantage your character receives her
initial spellbook, a tome, for free (a tome weighs ~2 pounds).
If lost, destroyed, or stolen she may create a new one, but doing
so requires an amount of time equal in hours to your characters
total CPV 5. Its creation also consumes 50g worth of magical
reagents. Fortunately, a wizards spellbook has no value to others since each book is uniquely tailored to its creator. Even other
wizards cannot make use of another wizards spellbook except to
identify the kinds of spell effects that the wizard knows.
Rank 2 (6): Spellcasting: Any (R3)
Your character gains additional spellcasting benefits when
using her spellbook. First, she adds a +1 bonus to the range increments for all distance spells. Second, she may also cast up to
two spells in the same round, using the same hand, but doing so
still accrues multiple action penalties normally. Wizards under the
effect of the Hasten spell effect and nerrefs may cast up to three
spells (hastened nerrefs can cast up to four).

57

EQUIPMENT

CHAPTER 3
EQUIPMENT

kay, now that your characters faculties have been assigned


and his traits have been selected youre probably ready to
start exploring dungeons and killing monsters, right?
Well, not so fast... Your character still needs gear, armor, and
most importantly weapons. That is, unless you plan on having
him fight naked using only his fists, which is perfectly fine if he
has the right combination of advantages to do it, but since most
characters do not, lets go ahead and assume that hell be needing
to purchase equipment.

CURRENCY

In ages past, many species and cultures developed their own currencies as a means for exchanging goods and services. Although many unique
currencies still exist, especially among less
civilized species, three common types of
currency dominate the major economies of the world of Arlakor: gold
pieces, silver pieces, and gems.
Gold and silver pieces are roughly equal in size, about 1 inch in diameter, and standard gems are each
generally the size of a pebble.
Both coins and gems weigh approximately 0.01 lb each (100 to
a pound). Obviously, the weight and
size of currency can pose problems for smaller creatures, but this can be solved by exchanging coins for gems or by
obtaining a bottomless coin poucha lesser magical item that
helps to alleviate the weight of large quantities of coins (unfortunately, gems cannot be held within the pouch).

1 Gold Piece (g) = 100 Silver Pieces (s)


Typical Gem Values = 10g, 25g, 50g, 100g, and 250g
Silver pieces are most often used for daily transactions, such
as meals and basic services. Gold pieces and gems are typically
reserved for more expensive purchases. A typical skilled laborer
can expect to earn about 1g per day or roughly 57g per week.
Gem Appraisal: Most civilized settlements have at least one
appraiser who is skilled at estimating the value of gems via the
Appraisal discipline. Such professionals stake their reputations

on providing accurate estimates. However, gems are not as easily


valued as simply counting gold or silver pieces, which means that
in even the most honest of transactions a buyer paying with gems
must often overpay by about 10% to ensure that the proper price
has been met and to compensate the appraiser. For instance, a
buyer that is trying to purchase 9g worth of items may simply pay
with a gem valued at 10g.

Selling Gear & Loot

Used gear and loot, such as items that were acquired through
adventuring, can generally be sold for 50% of
their listed prices, assuming that the
items are still in good condition and
that your character can find a merchant who is willing to buy them.
This price reflects the difficulty of
having to resell used items and allows
for the profit markups and overhead
costs of the merchant to which theyre
sold. Land and real estate are exceptions
to this rule and tend to sell for the full value
of their listed prices. Relicsthe highest tier
of magical itemsare also exceptions to this
rule since the monetary value of such
items is immeasurable.
Finding Buyers: Players should
keep in mind that simply having loot to
sell doesnt guarantee that a merchant will
buy it. Returning from a dungeon with heaps of used weapons
and armor that was scavenged from slain enemies is rarely worth
the effort of hauling everything back to town. Most merchants are
either unable or unwilling to dole out large payments for excessive quantities of used merchandise, especially if resale would
likely prove difficult. Even if the party is fortunate enough to find
a merchant who is willing to buy their plundered goods they may
be forced to accept a price that is significantly less than 50% of
the items listed values and/or may be required to accept store
credit instead of being payed with coins.
Economic Conditions: The GM might also wish to adjust
the selling percentage of used goods according to the particular
economic conditions and events within the game world. For instance, a shortage of metal might make metal weapons and armor
more valuable, whereas a region that is enjoying a long period of
peace may have little need for such items.

59

CHAPTER 3

ENCUMBRANCE

This is the measurement of how much weight your character


can equip and carry without suffering Dexterity and Speed Penalties. Each multiple of your characters Encumbrance Factor stat
(EF) imposes a cumulative penalty of 1 to his Dexterity attribute
and Speed stats (all forms), up to a maximum penalty of 4.
For example, if your character has an EF of 25 he can equip
up to 25 pounds of armor, weapons, and gear without incurring
any encumbrance penalties. For each additional EF multiple he
would suffer the following penalties:
up to 25 pounds (EF x 1): no penalty
above 25 pounds, up to 50 pounds (EF x 2): 1 penalty
above 50 pounds, up to 75 pounds (EF x 3): 2 penalty
above 75 pounds, up to 100 pounds (EF x 4): 3 penalty
above 100 pounds, up to 125 pounds (EF x 5): 4 penalty
above 125 pounds: refer below to Maximum Encumbrance
Encumbered Movement: If one of your characters Speed
stats has been reduced to 0 then he is unable to move via that particular form. He can still attempt to sprint, but Flying, Running,
and Swimming discipline checks are penalized as well from the
EF penalty to Dexterity, which means that sprinting is hindered
significantly when your character is encumbered.

Maximum Encumbrance

The maximum amount of weight that your character can


equip and/or carry while still being able to move and act normally
is known as his free limit, which is equal to his EF x 5. Whenever
your character attempts to lift or manipulate weight beyond his
free limit, via the Might discipline, his Speed is automatically
reduced to 1 square (5 feet) until the excess weight is set aside,
assuming that his Speed has not already been reduced to 0 from
encumbrance penalties, and he may not attempt to sprint.

EQUIPMENT ADJUSTMENTS

Your characters creature size determines how much his


equipment costs and weighs. Each creature size tier assigns specific, separate multiples that must be applied against the listed
costs and weights of most items. An items relative size also applies a modifier to its Resilience value.
Tilde Symbol (~): Costs and weights that are marked with
the tilde symbol must be adjusted by applying your characters
corresponding multiple. Costs are rounded to the nearest silver
piece, when necessary. Weights are recorded as decimal values.
Costs and weights that are listed without this symbol are standard
for all creature sizes.
The Resilience values for shields and weapons are also
marked with the tilde symbol, as are the range increments for
launched and thrown ranged weapons, indicating that a specific
modifier must be applied to the base value according to the items
relative size. The list of size modifiers can be found in the corresponding items section or description.
Exemptions: Land, real estate, livestock, mounts, and services are exempt from having to be adjusted. Either the issues of
cost and weight are irrelevant for these purchases or they have al-

60

ready been adjusted accordingly. Magical enchantments are also


exempt, but the costs and weights of their base items, prior to
enchantment, are not exempt and must still be adjusted.
Poisons, potions, and spell foci are special cases. For poisons, the cost and weight of an individual dose is the same regardless of creature size, but the cost and weight of the poisons
chosen container must still be adjusted. For potions and spell foci,
which magically resize themselves to accommodate the size of
the creature that holds them, it becomes necessary to readjust
their weights accordingly; the costs of potions and spell foci are
the same for all creatures, regardless of size.

Creature Size Multiples


Creature
Size
Tiny
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Enormous
Gigantic
Colossal

Cost
Multiple
x 0.5
x 0.6
x1
x2
x5
x 15
x 50
x 150

Weight
Multiple
x 0.1
x 0.3
x1
x3
x 10
x 30
x 100
x 300

Understanding Cost Multiples

Your characters cost multiple allows you to easily calculate


the difference in an items cost, which is necessary since creatures
of different sizes require items of different sizes. For instance, a
longsword has a listed cost of 5g, so a small longsword costs 3g
(x0.6 multiple), a medium longsword costs 5g (x1 multiple), a
large longsword costs 10g (x2 multiple), and so on. The differences in costs are due to the varying amounts of raw materials that
are required to craft items of different sizes, adjustments in labor
costs, and other factors.

Equipment Size & Effectiveness

If a weapon is bigger and weighs more than a similar weapon


that was designed for a creature of a smaller size, then shouldnt
it also inflict more damage? Yes, it does indeed inflict more damage, but the additional damage modifiers are already factored into
your characters creature size benefits. Bigger creatures hit harder
by their very nature, regardless of the weapons they choose to
wield. Therefore, a weapons damage does not have to be scaled
on an individual basisits damage adjustment for size is already
included via your characters Brute Force stat or from special
modifiers (the Damage spell effect, a weapon that possesses the
Mechanical special quality, etc.). The same is also true of armor
and your characters Total Resilience stat.
Size Incompatibility: Your character is generally unable to
equip or make use of gear that is designed for creatures of different sizes. Weapons are an exception to this rule (as are shields
when used to attack), but they may only be within one size tier
bigger or smaller than your characters size. Incompatible weapons are also less precise and may impose additional restrictions,
such as requiring two hands to wield.

EQUIPMENT

ARMOR
Wearing armor protects your character from most forms of
damage by adding to her Total Resilience stat. The tradeoff is that
armor is heavy and bulky, which adds significant weight to your
characters encumbrance and limits her ability to dodge attacks.

Armor Types

There are three types of armor that offer increasing degrees


of protection:
Light Armor: This type of armor is light weight and is usually constructed of materials that offer the most flexibility
while still providing a minimum amount of protection.
Examples include padded cloth, leather, animal furs and
hides, and even more exotic materials such as strong silks
and plant-based components.
Moderate Armor: This type of armor constitutes a more
balanced tradeoff between protection, flexibility, and
weight, but its restrictive bulk also imposes a 1 penalty
to your characters Defense stat. It usually consists of a
combination of flexible metal coverings, such as chains
or rings, with an underlining of leather or cloth. Bone is
another material that is frequently used, especially by less
civilized species and cultures.
Heavy Armor: This type of armor offers the maximum
amount of protection available, but its rigid construction
imposes a 2 penalty to Defense and its weight can prove
to be a significant burden to all but the very strongest of
warriors. Heavy armor often consists of either thick metal
plates or overlapping scales that are secured atop a dense
layer of leather or cloth. Scale armor, in particular, can
either be fashioned from metal or from the actual scales
of creatures such as dragons.

Armor
Armor Cost
Type
(~)
Light
10g
Moderate 20g
Heavy
35g

Total
Resilience
+1
+3
+5

Defense

Choosing to Wear Armor

0
1
2

Weight
(~)
10
25
50

The choice of whether or not to wear armor is sometimes


a difficult one. On one hand, being unarmored will allow your
character to dodge more attacks and perform dexterous acts more
freely, but she is likely to suffer greater wounds when she does
get hit. On the other hand, wearing armor will allow her to absorb the brunt of most attacks without being severely injured, but
she will get hit more often, and if encumbered her Dexterity and
Speed (all forms) will be reduced.
Encumbrance Factor: It is very important to consider your
characters EF stat when deciding whether or not to wear armor,
and if so, what type of armor to wear. If your character is strong
and has a high EF stat then she may be able to wear armor without

becoming encumbered. Weaker characters may wish to remain


unarmored or to limit their choice to light armor instead, unless
they dont particularly care about reduced mobility.
Defense Penalty: The restrictive bulk of moderate and
heavy armor imposes a penalty to your characters Defense stat,
regardless of her encumbrance. Light armor does not impose a
penalty to Defense, but the protection it offers is significantly less
than moderate or heavy armor.

Additional Considerations

Armor Components: Purchasing a suit of armor includes


all of the pieces necessary to cover your characters body. These
include extremity pieces such as boots, gloves or gauntlets, and a
helmet, as well as potential species-related components, such as
tale coverings, horn caps, and so forth.
Characters who purchase a suit of armor may refrain from
also having to purchase a set of clothing since the armor automatically includes all necessary clothing accessories (tunics, skirts,
undergarments, etc.). Even so, some characters may wish to own
additional sets of clothing for special occasions, emergencies, or
purely for roleplaying purposes.
Species with unusual body parts may require custom-fitted
armor in order to accommodate their hooves, wings, horns, tails,
and other more exotic features. Making alterations to an existing
suit of armor generally costs about 25% of the armors original
price. The GM will determine if such alterations are necessary
according to the armors design. For instance, a gargond who
chooses to buy an existing suit of armor in a human shop is likely
going to need to have it altered and refitted in order to accommodate his wings and tail, unless the GM decides that the shop also
carries gargond suits as well. Having a custom suit of armor crafted from scratch does not require any alterations since the buyers
body type can be incorporated into the armors design. However,
commissioning a suit of armor requires a significant amount of
time, usually several days at least, and so it may not be ready
precisely when your character needs it.
Spikes (optional): Spikes can be added to any type of armor, which provide a +2 bonus to wrestling damage checks made
while grappling (melee grappling only). This bonus does not
stack with the bonus gained from the Enhanced Unarmed Attack:
Barbs trait. Armor with spikes has its weight increased by ~2 lb
and costs an extra ~2g, regardless of its type.
Armor Grade: Armor comes in three different quality
grades: lowgrade, common, and highgrade. Lowgrade armor
costs half as much as common varieties but weighs 20% more
(light ~12 lb, moderate ~30 lb, and heavy ~60 lb). Highgrade armor costs three times as much as common varieties but weighs
20% less (light ~8 lb, moderate ~20 lb, and heavy ~40 lb).
Armor Incompatibility: Armor that is designed for creatures of one size may not be worn by those of a different size.
Even among creatures of the same size it may be necessary to
have a suit of armor altered and refitted to accommodate the
unique body parts of certain species (GMs call; see above).

61

CHAPTER 3

SHIELDS
Equipping a shield adds an extra Block value on top of
your characters Defense stat that can sometimes allow him to
block incoming attacks, but his shield can also be damaged or destroyed. Shields may also serve as weapons that can make melee
attacks for d4 damage and are capable of inflicting critical hits.
Your character may only gain the benefits of a single
shield (block value and bullrush) despite having more than one
equipped. He may still use multiple shields as weapons, however.

Shield Types

There are three types of shields that offer increasing degrees


of protection:
Buckler: This type of shield is attached to you characters
arm and cannot be disarmed. It still allows your characters hand to be used, including the option of wielding a
weapon, but all actions requiring the use of that arm suffer
a 1 penalty during combat. Attacks with the buckler itself ignore this penalty unless another item or weapon is
being held with the same hand. Note that only one buckler
or one Attached weapon may be secured on a single arm.
Standard Shield: This type of shield is the most common
of the three varieties. It offers a moderate level of protection without adding too much additional weight. Standard
shields also grant a +1 bonus to your characters Might
checks when making and resisting bullrush attempts.
Tower Shield: This type of shield is quite large and heavy,
but it provides the most protection. Tower shields also
grant a +1 bonus to your characters Might checks when
making and resisting bullrush attempts.

Shields

Shield
Type
Buckler
Standard
Tower

Cost
(~)
2g
4g
7g

[Durability: 3]
Block Resil. Weight
Qualities
Value (~)
(~)
+1
5
4
Attached
+2
6
9
Bullrush
+3
7
15
Bullrush

Choosing to Equip a Shield

Equipping a shield can add a considerable boost to your


characters Defense, but there are tradeoffs that should be considered. First, a shield occupies one of your characters hands, which
means that he cannot equip a weapon in that hand or use it for other purposesa buckler is an exception, but it still penalizes combat actions that involve its respective arm. Second, shields tend to
weigh more than most one-handed weapons. Third, shields tend
to lose durability over time and need to be repaired or replaced.
Block Value: Each type of shield is assigned a block value,
which is added to your characters Defense stat. The total is indicated on your character sheet after his Defense value. Any attack
result that falls below your characters Defense misses entirely;
any result that equals his Defense but falls below the combined

62

block value hits his shield; any result that equals or exceeds the
combined block value hits his body. Also note that critical hits
against your character are always determined by his Defense stat,
not his combined block value.
For example, if your character has a Defense of 5 and is
using a standard shield with a block value of 2 then his Defense
and combined block value would be written as 5/7. An attack result of 4 or lower misses entirely; a result of 56 hits the shield;
a result of 7 or higher hits your character. A critical hit against
your character would occur on a result of 10 or higher (5 points
higher than his Defense stat).
Resilience & Creature Size: The Resilience value of each
shield must be adjusted according to the size of creature for which
it was designed: tiny 2, small 1, medium 0, large +2, huge +4,
enormous +7, gigantic +10, or colossal +14. Remember to make
this adjustment whenever your character purchases a new shield.
Durability: New shields have a durability value of 3. Any
attack that hits the shield compares its damage against the shields
Resilience value. Each success and critical success lowers the
shields durability value by 1 point. When a shields durability is
reduced to 0 it breaks and can no longer be equipped. Additionally, each point of damage beyond the shields limit is then applied
against your characters Total Resilience stat instead, and such
attacks are always targeted against your characters shield arm.
For example, lets assume that your characters shield has 1
point of durability remaining and a Resilience of 6. It is then hit
by an attack for 11 points of damage. The first 6 points of damage
are enough to reduce its durability to 0, so the remaining 5 points
of damage are applied against your characters Total Resilience.

Additional Considerations

Spikes (optional): Spikes can be added to any type of shield,


which grants it the vicious weapon quality. It inflicts +2 additional points of bonus damage whenever a critical hit is achieved. All
severity checks are also increased by +1 for injuries caused by the
shield, regardless of achieving a critical hit. A shield with spikes
has its weight and cost increased according to its type: add ~1 lb
and ~1g to bucklers, add ~2 lb wight and ~2g to standard shields,
and add ~3 lb and ~3g to tower shields.
Shield Grade: Shields come in three different quality
grades: lowgrade, common, and highgrade. Lowgrade shields
cost half as much as common varieties but suffer a 2 penalty to
their Resilience. Highgrade shields cost three times as much as
common varieties but gain a +2 bonus to their Resilience.
Shield Repair: Damaged shields may be repaired for a cost
equal to about 25% of their original price, which fully restores
their durability to 3. Broken shields (durability 0) cannot be repaired and must instead be replaced.
Shield Incompatibility: Shields that are designed for creatures of one size grant no benefits when used by those of a different size. In other words, its block value and special quality are
lost, but it may still be able to be used as a weapon. Refer to the
Weapon Incompatibility rules later in this chapter for details.

EQUIPMENT

63

CHAPTER 3

WEAPONS
Weapons come in a variety of different designs and functions. Inflicting damage is the primary purpose of most weapons,
but many are also capable of providing other combat advantages
as well, such as enhancing your characters Defense or bolstering
his attempts at tripping or disarming opponents.
Standard and specialized weapons are listed later in this
section, but you can also design customized weapons for your
character, if desired.

Weapon Types

There are four types of weapons and each type offers unique
tactical advantages:
One-Handed Melee Weapon: This type of weapon is designed for melee attacks and is wielded in one hand. Your
character is free to use his other hand to wield a second
weapon, carry a shield, or perform actions like casting
spells. Your character can still choose to make attacks
with the weapon using two hands, which grants an additional +1 bonus to its damage check.
Two-Handed Melee Weapon: This type of weapon is designed for melee attacks and requires the use of two hands.
Its damage die tends to be higher than most one-handed
weapons, plus it also gains the standard +1 damage bonus
for making two-handed melee attacks (already included).
Launched Ranged Weapon: This type of weapon is designed for ranged attacks and requires the use of two
hands (except for weapons that possess the One-Handed
Firing special quality). It launches ammunition of a particular type, which always requires two hands to load:
arrows for bows, bolts for crossbows, bullets for slings,
or needles for blowguns. Loading ammunition is a free action unless the weapon possesses the Slow special quality.
Thrown Ranged Weapon: This type of weapon is designed
for ranged attacks and is thrown with one hand. However,
certain specialized weapons, specifically lassos and nets,
can only be thrown when using two hands.

Choosing the Right Weapons

Each weapon provides a unique combination of damage potential and combat utility. Your characters choice of weapons can
often make a huge difference in how he chooses to fight. For instance, a maul is all about inflicting brutal damage, while a quarterstaff is more suited to inhibiting opponents and bolstering your
characters own defenses. Carefully consider all of a weapons
base values and special qualities in order to find one that best
compliments your characters preferred style of fighting.
Carrying Multiple Weapons: Most characters find it beneficial to carry multiple weapons so that they are prepared for a
variety of different combat situations, assuming that they can accommodate the added weight. This typically includes at least one
melee weapon and one ranged weapon. Even if your character
relies on his sword for most attacks he will eventually encounter
situations where a ranged weapon would prove to be more useful.

64

After all, there is nothing more pathetic than an armored knight


who must resort to throwing stones at flying enemies because he
chose not to bring along any ranged weapons.
Resilience, Range, & Creature Size: The Resilience value
of each weapon must be adjusted according to the size of creature
for which it was designed: tiny 2, small 1, medium 0, large +2,
huge +4, enormous +7, gigantic +10, or colossal +14.
Additionally, the range increment for launched and thrown
weapons must be adjusted as well: tiny 1, small/medium 0,
large/huge +1, enormous/gigantic +2, or colossal +3.
Remember to make these adjustments whenever your character purchases a new weapon.

Additional Considerations

Weapon Grade: Standard and custom weapons come in


three different quality grades: lowgrade, common, and highgrade.
Lowgrade weapons cost half as much as common varieties but
suffer a 1 penalty to their damage checks and Resilience values
(Resilience has a minimum value of 0). Highgrade weapons cost
three times as much as common varieties but gain a +1 bonus to
their damage checks and Resilience values. Specialized weapons
are only available as common grade.
Weapon Repair: Attacks that are aimed at your characters
weapon can potentially damage or break it. Successful attacks
against the weapon compare their damage against its Resilience
value. Success weakens the weapon and imposes a penalty of 1
to both its Precision checks and damage checks until it is repaired.
With a critical success, or another success if already weakened,
the weapon is broken and can no longer be wielded.
Weakened weapons can be repaired for a cost equal to about
25% of their original price. Broken weapons may or may not be
able to be repaired at all, per the GMs discretion. Each weapons
unique composition determines what kind of tools and materials
are required for its repairs.
Weapon Incompatibility: Attempting to make an attack
with a weapon (or shield) that was designed for a creature of a
different size incurs a 1 penalty on its Precision check. This
rule is limited to weapons that are within one size tier bigger or
smaller than your character. Smaller melee weapons that normally require two hands can be used with one hand instead. Larger
one-handed melee weapons must be used with two hands, while
larger two-handed melee weapons cant be used at all. Larger melee weapons with the Reach special quality are too unwieldy to
use as well, and smaller versions are not likely capable of extended reach (GMs call).

Makeshift Weapons

Makeshift weapons are ordinary items or tools that can be


used as weapons in a pinch. They are not as powerful or as efficient as true weapons and have a negative construction point value (see Custom Weapons). Some of the most common examples
of makeshift weapons are listed in red on the standard weapon
tables later in this section.

EQUIPMENT

CUSTOM WEAPONS

Rather than selecting from the standard and specialized


weapon tables you may instead opt to design custom weapons
for your character. All weapons are designed using construction
points, which are assigned according to which special qualities a
weapon possesses. A total construction value of 0 is considered
balanced and serves as the benchmark for all standard weapons,
while those with negative values are considered to be makeshift
or inferior weapons. Custom weapons may not have construction
point totals that are greater than 0.
Designing a custom weapon requires that the following four
steps be completed in precise order:
1. Select the Weapons Type: Begin by selecting one of the
four weapon types from the table below, which determines its base damage die, Resilience, weight, and range.
2. Select its Special Qualities: Next, select the weapons special qualities until its total construction point value equals
0 (or until it equals a negative value, if desired). Modify
its base values accordingly, but be mindful of the minimum values described below.
3. Apply Creature Size Adjustments: Once all modifiers from
special qualities have been calculated then you may apply
your characters creature size adjustments to the weapon.
4. Determine the Weapons Cost: Lastly, determine the weapons cost. The tables for calculating the weapons cost are
located at the end of this section.

Custom Weapon Base Values


Weapon
Resil. Weight Range
Damage
Type
(~)
(~)
(~)
One-Handed
d8
5
4
Melee
Two-Handed
6
6
d10+1
Melee
Launched
4
3
7
d6
Ranged
Thrown
3
1
4
d6
Ranged

Minimum Values

Many special qualities apply modifiers to the weapons base


values. There are specific minimum values that exists for each
quantity, as noted:
Damage Die: A weapons minimum damage die is d4. However, if its damage die is already d4 and a special quality
is selected that would decrease its damage die further then
the weapon is rendered incapable of inflicting critical hits
instead. After this point the weapon may not select any
additional special qualities that would decrease its damage die further.
Resilience: A weapons minimum Resilience is 0, even after
making adjustments for creature size. At this point, special qualities that include Resilience penalties can still be
selected, but further reductions to Resilience are ignored.

Weight: A weapons minimum weight is 0.3 lb, prior to


making adjustments for creature size. Weight penalties
are listed in whole numbers, either as 1 or 2 lb, but if a
weapons weight is reduced to 0 lb or less after all special
qualities have been applied then its final weight is automatically set at 0.3 lb. Weight multiples for tiny and small
creature sizes can still reduce a weapons weight below
this point, however.
Range Increment: A weapons minimum range increment is
1 square, even after making adjustments for creature size.

Special Qualities

Each special quality lists its construction point value in


brackets after its title. A custom weapon may possess any number
of special qualities as long as its total construction point value is
0 or negative. Some special qualities may be selected multiple
times, up to a specific limit, as noted in their descriptions.
Attached [+2]: This weapon is attached to your characters
arm and cannot be disarmed. It still allows your characters hand to be used, including the option of wielding another weapon (shields cannot be wielded), but all actions
requiring the use of that arm suffer a 1 penalty during
combat. Attacks with the weapon itself ignore this penalty
unless another item or weapon is being held with the same
hand. Note that only one buckler or one Attached weapon
may be secured on a single arm. This quality may only be
applied to Light weapons.
Battering [+1]: This weapon inflicts +2 damage against
objects (including weapons and shields) and solid-form
elementals. It also gains a +1 bonus to its Resilience. This
quality may not be applied to Brittle weapons.
Brittle [2]: This weapon is particularly fragile and is more
prone to breaking. Whenever its Precision roll is a 1 its
own damage die is rolled and compared against its Resilience to see if it sustains damage. A damage modifier is
also applied according the weapons size: tiny 2, small
1, medium 0, large +2, huge +4, enormous +7, gigantic +10, and colossal +14. No other modifiers are applied,
such as from Brute Force or the +1 damage bonus for
wielding a melee weapon with two hands. This quality
may not be applied to Battering weapons.
Clumsy [3]: This weapon can prove unwieldy at times and
is twice as likely to suffer a critical failure when making attacks. Whenever a 1 or 2 is rolled for its Precision
check the same die is immediately rolled again to check
for a critical failure (normally weapons only risk a critical
failure on a roll of 1). A critical failure then occurs if the
secondary roll is a 1 or 2, as is normally the case.
Decreased Damage [3]: This weapons damage die is decreased by one tier (from d8 to d6, from d6 to d4, etc.).
This quality may be selected up to two times.
Decreased Range [1]: This weapons range increment suffers a penalty of 2. This quality may only be applied to
ranged weapons.
Defensive [+3]: This weapon allows your character to fight
more defensively at certain times. During any round in
which he makes an attack with the weapon he gains a +1

65

CHAPTER 3
bonus to his Defense stat until his next turn, regardless
of whether or not the attack succeeds. Bonuses may not
be stacked from separate attacks, not even if made with
multiple Defensive weapons. Additionally, whenever
your character takes a defending combat action while the
weapon is held at the ready he receives a +2 bonus to his
Defense stat (instead of the standard bonus of +1; Concentration and Fortitude bonuses remain unchanged). This
quality may not be applied to Slow weapons.
Disarm [+1]: This weapon tends to be more successful at
making disarming attempts by adding +1 to your opponents SV to resist the maneuver.
Fast [+2]: This weapon is capable of making fast attacks.
One-handed melee and thrown ranged weapons reduce
any multiple action penalties that would normally apply
to their Precision checks by 1 point but only for their own
attacks. All other actions in the round suffer the full multiple action penalty that has been accrued by your character.
Alternatively, two-handed melee weapons do not receive
this benefit but may instead make one additional attack in
the same round, accruing multiple action penalties normally. This quality may not be applied to Slow weapons
or launched ranged weapons.
Impaling [+1]: This weapon can be particularly effective
against targets that are attempting to either bullrush or
charge. Whenever your character takes a defending combat action he may perform a free melee attack with the
weapon at any target who attempts to either bullrush or
charge into or through his threatened range (including
the weapons reach, if applicable), even if the bullrush or
charge is directed at another creature. Only one attack per
round may be attempted, regardless of success or failure,
but it temporarily interrupts the targets action and must
be resolved first. Afterwards the target continues with his
bullrush or charge, assuming that he survives the attack
and is still capable of doing so. Slow weapons that select
this quality must be readied to use (having already been
reset or repositioned if necessary) before they can perform
the free attack, and if it is attempted they must be reset or
repositioned prior to being able to attack again. This quality is available for all weapon types, but launched and
thrown weapons must also be Melee Capable.
Improvised Ammo [+1]: This weapon may launch improvised objects of a similar size, shape, and composition to
that of its standard ammunition (GMs call), but such attacks suffer a 1 penalty to their Ranged Precision checks.
For instance, a sling can launch pebbles, coins, gems, and
other similar objects instead of its standard bullets. This
quality may only be applied to launched ranged weapons.
Increased Damage [+3]: This weapons damage die is increased by one tier (from d6 to d8, from d8 to d10, etc.),
but its weight is also increased by +1 lb. Launched and
thrown weapons also gain a +1 bonus to their range increments. If the weapons damage die is already d12, such
as from having selected the Mechanical quality, then a +1
bonus is applied to its damage check instead. This quality
may only be applied to Clumsy or Slow weapons.

66

Increased Range [+1]: This weapons range increment


gains a +2 bonus. This quality may only be applied to
ranged weapons.
Light [+1]: This weapons weight is reduced by 2 lb, but its
Resilience also suffers a 2 penalty. This quality may not
be applied to Weighted weapons.
Mechanical [+3]: This weapon relies on mechanical components to inflict its damage instead of your characters
Strength. As such, your characters Brute Force stat is not
applied to damage checks, but a modifier for the weapons
corresponding creature size is still applied: tiny 2, small
1, medium 0, large +2, huge +4, enormous +7, gigantic
+10, or colossal +14. The weapons damage die is also
increased by one tier (from d6 to d8, from d8 to d10, etc.),
but its weight is increased by +2 lb. Launched and thrown
weapons also gain a +1 bonus to their range increments.
If the weapons damage die is already d12, such as from
having selected the Increased Damage quality, then a +1
bonus is applied to its damage check instead.
Melee Capable [+1]: This ranged weapon is also capable
of making melee attacks. Its weight is increased by +1
lb, but its Resilience gains a +1 bonus. Thrown weapons
can make either one-handed or two-handed melee attacks,
whereas launched weapons must always use two hands
unless the One-Handed Firing quality is also selected.
Note that all two-handed melee attacks receive a +1 bonus
to their damage checks. This quality may only be applied
to ranged weapons.
Mounted [+2]: This weapon is especially effective when
performing charging attacks while riding a mount with
combat training. The weapons mounted charging attacks
gain a +1 bonus to their Melee Precision checks and inflict
an additional +1 damage bonus (in addition to the standard +2 damage bonus from charging). Mounted charging
attacks with the weapon are also able to be performed
one-handed, regardless of the weapons type, such as
when making a one-handed charging attack using a lance.
However, non-mounted charging attacks with two-handed
weapons still require the use of both hands. This quality is
available for all weapon types, but launched and thrown
weapons must also be Melee Capable.
One-Handed Firing [+1]: This launched weapon may be
fired with only one hand, but loading ammunition still
requires the use of two hands (or one hand and a prehensile tail). However, the process of loading ammunition is
quite simple and can even be performed by an occupied
hand without penalty. In other words, the offhand can still
be used to wield a shield or another weapon. This quality
may only be applied to launched ranged weapons.
ReachDouble [+1]: This weapon is capable of making
melee attacks at up to double your characters standard
threat range. However, attacks that are aimed at opponents within the standard threat range suffer a 1 penalty
on both their Precision checks and damage checks, while
attacks that are aimed at double threat range are not penalized. Kreevogs, lavossi, some yuelloks, and creatures
that have the Extended Reach creature trait may attack

EQUIPMENT
with this weapon at double their standard reach plus the
additional distance granted by Extended Reach, and they
are only penalized when making attacks within the standard reach for their size. For instance, a lavossi using a
weapon with this quality may attack at up to 15 ft but only
suffers penalties when attacking within 5 ft. This quality is
available for all weapon types, but launched and thrown
weapons must also be Melee Capable. This quality may
not be applied to ReachTriple weapons.
ReachTriple [+5]: This weapon is capable of making melee attacks at up to triple your characters standard threat
range. However, attacks that are aimed at opponents within the standard threat range suffer a 1 penalty on both
their Precision checks and damage checks, while attacks
that are aimed at double or triple threat range are not penalized. Kreevogs, lavossi, some yuelloks, and creatures
that have the Extended Reach creature trait may attack
with this weapon at triple their standard reach plus the
additional distance granted by Extended Reach, and they
are only penalized when making attacks within the standard reach for their size. For instance, a kreevog using a
weapon with this quality may attack at up to 20 ft but only
suffers penalties when attacking within 5 ft. This quality is
available for all weapon types, but launched and thrown
weapons must also be Melee Capable. This quality may
not be applied to ReachDouble weapons.
Silver Point [0]: This weapon has a sharp silver point,
blade, or edge, which allows it to inflict additional damage against targets that are afflicted with the Lycanthropy
disadvantage. It gains a +2 bonus to damage when used
against lycanthropes that are in their standard species
forms or a +4 bonus if they are currently transformed into
werewolves. However, the weapons Resilience suffers a
1 penalty. This quality is available for all weapon types,
but launched ranged weapons must also be Melee Capable. Silver Point ammunition for launched weapons must
be purchased separately. This quality may not be applied
to Wooden Point Weapons.
Simple [0]: This weapon is simple in its design and requires
less work to craft. Its base cost is equal to half that of
standard weapons of the same type. Selecting this quality
imparts no other benefits or penalties. Custom weapons
must receive the GMs approval before this quality may be
applied, and it may not be applied to makeshift weapons
since they ignore the standard rules for calculating cost.
Slow [4]: This weapon requires a trivial Agility check of
SV 1 to reload, reset, or reposition between attacks. It
can still be reset and used to attack in the same round, if
desired, but doing so incurs the standard multiple action
penalty. This quality may not be applied to Defensive or
Fast weapons or to custom thrown ranged weapons (some
thrown specialized weapons do possess this quality, however). Additionally, Slow ranged weapons that are also
Melee Capable ignore this quality for their melee attacks.
Small [2]: This weapon is smaller than others of its type.
Its weight is reduced by 1 lb, but its Resilience suffers a
1 penalty. The weapons damage die is also decreased

by one tier (from d8 to d6, from d6 to d4, etc.). On the


plus side, attempting to conceal Small weapons on your
characters body is easier and grants a +2 bonus to Stealth
checks when doing so. This quality may not be applied to
two-handed melee weapons.
Trip [+1]: This weapon tends to be more successful at making tripping attempts by adding +1 to your opponents SV
to resist the maneuver.
Vicious [+2]: This weapon is particularly brutal and inflicts
an additional +2 points of bonus damage whenever a critical hit is achieved. All severity checks are also increased
by +1 for injuries caused by this weapon, regardless of
achieving a critical hit. However, the weapons weight is
increased by +2 lb.
Weighted [1]: This weapon is heavier than others of its
type. Its weight is increased by +2 lb, but its Resilience
gains a +1 bonus. This quality may be selected up to three
times, but it may not be applied to Light weapons.
Wooden Point [1]: This weapon has a sharp wooden point,
blade, or edge, which makes it particularly deadly against
targets that are afflicted with the Vampirism disadvantage.
It can be used to attempt a standard called shot at a 4 penalty that is aimed at a vampires heart (torso). If the attack
succeeds and inflicts at least one point of health loss then
the vampire is instantly destroyed and reduced to dust,
regardless of any remaining health points. The weapons
weight is reduced by 2 lb, but its Resilience suffers a 2
penalty. Its damage die is also decreased by one tier (from
d8 to d6, from d6 to d4, etc.). This quality is available
for all weapon types, but launched ranged weapons must
also be Melee Capable. Wooden Point ammunition for
launched ranged weapons must be purchased separately.
This quality may not be applied to Silver Point weapons.
Additionally, all Wooden Point weapons must also possess the Brittle special quality.

Calculating Cost

The weapons type determines its base cost. This base is then
multiplied by the combined cost percentages of all the weapons
special qualities, as indicated. Note that many special qualities do
not have associated cost percentages (Fast, Trip, etc.).
In order to determine the combined cost percentage simply
begin at 100% and then add or subtract each special qualitys cost
percentage. If a quality was selected more than once then its cost
percentage must be added or subtracted multiple times, respectively. Finally, multiply the weapons base cost by its combined
cost percentage to determine its common price.
For example, a scimitar is a one-handed melee weapon,
which has a base cost of 5g. Its Decreased Damage quality applies a cost percentage of 10%, its Light quality applies a cost
percentage of 15%, and its Mounted quality does not apply any
cost percentage. The weapons combined cost percentage is calculated as 100% 10% 15% = 75%. Therefore, the scimitars
common price is calculated as 5 x 0.75 = 3.75, or 3g, 75s.
Minimum Combined Cost Percentage: A weapons combined cost percentage cannot be reduced lower than 10%. Lower
combined cost percentages are automatically set at 10%.

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CHAPTER 3
Creature Size & Weapon Grade Adjustments: Once a
weapons common price has been calculated remember to apply
additional adjustments for your characters creature size and the
weapons grade, as necessary.
For example, a common scimitar has a price of 3g, 75s. If
your character instead wanted to purchase a large size (x2) highgrade (x3) scimitar he would calculate its price as 3.75 x 2 x 3 =
22.5, or 22g, 50s.
Makeshift Weapons: Makeshift weapons ignore these rules
and either cost substantially less or have no cost at all. The GM
should assign an appropriate cost according to the weapons design, primary function, materials, and degree of craftsmanship.

Weapon Base Costs


Weapon Type
One-Handed Melee
Two-Handed Melee
Launched Ranged
Thrown Ranged

Cost
5g
8g
3g
2g

Cost Percentages
Special Quality
Attached
Battering
Brittle
Clumsy
Decreased Damage
Decreased Range
Defensive
Disarm
Fast
Impaling
Improvised Ammo
Increased Damage
Increased Range
Light
Mechanical
Melee Capable
Mounted
One-Handed Firing
ReachDouble
ReachTriple
Silver Point
Simple
Slow
Small
Trip
Vicious
Weighted
Wooden Point

68

Percentage
+15%
+5%
25%
15%
10%
+35%

+25%
15%
+50%
+10%

+30%
+60%
+75%
50%
30%
+5%
+10%
50%

SPECIALIZED WEAPONS

The following weapons are highly specialized and do not


necessarily adhere to the standard rules. They are not balanced
using construction points, but some still possess certain special
qualities. Each specialized weapon also allows for its own unique
rules, as detailed in its description. Note that specialized weapons
are only available as common grade.
Blowgun: This weapon launches a poisoned needle at its
designated target, but its attacks always require a non-damaging
called shot in order to strike one of the targets more vulnerable
locations. If the called shot succeeds then a special d6 damage
check is made, but no modifiers are applied, such as from Brute
Force, critical hits, lucky breaks, etc. If the result equals or exceeds the targets Base Resilience stat then he is successfully
poisoned. Note that actual health loss is never inflicted and that
non-poisoned needles have no effect other than to cause annoyance. Poison must be acquired or purchased separately.
Boot Knife: A spring-loaded blade is built into the sole of
a boot. The blade can be extended by applying specific pressure
to the boots heel, and once extended it remains that way until it
is reset by pressing the blade against a hard surface at a particular angle. Note that the blade does not have to be reset between
attacks in order to inflict damage. A boot knife is very easily concealed via the Stealth discipline and grants a +4 bonus to your
characters check. A boot knife cannot be disarmed.
Caltrops: A set of caltrops is usually deployed from a basic
wooden box that contains about 20 caltrops. Doing so requires
two hands and a trivial Agility check of SV 1. Success allows the
caltrops to be scattered onto the ground into a small area-effect
template, using any template shape desired, but the point of emanation must be within your characters reach. Alternatively, a
set of caltrops can be deployed outside of combat to affect any 8
squares instead of using an area-effect template, but the deployment time is also increased accordingly (GMs call).
Any creature that moves into or through an affected area
treats each square as rough terrain and must succeed on a free
Agility check of SV 5 each round or it suffers damage equal to
d4 + a modifier based upon the caltrops corresponding creature
size: tiny 2, small 1, medium 0, large +2, huge +4, enormous
+7, gigantic +10, or colossal +14. If health loss occurs then the
creature also suffers a damaged faculty penalty of 1 to its Running discipline (penalties from multiple injuries are cumulative).
However, only one Agility check is required per round, even if a
creature moves into or through multiple separated areas.
Caltrops are easily avoided and are completely ignored by
creatures of more than two size tiers smaller or bigger than the
caltrops corresponding creature size. Caltrops are only useful
against land-based creatures and the Jumping discipline can be
used to avoid affected areas. Generally, a free Alertness check
of SV 5 is granted to spot an area that is covered in caltrops,
unless the caltrops were witnessed being deployed, in which case
no check is needed. Lastly, gathering up the deployed caltrops
usually takes about one minute.
Harpoon: This spear-like weapon has a special cord attached
to its end that allows it to be pulled back after being thrown. Such
attacks are considered Slow and require the use of two hands to
reset the weapon in between attempts (melee attacks with the har-

EQUIPMENT
poon are not considered Slow). The weapons maximum range is
also limited by the length of its cord, which is equal to 5 squares
+ the length of the occupied space of the corresponding creature
size for which it was designed.
Additionally, the hooked-barbs along the harpoons blade
embed themselves into the targets flesh whenever health loss
is inflicted, thereby tethering the target to either your character
(only requiring one hand) or to a mooring if the harpoons cord
was previously anchored. The target may attempt to remove the
harpoon on his turn by making either an Agility or Might check
of SV 5. Failure leaves the harpoon embedded. Success allows
it to be removed, but its barbs inflict an additional d6 points of
damage (no modifiers are applied) against the targets Base Resilience stat. Achieving a critical success allows the harpoon to be
removed without inflicting damage. An embedded harpoon may
be removed automatically outside of combat, but damage is still
inflicted unless a Healing check of SV 5 can be achieved (SV 8 if
self-treated). Refer to Movement and Position: Being Tethered in
Chapter 4 for more information.
Holy Water Flask: This unique glass flask is filled with
water that has been blessed to inflict divine damage when used
against undead creatures. Each flask contains three portions that
can each be splashed at a single target, using a base range increment of 1 square. Splashing an individual portion also ignores the
standard 2 Ranged Precision penalty for making ranged attacks
while threatened by hostile creatures. Splashed damage is equal
to d8 plus a modifier according to the flasks size.
Alternatively, the entire holy water flask is designed to be
thrown so that it bursts and affects all undead creatures in a small
sphere area-effect template, using a base range increment of 2
squares. Since it is an area-effect attack your characters Ranged
Precision check suffers a 2 penalty. Furthermore, thrown attacks
are also susceptible to the standard 2 Ranged Precision penalty if
attempted while your character is threatened by hostile creatures.
Thrown area-effect damage is also equal to d8 plus a modifier
according to the flasks size and how many portions of holy water
the flask still contains, with more remaining portions resulting in
a greater damage modifier.
Holy water only harms undead, including vampires and
shades. Additionally, keep in mind that since undead possess the
Weakness: Divine +4 trait that they are even more susceptible to
the divine damage that holy water inflicts. Non-undead targets
suffer no damage at all from either form of attack since the flask
is too delicate to cause significant damage on its own in most
situations. Even non-undead targets who possess the Weakness:
Divine trait are impervious to holy waters damage since the holy
water itself does not inflict damage, and therefore, the additional
divine damage cannot be inflicted.
Each holy water flask is specifically enchanted and bound
with the divine water that it contains. Once all of its portions have
been splashed a flask magically crumbles into dust and cannot
be reused. Holy water that has been bound into its flask cannot
be transferred into other containers, nor can the contents of one
flask be poured into another flask in order to refill it. Note that
holy water flasks are purposely designed to serve as weapons and
that holy water encountered in other forms, such as in a temples
basins, does not necessarily adhere to the same rules.

Holy Water Damage Modifiers


Flask Size
Tiny
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Enormous
Gigantic
Colossal

Splashed
Modifier
2
1
0
+2
+4
+7
+10
+14

Thrown Modifier
3P
2P
1P
2
4
6
1
3
5
0
2
4
+2
0
2
+4
+2
0
+7
+5
+3
+10
+8
+6
+14
+12
+10

Lasso: This non-damaging weapon is essentially just a


length of special rope that forms a loop at one end, which is primarily designed to be thrown around a targets head and tightened; alternatively, a lasso can be used to make disarming attempts. Throwing the loop requires the use of two hands and your
character must attempt a non-damaging specialized called shot.
If successful, an affected target is considered tethered (or risks
being disarmed), either to your character, which only requires
one hand, or to a mooring if the lasso was previously anchored.
A lassos maximum range is also limited by its length, which is
equal to 5 squares + the length of the occupied space of the corresponding creature size for which it was designed. Lastly, a lassos
tethering ability is completely ignored by creatures of more than
two size tiers smaller or bigger than the weapons corresponding
creature size. Refer to Movement and Position: Being Tethered in
Chapter 4 for more information.
Mage Staff: A mage staff is a two-handed melee weapon that
is similar to a quarterstaff but which is usually unshod and often
adorned with crystals or other mystical ornaments. While anyone
can use a mage staff to make standard attacks only the character
to which it has been attuned gains the full benefit of its power. A
mage staff can only be attuned to someone who possesses either
the Inborn Tap species trait or the Magical Tap advantage.
An attuned mage staff allows your character to cast and hold
one of his taps without actually having to use his stamina. Instead,
the tap is anchored to the mage staff itself and a stamina point
does not have to be moved into the tap row. However, rolling a 1
on any spellcasting check when using the mage staff to tap a spell
or magical ability incurs the loss of one of your characters stamina points. Your character is still limited to only being able to hold
a single tap unless he has multiple ranks of the Inborn Tap species
trait and/or the Magical Tap advantage, and even if he is able to
hold multiple taps only one may be anchored to the mage staff.
If a mage staff is unequipped, disarmed, set aside, or dropped
then its tapped spell immediately ends. Tapped spells are also susceptible to the Suppress Magic spell effect. A mage staff may be
held in one hand without losing its tap, even when tapping a new
spell, such as when it is being used as a walking stick, but its
melee attacks may only be performed two-handed.
New unattuned mage staves have a cost of 10g, and those
staves that have been attuned to another caster only tend to fetch
around 2g, 50s if sold. This is because the act of attunement is
what gives a mage staff its power, which can only be accessed

69

CHAPTER 3
by its rightful owner (until it has been re-attuned). The ritual of
attunement takes 6 hours and consumes 100g worth of magical
reagents. This process also removes any existing attunement. In
addition to its ability to hold one tap, a mage staff that has been
properly attuned also acquires the Channeling magical quality for
free but only for its rightful owner. Lastly, a mage staff may be
enchanted like any other weapon and its enchantments are always
treated independently from its attunements, meaning that other
wielders can still make use of the staffs enchantments and that its
inherent monetary value is increased accordingly.
Man Catcher: This two-handed melee weapon has a special
spring-loaded end that allows it to entrap the targets neck, thereby tethering the target to your character, but doing so first requires
a non-damaging specialized called shot. Mounted targets are particularly vulnerable to this attack and are automatically pulled
from their mounts if it succeeds, but keep in mind that the overall
Precision penalty is 4 (2 from attacking the mounted rider and
2 from performing a called shot). A target that is dismounted is
granted a free Agility check of SV 5 to land standing up, but if he
fails he instead falls prone; either way, he still remains tethered.
A man catcher creates a solid tether so that a specific distance must be maintained between your character and the target at
all times, which is equal to 1 square + the length of the occupied
space of the corresponding creature size for which the weapon
was designed (2 squares for medium, 3 squares for large, etc.).
Lastly, a man catchers tethering ability is completely ignored by
creatures of more than one size tier smaller or bigger than the
weapons corresponding creature size, but it can still be used to
make standard damaging attacks. Refer to Movement and Position: Being Tethered in Chapter 4 for more information.
Net: Using two hands, a net can be thrown to make a ranged
grappling attempt. A single Ranged Precision check is made
against the Defense stats of all opponents whose occupied spaces
are fully covered by the nets size, and no called shot is required
since the net is a ranged attack. On his turn an opponent may
break out of the grapple by succeeding on a free Agility or Might
check of SV 5; note that Combat Maneuvers is not applied by
either combatant. Winged targets that are affected while flying or
gliding must succeed on a free Flying check of SV 5 each round
or they begin to fall as if tripped (20 feet per point of failure).
A standard net covers an area equal to the occupied space of
the corresponding creature size for which it was designed (1x1
square for small/medium, 2x2 squares for large, etc.), whereas an
oversized net covers an area that is four times as big (2x2 squares
for small/medium, 4x4 for large, etc.).
Poison Pouch: This insidious weapon takes the form of a
small pouch that is thrown at a specific location (using a Defense
of 1), which then erupts into a poisonous cloud of visible dust and
vapors. Flying creatures must often be targeted directly, thereby
using the primary targets Defense stat instead. Missed attacks
cause the poison pouch to erupt at an unintended location, which
should be determined randomly by the GM. Each poison pouch
contains precisely one dose of poison that erupts into a small
sphere area-effect template, which then lingers for about one minute before dispersing harmlessly. The GM may alter the shape
of this area if strong winds are present. Poison pouches have no
effect underwater and quickly disperse without causing harm.

70

At the moment a poison pouch erupts all sapient creatures


within its affected area may attempt to hold their breath, but there
is still a chance of exposure, and each must make a free Constitution check of SV 5 to determine whether or not the poison
is contracted. Sapient creatures that move into the affected area
afterwards can choose to hold their breath without having to make
this check or risking contraction. Bestial and mindless creatures
automatically contract the poison since they do not tend to realize
this danger and may not choose to hold their breath. Note that
additional poison pouches of the same poison type do not impose
additional risks of exposure if overlapping, but they can be used
to expand the poisons affected area.
Sap: Although a sap can make standard melee attacks, this is
not its primary purpose. Instead, when used against a living target
that is surprised, a sap can attempt a standard called shot aimed
at the head that compares its damage against the targets Base
Resilience (instead of Total Resilience). If the target suffers any
health loss from this attack then he is automatically knocked unconscious. Note that the +2 Melee Precision bonus from surprised
cancels out the 2 called shot penalty. An unconscious target is
helpless, but he can make a Constitution check of SV 5 immediately after combat and then once every hour to see if he rouses
on his own. A successful use of the Healing discipline (SV 5) can
also rouse an unconscious target but only after battle has ended.
Spell Foci: Spell foci are special items with the ability to
cast one specific spell effect, even if your character is not a spellcaster, and includes scepters, spell crystals, spell scrolls, and
wands. Attempting to use a spell foci works in much the same
way as standard spellcasting, including applying the spells CM
to the check. Stamina loss occurs on a roll of 1 or automatically if
the spell has the stamina loss spell descriptor [S]. All of a spells
other requirements must still be adhered to as well, such as the
consumption of magical reagents. Freeform spells [F] must designate one specific sub-effect and its general options, which cannot
be changed or readjusted. Duration-based effects can instead be
held with a tap if your character possesses the Inborn Tap species trait and/or the Magical Tap advantage. Lastly, spell foci still
require one free hand and verbal commands to use, but mental
spells [M] can instead be activated purely through mental thought
(a spell scroll is read silently, a wand is triggered mentally, etc.).
Your character uses his own spellcasting discipline that corresponds with the focis type according to its spell effect: Geomancy, Mysticism, Sorcery, or Spell Precision. All spell foci
possess the Resizing magical quality for free, with no limitation
regarding maximum size, which occurs when the item is grasped
(remember to adjust the items weight). Scepters and wands also
possess the Channeling magical quality for free.
Scepter: A scepter is a one-handed melee weapon that is typically crafted from metal and adorned with crystals or other mystical ornaments. A d8 is always rolled for its spellcasting check,
but the casters own spellcasting discipline modifier is applied to
the result. A scepter may potentially cast its designated spell an
unlimited number of times. However, if a critical failure ever occurs then the scepter is instantly destroyed, shattering and crumbling into dust (fortune points cannot change this outcome). The
scepters destruction is only risked when casting its designated
spell, not when channeling other spells or making melee attacks.

EQUIPMENT
Spell Crystal: A spell crystal, while not a weapon in the literal sense, is a small precious gem that has been imbued with the
ability to cast a spell one time. A d8 is rolled for its spellcasting
check, but the casters own spellcasting discipline modifier is applied to the result. A spell crystal is consumed and crumbles into
dust once it has been used, regardless of success or failure.
Spell Scroll: A spell scroll, while also not a weapon in the
literal sense, is a piece of parchment that has been inscribed with
magical runes that allow it to cast a spell one time. Its spellcasting
check is entirely based on the casters own spellcasting attribute
roll and discipline modifier. A spell scroll is consumed and crumbles into dust once it has been used, regardless of success or failure. Note that spell scrolls only require one free hand to use since
the scroll unfurls itself by magic, plus it can be read quickly even
in the heat of battle without risking distraction.
Wand: A wand is a one-handed melee weapon that is typically crafted from wood and is relatively simple in its design. Its
spellcasting check is entirely based on the casters own spellcasting attribute roll and discipline modifier. A wand may potentially

cast its designated spell an unlimited number of times. However, if a critical failure ever occurs then the wand is instantly destroyed, shattering and crumbling into dust (fortune points cannot
change this outcome). The wands destruction is only risked when
casting its designated spell, not when channeling other spells or
making melee attacks.
Torch: A torch can be used as a one-handed melee weapon.
Unlit, it inflicts d4 damage, but once lit it inflicts an additional
+2 points of heat damage and produces light for 2 hours (OS x
20 ft). Achieving a critical hit causes the target to catch fire for
one round, regardless of whether or not health loss is inflicted. If
the targets turn occurs prior to your characters next turn he may
attempt to put out the flames by making an Agility check of SV 5.
If he is unsuccessful, or if your characters turn occurs first, then
he automatically suffers another d8 points of heat damage plus
a modifier according to the torchs corresponding size: tiny 2,
small 1, medium 0, large +2, huge +4, enormous +7, gigantic
+10, or colossal +14. The result is compared against the targets
Total Resilience stat. Afterwards the flames automatically die out.

One-Handed Melee Weapons


Weapon
Bastardsword
Bastardsword, Silver
Battleaxe
Battleaxe, Silver
Brass Knuckles
Chain
Club/Stick
Club, Spiked
Flail
Footstool
Longsword
Longsword, Silver
Mace
Parrying Dagger
Pick, Mining
Pick, War
Rapier
Scimitar
Scourge
Shortsword
Shortsword, Silver
Sickle, Farming
Sickle, War
Spiked-Gauntlet
Whip
Wooden Stake
Wrist Claws

Cost
(~)
5g, 50s
9g, 25s
4g, 75s
8g, 50s
50s
80s
1g, 50s
5g, 50s
40s
5g
8g, 75s
5g, 75s
4g
1g
5g
4g, 25s
3g, 75s
50s
3g, 50s
7g, 25s
1g
3g, 75s
4g, 50s

Damage
d10
d10
d8
d8
d4
d6
d6
d8
d8
d6
d8
d8
d8
d4
d6
d8
d6
d6
d4
d6
d6
d6
d6
d6

Resil.
(~)
5
4
6
5
2
6
5
5
6
5
5
4
7
2
7
6
3
3
2
4
3
3
3
3

Weight
(~)
5
5
6
6
1
6
4
6
6
4
4
4
6
1
8
8
2
2
3
3
3
2
2
2

2g

d4

2s
3g, 25s

d4
d6

0
3

0.3
2

Special Qualities
Clumsy, Increased Damage
Clumsy, Increased Damage, Silver Point
Battering, Clumsy, Vicious
Battering, Clumsy, Silver Point, Vicious
Attached, Decreased Damage, Fast, Light, Simple, Small
Clumsy, Decreased Damage, Disarm, Weighted
Brittle, Decreased Damage
Brittle, Simple, Vicious
Disarm, Weighted
Brittle, Clumsy, Decreased Damage, Defensive
Silver Point
Battering, Weighted
Decreased Damage, Defensive, Disarm, Light, Small
Battering, Clumsy, Decreased Damage, Vicious, Weighted
Clumsy, Mounted, Vicious, Weighted
Brittle, Decreased Damage, Defensive, Disarm, Light
Decreased Damage, Light, Mounted
Decreased Damage, Fast, Light, Simple, Small, Vicious
Fast, Small
Fast, Silver Point, Small
Decreased Damage, Light
Decreased Damage, Fast, Light
Attached, Decreased Damage, Light
Clumsy, Decreased Damage, Disarm, Light, ReachTriple,
Simple, Small, Trip
Brittle, Fast, Light, Small, Wooden Point
Attached, Brittle, Decreased Damage, Fast, Light

71

CHAPTER 3

Two-Handed Melee Weapons


Weapon
Board/Plank
Chair
Greataxe
Greataxe, Silver
Greatclub
Greatflail
Greatsword
Greatsword, Silver
Lance
Lance, Wooden

Cost
(~)
15s
70s
7g, 60s
13g, 60s
2g, 40s
8g, 80s
8g
14g
10g, 80s

Damage
d6+1
d8+1
d10+1
d10+1
d10+1
d10+1
d10+1
d10+1
d10+1

Resil.
(~)
6
6
7
6
6
7
6
5
7

Weight
(~)
6
6
8
8
8
8
6
6
10

75s

d8+1

5g, 20s

d8+1

30s

d6+1

Maul
Morningstar
Polearm

12g
9g, 20s
12g, 80s

d12+1
d10+1
d12+1

10
8
8

15
8
11

Polearm, Silver

18g, 80s

d12+1

11

Longspear
Longspear, Wooden

Quarterstaff

2g

d6+1

Scythe, War

2g
10g, 80s

d10+1
d12+1

7
8

10
13

Spiked-Chain

9g, 60s

d8+1

10

Scythe, Farming

Special Qualities
Brittle, Decreased Damage x2, Defensive, Trip
Brittle, Clumsy, Decreased Damage, Defensive
Battering, Clumsy, Vicious
Battering, Clumsy, Silver Point, Vicious
Brittle, Simple, Vicious
Disarm, Weighted
Silver Point
Brittle, Clumsy, Impaling, Mounted, ReachTriple, Slow, Vicious,
Weighted
Brittle, Clumsy, Impaling, Mounted, ReachTriple, Slow,
Weighted, Wooden Point
Brittle, Clumsy, Decreased Damage, Impaling, ReachTriple,
Simple, Vicious
Brittle, Clumsy, Decreased Damage, Impaling, ReachTriple,
Wooden Point
Battering, Clumsy, Increased Damage, Vicious, Weighted x3
Battering, Weighted
Clumsy, Impaling, Increased Damage, ReachDouble, Weighted x2
Clumsy, Impaling, Increased Damage, ReachDouble,
Silver Point, Weighted x2
Brittle, Decreased Damage x2, Defensive, Disarm, Fast, Light,
Simple, Trip
Clumsy, Vicious, Weighted
Clumsy, Increased Damage, Vicious, Weighted x2
Clumsy, Decreased Damage, Disarm, Fast, ReachDouble, Trip,
Vicious, Weighted

Launched Ranged Weapons


Weapon
Crossbow
Crossbow, Hand

2g, 40s

Damage
d8
d6

Resil.
(~)
4
1

Weight Range
(~)
(~)
5
8
2

Crossbow, Heavy

5g, 10s

d10

11

Longbow

2g, 10s

d8

10

Longbow, Bladed
Shortbow
Shortbow, Bladed

3g, 90s
1g, 80s
3g, 60s

d8
d6
d6

6
2
6

7
1
6

8
9
7

Sling
Staff-Sling

72

Cost
(~)
4g, 50s

30s
90s

d4
d4

1
3

0.3
2

5
7

Special Qualities
Mechanical, One-Handed Firing, Slow
Brittle, Decreased Range, Light, Mechanical,
One-Handed Firing, Small
Clumsy, Increased Damage, Increased Range,
Mechanical, One-Handed Firing, Slow, Weighted
Brittle, Clumsy, Increased Damage, Increased Range,
Light
Clumsy, Increased Damage, Melee Capable, Weighted
Brittle, Increased Range, Light
Melee Capable, Weighted
Decreased Range, Improvised Ammo, Light,
One-Handed Firing, Simple, Small
Brittle, Clumsy, Decreased Damage, Defensive, Disarm,
Improvised Ammo, Light, Melee Capable, Simple, Trip

EQUIPMENT

Thrown Ranged Weapons


Weapon
Bolas
Bottle, Empty
Dagger

Cost
(~)
40s

d4

Resil.
(~)
2

5s

d4

0.3

1g, 60s

d4

Damage

Weight Range
(~)
(~)
0.3
4

Dagger, Silver

3g, 10s

d4

Dart/Shuriken
Handaxe
Javelin
Knife

40s
2g, 20s
1g
1g

d4
d6
d6
d4

2
4
3
3

0.3
2
1
1

4
2
4
2

Special Qualities
Disarm, Simple, Small, Trip
Brittle, Clumsy, Decreased Damage, Decreased Range,
Light, Melee Capable
Decreased Range, Fast, Melee Capable, Small
Decreased Range, Fast, Melee Capable, Silver Point,
Small
Fast, Simple, Small
Decreased Range, Melee Capable
Simple
Decreased Range, Melee Capable, Small
Brittle, Clumsy, Decreased Range, Impaling, Melee

Spear

1g, 30s

d6

Capable, Mounted, ReachDouble, Simple, Vicious,


Weighted
Brittle, Clumsy, Decreased Range, Impaling, Melee

Spear, Wooden

20s

d4

Capable, Mounted, ReachDouble, Weighted,


Wooden Point

Stone, Heavy
Stone, Light

d6
d4

5
2

2
0.3

2
4

Trident

3g, 40s

d8

Warhammer

2g, 50s

d6

Battering, Clumsy, Decreased Range, Melee Capable


Small
Clumsy, Decreased Range, Impaling, Increased
Damage, Melee Capable, ReachDouble, Weighted x2
Battering, Decreased Range, Melee Capable, Weighted

Specialized Weapons
Weapon
Blowgun
Boot Knife
Caltrops, Set
Harpoon
Holy Water Flask
Lasso
Mage Staff
Man Catcher
Net, Oversized
Net, Standard
Poison Pouch
Sap
Spell Foci
Scepter
Spell Crystal
Spell Scroll
Wand
Torch

Cost

Damage

~1g
~1g, 50s
~1g

d6
d4
d4

~2g
~2g
~50s
~10g
~12g
~1g
~25s
poison
~50s
50g
5g
5g
50g
~3s

d8
varies
d6+1
d6+1

d4
d6

d4
varies

Resil.
(~)
2
3
3
4 shaft
3 cord

Weight Range
(~)
(~)
1
4
1
3
7

1.5

3
3
6
1
1
0
2

2
3
6
12
3
1
1

4
1
0
2
2

3
0.3
0.1
1
1

3
1 splash
2 throw
2

Weapon Type & Special Qualities


Launched Ranged
One-Handed Melee
No Type : Small
Thrown Ranged: Clumsy, Impaling, Melee Capable,
ReachDouble, Slow, Vicious
Thrown Ranged: Small
Thrown Ranged (requires two hands): Disarm, Slow
Two-Handed Melee: Brittle, Defensive, Disarm, Trip
Two-Handed Melee: ReachDouble

2
2
2

Thrown Ranged (requires two hands)


Thrown Ranged (requires two hands)
Thrown Ranged: Small
One-Handed Melee: Small
One-Handed Melee
No Type : Small
No Type : Small
One-Handed Melee: Brittle, Small
One-Handed Melee: Brittle

73

CHAPTER 3

74

EQUIPMENT

75

CHAPTER 3

76

EQUIPMENT

77

CHAPTER 3

PROVISIONS & SERVICES


Your character will likely need more than just armor and
weapons if she hopes to survive the wild places of the world and
the unforgiving depths of the Vexith . Basic provisions, such as
food and clothing, can prove equally important. More specialized
equipment like lockpicks and potions, or even the paid services of
a dependable hireling, can often make the difference between an
adventure that ends in triumph or one that ends in tragedy.
Custom Items: Your character may purchase custom items
beyond the ones that are listed in this section, but you must first
obtain the GMs approval before doing so. The GM will determine the items cost and weight, prior to adjustments for your
characters creature size, as well as any other rules that may concern its use or function (volumes for custom containers, limitations regarding creature size compatibility, etc.).
Illegal Items (*): Items that are marked with an asterisk are
usually considered illegal in most civilized regions. Owning or
possessing such items is often viewed as a minor crime, while
crafting or selling them is a more serious offense. New characters
may still purchase illegal items with their starting funds, but they
should probably consider keeping them concealed when adventuring in civilized lands.
Creature Size Multiples (~): Costs and weights that are
marked with the tilde symbol must be adjusted by applying your
characters corresponding multiple. Costs are rounded to the
nearest silver piece, when necessary. Weights are recorded as decimal values. Costs and weights that are listed without this symbol
are standard for all creature sizes.

Creature Size Multiples


Creature
Size
Tiny
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Enormous
Gigantic
Colossal

Cost
Multiple
x 0.5
x 0.6
x1
x2
x5
x 15
x 50
x 150

AMMUNITION

Weight
Multiple
x 0.1
x 0.3
x1
x3
x 10
x 30
x 100
x 300

Launched ranged weapons require ammunition to function.


Once fired, each shot of standard ammunition has a 50% chance
of being able to be recovered and used again. Retrieving fired
shots may also require a significant amount of time according to
the particular location, especially in natural settings.
Silver Point Ammunition: Silver Point ammunition grants
a +2 bonus to damage against lycanthropes that are in their standard species forms or a +4 bonus if they are transformed into
werewolves. Shots only have a 25% chance of being recovered.

78

Wooden Point Ammunition: Wooden Point ammunition


may be used to attempt a standard called shot at a 4 penalty that
is aimed at a vampires heart (torso). If the attack succeeds and
manages to inflict at least one point of health loss then the vampire is instantly destroyed and reduced to dust, regardless of any
remaining health points. Wooden Point ammunition reduces the
weapons damage die by one tier (from d8 to d6, from d6 to d4,
etc.); if it is already d4 then it is rendered incapable of inflicting
critical hits instead. Wooden Point shots cannot be recovered.
Improvised Ammo: Pebbles are listed for slings as a form
of improvised ammunition and are free to acquire. However, such
attacks suffer a 1 penalty to their Ranged Precision checks.

Ammunition
Ammunition
Arrow (bows)
Arrow, Silver Point (bows)
Arrow, Wooden Point (bows)
Bolt (crossbows)
Bolt, Silver Point (crossbows)
Bolt, Wooden Point (crossbows)
Bullet (slings)
Needle (blowguns)
Pebble (slings; Improvised Ammo)
Container (up to 20 capacity)
Bandolier, Bolt or Needle
Pouch, Bullet or Pebble
Quiver, Arrow
Quiver, Bolt

Cost
(~)
5s
7s
4s
5s
7s
4s
3s
4s

Weight
(~)
0.1
0.1
0.05
0.1
0.1
0.05
0.05
0.01
0.03

25s
3s
20s
15s

0.3
0.01
1
0.5

EQUIPMENT

CONSUMABLES

Being able to find enough to eat, either by hunting for ones


food or by carrying rations, is vital to the success of any adventure. Even the mightiest of warriors can be felled by hunger.
Creature Size & Portions: Consumables are proportioned
according to your characters creature size. Consuming those that
are proportioned for creatures of a smaller size has a limited or
negligible effect unless numerous portions are combined.
Alcoholic Drinks: Consuming alcoholic drinks can cause
your character to become drunk. Refer to General Rules: Alcohol
in Chapter 4 for specific rules and consequences.
Preserved Rations: Heavily salted, smoked, or pickled,
these rations can remain fresh for up to one month, or for up to
three months if properly stored in a cellar or other cool location.

Consumables
Alcoholic Drink
Beer
Tankard (1 drink)
Bottle (2 drinks; container)
Keg (200 drinks; container)
Barrel (667 drinks; container)
Liquor
Shot (1 drink)
Bottle (10 drinks; container)
Keg (1,000 drinks; container)
Barrel (3,333 drinks; container)
Wine
Glass (1 drink)
Bottle (4 drinks; container)
Keg (400 drinks; container)
Barrel (1,333 drinks; container)
Food
Meal
Poor
Common
Gourmet
Rations
Standard (2 meals; fresh for 1
week; compact bundle)
Standard, Bulk (32 meals; fresh
for 1 week; standard crate)
Preserved (2 meals; fresh for 1
month; compact bundle)
Preserved, Bulk (32 meals; fresh
for 1 month; standard crate)
Salt (for 32 meals; jar)
Spices, Simple (for 32 meals; jar)
Spices, Exotic (for 32 meals; jar)

Cost
(~)

Weight
(~)

3s
11s
6g, 40s
18g, 25s

1.5
155
517

5s
55s
46g
135g, 50s

1.5
155
517

7s
33s
26g, 20s
77g

1.5
155
517

2s
5s
25s
25s

3g, 75s

26

1g

14g, 50s

26

1g, 62s
1g, 62s
3g, 22s

0.5
0.5
0.5

GENERAL ITEMS

There are numerous general items that your character may


require, such as clothing, containers, light sources, and tools. The
items that are listed on the following page are the ones that are
most commonly used by adventurers.
Creature Size & Compatibility: General items that are designed for creatures of a particular size may not be compatible
with creatures of a different size, per the GMs discretion. For
instance, rope that is designed for a medium size creature will
also work fine for small or tiny creatures, but a large creatures
weight might cause the rope to snap. Each item is different and its
compatibility should be judged on a case-by-case basis.
Note that healing supplies and magical reagents are exempt
from this rule. Their costs and weights are the same for all characters and are never adjusted for creature size.
Clothing: Purchasing an outfit includes all components that
are suitable for its type. This includes extremity pieces such as
footwear, gloves, hats, a cloak, and any species-related components and their necessary modifications. Characters who choose
to wear armor are not required to purchase a set of clothing since
the armor already includes all necessary components and undergarments. However, some characters may prefer to have multiple
outfits available for use in different situations, even if strictly for
roleplaying purposes.
Containers: Liquid containers like flasks are measured in
gallons, while storage containers like backpacks are measured in
cubic feet. The volume of a particular container is multiplied by
the weight multiple that corresponds to the creature size for which
it was designed. For instance, a medium backpacks volume is
equal to 3 cu ft, but a large backpacks volume is equal to 9 cu ft.
Healing Supplies: The use of healing supplies grants a +1
bonus to any one specific Healing check, including checks for
self-treatment, but doing so consumes one application of the supplies even if the attempt fails. Note that only one application of
supplies may be used when assisting others and that the +1 bonus
is applied to the primary result rather than to individual checks.
For simplicity, the cost and weight of healing supplies are the
same for all characters and are never adjusted for creature size.
Light Sources: Candles, lanterns, and torches produce light
in a sphere that has a radius equal to the length of the occupied
space of the lights corresponding size multiplied by a specific
value: 10 ft for candles or 20 ft for lanterns/torches. For instance,
a medium torch illuminates 20 feet in all directions (1 x 20 ft),
while a large torch illuminates 40 feet in all directions (2 x 20 ft).
Magical Reagents: These are the various spellcasting supplies and components that are needed to produce some of the
more unique and powerful spell effects and mystical rituals.
Magical reagents are fully consumed once the spell or ritual is
successfully completed but are not consumed if it fails. They are
sold in batches worth 25g each, so a spell or ritual that requires
100g worth of magical reagents would consume 4 batches each
time it is completed. For simplicity, the cost and weight of magical reagents are the same for all characters and never need to be
adjusted for creature size.
Tools: There are numerous tools that adventurers may find
useful. The cost of each tool is generally 1g, but a tools weight
varies according to its size and material composition (GMs call).

79

CHAPTER 3

General Items
Item
Alchemy Equipment (necessary for
Alchemy profession; includes tools,
cauldron, scales, etc.)
Bedroll
Blanket
Book, Blank (100 pages)
Book, Blank Tome (300 pages)
Climbing Gear (+1 Climbing checks
for natural surfaces; special rules;
rope not included)
Clothing
Poor
Common
Wealthy
Formal
Winter
Container, Liquid
Barrel (~50 gal)
Bottle/Flask/Wineskin (~0.15 gal)
Jar/Vial (~0.05 gal)
Keg (~15 gal)
Container, Storage
Backpack (~3 cu ft)
Belt Pouch (~0.3 cu ft)
Bundle/Sack, Compact (~0.5 cu ft)
Bundle/Sack, Standard (~5 cu ft)
Bundle/Sack, Oversized (~10 cu ft)
Chest, Compact (~1 cu ft; no lock)
Chest, Standard (~6 cu ft; no lock)
Chest, Oversized (~12 cu ft; no lock)
Crate, Standard (~8 cu ft)
Crate, Oversized (~16 cu ft)
Pouch (~0.1 cu ft)
Flint and Steel
Grappling Hook (rope not included)
Hand Mirror
Healing Supplies (1 application; +1
Healing checks; special rules)
Holy Symbol, Simple
Holy Symbol, Exquisite
Light Source
Candle (OS x 10 ft; burns 6 hours)
Lantern (OS x 20 ft; requires oil;
burns 4 hours per portion of oil)
Torch (OS x 20 ft; burns 2 hours)

80

Cost
(~)

Weight
(~)

1g, 50s

40s
20s
50s
1g

3
2
0.75
2

5g

10s
30s
1g, 50s
5g
1g

2
2
2
2
3

2g, 25s
5s
2s
1g

100
0.3
0.1
30

50s
10s
1s
2s
4s
1g
3g, 50s
7g, 50s
25s
55s
1s
3s
1g
45s
20s
(not ~)
50s
3g

1
0.3
0.01
0.1
0.2
5
20
50
10
25
0.01
1
2
0.5
0.4
(not ~)
0.3
0.5

2s

0.3

2g

3s

Cost
(~)
Lock/Manacles (includes 1 key; key weighs ~0.1 lb)
Simple (SV 3)
1g
Common (SV 5)
3g
Expert (SV 8)
7g
Master (SV 12)
15g
Lockpicks, Set *
Lowgrade (1 Tinkering checks for
5g
picking locks)
Common (no modifier)
10g
Highgrade (+1 Tinkering checks for
30g
picking locks)
25g
Magical Reagents
(not ~)
Musical Instrument, Personal (requires
2g
two hands to play)
Oil (3 portions; flask)
20s
Parchment, Blank Scroll
5s
Parchment, Blank Sheet
1s
Rope (50 feet)
50s
Scroll Case (20 scroll/sheet capacity)
15s
Scroll Case, Waterproof (20 scroll/
1g
sheet capacity)
Spyglass, Basic (x5 visual range)
10g
Spyglass, Expert (x10 visual range)
50g
Tent
Compact (~2 occupancy)
1g, 50s
Standard (~4 occupancy)
4g
Oversized (~8 occupancy)
10g
Thieving Tools, General Set *
Lowgrade (1 Tinkering checks for
7g, 50s
disarming traps)
Common (no modifier)
15g
Highgrade (+1 Tinkering checks for
45g
disarming traps)
Thieving Tools, Runebreaking Set *
Lowgrade (1 Tinkering checks for
20g
disarming traps)
Common (no modifier)
40g
Highgrade (+1 Tinkering checks for
120g
disarming traps)
Tool: Crowbar (5 lb), Hammer (2 lb),
1g
Shovel (4 lb), Wrench (1 lb), etc.
Whetstone
2s
Writing Ink (jar)
10s
Writing Quill
1s
Item

Weight
(~)
1L / 3M
1L / 3M
1L / 3M
1L / 3M
1.5
1.5
1.5
0.1
(not ~)
2
1.5
0.1
0.01
5
0.3
0.5
1
1.5
10
20
40
1.5
1.5
1.5

2.5
2.5
2.5
varies
0.3
0.5
0.01

EQUIPMENT

81

CHAPTER 3

LAND & REAL ESTATE

Your character may eventually wish to rent or purchase a


home or business. The costs that are listed below are rough estimates and should only serve as starting points. Actual costs can
vary greatly depending on land value, strategic position, natural
resources, historical importance, and other factors. The cost for
real estate represents new property, which includes all material
and labor costs but does not include the cost of the land itself.
Ownership Rights: Be aware that in many countries and
territories that the right to own land or real estate is a privilege
that is strictly reserved for those of noble birth. In such regions
commoners may only rent property or serve as stewards.
Ownership & Taxes: Owning property often requires that
taxes be paid to whichever ruling body holds claim over the region. Taxes are typically equal to about 3% of the propertys total
cost per year (land + structures). Property that is located in remote
locations may not even be taxed at all, per the GMs discretion.
Renting: The average cost to rent land or real estate is equal
to about 1% of the propertys total cost per month. Castles and
other large structures are not generally available for rent.
Creature Size Adjustments: Land and real estate costs are
generally exempt from having to be adjusted for creature size.
Many structures are able to accommodate most playable species
without significant cost adjustments. However, structures that are
built strictly for creatures of a particular size may require that
their costs be adjusted accordingly (GMs call).

Land & Real Estate


Land (per 1 acre)
Barren/Rocky
Wooded
Cleared/Fertile
Urban
Real Estate (approximate area)
Commercial Structure
Business/Shop, Modest (300 sq ft)
Business/Shop, Expansive (1,000 sq ft)
Warehouse, Modest (3,000 sq ft)
Warehouse, Expansive (10,000 sq ft)
Residence: Apartment
Poor (150 sq ft)
Common (400 sq ft)
Wealthy (1,000 sq ft)
Residence: Home
Poor (400 sq ft)
Common (1,000 sq ft)
Wealthy (2,500 sq ft)
Mansion (10,000 sq ft)
Unique Structure
Castle, Modest (100,000 sq ft)
Castle, Expansive (250,000 sq ft)
Tower (3 floors and roof; 2,000 sq ft)

82

Cost
50g
100g
250g
500g

1,125g
4,500g
7,500g
30,000g
300g
1,000g
3,000g
1,200g
3,750g
11,250g
52,500g
500,000g
1,500,000g
10,000g

LIVESTOCK & MOUNTS

Bestial creatures can fulfill a variety of roles that are useful


to adventurers, such as pets, mounts, guardians, and work animals. Refer to General Rules: Pets & Mounts in Chapter 4 for
how to issue commands and other specific rules.
Training: Bestial creatures can be trained to function reliably in specific roles and situations. Each type of training imparts
unique benefits but is costly and requires d4 weeks to complete:
Combat Training: The creature remains calm and no longer has to make fear checks due to combat. It can also
be commanded to attack the handlers enemies (aggressive creatures are easier to command in this respect).
Bestial creatures without combat training must make a
fear check whenever they enter combat.
Mount Training: The creature is able to serve as a reliable
mount. Bestial creatures without such training can still
be ridden but will often struggle and attempt to buck
their riders at random times, as determined by the GM,
which forces a rider to succeed on an Agility check of
SV 5 to avoid being thrown and potentially suffering
falling damage. Untrained creatures also suffer a 1
penalty to all actions that are initiated by their riders.
Task Training: Type: The creature has been trained to reliably perform a specific set of tasks, such as Couriering,
Entertainment, Manual Labor, or Tracking (requires
the Heightened Sense: Scent trait). Other types of tasks
may also be allowed, per the GMs discretion.
Bonding: A new creature requires sufficient time to fully
bond with its handler before it can be commanded, usually equal
to d4 days if docile or d4 weeks if aggressive. Any creature that
has bonded to its handler can be commanded to perform basic
tasks (stay, come, sit, etc.), regardless of its training. Creatures
that are trained as mounts or for manual labor can usually be ridden or driven by anyone without having to form a bond.
Mounts & Rider Sizes: Generally, mounts must be at least
one size tier larger than their riders (a medium size rider requires
a large size mount). Certain species may have limitations as to the
kinds of mounts they can ride, and some species, like centaurs,
may be unable to ride mounts due to their unique body types.
Tack: Be aware that a creatures tack needs to be adjusted
according to its own cost and weight multiples, not those of its
handler. Tack includes all of the necessary gear for riding and
performing manual labor (saddle, harness, collar, leash, etc.). A
mount without proper tack suffers a 1 penalty to its Defense stat
while carrying a rider due to the awkward distribution of weight,
but riders that are at least two size tiers smaller than the mount do
not impose this penalty. Riding a mount without tack also incurs a
2 penalty to the riders Agility checks when attempt to resist falling off (regardless of size). Leashes typically extend up to twice
the length of the creatures occupied space, or double this length
for an additional 25% of the tacks weight and cost.
Cost: A creatures CPV and temperament (docile or aggressive) determines the base cost for an adult specimen. Each type of
training adds an additional multiple of the creatures base cost to
the total. For instance, a horse normally costs 5g without training
but costs 30g with combat training (+15g) and mount training
(+10g). Tack also adds an additional cost, if desired.

EQUIPMENT

POISONS *

Livestock Base Costs


CPV Range
125
2650
5175
76100
101125
126150
151175
176200

Docile
Base Cost
25s
50s
1g, 25s
2g, 50s
5g
10g
20g
40g

Aggressive
Base Cost
1g
2g
5g
10g
20g
40g
80g
160g

Livestock, Training, & Tack


Livestock (size, temperament)
Badger (small, aggressive)
Bear (large, aggressive)
Boar (small, aggressive)
Camel (large, docile)
Cheetah (medium, aggressive)
Dog (small, docile or aggressive)
Donkey (medium, docile)
Eagle/Falcon/Hawk (small, docile)
Elephant, Juvenile (huge, docile)
Fox (small, docile)
Ghartekot (huge, aggressive)
Goat (medium, docile)
Horse (large, docile)
Hyena (small, aggressive)
Jaguar/Leopard/Panther (medium, aggressive)
Lion (large, aggressive)
Lizard (small, docile or aggressive)
Lynx (small, aggressive)
Mordon (huge, docile)
Mule (large, docile)
Ostrich (medium, aggressive)
Pony (medium, docile)
Rat (tiny, docile)
Shark (large, aggressive)
Snake (small, docile)
Tiger (large, aggressive)
Vansker (small, aggressive)
Warg (large, aggressive)
Wolf (medium, aggressive)
Training & Tack
Combat Training
Mount Training
Task Training: Type
Tack (weight: ~5 lb; use creature's multiples)

Cost
5g
80g
5g
5g
20g
varies
2g, 50s
2g, 50s
20g
1g, 25s
80g
2g, 50s
5g
10g
40g
80g
varies
20g
10g
5g
20g
2g, 50s
50s
40g
50s
80g
10g
40g
20g
Base x 3
Base x 2
Base x 1
~1g, 50s

Each specific type of poison possesses four fundamental aspects: Methods of Application, Potency, Frequency, and Effects.
You must select each of these properties in order to determine the
poisons overall cost. Refer to General Rules: Diseases & Poisons in Chapter 4 for more information.
Illegality: In most civilized regions it is illegal to own, create, sell, or use poison. Even so, poisons can still be purchased
if your character knows where to look, but finding a trustworthy
dealer may prove to be quite a challenge.
Doses, Containers, & Creature Size: For simplicity, one
dose of a poison is equally effective against creatures of all sizes. Each dose of poison weighs 0.04 pounds and never has to be
adjusted for creature size. However, the cost and weight of the
poison container itself must still be adjusted according to its size.
Poisons are generally carried as liquids in vials or flasks.
Vials and flasks can hold a maximum number of doses according
to the creature size for which they were designed, but generally a
character may carry and make use of any size of vial or flask that
suits his needs, within reason. For instance, a human can carry
and use a tiny vial if he only needs a single dose of poison, or he
can carry and use a large flask if hes willing to accept the added
weight. Due to their immense capacities, bulks, and weights, it
is rare for the larger poison containers to be used at all, even by
giants and dragons, except perhaps for long term storage.
The following table shows the capacity of doses for each
size and type of container, as well as its total weight when full:

Container
Size
Tiny
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Enormous
Gigantic
Colossal

Vial
Doses
1
3
10
30
100
300
1,000
3,000

Vial
Weight
0.05
0.15
0.5
1.5
5
15
50
150

Flask
Doses
3
9
30
90
300
900
3,000
9,000

Flask
Weight
0.15
0.45
1.5
4.5
15
45
150
450

Methods of Application: Poisons may be applied to their


victims in one of the following ways:
Damage: One dose may be applied to a weapon or to a
single shot of ammunition. If the weapon hits a target
and manages to inflict health loss then he is automatically poisoned. If it hits but fails to inflict health loss
then the dose is wasted. A dose is never wasted for a
missed melee attack but is always wasted for a missed
ranged attack.
Ingestion: Poison can be used to contaminate food and
beverages. Generally, one dose is enough to poison one
creature who consumes the whole dose within a reasonable amount of time. This is easy to determine when
applying a dose to a single serving of food or drink, but
attempting to poison whole batches of food or a towns
water supply often requires numerous doses of poison
in order to be effective, as determined by the GM.

83

CHAPTER 3
Inhalation (Poison Pouches): A poison pouch is a specialized weapon that can be thrown to deliver an area-effect
burst of poisonous dust and vapors. The pouch already
contains one dose of poison, and since the pouch itself
is treated as a weapon its weight varies according to
the creature size for which it was designed. Refer to
Specialized Weapons earlier in this chapter for details.
Touch: Poison can be applied to a specific portion of any
object so that it is automatically contracted whenever
it makes contact with a victims skin or other exposed
body part. This essentially means that the first creature
to touch the object is poisoned. Note that only a single
dose is required, but it must be applied to a portion of
the object that is most likely to be handled (a doors
handle, a weapons hilt, etc.). A poisoned object is rendered safe to handle after it has been touched. Clothing
and armor prevents contamination. This application of
poison may also be applied to a gloved hand in order to
deliver the poison directly via touch, but your character
must first succeed on a non-damaging called shot in order to make sufficient contact.
Trivial Action: The act of applying one dose of poison to a
weapon, object, food, or beverage is a trivial action (SV 1) and
only requires an Agility check if your characters total modifier
is negative. Failure results in your character fumbling around and
being unable to successfully apply the dose. Failing with a result
that is at least 3 points lower than the SV causes your character to
spill one dose, and a critical failure causes the vial or flask to be
dropped, thereby spilling and wasting all remaining doses. Only
one dose of poison may be applied per action, and multiple doses
from either the same container or from different ones cannot be
applied in the same round unless your character is affected by the
Hasten spell effect or a similar ability.
Poison Cost (per dose): To determine the poisons total cost
per dose simply add up the costs of its potency, frequency, and all
of its effects. Remember that a poisons cost is not adjusted for
creature size, but the poisons container must still be purchased
separately and its cost does vary according to its size/capacity.

Potency
+2
+1
0
1
2

Cost Frequency Cost


25s
rounds
6g
50s
minutes
2g
1g
hours
1g
4g
days
75s
8g
weeks
50s

Alchemist Conversion: Typically, poisons are not interchangeable concerning their methods of application. For instance,
a poison that is designed for ingestion has no effect if applied to
a weapon, just as a poison that is meant to be inhaled poses no
danger when merely touched. However, the Alchemist profession
can be used to convert poison batches between different application methods. The process requires access to a set of alchemy
equipment, one hour of time, and an Alchemist check of SV 5.
The alchemist may convert a batch of up to 10 doses of the
same poison together at one time. Success converts all doses into
the new application method. Failure results in the loss of one

84

dose, but the rest of the batch is able to be salvaged and the doses
retain their original application method. Suffering a critical failure or getting a result that is at least 3 points lower than the SV
spoils the entire batch, resulting in the loss of all doses.
Antidotes: Many poisons have antidotes that can be applied
to a victim in order to provide a cure. Their specific application
can also vary, but ingestion is the most common delivery method.
Whether or not a specific antidote is available, or even possible,
is entirely up the GM. Many antidotes must be researched at great
length, and most require rare ingredients. Certain antidotes may
be able to be purchased from shops, but their costs vary greatly
according to rarity of their ingredients and other factors, per the
GMs discretion. Alternatively, the Cure: Poison spell effect can
be used to cure any poison, but a critical success is required to do
so (a standard success only slows the poisons frequency).

Poison Effects

Beyond the standard risk of further progression many poisons impose additional afflictions. Most also have unique rules
that must be observed. The cost of each effect is listed in brackets.
Distraction [3g]: The victim is considered distracted until
the poison is cured.
Faculty Loss: Type [varies]: The victim suffers a cumulative 1 penalty to the chosen faculty each time the progression
condition occurs, which is treated as a damaged faculty even after
the poison is cured (the EF stat suffers a cumulative penalty that
is equal to 5 x the victims weight multiple instead). The effects
cost varies according to which faculty is chosen. This effect can
also be selected multiple times for different faculties, but disciplines and the Total Resilience stat may not be selected.
Health Loss [12g]: The victim loses one health point each
time the progression condition occurs. Lost health can be recovered normally but may be lost again by subsequent failed checks.
Ineptitude [16g]: The victim is forced to make all discipline
checks (including Initiative checks), profession checks, and damage checks twice and must use the lesser of the two results. The
only exception is for the free Constitution checks that are made
to determine the poisons progression, which are not affected, but
all other Constitution checks must still be made twice. This effect
lasts until the poison is cured.
Mute [3g]: The victim is rendered unable to speak and may
not produce deliberate vocal sounds of any kind. Essentially, the
victim acquires the Mute disadvantage until the poison is cured.
Paralysis [32g]: The victim is paralyzed and is unable to
move, perform physical actions, or speak (purely mental actions
are not hindered). He is unable to defend himself and his Defense
stat is reduced to the minimum value for his creature size. He also
falls prone if standing, sinks at a rate of 5 feet per round if swimming (victims with the Awkward Form: Aquatic trait remain stationary), or falls as if tripped if flying or gliding via wings (flying
or gliding via mystical means causes him to descend slowly at a
rate of 5 feet per round). This effect lasts until the poison is cured.
Sensory Deprivation: Type [varies]: The victim is robbed
of one or more of his senses until the poison is cured. The poisons effects and cost depend on which variation is selected:
Hearing [3g]: The victim is stricken deaf. He acquires
the Deaf (R2) disadvantage.

EQUIPMENT
Sight [8g]: The victim is stricken blind. He acquires the
Blind (R2) disadvantage.
Smell/Taste [2g]: The victim loses both his sense of smell
and his sense of taste.
Touch [4g]: The victim loses much of his ability to feel
texture and pressure (though not entirely). He suffers a
1 penalty on all actions that require physical interactions and all Melee/Ranged Precision checks. Mental
abilities, spellcasting discipline checks, and Spell Precision checks remain unhindered.
Sleep [16g]: The victim instantly falls into a deep sleep each
time that the progression condition occurs. A sleeping victim
may attempt an Awareness check of SV 5 each round in which
significant noises, smells, or movement/touching occurs (usually
each round during combat), and rouses automatically if he suffers
health loss. Standing victims fall prone but are able to collapse
somewhat gently. Winged victims that are flying or gliding are
not as fortunate and risk falling damage, which causes them to
rouse if they survive the fall. Swimming victims that cannot
breathe underwater also rouse immediately due to choking but
begin to drown; swimming targets that can breathe underwater
simply remain asleep and do not begin to drown.
Slow [6g]: The victims metabolism is greatly slowed. He
may only attempt one action per round and is forbidden from
making sprinting checks (ettins can attempt one action per mind).
This effect lasts until the poison is cured.
Stamina Loss [6g]: The victim loses one stamina point each
time the progression condition occurs. Lost stamina can be recovered normally but may be lost again by subsequent failed checks.

Poisons
Effect
Distraction
Faculty Loss: Type
Brute Force, Combat Maneuvers, EF, Flight
Speed, Notice, Run Speed, or Swim Speed
Base Resilience, Charisma, Concentration,
Defense, Fortitude, Intellect, Perception,
or Strength
Accuracy or Endurance
Health Loss
Ineptitude
Mute
Paralysis
Sensory Deprivation: Type
Hearing
Sight
Smell/Taste
Touch
Sleep
Slow
Stamina Loss

Cost
3g
2g
3g
6g
12g
16g
3g
32g
3g
8g
2g
4g
16g
6g
6g

POTIONS

Potions are liquid concoctions that instantly impart a single beneficial spell effect upon the consumer. A special d8 roll
is made to determine the potions effectivenessmodifiers are
never applied to the roll and it cannot max, fail, or critically fail.
Potions always apply the base spell effect successfully, regardless
of the result, and critically succeed if the result equals or exceeds
SV 5. For instance, consuming a Cure: Disease potion slows the
diseases frequency with a result of 4 or less and cures the disease
outright with a result of 5 or more. Refer to Spell Effects in Chapter 5 for details about a potions particular spell effect.
Trivial Action: The act of consuming one swig of a potion
is a trivial action (SV 1) and only requires an Agility check if
your characters total modifier is negative. Failure results in your
character fumbling around and being unable to successfully take
a swig. Failing with a result that is at least 3 points lower than the
SV causes your character to spill one swig, and a critical failure
causes the potion to be dropped, thereby spilling and wasting all
remaining swigs. Only one swig of a potion may be consumed per
action, and multiple swigs from either the same potion or from
different ones cannot be consumed in the same round unless your
character is affected by the Hasten spell effect or a similar ability.
Non-living Creatures: Non-living creatures may still benefit from consuming potions, despite not having biological anatomies. Potions are magical in nature and do not differentiate between living and non-living creatures.
Administering Potions to Others: Consuming a potion
is usually a personal action during combat. Therefore, a potion
may not be administered to another creature unless the creature
is unconscious, incapacitated, or is willing to forgo all actions
and movements for the round, which also means not having acted
or moved previously in the round. Administering a swig of a
potion to another creature requires your character to succeed on
a Healing check of SV 5, but the attempt renders both of you
distracted until your next turns despite success or failure. Due to
the potions Resizing quality (see below) the swig automatically
resizes down to the recipients creature size. For instance, a troll
could administer a swig to a brownie without issue.
Resizing & Weight: All potions possess the Resizing magical quality for free, with no limitation regarding maximum size.
This change automatically occurs whenever the vial or flask is
grasped (remember to adjust the potions weight).

Potion Sizes & Weights


Potion
Swig
Size
Weight
Tiny
0.04
Small
0.12
Medium
0.4
Large
1.2
Huge
4
Enormous
12
Gigantic
40
Colossal
120

Full Vial
Weight
0.05
0.15
0.5
1.5
5
15
50
150

Full Flask
Weight
0.15
0.45
1.5
4.5
15
45
150
450

85

CHAPTER 3
Container & Contents: Once all of a potions swigs have
been consumed (or spilled) its vial or flask magically crumbles
into dust and cannot be reused. A potions contents cannot be
swapped between other vials or flasks, not even between those
that contain the same kind of potion. Unless being consumed,
a potions contents quickly dissolve away if they are spilled or
emptied from their container.

Potion Effects

Each potion mimics a particular spell effect. Effects with the


stamina loss spell descriptor [S] never cause the consumer to lose
stamina, but they do have an additional cost (already included).
Otherwise, potions function in exactly the same way as the spell
effects upon which theyre based, including magical reagent costs
(already included) and any rule limitations. For instance, a Quick
Heal potion can only restore health points that were lost in the
current round or in the previous one, while a Restore: Health potion is able to restore health points regardless of when they were
lost (and without the loss of stamina).
Costs: The cost of each swig from a potion varies according
the relative power of its spell effect. A vial holds 1 swig and a
flask holds 3 swigs, so a flask costs three times as much as a vial.
The cost of the container itself is a trivial sum when compared to
the value of each swig and is therefore able to be ignored, especially since the container is destroyed and crumbles into dust once
the potion has been consumed.

Potion Durations

Potions with set durations remain active for 2 units of time


by default. In the case of a duration that is measured in rounds the
effect lasts for the remainder of the round in which the swig is
consumed and then for two additional rounds thereafter. Potions
with instant durations take effect immediately once consumed,
and the Luck effect, which has a special duration, lasts until the
end of the consumers next turn.
Extended or Variable Durations: Potions with extended or
variable durations may also be purchased, if desired. To do so,
simply multiply the potions base cost by the cost multiple on the
table below that corresponds to the chosen extended or variable
duration. Note that effects with instant or special durations cannot
have their durations extended or made variable.
For example, a standard vial of a Flight potion lasts for 2
rounds, plus the round in which it is consumed, and costs 45g.
An extended version of the potion that lasts for 10 rounds could
instead be purchased by multiplying the base cost of 45g x 2, for
a total cost of 90g; alternatively, a variable version that lasts for
d10 rounds could be purchased for a total cost of 67g, 50s.

Potion Durations
Effect Duration
Default: 2 units
Extended: 5 units
Extended: 10 units
Variable: d10 units

86

Cost
Multiple
base
base x 1.5
base x 2
base x 1.5

Potions
Spell Effect

Duration

Costs
Vial Flask
1 swig 3 swigs

Air Control: Easy Breathing


Commune: Type
Comprehension
Concentrate
Cure: Type
Disease
Mental Condition
Poison
Detect Afflictions
Detect Creatures: Type
Flight
Freedom
Hasten
Improve Faculty: Type
Brute Force, Combat
Maneuvers, EF, Flight
Speed, Notice, Run Speed,
or Swim Speed
Base Resilience,
Concentration, Defense,
or Fortitude
Charisma, Dexterity,
Endurance, Intellect,
Perception, or Strength
Accuracy
Invisibility
Luck
Mind Shield
Phase Shift
Quick Heal
Recovery: Type
Blind (R1)
Blind (R2)
Broken Bone, Lesser
(ribs, teeth, etc.)
Broken Bone, Greater
(shattered spine)
Crippled Arm/Leg/Wing
(R1)
Crippled Arm/Leg/Wing
(R2; broken)
Crippled Arm/Leg/Wing
(R2; destroyed/severed)
Damaged Faculties

2 minutes
2 minutes
2 minutes
2 rounds

20g
20g
15g
15g

60g
60g
45g
45g

instant
instant
instant
instant
instant
2 rounds
2 rounds
2 rounds

80g
255g
80g
20g
20g
45g
30g
55g

240g
765g
240g
60g
60g
135g
90g
165g

2 rounds

15g

45g

2 rounds

20g

60g

2 rounds

45g

135g

2 rounds
2 rounds
special
2 rounds
2 rounds
instant

55g
30g
75g
20g
30g
20g

165g
90g
225g
60g
90g
60g

instant
instant

140g 420g
375g 1,125g

instant

50g

instant

375g 1,125g

instant

80g

240g

instant

255g

765g

instant

500g 1,500g

instant

80g

150g

240g

EQUIPMENT
Deaf (R1)
Deaf (R2)
Mute
Smell/Taste
Touch
Resistance: Type
Cold or Heat
Any Other Type
Restore: Type
Sensory Augmentation: Type
Dark Sight
Echolocation
Magic Sight
Scent [Aquatic]
Scent [Standard]
See Invisibility
Tremorlocation
Sustenance
Telepathy
Water Control: Buoyancy
Weather Control: Comfort

SERVICES

instant
instant
instant
instant
instant

80g
255g
50g
50g
140g

240g
765g
150g
150g
420g

2 rounds
2 rounds
instant

20g
15g
40g

60g
45g
120g

2 rounds
2 rounds
2 rounds
2 rounds
2 rounds
2 rounds
2 rounds
instant
2 minutes
2 minutes
2 minutes

15g
45g
20g
15g
15g
15g
30g
25g
30g
20g
15g

45g
135g
60g
45g
45g
45g
90g
75g
90g
60g
45g

There are numerous services that adventurers may require


from time to time. Costs may vary greatly depending on local
economic conditions.
Hirelings: A hirelings specific fee depends upon the necessary degree of training and his rank in the primary discipline
that corresponds to the role for which he is hired, such as Melee
Precision for a body guard, Might for a laborer, Tracking for a
scout, and so on. Common roles are those that can be performed
without access to specific advantages, whereas specialized roles
are those that do require access to specific advantages (Spellcasting, vocational advantages, etc.). Beyond the base cost, other conditions of the hirelings employment may need to be negotiated,
especially if hired for extended periods of time, such as room and
board, food expenses, and travel arrangements. There is no limit
to the number of hirelings that a player may employ, but keep in
mind that even though a character may give his hirelings orders
they are still roleplayed and controlled by the GM, even during
combat situations.
Spellcasters may also be hired to cast spells and to provide
magical services. They are always treated as being specialized
and typically charge a minimum fee equal to one hours work,
even if only a single spell is needed. Spell effects that possess the
stamina loss spell descriptor [S] add an additional fee of +10g per
spell, regardless of success, and the spellcaster is likely to require
rest in between the casting of such spells. Those that possess the
reagent consumption spell descriptor [R] also add an additional
fee that is equal to the cost of the magical reagents they consume.
Inn Rooms: Most inns are built to medium size standards,
especially those that are located in settlements that boast a diverse
range of creature sizes. Such inns will often insist that tiny and

small size characters pay the medium size rates, unless the inn
is specifically suited to tiny or small size creatures. On the other
hand, large size creatures are sometimes charged additional fees,
especially in situations where available space may be limited.
Creatures of even bigger sizes are usually out of luck since most
inns are simply unable to offer suitable accommodations.
Transportation Rates: Of all the prices in this chapter none
are more variable than the cost of passenger rates. The overall distance of the journey is only a rough estimation at best. The danger
of the route, the amount of cargo being transported, the willingness of the driver or captain to travel to the destination, and a host
of other factors should also be considered. Many transportation
services will also accept duty as a partial form of payment, such
as assisting with maintenance, chores, or even defense of the vehicle or caravan if attacked. Some transportation services may
even require such duties in addition to the standard rates.

Services
Service
Hireling (per hour / per day)
Common, Rank 0
Common, Rank 1
Common, Rank 2
Common, Rank 3
Specialized, Rank 1
Specialized, Rank 2
Specialized, Rank 3
Inn Room (per day / per week)
Poor, Common Room (multiple beds)
Standard, Shared Room (4 beds)
Standard, Private Room (1 bed)
Wealthy, Shared Room (4 beds)
Wealthy, Private Room (1 bed)
Stabling (per day; docile / aggressive)
Small Animal or Mount
Medium Animal or Mount
Large Animal or Mount
Huge Animal or Mount
Transportation Rates (per mile)
Land Vehicle
Water Vehicle

Cost
6s / 60s
10s / 1g
30s / 3g
1g / 10g
2g / 20g
5g / 50g
10g / 100g
25s
2g
1g
10g
5g
7s / 11s
10s / 15s
25s / 38s
50s / 75s
5s
3s

TRAP KITS

Trap kits can be used to deploy relatively simple mechanical


traps to protect an area against thieves and enemies. Your character may purchase specific kits to quickly assemble traps by using
the Tinkering discipline. Average assembly times for a new trap
are listed in parenthesis after the traps title, whereas rearming an
existing trap requires only half as long. Receiving assistance from
others and/or attempting to assemble the trap hastily can lessen
the amount of time required, but doing so increases the SV. Refer
to Tinkering: Setting Traps in Chapter 1 for more information.

87

CHAPTER 3
Most trap kits affect a single target and automatically affect
the creature that triggers them, except for damage traps, which
must succeed on a Precision check before inflicting damage. The
targets creature size in relation to the traps size is an important
factor that the GM should take into consideration. As a general
rule, most trap kits are only triggered by targets that are within
one size tier below or above the traps corresponding size. For
instance, a medium size trap kit may only be triggered by small,
medium, or large size targets; tiny size targets and those that are
huge size or bigger are not usually affected. However, the GM
may of course rule otherwise in unique situations.
Each trap kit automatically includes all components for a
single use, but individual components can also be purchased
separately. Expendable components are marked with an [E], and
must always be replaced whenever a trap kit has been triggered.
Therefore, your character may find it beneficial to purchase and
bring along additional expendable components on his adventures.

Trap Kit Types

Alarm Trap (5 minutes): This trap emits an audible alarm


when triggered, which can be heard clearly at a distance of up
to 100 feet, or with an Awareness check of SV 5 at up to 250
feet. Components: 1 chimes, set; 2 pulleys; 1 stake, wooden; 1
tripwire, coil.
Damage Trap: Type: This trap is designed to inflict damage
on a single target. A roll of d8 is used for both Precision and damage, but the creature size for which the trap is designed applies
additional modifiers:

Trap Size Precision Damage


Tiny
+1
2
Small
0
1
Medium
0
0
Large
1
+2
Huge
1
+4
Enormous
2
+7
Gigantic
2
+10
Colossal
3
+14
Damage traps can be purchased in the following types, each
with its own application and components:
Acid (10 minutes): This trap launches a thin jet of acid
at the target (full acid damage). The traps Precision
check gains a +1 bonus due to splashing and spraying
but inflicts 1 damage for the very same reason. Components: acid (1 portion) [E]; 1 pressure tube, glass; 2
pulleys; 1 stake, metal; 1 tripwire, coil.
Crossbow (10 minutes): This trap launches a crossbow
bolt at the target. Poison may also be applied to the bolt,
if desired (for a separate cost). Components: 1 bolt [E];
1 crossbow; 2 pulleys; 1 stake, metal; 1 tripwire, coil.
Fire (10 minutes): This trap sends a jet of fire at the target
(full heat damage). If the trap achieves a critical success
on its Precision check the target also catches fire for one
round. He may attempt to put out the flames by making
an Agility check of SV 5. If he is unsuccessful he auto-

88

matically suffers another d8 damage plus a modifier according to the traps size (see above), compared against
his Total Resilience stat. Afterwards the flames die out
on their own. Components: oil (1 portion) [E]; 1 pressure tube, glass; 2 pulleys; 1 spark-wick [E] (must be
lit beforehand; burns for up to 10 minutes); 1 stake,
metal; 1 tripwire, coil.
Pit Trap (time varies): This trap requires a lot of effort on
your characters part since he must first dig the pit (unless hes
lucky enough to find a suitable hole). Digging a pit usually takes
about around 1 hour for each volume of dirt equal to your characters occupied space (one 5-foot cube for a medium creature),
which includes digging and then relocating the dirt to a separate
locationthe type of material being dug can either increase or
decrease this time considerably (sandy, rocky, solid stone, etc.). A
pit trap inflicts falling damage and can be augmented with spikes
that inflict an additional d8 points of damage (for a separate cost);
all damage is compared against Base Resilience. Components: 1
net, standard (an oversized net or even multiple nets can be connected for bigger pits; requires camouflaging with leaves or other
debris); 1 rope, half coil (for climbing out of the pit); 1 shovel; 4
stakes, wooden.
Snare Trap: Type: This trap restricts the targets ability to
move and/or take actions. Snare traps can be purchased in the
following types, each with its own application and components:
Foot-Hold (5 minutes): This trap locks onto the targets
leg, thereby rooting him to his current spot. The trap
also inflicts d4 damage, modified by the traps size
(refer to Damage Traps above). Poison may also be
applied to the foot-hold assembly, if desired (for a
separate cost). The target cannot move or sprint until
he frees himself but is granted a free Agility or Might
check at the beginning of each of his turns (adding his
Combat Maneuvers stat). The SV to break free is equal
to 5 + a modifier for the traps size (tiny 2, small 1,
medium 0, large +1, huge +2, enormous +4, gigantic
+6, and colossal +9). Components: 1 chain, half length;
1 foot-hold assembly; 1 stake, metal. All components
must be camouflaged with leaves or other debris.
Net (15 minutes): This area-effect trap drops an oversized
net onto the target(s), affecting an area equal in size to
the next larger occupied space for which it is designed
(2x2 squares for a medium trap), thereby initiating a
ranged grappling attempt against all targets whose occupied spaces are fully contained in the nets area. The
nets area is centered on the triggering targets occupied space. An affected target cannot move or act until
he frees himself but is granted a free Agility or Might
check at the beginning of each of his turns (adding his
Combat Maneuvers stat). The SV to break free is equal
to 5 + a modifier for the traps size (tiny 2, small 1,
medium 0, large +1, huge +2, enormous +4, gigantic
+6, and colossal +9). Components: 1 net, oversized (requires an elevated position above the target); 1 latch; 2
pulleys; 1 stake, wooden; 1 tripwire, coil.
Tripwire (1 minute): This trap trips the target. Components: 2 stakes, metal; 1 tripwire, coil.

EQUIPMENT

Trap Kits
Trap Kit
Alarm Trap
Damage Trap
Acid
Crossbow
Fire
Pit Trap (spikes not included)
Snare Trap
Foot-Hold
Net
Tripwire
Individual Component
Acid (1 portion) [E]
Bolt [E]
Chain, Half Length
Chimes, Set
Crossbow
Foot-Hold Assembly
Latch
Net, Oversized
Net, Standard
Oil (1 portion) [E]
Pressure Tube, Glass
Pulley
Rope, Half Coil
Shovel
Spark-Wick [E]
Spikes, Metal
Stake, Metal
Stake, Wooden
Tripwire, Coil

VEHICLES

Cost
(~)
1g, 67s

Weight
(~)
3.8

16g, 85s
6g, 40s
6g, 91s
1g, 58s

3.9
7.6
3.9
10.7

4g, 90s
2g, 52s
1g, 75s

9
13.9
2.5

10g
5s
40s
30s
4g, 50s
4g
15s
1g
25s
5s
5g
30s
25s
1g
1s
4g, 50s
50s
2s
75s

0.4
0.1
3
2
5
5
0.1
12
3
0.4
1
0.5
2.5
4
9
1
0.3
0.5

Vehicles reduce the amount of travel time and can allow


for easier transportation of large quantities of passengers and/or
goods. The listed costs are for newly constructed vehicles.
Land Vehicles & Livestock: Land vehicles require work
animals in order to provide a means of propulsion. The number of
animals listed indicates those of average strength and size. Fewer
larger or more numerous smaller animals can also be used instead
(GMs call). Also, keep in mind that the costs for purchasing and
maintaining livestock are entirely separate from the cost of the
vehicle itself, and that tack must also be purchased separately for
each and every work animal.
Crew Requirements: Both land and water vehicles require
a least one driver, but many of the larger vessels need a minimum
crew in order to be maneuvered reliably. Fewer crew members
may be permissible (a minimum of half), but the GM should im-

pose a penalty to the drivers discipline or profession checks for


controlling the vehicle in accordance to the number of missing
crew members: 2 if missing a quarter or 4 if missing half. Also,
keep in mind that the costs for hiring and retaining crew members
are entirely separate from the cost of the vehicle itself.
Creature Size: Land vehicles are often subject to adjustments for creature size concerning costs, cargo capacity, and
animal requirements. Be sure to multiply cargo capacity by the
creatures weight multiple.
Water vessels, however, tend to be built to a standard of medium size, which is the size that is most suited to safely traversing
natural conditions and docking in foreign ports. Crew listings for
water vessels are given for medium size creatures but fewer larger
crew members or additional smaller crew members should also
suffice (GMs call).
Cargo/Passenger Capacity: Passengers take up a portion of
a vehicles cargo capacity according to their creature size, as measured in cubic feet: tiny 2.5, small 7.5, medium 25, large 75, huge
250, enormous 750, gigantic 2,500, and colossal 7,500. Crew and
animal spaces are treated separately and do not count toward a
vehicles capacity. Additional cargo or passengers can also be accommodated at the GMs discretion but may impose undesirable
consequences (slower speed, uncomfortable conditions, etc.).

Vehicles

[A = Animals; C = Crew]
Land Vehicle
Cost
Carriage (~150 cu ft)
~75g
Carriage, Grand (~250 cu ft)
~120g
Cart (~100 cu ft)
~15g
Chariot (~25 cu ft)
~50g
Wagon (~180 cu ft)
~40g
Wagon, Extended (~300 cu ft)
~60g
Water Vehicle
Oar Propulsion
Canoe (50 cu ft)
30g
Raft (75 cu ft)
50g
River Barge (400 cu ft)
250g
Rowboat (60 cu ft)
40g
Sail Propulsion
Caravel (3,000 cu ft)
8,000g
Caravel, Extended (5,000 cu ft)
12,000g
Galleon (6,000 cu ft)
17,000g
Galleon, Grand (10,000 cu ft)
25,000g
Oar and Sail Propulsion
Galley (1,800 cu ft)
10,000g
Galley, Grand (3,000 cu ft)
15,000g
Knarr (300 cu ft)
1,000g
Knarr, Extended (500 cu ft)
1,500g
Longship (360 cu ft)
1,300g
Longship, Extended (600 cu ft)
2,000g

Crew
2A, 1C
4A, 1C
1A, 1C
2A, 1C
2A, 1C
4A, 1C

1C
1C
3C
2C
18C
30C
90C
150C
60C
100C
6C
10C
30C
50C

89

CHAPTER 3

MAGICAL ITEMS
Magical items are those that have been imbued with permanent magical enchantments, which provide unique benefits and
abilities to your character. The Enchanter profession allows for
the crafting of magical items, and the Appraisal discipline is used
when attempting to identify a magical items unknown properties.
Item Size & Cost: The cost of a magical quality is independent of its items size. However, the cost of the base item itself
must still be adjusted according to its wielders creature size.

Magical Item Tiers

Each of the magical qualities in this section is assigned an


enchantment value of 0, 1, or 2 points, which denotes its relative
level of power. Magical items may possess any number of magical qualities, but they are restricted by
their total enchantment values and are categorized
into one of the following three tiers:
Lesser Magical Items (0): Items of this tier
may only possess total enchantment values of 0 points, which severely restricts
their selection of potential magical qualities.
Lesser magical items are very common,
relatively cheap, and they can often
be purchased in most settlements
and trading outposts of at least
moderate size.
Greater Magical Items (1 or 2):
Items of this tier possess total
enchantment values of either 1 or
2 points. Greater magical items are much harder
to come by and are not generally available for sale in
shopsin fact, they are sometimes worth more than the
shops themselves! As such, most common merchants simply do not possess the necessary resources to acquire or to
trade in greater magical items.
Relics (3+; special): Items of this tier possess total enchantment values of at least 3 points but are not actually limited
by enchantment values at all. Relics are the most powerful
kinds of magical items and may even boast unique abilities and properties beyond the standard magical qualities
that are detailed in this section. They are extremely rare
and should always be carefully designed by the GM prior
to being introduced into a campaign. A relics history and
reputation are often steeped in lore, and its use tends to
attract the attention of powerful figures who would seek
to acquire its magic for themselves.

APPAREL & WEAPONS

Apparel constitutes all items that are continuously worn,


such as armor, clothing, jewelry, and even magical tattoos. Weapons constitute all items that must be held at the ready and that are
capable of making physical attacks, which includes shields and
all standard, customized, and specialized weapons.

90

Magical Apparel: These magical items function for as long


as they are properly worn but cease to function immediately if
removed (including active triggered effects). For instance, a magical ring functions normally if worn on a finger or other body
part but not at all if it is kept in your characters pocket. Most
characters are limited to only being able to benefit from 2 pieces
of greater magical apparel at once (refer to the sidebar).
Magical Tattoos (treated as apparel): An enchanter can
also inscribe magical tattoos onto your characters body, which
are treated as a special form of magical apparel. The monetary
cost to inscribe a magical tattoo is equal to 75% of the standard
price. The greater magical apparel limit still applies to tattoos
and they are always counted before worn items.
For instance, if your character already has two
greater magical tattoos and then equips a suit of
greater magical armor then the armors magical
qualities would be ignored.
Magical tattoos can only be removed via
a ritualized version of the Suppress Magic spell
effect (requiring 10 minutes and a critical success)
or by severing the body parts upon which they
are inscribed. Note that the following apparel
magical qualities are not permitted for tattoos:
Awareness, Repairing, and Resizing.
Magical Weapons: Magical weapons only
impart their benefits when held at the ready. They
immediately cease to function if sheathed, stowed,
or dropped (including active triggered effects).
Magical launched weapons impart all of their
magical qualities to their ammunition. For instance, an
arrow that is fired from a longbow that has been enchanted with
the Damage Bonus: Heat quality inflicts additional heat damage
on its target. The Repairing and Resizing magical qualities are
exceptions to this rule and cannot be imparted to ammunition.
Magical qualities that have been imparted to ammunition immediately cease to function once the projectile either hits or misses
its target and comes to rest.
Ammunition itself may not be enchanted with standard
weapon magical qualities. However, while extremely rare, relic
ammunition has been known to exist, such as arrows that have
been enchanted to slay a particular type of creature.

Passive vs. Triggered Effects

Each magical quality is designated as being either a passive


effect or a triggered effect, which determines when and how its
benefits are applied.
Passive Effects (P): These effects are either always active or
they automatically activate whenever a specific situation occurs.
Triggered Effects (T): These effects require your character
to succeed on a spellcasting discipline check of SV 5 in order to
activate, and a point of stamina is lost on a roll of 1. Each effects
CM is listed in parenthesis and must always be applied to your
characters spellcasting check (all CM modifiers for the effects

EQUIPMENT
general options are already included). Unless otherwise stated,
all triggered effects are considered to be self only, reach, and to
have a duration equal to 2 units of time, which is also listed in
parenthesis. If a duration is measured in rounds then the effect
lasts for the remainder of the round in which it is triggered and
then for two additional rounds thereafter. Triggered effects must
also adhere to all spell descriptors of the particular spell effect
that they happen to mimic.

Magical Qualities

The title of each magical quality is followed by a set of brackets that includes its enchantment value and its cost in gold. Next,
a set of parenthesis indicates whether the quality is passive (P) or
triggered (T), along with the qualitys duration units and CM if
it is triggered. Some magical qualities may be selected multiple
times, up to a specific limit, as noted in their descriptions.
Accuracy [1; 2,550g] (P): This quality grants a +1 bonus to
the weapons Precision checks. The bonus cannot be stacked with
an Accuracy bonus from the Improve Faculty spell effect, Siphon
Faculty spell effect, or the Improve Faculty bardic melody. This
quality may only be applied to weapons.
Awareness [0; 25g] (P): This quality instantly reveals all of
the items magical properties to any sapient creature that properly
grasps it, without the need for an Appraisal check. Note that simply touching the item does not cause it to reveal its secrets, such
as when being struck by a weapon.
Breathless [2; 2,000g] (P): This quality allows your character to survive without having to breathe, which also renders him
immune to toxic gases, spores, and diseases/poisons that require
inhalation. Furthermore, he cannot drown or suffocate. This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Channeling [0; 50g] (P): This quality allows your character
to cast non-mental spells through the weapon as if she had a free
hand, even if she has already made or intends to make an attack
with the weapon that round. Bucklers and Attached weapons that
are enchanted with this quality may also have spells cast through
them without suffering the 1 action penalty as long as their hand
is free, but the penalty is still applied if another item or weapon
is being held. Mage staves, scepters, and wands receive this quality for free. Mental spells [M] cannot be channeled through this
weapon. This quality may only be applied to weapons.
Comfort [1; 750g] (P): This quality allows your character
to remain undampened by natural precipitation (rain, snow, sleet,
hail) and unhindered by wind of less than destructive force. Even

light airborne debris (dust, sand, etc.) poses no discomfort but


may still obscure vision. Your character also gains a +2 bonus to
Constitution checks that are made to resist stamina loss in extreme
temperatures. This quality offers no protection against dangerous
or impeding conditions, such as fire, lava, lightning strikes, flooding, deep snow, or flying debris from winds of destructive force.
Likewise, this quality does not protect against damage from cold
or heat based attacks. This quality may only be applied to wholebody apparel (suits of armor, cloaks, robes, etc.).
Commune: Type [2; 2,000g] (T, minutes, CM +2): This
quality allows your character to communicate with other creatures of a chosen type, exactly like the Commune spell effect.
The spellcasting discipline required to trigger this effect varies
according to which type is selected: Bestial (Geomancy), Sapient
(Mysticism), or Undead (Sorcery). This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Comprehension [1; 750g] (T, minutes, CM +3): This quality allows your character to understand written and/or verbal languages, symbols, and gestures, exactly like the Comprehension
spell effect. The Sorcery discipline is used to trigger this effect.
This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Concentration [1; 750g] (P): This quality prevents your
character from being distracted (all sources). It does not prevent
your character from being surprised, however. This quality may
only be applied to apparel.
Damage Bonus: Type [1; 750g] (P): This quality grants a
+1 bonus to the weapons damage checks of one of the following damage types: Acid, Arcane, Cold, Divine, Electricity, Heat,
Physical, or Shadow. The weapons base damage result is still
considered to be physical. This quality may be selected twice,
either for the same or for different damage types (bonuses stack
freely). This quality may only be applied to weapons.
Damage Conversion: Type [1; 3,450g] (P): This quality causes the weapon to inflict damage as one of the following
non-physical damage types: Acid, Arcane, Cold, Divine, Electricity, Heat, or Shadow. The weapons entire base damage result is
converted into the chosen damage type, including contributions
from Brute Force and other non-magical damage modifiers like
those from the Melee Expertise or Ranged Expertise advantages.
However, magical damage modifiers, such as a jelgharis Living
Flames trait, the Damage Bonus magical quality (see above), or
the Augmented Damage advantage still apply their own unique
damage types separately from the weapons converted damage
result. This quality may only be applied to weapons.

Greater Magical Apparel Limit


Most characters may only benefit from up to 2 pieces of greater magical apparel at once.
Only the first 2 pieces that are equipped have any effect, and subsequent pieces produce no
passive effects and cannot be triggered unless an existing piece is removed. Lesser magical
apparel and relics do not count toward this limit and may be combined freely; magical weapons are also exempt. Note that elves, some ettins, and characters with the Magically-Receptive
mystical advantage may benefit from more than 2 pieces of greater magical apparel at once.

91

CHAPTER 3
Detect Afflictions [1; 1,200g] (T, instant, CM +2): This
quality allows your character to detect the presence of diseases,
poisons, and duration-based magical afflictions, exactly like the
Detect Afflictions spell effect, including all rules pertaining to the
mental casting spell descriptor [M]. The Mysticism discipline is
used to trigger this effect.
Detect Creatures: Type [1; 1,200g] (T, instant, CM +2):
This quality allows your character to detect the presence of creatures of a particular type, exactly like the Detect Creatures spell
effect, including all rules pertaining to the mental casting spell
descriptor [M]. The spellcasting discipline required to trigger this
effect varies according to which type is selected: Living (Geomancy) or Undead (Sorcery).
Faculty Bonus: Type [varies; varies] (P): This quality
grants a +1 bonus to one of your characters attributes or stats;
Encumbrance Factor, if selected, gains a bonus equal to 5 x your
characters weight multiple instead. Note that the Accuracy attribute, Total Resilience stat, and disciplines cannot be enhanced
by this effect. The faculty bonus cannot be stacked with the same
faculty bonus from other magical items, the Improve Faculty or
Siphon Faculty spell effects, or the Improve Faculty bardic melody. However, this quality may be selected multiple times for
different faculties. This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Flight [2; 4,250g] (T, rounds, CM 0): This quality allows
your character to fly, exactly like the Flight spell effect. The Sorcery discipline is used to trigger this effect. This quality may only
be applied to apparel.
Freedom [2; 3,000g] (T, rounds, CM +1): This quality allows your character to move freely through zones of control and
rough terrain, exactly like the Freedom spell effect. The Geomancy discipline is used to trigger this effect. This quality may only
be applied to apparel.
Gliding [1; 2,550g] (P): This quality allows your character to glide exactly like the Gliding: Mystical creature trait. This
quality may only be applied to apparel.
Healing [2; 3,000g] (P): This quality grants a +2 bonus to all
healing-related checks directed at your character, which includes
all uses of the Healing discipline (including self-healing checks)
and all Constitution checks for daily healing and for resisting the
effects of diseases, poisons, and bleeding. Spellcasting checks
that target your character with the following spell effects also receive the +2 bonus (other affected targets of a spell do not gain
the bonus): Cure, Quick Heal, Recovery, and Restore: Health.
However, the item has a delayed activation time and this quality
only begins to function after having been worn continuously for
24 hoursthe activation time is reset whenever the item is removed. This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Invisibility [2; 3,000g] (T, rounds, CM +1): This quality
allows your character to turn invisible, exactly like the Invisibility
spell effect. The Sorcery discipline is used to trigger this effect.
This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Life Stealing [2; 3,000g] (P): This quality grants a chance
for your character to heal whenever the weapon inflicts the killing
blow against a living creature. Each time that a killing blow is
achieved your character can make a free Sorcery check of SV 8 to
immediately heal one health point (there are no consequences for
failure). An attack must deliver the killing blow in order for this

92

effect to function, so creatures that bleed to death afterwards do


not count. Additionally, this effect only functions against living
creatures that possess CPVs of 100 or greater. This quality may
only be applied to weapons.
Light: Type [varies; varies] (P): This quality causes the
item to emit light equivalent to that of a torch (OS x 20 ft). The
color of the light and its other visual aspects can be customized
per each enchantment (constant, pulsing, sparkling, etc.). Your
character may activate or deactivate the items light as a free
action. The type of light selected determines the enchantment
value, cost, and the potency of the darkness that it overcomes:

Type

Value

Cost

Minor

25g

Moderate

100g

Major

300g

Overcomes
non-magical
darkness
standard magical
darkness
critical success
magical darkness

Mind Scanning [1; 2,550g] (T, minutes, CM 0): This quality allows your character to scan the minds of all nearby sapient
creatures, exactly like the Mind Scanning spell effect, including
all rules pertaining to the mental casting spell descriptor [M]. The
Mysticism discipline is used to trigger this effect. This quality
may only be applied to apparel.
Mind Shielding [2; 2,000g] (P): This quality renders your
character immune to the following list of invasive spell effects:
Charm, Detect Creatures, Dream Craft (nightmares only), False
Memories, Insanity, Mind Reading, Mind Scanning, and Scrying
(individual viewing only). Other similar abilities are also blocked,
per the GMs discretion, such as an imps Power of Suggestion
trait. Note that spells and abilities that are already affecting your
character prior to equipping the item are not dispelled or inhibited
in any way. This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Preservation [1; 750g] (P): This quality preserves your
characters corpse upon death and also makes it harder for it to
be reanimated as undead for up to 2 days, exactly like the Preservation spell effect. The item only functions if it was being worn
at the time of your characters death, and its benefits immediately
cease if it is removed. Placing the item on an existing corpse is
useless, as is reequipping the item on an affected corpse after it
has been removed. This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Repairing [0; 100g] (P): This quality magically begins to
repair the item whenever it is damaged, requiring a full minute
to restore the item to its original conditioneffectively, repairs
do not occur during combat or normal use but quickly happen
afterwards. The item also continually strives to maintain its original pristine appearance (dirt and mud are repelled, water is dried,
metal items regain their polished sheen, etc.). Lastly, anytime that
the item is fully destroyed it has a 50% chance to repair itself once
all of its pieces have been gathered back together; failure means
that the item is irrevocably destroyed.
Resistance: Type [varies; varies] (P): This quality grants
your character a resistance against a particular type of damage.
Resistances to cold and heat are special cases and also grant a
bonus to your characters Constitution checks when resisting

EQUIPMENT
stamina loss in cold or hot temperatures, respectively; the bonus
is equal to half of the resistance value, made positive (either +1 or
+2). This quality may only be applied to apparel.

Type
Acid, Arcane, Divine,
Electricity, Mental,
or Shadow
Cold or Heat
(special rules)

Resist

Value

Cost

750g

1,250g

2 (+1)
4 (+2)

1
2

1,200g
2,000g

Resizing: Maximum Size [0; varies] (P): This quality magically readjusts the items size to match that of its current wielder
but only up to a specified maximum size. The enchantment cost
is equal to 50g, plus the difference between the items original
cost and the cost of the maximum size it may become (both as
if purchased new). For instance, enchanting a small highgrade
longsword that could be resized up to huge would cost 116g (50g
+ 75g for a huge highgrade longsword 9g for a small highgrade
longsword). Resizing occurs instantaneously whenever the item
is grasped solely by a single creature, and it remains that size until
it is grasped solely again by a different size creature. Remember
to adjust the items weight, Resilience, and range increments to
accommodate its new size. All spell foci and potions possess this
quality for free with no limitation regarding their maximum sizes.
Returning [1; 1,200g] (P): This quality causes the weapon
to be teleported back into your characters hand soon after being
thrown, regardless of whether it hits or misses its target and comes
to rest. This generally occurs quickly enough for your character
to reuse the weapon immediately, such as when affected by the
Hasten spell effect or similar abilities (GMs call). Expendable
weapons, such as holy water flasks or poison pouches, cannot be
enchanted with this quality. This quality may be applied to any
weapon, but it typically best for those that are meant to be thrown.
Sensory Augmentation: Type [1; varies] (T, rounds): This
quality temporarily grants your character a new or augmented
sensory ability, exactly like the Sensory Augmentation spell effect. There are several types that determine the effects cost, CM,
and its required spellcasting discipline (those with a choice must
select which discipline is always used). Refer to the Sensory Augmentation spell effect in Chapter 5 for specific rules and benefits
of each type. This quality may only be applied to apparel.

Type
Dark Sight
Echolocation
Magic Sight
Scent [Aquatic]
Scent [Standard]
See Invisibility
Tremorlocation

CM
+3
0
+2
+4
+3
+4
+1

Cost
750g
2,550g
1,200g
450g
750g
450g
1,800g

Discipline
Mysticism/Sorcery
Geomancy
Mysticism/Sorcery
Geomancy
Geomancy
Sorcery
Geomancy

Slow Diseases/Poisons [2; 2,000g] (P): This quality automatically slows the frequency of all diseases and poisons that
affect your character by one time interval, exactly like the Cure
spell effect (as if achieving a standard success). However, the
item has a delayed activation time and this quality only begins to

function after having been worn continuously for 24 hoursthe


activation time is reset whenever the item is removed. This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Soul Stealing [2; 3,000g] (P): This quality grants a chance
for your character to temporarily surge with mystical energy
whenever the weapon inflicts the killing blow against a sapient
creature. Each time that a killing blow is achieved your character
can make a free Mysticism check of SV8 to immediately gain a
+2 bonus to all discipline, profession, and damage checks until
the end of the following round (there are no consequences for
failure). An attack must deliver the killing blow in order for this
effect to function, so creatures that bleed to death afterwards do
not count. Bonuses cannot be stacked from multiple killing blows,
but rather the duration is simply renewed. Additionally, this effect
only functions against sapient creatures that possess CPVs of 100
or greater. This quality may only be applied to weapons.
Spell Aim [1; 2,550g] (P): This quality grants a +1 bonus
to your characters Spell Precision checks for all spells that are
channeled through the weapon. The bonus cannot be stacked with
an Accuracy bonus from the Improve Faculty spell effect, Siphon
Faculty spell effect, or the Improve Faculty bardic melody. This
quality may only be applied to weapons that already possess the
Channeling magical quality.
Spell Damage [1; 750g] (P): This quality grants a +1 bonus
to your characters damage checks for all spells that are channeled through the weapon. This quality can be selected twice (bonuses stack freely). This quality may only be applied to weapons
that already possess the Channeling magical quality.
Sustenance [2; 1,250g] (P): This quality keeps your character permanently sated, entirely eliminating the need to consume
food and water. However, the item has a delayed activation time
and this quality only begins to function after having been worn
continuously for 24 hoursthe activation time is reset whenever
the item is removed. Characters that possess the Voracious Appetite trait only have their food and water requirements halved, not
eliminated entirely. This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Telepathy [2; 3,000g] (T, minutes, CM +1): This quality
allows your character to selectively broadcast telepathic thoughts
directly into the minds of other sapient creatures, exactly like the
Telepathy spell effect, including all rules pertaining to the mental
casting spell descriptor [M]. The Mysticism discipline is used to
trigger this effect. This quality may only be applied to apparel.
Unlimited Ammunition [1; 1,200g] (P): This quality allows the weapon to create and launch its own magical projectiles
that mimic standard ammunition. The magical projectiles fade
away once they hit or miss their targets and come to rest. Real
ammunition may still be launched instead, if desired. This quality
may only be applied to launched ranged weapons.
Vitality [2; 3,000g] (P): This quality halves the amount of
time that is required for your character to recover lost stamina
points to one point every hour (instead of one point every two
hours). Additionally, the amount of sleep that he needs each day
is also halved (if living) so that he only requires at least 3 hours
(instead of 6). However, the item has a delayed activation time
and this quality only begins to function after having been worn
continuously for 24 hoursthe activation time is reset whenever
the item is removed. This quality may only be applied to apparel.

93

CHAPTER 3

Apparel & Weapon Enchantments

[A = Apparel; W = Weapons]
Magical Quality
A W Value

Accuracy
1

Awareness
0

Breathless
2

Channeling
0

Comfort
1

Commune: Type
2

Comprehension
1

Concentration
1

Damage Bonus: Type


1

Damage Conversion: Type


1

Detect Afflictions
1

Detect Creatures: Type
1
Faculty Bonus: Type
Brute Force, Combat
Maneuvers, EF, Flight

1
Speed, Notice, Run Speed,
or Swim Speed
Base Resilience,

Concentration, Defense,
2
or Fortitude
Charisma, Dexterity,

Endurance, Intellect,
2
Perception, or Strength

Flight
2

Freedom
2

Gliding
1

Healing
2

Invisibility
2

Life Stealing
2
varies
Light: Type

Mind Scanning
1

Mind Shielding
2

Preservation
1

Repairing
0

Resistance: Type
varies

Resizing
0

Returning
1
Sensory Augmentation: Type

Dark Sight
1

Echolocation
1

Magic Sight
1

Scent [Aquatic]
1

Scent [Standard]
1

See Invisibility
1

Tremorlocation
1

94

Cost
2,550g
25g
2,000g
50g
750g
2,000g
750g
750g
750g
3,450g
1,200g
1,200g

750g

2,000g

4,250g
4,250g
3,000g
2,550g
3,000g
3,000g
3,000g
varies
2,550g
2,000g
750g
100g
varies
varies
1,200g
750g
2,550g
1,200g
450g
750g
450g
1,800g

Slow Diseases/Poisons
Soul Stealing
Spell Aim
Spell Damage
Sustenance
Telepathy
Unlimited Ammunition
Vitality

2
2
1
1
2
2
1
2

2,000g
3,000g
2,550g
750g
1,250g
3,000g
1,200g
3,000g

MISCELLANEOUS GEAR

Miscellaneous gear is a catchall category that includes tools,


accessories, and other general items that have been enchanted
with unique magical properties. Such items are still categorized
according to their total enchantment values, and the common
items that are detailed below all have enchantment values of 0.
If desired, miscellaneous items may be further enchanted with
either apparel or weapon magical qualities, depending on whether
they are designed to be worn continuously or held at the ready.

Common Miscellaneous Gear

The following miscellaneous items are those that are most


commonly encountered by adventurers. The cost of each items
enchantment is listed in brackets, but the cost of the base item
itself must also be paid and adjusted for your characters size.
Animated Tool [5g]: This tool or item may animate itself at
the owners command, thereby performing its intended task without the need for constant supervision. However, if its tasks is interrupted for any reason the tool will cease until reactivated by its
owner. Such tools can only be used to perform mundane tasks (a
broom that sweeps the floor, a cloth that cleans dishes, etc.) or to
assist with individual steps of a more complicated task (crafting a
piece of armor). These effects are purely for roleplaying purposes
and cannot impart actual bonuses, such as an animated shield that
offers protection to its owner. Animated tools cannot be used to
produce goods or crafted items entirely on their own.
The following animated tools are some of the most common
examples and may serve as references for custom items:
Enchanted Broom/Mop: This tool continually sweeps or
mops a specified room until it is free of dust and dirt,
then returns to its designated place of storage.
Enchanted Cleaning Cloth: This simple cloth can be made
to continually wash dishes, dust furniture, scrub dirty
children, or perform other similar tasks.
Enchanted Hammer: This hammer can be instructed to secure loose nails, hammer-out dents in armor, or flatten
hot metal in preparation for forging.
Enchanted Spoon: This spoon continually stirs the contents of a cooking pot or cauldron. It can also dish out
servings into bowls or containers that are brought close.
Bottomless Coin Pouch [5g]: This pouch is able to hold a
large number of coins without increasing in weight (~0.3 lb; the
same as a standard belt pouch). Despite its name, however, it is
not actually bottomless and may only carry up to 1,000 coins. A
bottomless coin pouch allows small and tiny creatures to carry
their wealth without becoming encumbered, but bigger creatures

EQUIPMENT
may also benefit from having one. Only the weight and volume
of coins are negated while insideother items, including gems,
can still be stored, but their weights and volumes are not reduced.
A bottomless coin pouch that is torn or destroyed causes all
of its contents to immediately spill out. The Suppress Magic spell
effect renders a bottomless coin pouch inaccessible for 1 minute with a standard success (this limitation only applies to coins;
gems and other contents can still be accessed normally).
Convenience Gear [3g]: This mundane item offers minor
magical benefits to its owner, purely for roleplaying purposes. It
may not impart bonuses or grant significant tangible benefits.
The following convenience items are some of the most common examples and may serve as references for custom items:
Fogless Glasses: These glasses or spectacles never fog up
and hardly ever need to be cleaned.
Inkless Quill: This quill produces its own endless supply
of ink (only when writing) and never has to be dipped.
Restful Bedroll/Pillow: This bedroll or pillow helps to ensure a full nights rest. Your character is better able to
rest despite sleeping in dungeons, outdoors, or in noisy
inns. Tossing and turning is generally reduced, nightmares are rarely experienced, and waking up with an
aching back is often prevented. However, be aware that
restful bedrolls and pillows do nothing to alleviate the
nightmares that are caused by either the Dream Craft
spell effect or the Nightmares disadvantage.
Self-Erecting Tent: This tent automatically erects on command, assuming that there is sufficient space available
to accommodate its size. It can also be commanded to
collapse into a neatly folded pile but only if there are no
occupants or objects that are currently inside.
Self-Serving Dish [varies]: This oversized dish, platter,
pot, or other type of cookware is enchanted and magically linked
to any number of plates, bowls, and/or cups. Whenever food is
placed into the primary dish it automatically teleports a portion
of its contents to all of its linked receptacles, distributing the food
equally. The volume of food or drink is not duplicated, so enough
is necessary to allocate evenly according to the total number of
linked receptacles. Only consumable foods and drinks can be
teleported, and then only to linked receptacles within 500 feet.
These magical items are particularly useful for prisons, whereby
a linked receptacle is kept in each cell that allows prisoners to be
fed without the guards having to risk personal contact. The cost
of the enchantment is equal to 5g for the primary dish and an
additional 50s for each linked receptacle.
Suppression Manacles [100g]: These manacles instantly
suppress the victims ability to channel magical energy, which
renders spellcasting and the use of magical abilities and magical
items impossible. Essentially, the victim is treated exactly as if he
were affected by an ongoing version of the Suppress Magic spell
effect (standard success). The manacles also negate all beneficial
magical effects that are currently affecting the victim and any that
are cast on him while the manacles are being worn but only the
portion that would affect him personally; negative magical effects
may not be suppressed, however (GMs call). Manacles can be
forcefully secured onto an opponent via grappling once pinning
has been achieved.

Weightless Container [varies]: These containers come in a


variety of different forms: backpacks, pouches, chests, crates, and
even furniture. The contents of a weightless container only weigh
a fraction of their normal weight while inside, making them easier
to carry. The term weightless is somewhat misleading since the
container itself, whether it is empty or filled, still weighs the standard amount for its type (only its contents actually weigh less).
The percentage of the containers weight reduction determines
the cost of its enchantment: 25% [50g], 50% [150g], 75% [300g],
and 100% [500g]. Note that only the weights of the containers
contents are reduced; their volumes are unaffected. Lastly, if one
weightless container is placed within another then the magical
benefits of both are negated until they are once again separated.
A weightless container that is broken or destroyed causes
all of its contents to immediately spill out. The Suppress Magic
spell effect renders a weightless container inaccessible for 1 minute with a standard success, meaning that no items can be placed
inside or taken out.

Common Miscellaneous Gear

[A = Apparel; W = Weapons]
Item
A W
Cost

Animated Tool
5g

Bottomless Coin Pouch


5g
Convenience Gear
varies
3g

Self-Serving Dish
varies

Suppression Manacles
100g

Weightless Container
varies

Custom Miscellaneous Gear

There are many other kinds of miscellaneous magical items


than the ones that are described in this section. Players are even
allowed to design their own miscellaneous items, per the GMs
approval. The GM should reference the common miscellaneous
items above to help balance the power and costs of custom items.

CURSED MAGICAL ITEMS

Not all magical items are beneficial. In fact, some items are
actually cursed to be detrimental to your character and can even
impose penalties (in addition to their standard effects), whereas
others are downright malevolent in their design and function.
Fortunately, cursed magical items tend to be somewhat rare.
The demand for such items is virtually nonexistent since their use
is unpredictable at best, often dangerous, and possibly illegal. The
value of cursed items is therefore largely situational, so the GM
should carefully consider each items potential uses, its overall
power, and its buyers motivation before deciding on its cost.
Identifying Cursed Items: Most cursed items are intentionally designed to deceive their would-be users into believing that
they are somehow beneficial. Succeeding on an Appraisal check
is normally enough to reveal a magical items properties, but in
the case of a cursed item a standard success reveals false properties instead, according to each specific type of curse. A critical
success is required to reveal an items cursed nature.

95

CHAPTER 3

Curse Types

Each cursed item is wholly unique, but the following curse


types should provide a glimpse of the range of possible options:
Compulsion: This curse attempts to compel the items user
to perform actions against her will. Often, a willpower
check is made by the GM to see if the user can resist the
curses influence (a modifier may also be applied to the
check depending on the curses power). Being able to successfully resist the compulsion may or may not alert the
user to the items cursed nature (again, depending on its
power). Such compulsions might only occur in specific
situations or they might be more general, with the latter
type allowing for more periodic willpower checks.
Detriment: This curse has a detrimental effect on the items
user, either by imposing negative conditions (an excessive
thirst, a slowed rate of healing, etc.) or by imposing a
penalty to one or more of his faculties. Such detriments
usually take place without the users knowledge, at least
initially, but gradually the user may begin to suspect that
something is amiss the longer that the item is equipped.
Note that many such items still grant beneficial qualities
to their users, so as to appear benign, but their negative
aspects should always outweigh their benefits.
Obsession: This curse causes anyone who interacts with the
item to crave it and to seek it for their own. This usually
occurs after having touched the item, but more powerful
cursed items are able to elicit obsession from those who
simply view them. Once the item has been claimed its
user must typically endure an initial willpower check or
she cannot stand to part with it, and may even risk death or
potentially commit murder to keep it. Further willpower
checks should be permitted in extreme situations where
the user would have to compromise her core beliefs or risk
her life in order to keep possession of the item (killing a
friend whos grappling for the item).
Trickery: This curse attempts to deceive the user of the
item in various ways (more so than other curses), either
by providing false information about the items powers or
by forcing the item to betray its user at crucial moments.
For instance, an item that normally seems to mimic the
Mind Scanning spell effect might periodically create false
thoughts in its users mind or secretly broadcast his own
thoughts or intentions to all nearby enemies during battle.

EXAMPLE MAGICAL ITEMS

The following nine magical items provide a varied range of


helpful examples. Each items description begins with its tier and
type, along with its total enchantment value in parenthesis (except
for relics), followed by the items corresponding creature size.

Arnurian Battlemage Trident

Lesser Magical Weapon (0); medium size


These highgrade tridents are given to arnurian battlemages
once they complete both their martial and magical training regimens. Each trident is enchanted to allow the arnurians spells to
be cast through it as if it were a free hand. It can also be made to

96

emit teal-colored light equal to that of a torch (OS x 2), which is


particularly useful at providing visibility when deep underwater.
The tridents value is 85g, 20s.
Magical Qualities: Channeling (0), Light: Minor (0)

Butchering Blade (cursed)

Greater Magical Weapon (2); medium size


This longsword is deceptively unremarkable in appearance,
but it is actually a potent magical weapon that inflicts +2 bonus
points of physical damage. However, it is also cursed and its user
continually risks being compelled by bloodlust (see below).The
longswords estimated value is 1,505g (common grade), but its
cursed nature means that its actual value is highly situational.
Magical Qualities: Damage Bonus: Physical x 2 (1 each)
Curse (Compulsion): Whenever the weapon inflicts the
loss of at least one health point without actually killing its target
the user is magically compelled to continue attacking the same
target until he is killed. The user must immediately succeed on
a willpower check, applying a +1 modifier (this means that the
compulsion is harder to resist), or he is overcome with a sense of
bloodlust regarding the target. Failure forces the user to make a
melee attack against the same target using the longsword at least
once each round until he is killed, and the user may not perform
any other actions except those that are necessary to attack the target in melee, such as sprinting (GMs call). However, succeeding
on the willpower check or being unable to attempt a melee attack
against the target for one full round ends the current compulsion,
but a new compulsion may begin if the longsword inflicts health
loss against the same target or a different one.
Only melee attacks against living targets cause the curse to
activate. The blades magic can sense the life force of its targets
and is able to tell when a target is actually killed. In other words,
a target who is only knocked unconscious or who is pretending to
be dead will not cause the compulsion to cease. Lastly, making an
area-effect attack with the longsword, such as via the Shockwave
combat technique advantage, randomly designates one affected
target (from among those who suffered health loss and still managed to survive the attack).

Cloak of Serenity

Greater Magical Apparel (1); tiny size


This tiny hooded cloak always appears as if it were brand
new. Even when damaged or soiled its magic continually works
to restore the cloak to its original condition. Its wearer remains
unhindered by natural precipitation, winds of less than destructive force, and light airborne debris (vision may still be obscured).
She also gains a +2 bonus to her Constitution checks that are
made to resist stamina loss in extreme temperatures. The cloaks
value is 850g, 25s.
Magical Qualities: Comfort (1), Repairing (0)

Emberian Training Armor

Lesser Magical Apparel (0); Resizing (up to large)


These suits of armor are used by the armies of the City-State
of Emberfell to train their wide diversity of new recruits. Each
suit is able to magically resize itself to accommodate soldiers
ranging from tiny to large sizes. Damage that the armor sustains

EQUIPMENT
is also magically repaired, which helps to justify its significantly
higher cost. The armors value varies according to its type (all
common grades): light [170g], moderate [190g], or heavy [220g].
Magical Qualities: Repairing (0), Resizing (0)

Linrioks Amulet

Relic Apparel; large size


This immensely powerful amulet was enchanted by Linriok,
the renowned ferellik wizard himself, prior to his disappearance
within the Vexith . It is forged of pure copper and is set with three
pristine emeralds. The amulets value is beyond measure.
Magical Qualities: Faculty Bonus: Fortitude (2), Mind
Shielding (2), Repairing (0), Stamina-less Taps (?)
Stamina-less Taps: The amulets wearer no longer has to
move stamina tokens into the fatigue row when holding taps.
However, rolling a 1 on any spellcasting check when attempting
to hold a tap still incurs the loss of one of the wearers stamina
points. The amulet may hold up to three taps, assuming that the
wearer possesses the Inborn Tap species trait and/or the Magical
Tap advantage (one or both ranks), which determines precisely
how many taps he may hold. Note that amulet does not automatically grant the ability to hold taps on its own and that its wearer
must possess at least one of these traits to make use of this quality.
Background: Linriok constructed his amulet following the
successful return of his first grand expedition into the Vexith . It
is believed that he sought a way to bolster his mental defenses
and to alleviate the physical stresses of prolonged spellcasting on
his aging body. Historical accounts indicate that he spent several
years and most of his resources researching, forging, and enchanting the amulet. It is also rumored that Linriok nearly abandoned
the attempt altogether after a trusted aide was accidentally killed
during one of the rituals required for its creation.
Eventually, the amulet was completed and Linriok began
making new preparations for another grand expedition into the
Vexith . Unfortunately, after only a few weeks from the time of
their descent, a handful of the expeditions members returned to
the surface, bloodied and battered, with reports of ambush by a
host of demonic foes. Whether lost, captured, or killed, Linrioks
fate is still a mystery to this day, as is the fate of his amulet.

Monocle of Mystical Observation

Greater Magical Apparel/Miscellaneous (1); small size


This clear glass lens is encircled by a ring of bronze and is
connected to a delicate bronze chain that secures to the wearers
clothing. The monocle is enchanted to be fogless (like the miscellaneous gear convenience item). It also allows its wearer to
trigger the Sensory Augmentation: Magic Sight quality via the
Mysticism discipline. The monocles value is 1,204g, 20s.
Magical Qualities: Sensory Augmentation: Magic Sight (1)

Ring of Fallen Angels (cursed)

Greater Magical Apparel (2); medium size


This solid silver ring is intricately fashioned to display a pair
of angelic wings that fold around its outer surface. When triggered, the ring allows its wearer to fly, but it is also cursed and can
prove to be quite deadly (see below). When the ring is properly
grasped it instantly reveals its magical qualities, but details about

its curse remain hidden. The rings estimated value is 4,280g, but
its cursed nature means that its actual value is highly situational.
Magical Qualities: Awareness (0), Flight (2)
Curse (Trickery): The ring grants the ability to fly, but if its
wearer ascends to a height of 30 feet above the ground its magic
immediately ceases to function. This causes the wearer to crash to
the ground and suffer falling damage.

Sling of the Spectral Hand

Relic Weapon; Resizing (up to gigantic)


This highgrade sling is able to launch an endless supply of
bullets composed of pure arcane energy, repair itself via magic if
damaged, and even resize itself to suit its current user. However,
its most unique feature is its ability to create a spectral version of
itself that is capable of making an additional attack during each
round of combat. The slings value is beyond measure.
Magical Qualities: Damage Bonus: Arcane (1), Damage
Conversion: Arcane (1), Repairing (0), Resizing (0), Spectral
Hand (?), Unlimited Ammunition (1)
Spectral Hand: Whenever the sling is held at the ready an
apparition of its users hand, also wielding a ghostly duplicate of
the sling itself, appears suspended in the air nearby. Its user may
mentally command the spectral hand to attack once per round for
free, in addition to any attacks that she attempts that round using
the real sling, or even if she attempts no attacks herself. The spectral hands Precision checks, damage checks, range increments,
and other details are identical to those affecting its user (lucky/
tough breaks, advantages, obscurement penalties, etc.), but its
attack is treated as a free action and therefore does not suffer
from or incur multiple action penalties. The spectral hand may
only make one attack per round even if its user is affected by the
Hasten spell effect or a similar ability. Choosing to use standard
ammunition with the real sling does not affect the spectral hand,
which always launches bullets of pure arcane energy. The spectral
hand is impervious to all forms of attack, but it instantly fades
away if the real sling is disarmed, dropped, or stowed away; it can
also be dispelled by the Suppress Magic spell effect, according to
whether or not the real sling itself is suppressed.
Background: Very little is known about the slings origins,
but during the last century it has left a trail of blood across the
face of Arlakor. Ownership of the sling has become an open invitation for conflict as new challengers continually seek to claim
it as their own. Most recently, the giant warlord Alidnox was defeated by the inquisitor Yeletra of Authara, who in turn lost the
sling to brigands. Rumors now suggest that its current owner is a
sprite adventurer named Kip, an elementalist of eccentric repute.

Trollhide Shield

Greater Magical Weapon (1); large size


This standard shield is as repugnant as it is powerful. It is
literally constructed from the bones, hide, and claws of a troll and
has been enchanted to magically repair itself when damaged. The
claws even serve as spikes (increased critical damage and more
severe injuries). Lastly, whenever the shield is thrown it is able to
magically teleport back into its users hand. The shields value is
1,312g (common grade).
Magical Qualities: Repairing (0), Returning (1)

97

GAMEPLAY

CHAPTER 4
GAMEPLAY

he purpose of the previous chapters was to provide you with


a plethora of choices to shape your characters persona and
abilitiesyouve assigned faculties, chosen traits, and decked
out your character in shiny new gear! Okay, thats great and all,
but now what? This chapter will teach you how to actually play
the game, including the rules for combat and general gameplay.

ROLLING THE DICE

Simply put, dice represent the element of chance. Its easy


enough to say what your character intends to do, but rolling a die
is how you determine whether or not she actually succeeds.
A Success Value (SV) is a numerical goal that corresponds
to the difficulty of the task at hand. After modifiers are applied, if
your result meets or exceeds the SV then the action is successful.

General SV Goals
Task Difficulty
Trivial (special rules)
Basic
Moderate
Advanced
Complex

SV
1
3
5
8
12

Stats as SV Goals: An opponents stats often serve as the


SV goals for various actions. For instance, Precision checks are
compared against an enemys Defense stat, whereas spellcasting
checks are compared against his Concentration or Fortitude stats.
Opposed Checks: In some situations your characters result
may be set against an opponents opposed check, such as when
attempting to sneak past a guard (Stealth vs. Awareness). The
person with the highest result wins the opposed check, but the
actions initiator always loses in the case of a tie.

Maxing

Certain checks allow for maxing, which occurs whenever


you roll the maximum value for the die (4 for d4, 6 for d6, etc.).
When this happens you immediately roll the die again and add
both of the results together. Maxing continues until the dies maximum value is no longer rolled. You then apply any additional
modifiers as you normally would. For instance, if you roll an 8 on
a d8, then roll another 8, then a 5, your total result would be 21
(8+8+5); any additional modifiers would then be applied.

Maxing is always applied to the rolls of discipline checks,


profession checks, and damage checks. It is sometimes applied to
other types of rolls as well, as noted in their descriptions.
Be aware that attributes of Rank 5 (d12) have an increased
chance of maxing. Their discipline rolls max on an 11 or 12!

Critical Successes

A critical success occurs whenever the total result of a check


is 5 points higher than the SV (or the defenders opposed check
or stat). This means that the action was exceptionally successful!
Many actions have specific benefits for rolling a critical success.
Certain checks and spell effects also have additional benefits
that increase for receiving multiple critical successes (a result that
is 5 points higher, 10 points higher, 15 points higher, and so on).
The benefits of such checks are detailed in their descriptions.

Failures

If the modified result of a check falls below the SV (or the


defenders opposed check or stat) then it fails. Some checks may
even have additional consequences if the modified result is at
least 3 points lower than the SV (Creature Lore, Tinkering, etc.).

Critical Failures

Whenever a 1 is rolled on the die for a check, regardless of


the modified result, the same die is immediately rolled again. If
the new roll is either a 1 or a 2 then your character has suffered a
critical failure! This means that the check automatically fails, and
the GM will select an appropriate mishap to befall your character.
For example, if a 1 is rolled on a discipline check then the
same die is immediately rerolled. If the new roll is a 1 or 2 then a
critical failure occurs; if it is a 3 or higher then the check either
fails or succeeds according to its initial roll of 1 plus its modifiers.
Unique Outcomes: Attacks and spells produce unique outcomes when they critically fail, as indicated on the following
pages. Many other checks have specific types of mishaps that
are detailed in their descriptions. If a specific outcome isnt listed
then the GM may simply make something up on the spot to hinder
your character in some other way.
Exceptions: Initiative, damage, and tiered-outcome checks
cannot critically fail. Tiered-outcome checks are those that are
made against a table (Bleeding, Diseases & Poisons, Exhausted,
Wounded, etc.). Only the modified result is relevant, which can
result in varying degrees of failure or success. Other types of
checks may also be exempt, as noted in their descriptions.

99

CHAPTER 4

Launched Attacks
Result
1

[Roll: d12]
Critical Failure Outcome

All Thumbs: You fumble around with your weapon

[Roll: d12]
Critical Failure Outcome

Result
Bad Move: You lose your remaining turn.
1

Slippery Grip: Your weapon is thrown d41 squares

and lose your remaining turn.


Slippery Grip: Your weapon is thrown d41 squares

Melee/Thrown/Unarmed Attacks

in a random direction, inflicting no damage (a result

of 0 indicates your own space).

Off-Balance: You lose your remaining turn and are


considered distracted until your next turn.

across the ground, requiring d6 rounds to pick up.

increment to be considered distracted until the end

(if thrown) to be considered distracted until the end


of the following round; you are unaffected.

causes you to lose your remaining turn and suffer

Defensive Opening: You lose your remaining turn

and suffer a 2 penalty to Defense until your next

Trip: You fall prone and lose your remaining turn.

a 2 penalty to Defense until your next turn.

turn. Enemies take notice of your vulnerable state.


Poor Follow-Through: You lose your remaining

Trip: You fall prone and lose your remaining turn.


Poor Follow-Through: You lose your remaining

turn and suffer a 2 penalty to all actions on your

next turn as you attempt to recover.

Launcher Malfunction: Your weapon is weakened


and suffers a 1 penalty to all of its Precision and

and suffers a 1 penalty to all of its Precision and

damage checks until it is repaired (weapons that

incurs the loss of one of your health points instead.

Friendly Fire: Reroll your Precision check against a

Friendly Fire: Reroll your Precision check against a

random allied or neutral target within two range

random allied or neutral target within your reach

increments, and include yourself as one of the

(if melee/unarmed) or within one range increment

possible targets. Apply all of the same modifiers,

(if thrown), and include yourself as one of the

except for those from lucky or tough breaks, which


apply their opposite values instead. Area-effect

10

the GM will determine a random placement for the

attacks are still able to affect multiple targets, but

attack's template.

the GM will determine a random placement for the


attack's template.
Incredibly Poor Execution: You lose your remaining

and confusion prevents you from being able to


move or attempt actions on your next turn. You
may still defend yourself, however.

11

and suffer a specific injury to your arm (roll d10

turn and confusion prevents you from being able to


move or attempt actions on your next turn. You
may still defend yourself, however.
Unbelievably Inept Move: You lose one health point

in the way of the shot. You lose one health point


for the severity).

100

except for those from lucky or tough breaks, which


apply their opposite values instead. Area-effect

Hand Shot: You somehow manage to get your hand

12

possible targets. Apply all of the same modifiers,

attacks are still able to affect multiple targets, but

Absurd Mishandling: You lose your remaining turn

11

damage checks until it is repaired (weapons that


are already weakened break); an unarmed attack

are already weakened break).

10

turn and suffer a 2 penalty to all actions on your


Reckless Attack: Your weapon becomes weakened

next turn as you attempt to recover.

(if melee/unarmed) or within one range increment

of the following round; you are unaffected.

Enemies take notice of your vulnerable state.

(if armored) until your wardrobe can be adjusted.

and neutral targets that are within the attack's reach

Excessive Concentration: Extra time spent aiming

Defense (if unarmored) or to your Total Resilience

Hinder Ally: Your classless display causes all allied

Premature Release: A dangerous and errant shot

considered distracted until your next turn.

Doing so requires an Agility check of SV 3.

action (Agility check of SV 1).

Off-Balance: You lose your remaining turn and are


Wardrobe Trouble: You suffer a 1 penalty to your

An individual piece can be picked up as a trivial

causes all allied and neutral targets within one range

of 0 indicates your own space); an unarmed attack


incurs the loss of your remaining turn instead.

Scatter Ammunition: All of your weapon's ammo


is spilled from its primary container and scatters

in a random direction, inflicting no damage (a result

12

and suffer a specific injury (roll d12 for the location


and d10 for the severity).

GAMEPLAY

Spells & Magical Powers ()


(combat techniques use the other tables)
[Roll: d12]
Result
Critical Failure Outcome
Unsettled: You lose your remaining turn.
1

Temporary Insanity: You lose your remaining turn

items are dropped in your space (those carried in


hands, grasping appendages, or prehensile tails).

Explosion of Lights: You are rendered Blind (R1)


for 1 minute. Additionally, make a special d8 roll
(this roll cannot max or critically fail). Compare the

stats then they too are rendered Blind (R1) for 1

Mental Lapse: You lose your remaining turn and are


considered distracted until your next turn.
Lack of Control: Reroll your Spell Precision check

minute by the bright lights.

10

reach) or within two range increments (if distance),

11

lucky or tough breaks, which apply their opposite


values instead. Area-effect spells and powers are

and held taps are lost (tapped stamina tokens are


moved into the fatigue row), which then requires
you to make a Perseverance check.

and include yourself as one of the possible targets.


Apply all of the same modifiers except those from

Severe Strain: You lose an extra stamina point.


Magic Drain: All of your remaining stamina points

or spellcasting check against a random allied or


neutral target within your standard threat range (if

result against all targets within 4 squares of your


spaceif it equals or exceeds their Concentration

You also lose your remaining turn.

rounds, as per a standard success. Refer to the


spell effect's description for further details.

Awkward Gesture: All of your held weapons and

and are affected by the Insanity spell effect for d4

Magical Energies Internalized: You lose one health

12

point and suffer a specific injury (roll d12 for the


location and d10 for the severity).

still able to affect multiple targets, but the GM will


determine a random placement for the template.
Excessive Focus: You lose your remaining turn and

suffer a 2 penalty to Defense until your next turn.


Enemies take notice of your vulnerable state.
Thundering Boom: You are rendered Deaf (R1) for
10 minutes. Additionally, make a special d8 roll
(this roll cannot max or critically fail). Compare the

result against all targets within 4 squares of your


spaceif it equals or exceeds their Concentration
stats then they too are rendered Deaf (R1) for 10
minutes by the loud sound.
Overload: You are knocked d41 squares in a
random direction and fall prone (the distance is
halved if underwater or in a similarly restrictive
environment). Creatures in your path can attempt
a free Agility check of SV 5 to automatically move
aside to the nearest unoccupied space to avoid the
collision. Colliding with another creature or solid
unattended object stops further knock-back, but

damage is inflicted to all involved that is equal to


d8 plus a modifier based on your creature size
(compared against Total Resilience): tiny 2, small
1, medium 0, large +2, huge +4, enormous +7,
gigantic +10, colossal +14. Any creatures involved
in the collision that are equal to your own size or
smaller must also make another free Agility check
of SV 5 or they fall prone; any creatures that are
bigger than you do not risk falling prone.

101

CHAPTER 4

COMBAT RULES
The rules in this section explain the mechanics for simulating combat. Sooner or later (probably sooner) your character is
going to get into a fight and he will need to do everything he can
in order to survive. His faculties, traits, and gear are extremely
important but so too is his use of tactics.

COMBAT NECESSITIES

As mentioned in the books Introduction, there are a few


requirements that must be met before combat can be simulated.
They are repeated here for your convenience:
Movement Board: A mat, board, or other type of playing
area divided into 1-inch squares is required. A movement
board allows the GM to set up combat encounters to aid
the players in visualizing the scene. A surface that is compatible with dry-erase markers is probably the best option.
Miniatures or Counters: Each player should have a unique
miniature or visual counter to represent their character on
the movement board. The GM should have counters to
represent the various non-player characters (NPCs) and
monsters that the characters engage in battle.
Vexith Initiative App (optional): Having access to the free
Vexith Initiative App via computer, tablet, or smart phone
is highly recommended but not required.

INITIATIVE

Combat is divided into units of time referred to as rounds.


Each round is approximately six seconds long, as measured in
game time. Regarding session time (real time), each full round
usually requires at least several minutes to complete depending
on the number of characters and combatants. Since combat tends
to be chaotic with many things going on simultaneously it helps
to divide the flow of the battle into manageable segments.
Your characters Initiative discipline is used to determine
how quickly she can take her turn during each round of combat.
Being able to act sooner than ones enemies can often make a
huge difference in a battles outcome, especially if an enemy is
wounded or defeated before his turn occurs. Initiative checks are
made by all combatants, either at the start of each new round if
using the app (rolled electronically) or only once at the start of
each new battle if using the traditional method (rolled by hand).
Groups of Similar Combatants (GM): The GM may find it
useful to make a single Initiative check for each group of similar
combatants in order to save time, assuming that they all share the
same faculties. For instance, a group of enemy warriors could
all use the same Initiative result, another group of enemy mages
could use a separate result, and their leader could use his own.
Enchanted Companions, Pets, & Minions: If your character has an enchanted companion, pet, arcane minion, summoned
creature, or thrall then it acts on your characters turn to simplify
the flow of combat (ignoring its own Initiative discipline), plus it
also shares lucky or tough breaks whenever these events occur.

102

Lucky Breaks

Lucky breaks are the moments in combat when the situation temporarily favors your character for one reason or another.
Perhaps he is suddenly struck with a momentary inspiration or
maybe the chaos of combat has unexpectedly shifted to grant him
a brief advantage.
Each combatant or group of similar combatants has a 5%
chance each round of receiving a lucky break, which grants a +2
bonus to all discipline checks, profession checks, and damage
checks for the entire round. Note that the bonus is not applied to
Initiative checks that are made to determine turn order.

Tough Breaks

Tough breaks are the moments in combat when things just


arent going your characters way. Maybe he gets something in
his eye, accidentally swallows a bug, unexpectedly sneezes, or
gets a muscle cramp, but regardless of the cause his performance
during the round is impaired.
Each combatant or group of similar combatants has a 5%
chance each round of suffering a tough break, which imposes a 2
penalty to all discipline checks, profession checks, and damage
checks for the entire round. Note that the penalty is not applied to
Initiative checks that are made to determine turn order.

Surprise

There are sometimes situations where the GM may rule that


certain combatants or groups of similar combatants are initially
unaware that they are being attacked, such as during an ambush.
When this occurs, simply determine initiative order normally
and skip the turns of any combatants who are deemed to be surprised but only for the first round. All attacks against surprised
targets during the first round receive a +2 bonus on their Precision
checks; the Damage: Mental spell effect gains a +1 bonus to its
Mysticism check instead. Note that area-effect attacks only apply
the bonus against surprised targets.
Surprise During Battle: Surprise can occur at the start of
combat and sometimes even during the later rounds of battle.
There are many situations, actions, and spell effects that can render a target or group surprised. A detection check, as described
later in this chapter, is often a good way to figure out which combatants are surprised. A combatant who is surprised during a later
round of battle is typically only considered to be surprised against
a specific attack, so unlike when surprise occurs at the start of
battle he does not lose his turn and only the first attack for which
he is unaware receives the bonus.
Rarity of Surprise: The occurrence of surprise is generally
rare and it should not be used for every battle. Simply walking
around the corner and coming face-to-face with a group of monsters is likely to be surprising but equally so for both sides. In
fact, that is the whole purpose of initiative orderto determine
which combatants are able to act first. Surprise should only be
used when there is clearly a situation where certain combatants
would be completely unaware of being attacked.

GAMEPLAY
Surprise vs. Distraction: Penalties for being surprised
and distracted do not stack togethersurprise takes precedence.
Gaining surprise against an opponent who is also distracted only
grants a +2 bonus to your characters Precision check (not +3).

Option #1: Vexith Initiative App

The free Vexith Initiative App is the recommended method


for generating the initiative order during combat. It creates a new
ordered list of all combatants turns for each round of battle, plus
it automatically checks for lucky and tough breaks and highlights
those combatants who receive them. The advantage of using the
app is that it can help to speed up the pace of combat by freeing
the GM and players from having to make Initiative checks.
Either the GM or one of the players should be assigned the
responsibilities of maintaining the app and announcing each combatants turn aloud to the group. The app itself contains simple
instructions for its use and operation, so please refer to the app
for more information.

Option #2: Traditional Method

Initiative order can also be generated by hand, which is the


more traditional method often used in other roleplaying games.
Maybe your group prefers the rolling of actual dice rather than
allowing the app to do so electronically, or perhaps your group
currently lacks access to the app. Whatever the reason, using the
traditional method does involve a few notable differences.
Static Initiative Order: Unlike the app, which generates
a new initiative order for each round of combat, the traditional
method establishes the order at the beginning of the battle and
then recycles the same order for each new round. Every player
makes an Initiative check at the start of combat and the GM does
the same for every NPC or similar group. Note that while these
kinds of Initiative checks may max, they may not succeed (in the
standard sense), critically succeed, fail, or critically failthey are
simply used to generate an ordered list for all combatants.
Either the GM or one of the players should be assigned the
responsibility of creating an ordered list that arranges all combatants according to their Initiative check results from highest
to lowest. Allow rerolls for ties, but rerolls should not affect the
order of combatants that did not tie. As combat progresses each
combatants turn should be announced aloud to the group or displayed via other means (written on a dry-erase board).
Lucky/Tough Breaks: When using the traditional method
your group must also decide on how they prefer to handle lucky
and tough breaks. The following three options present different
ways of doing so:
Rolling a d20: Many other roleplaying games make use of
an additional twenty-sided die, which the Vexith Roleplaying Game does not use. If your group has access to
d20s then each player can roll one at the beginning of
each round, with a result of 1 indicating a tough break
and a result of 20 indicating a lucky break. However,
this option can prove somewhat tedious, especially for
the GM, who must roll for multiple combatants.
Rolling a Percentile Die: Like the d20, some roleplaying games make use of a special ten-sided percentile
die. When rolled alongside a standard ten-sided die the

pair can produce a percentage result. If your group has


access to percentile dice then each player can make a
percentile roll at the beginning of each round, with a
result of 0105 representing a tough break and a result
of 9600 representing a lucky break. This option is the
most tedious choice, even more so than the d20 variant,
since it requires rolling multiple dice.
Rule Removal: If your group would rather not roll for
lucky or tough breaks each round it is possible to ignore
both rules entirely by removing them from the game.
Additionally, characters and creatures should be barred
from selecting any advantages or disadvantages that
modify these rules (Lucky Defense, Lucky Mobility,
etc.). Note that while this option can help to speed up
the pace of combat it also removes much of the chaos
(and fun) that often occurs during battle!

YOUR TURN

Your character can perform one or more actions during his


turn. An action constitutes doing something that requires focus
and time. Many actions require a discipline check or profession
check but not all. The following list provides examples of some
common actions your character can take on his turn:
Make an attack
Cast a spell
Consume a potion (one swig)
Sprint
Open a door
Pick up an item
Sheathe or stow an item (dropping a held item is a free)
Read a spell scroll
Speak detailed commands or instructions

Multiple Actions

Attempting multiple, different actions during the same turn


is possible, but all actions become increasingly more difficult.
Each additional action beyond the first imposes a cumulative 2
penalty to all actions during your characters turn; damage checks
are not penalized. For instance, attempting two actions during the
same turn would incur a 2 penalty on both checks, attempting
three actions would incur a 4 penalty, and so on.
Your character may not attempt the same action more than
once per round, such as casting two spells (even if separate spell
effects are attempted) or consuming two swigs of a potion (even
if each swig is from a separate potion). The only exceptions to this
rule are for making multiple attacks (see below) and for creatures
that are affected by the Hasten spell effect or similar abilities.
Declaring Number of Actions Beforehand: At the start of
your characters turn you must declare the number of actions that
he intends to attempt. The specific actions themselves are not important and can even be changed on the spot, but declaring the
number of actions is necessary since it determines the multiple
action penalty that needs to be applied. Extra actions cannot be
added during your characters turn (free actions are exceptions).
Fewer actions may be attempted than what was declared, but your
character must still endure the full multiple action penalty.

103

CHAPTER 4
For example, if a player declares that his character intends
to perform three actions then each would suffer a multiple action
penalty of 4. For his first action he might choose to attack an
enemy, and if the enemy falls he could then move his base Speed
and sprint to a nearby door as his second action, then open the
door as his third action. However, if his initial attack fails to drop
his enemy he might decide to cast a reach spell to finish her off,
after which he could then move and sprint toward to the door,
but he would be unable to open it until his next turn because he
already used his three actions (making the failed attack, casting
the spell, and sprinting). Alternatively, if his enemy managed to
survive the attack and the spell, your character might choose to
forgo his movement altogether, but his checks for both actions
would still suffer the full 4 multiple action penalty even though
one less action (sprinting) was attempted.
Multiple Attacks: Multiple attacks can be performed in the
same turn, but only one attack per each limb/weapon is allowed.
Additionally, if one of your characters limbs is used to cast a
spell then it cannot also be used to make an attack, and vice versa
(mental [M] spells still allow for head attacks to be performed in
the same round, such as bites and head-butts). For instance, your
character could cast a spell using her left hand, throw a dagger
with her right hand, kick with her left foot, and head-butt her target all in one turn, but doing so would incur a 6 multiple action
penalty to all four actions.
Attacking with a two-handed weapon counts as an attack for
both limbs that wield it and so it can only make one attack per
round. Likewise, creatures that possess multiple unarmed attack
forms on the same limb (a creature that has a bite attack and horns
on its head) can only make use of one such attack per round.

Trivial Actions

Trivial actions (those with an SV 1) do not typically require


discipline or profession checks, such as when opening a door
or taking a swig from a potion. No check is required for a standard success, but you may still opt to attempt checks for certain
actions, such as those that are capable of special outcomes for
achieving critical successeshowever, attempting such a check
means that it is now also capable of failing or critically failing.
Trivial actions do require a discipline or profession check
of SV 1 whenever your characters total modifier for the attempt
would be negative, since achieving a result of at least 1 is no longer guaranteed. Fatigue, multiple action penalties, injuries, and
even inherent attribute and discipline penalties can sometimes
necessitate that a check be made.
For example, assume that your character has a total Agility
modifier of +1 and wishes to pick up an item from the ground
during battle. He may do so without having to make an Agility
check, but if he also wants to attempt one additional action in
the same round then he will be forced to make an Agility check of
SV 1 due to the 2 multiple action penalty, which causes his total
Agility modifier to dip down to a negative value (1).
Agility Checks: The Agility discipline serves as the default
check for most physical actions that are not already paired with
another discipline (opening a door, consuming a potion, etc.). The
GM may instead require that an alternative discipline check be
made if it seems more appropriate for the situation.

104

Free Actions

Actions that require little focus or time are considered to be


free actions, meaning that they do not count against your characters number of declared actions for the turn and do not incur or
suffer from multiple action penalties. The majority of free actions
do not even have or require associated checks, and those that do
are always clearly designated as being free; such checks still apply penalties from fatigue, as well as modifiers from lucky/tough
breaks when those events occur during combat. The following
example actions are all considered to be free:
Moving a number of squares equal to one of your characters
Speed stats (refer to Combat Actions & Tactics: Movement and Position later in this chapter)
Speaking a few words or a short sentence; speaking detailed
commands or instructions is usually counted as a trivial
action, and longer dialogue may require multiple rounds
Drawing or readying weapons or easily accessible items; if
an item is inaccessible, such as in a backpack, drawing or
readying it counts as a trivial action instead
Swapping items between hands
Dropping a held item; sheathing or stowing an item counts
as a trivial action
Loading ammunition (unless the weapon is Slow)
Dropping to the ground (falling prone)
Reactionary checks in emergencies, such as the free Agility
check to reduce falling damage
Certain trait checks that are made to initiate special abilities
(Defender, Sentinel, an orcs Savage Combat trait, etc.)
Opposed checks (typically only the defenders check is free)

PRECISION CHECKS

The Melee Precision, Ranged Precision, and Spell Precision


disciplines are used to determine whether or not an attack hits
its target in combat. All Precision checks are compared against a
targets Defense stat.
Area-Effect Attacks: These attacks are made in the same
way as single target attacks, but an area-effect template is used to
determine which targets are affected. A single Precision check is
compared against all targets whose occupied spaces (any portion)
are overlapped by the template.
Creature Size Modifiers: Your characters creature size applies an Accuracy modifier to all of her Precision Checks. Refer
to the Creature Size Modifiers and Multiples table in Chapter 1
(or Chapter 7) for details.

Critical Successes

Precision checks that achieve a critical success against the


targets Defense stat grant a +5 bonus to the attacks damage
check. Note that no additional bonuses are granted for achieving
multiple critical successes.
Shields and Block Values: A critical success is always determined relative to the targets Defense stat, not according to the
combined block value that he gains by equipping a shield. For
example, if the target has a Defense and combined block value of
4/6 then a critical success would occur on a result of 9 or higher
(5 points higher than his Defense stat of 4).

GAMEPLAY
Unarmed Attacks: Your characters unarmed attacks, such
as punches and kicks, cannot achieve critical successes on their
Precision checks (unless bolstered by specific advantages). However, Enhanced Unarmed Attacks, like claws and bite attacks,
count as weapons and can achieve critical successes.

Melee Precision vs. Ranged Precision

All weapons can make use of both the Melee Precision and
Ranged Precision disciplines, but most weapons clearly favor one
type of attack over the other. For instance, both a sword and a
dagger can make melee attacks, but the dagger is also balanced
for throwingthe sword can still be thrown but not very well.
Penalties: Your character suffers a 2 penalty on his Precision check and damage check when making an attack with a
weapon using the discipline for which it was not designed, such
as when throwing a greatsword at an enemy. A base range increment of 2 is used for any item that is not normally designed for
making ranged attacks (remember to adjust this value according
to the throwers creature size). Ranged weapons with the Melee
Capable special quality, such as a dagger, are not penalized.

Ranged Attack/Spell Penalties

Ranged attacks and distance spells suffer increasing penalties depending on the distance from your character to the target.
A range increment, as measured in squares (1 square = 5 feet), is
assigned to weapons and spells, with every multiple of that increment representing a greater tier of distance. Each successive tier
beyond the first imposes a cumulative 1 penalty to your characters Precision check or spellcasting discipline check. Ranged distance is counted in the same manner as movement (each adjacent
square counts as one, diagonals count as one-two-one-two, etc.).
For example, if a weapon has a range increment of 7 squares
then attacking a target up to 7 squares away incurs no penalty.
Attacking a target 8 to 14 squares away incurs a 1 penalty, 15 to
21 squares away incurs a 2 penalty, and so on.
Attacking/Casting while Threatened: Attempting to make
a ranged attack or attempting to cast a distance spell/ability within
the threat range of a hostile target causes your character to suffer a
2 penalty on his Precision and spellcasting discipline checks due
to the heightened risk of attack (reach spells/abilities and those
with the mental casting spell descriptor [M] are not penalized).
Surprised or helpless targets do not threaten your character since
they do not exert zones of control, but attacks against them are
still penalized if your character is also threatened by other targets.

Called Shots

Your character can attempt to hit a specific body part of a target by making a called shot. Doing so incurs a 2 penalty on your
characters Precision check, but if it succeeds then her attack/
spell gains a unique benefit depending on the type of called shot
being performed (standard or specialized). Called shots may only
be performed by Precision-based, single target attacks and spells.
Standard Called Shots: Standard called shots that manage
to inflict health loss always cause the target to suffer a specific
injury, which also tends to be more severe than those caused by
normal attacks. For each additional point of health loss inflicted,
including each point of implied health loss, the severity of the

specific injury is increased by +1 (i.e. no increased severity for


losing one health point, +1 for losing two health points, +2 for
losing three health points, and so on). Refer to Specific Injuries
later in this section for more information.
Specialized Called Shots: Specialized called shots allow
your character to initiate special combat actions like disarms,
grapples, and trips. They can still inflict specific injuries, but they
are no better at doing so than normal attacks (i.e. requiring the
loss of two or more health points to inflict a specific injury).
Shields and Block Values: The total result of a called shot
is always compared against the targets combined block value (his
Defense stat + his shields block value). Standard called shots and
some specialized called shots may still inflict damage against the
shield normally, but the called shots potential benefits are lost
since it failed to strike its intended location.
Creature Vulnerabilities: Some creatures have body parts
that are particularly vulnerable to attack, such as a vampires
heart (torso) or a hydras necks (heads). Succeeding on a standard
called shot against these locations can hinder or even destroy/kill
such creatures but may require additional factors to be considered
(weapons with the Wooden Point special quality, an increased
called shot penalty of 4, etc.).

DAMAGE

Your character makes a damage check whenever he successfully hits a target. The die roll and its modifiers vary according to
each specific attack (weapons, spells, unarmed attacks, etc.). The
total damage result is then compared against the targets Total
Resilience stat. Note that the damage results from some attacks/
spells are compared against the targets Base Resilience stat instead, such as the Damage: Mental spell effect.
Unarmed Attacks: The base damage die is d4 for unarmed
attacks and they cannot achieve critical successes on their Precision checks (unless bolstered by certain advantages). However,
Enhanced Unarmed Attacks, like claws and bite attacks, tend to
have higher die rolls and can achieve critical successes.
Two-Handed Attacks (melee weapons only): Using two
hands when attacking with a one-handed melee weapon adds +1
to its damage check (two-handed weapons already include this
bonus). Thrown ranged weapons that possess the Melee Capable
special quality gain this bonus if performing a two-handed melee
attack. Unarmed attacks cannot normally receive this bonus.

HEALTH

One of your characters health points is lost whenever she


suffers damage that is equal to her Resilience stat (either Base Resilience or Total Resilience depending on the type of attack, spell,
or mishap), and another health point is lost for every additional
five full points that the damage exceeds her Resilience stat. Lost
health points are removed from your characters health row and
are placed into her fatigue row.
Specific Injuries: Any time that your character loses two or
more health points from a single attack, spell, or mishap, including implied health loss, she also suffers a specific injury. Refer to
Specific Injuries later in this section for more information.

105

CHAPTER 4

Wounded

Your character can continue to move, act, and function normally as long as she has at least one remaining health point in her
health row. However, once all of her health points are lost she is
considered wounded and must make an immediate free Toughness check, applying fatigue penalties, lucky/tough break modifiers, and penalties from additional implied health loss (see below);
this particular Toughness check cannot critically fail. The result
determines the extent of your characters wounds.
Having one or more health points healed means that your
character is no longer considered wounded and she may once
again move, act, and function normally. Bleeding also stops and
she rouses if unconscious. Each time that an attack, spell, or mishap reduces her health point total to zero she is again considered
wounded and must make a new Toughness check.
Implied Health Loss: Any attack, spell, or mishap that removes your characters final health point can potentially imply
additional health loss. Each point of implied health loss imposes
a cumulative 1 penalty on your characters Toughness check,
in addition to fatigue penalties and lucky/tough break modifiers.
For example, if your character only had one health point
remaining and was then hit by another attack, which imposed the
loss of three health points, she would suffer a 2 penalty on her
Toughness check, in addition to fatigue penalties and lucky/tough
break modifiers. She only had one actual health point left to lose,
so the loss of the other two health points would be implied.
Subsequent attacks, spells, or mishaps that occur after all of
your characters health has been depleted can also imply health
loss, which automatically causes her wounded condition to worsen according to how many points are implied. For instance, if
your character is already disabled and then suffers health loss
from another attack she would be knocked unconscious if the loss
of one point were implied or killed outright if the loss of two or
more points were implied.

Wounded
Result
10+
5 to 9
0 to 4
Negative

Conditions
Unstoppable
Disabled
Incapacitated/Unconscious
Destroyed/Killed

Conditions of Being Wounded

Depending on the result of the Toughness check your character can be affected by several conditions:
Unstoppable: Your character is somehow able to find the
momentum to keep fighting on, albeit briefly. She ignores
all fatigue penalties for this round and the next round (she
is still wounded but suffers no penalties on her checks).
Immediately after her turn ends on the following round,
fatigue penalties return and she is disabled (see below).
Suffering further implied health loss during this time automatically reduces her condition to disabled (1 implied
point), incapacitated/unconscious (2 implied points), or
destroyed/killed (3 or more implied points).

106

Disabled: Your character falls prone and is unable to stand


on her own (without support) until at least one health
point is healed. She can still take actions and/or crawl one
square per round but must remain prone (standing with
support is still treated as being prone). Suffering further
implied health loss automatically reduces her condition to
incapacitated/unconscious (1 implied point) or destroyed/
killed (2 or more implied points).
Incapacitated (non-living only): If non-living, your character cannot move or attempt significant actions, such as
attacks, abilities, or spells (even mental abilities and spells
are prohibited). She remains alert and can communicate,
if able but is otherwise completely helpless. This condition persists indefinitely until at least one health point is
healed. Suffering further implied health loss (any number
of points) automatically destroys your character.
Unconscious (living only): If living, your character falls
unconscious and is considered helpless. She can make a
Constitution check of SV 5 immediately after combat and
then once again every hour to see if she rouses on her
own. She also rouses automatically if at least one health
point is healed. A successful use of the Healing discipline
(SV 5) can also rouse her but only after battle has ended. Suffering further implied health loss (any number of
points) automatically kills your character.

SPECIFIC INJURIES

You must roll for a specific injury whenever your character


loses two or more health points, including implied health loss,
from a single attack, spell, or mishap. However, standard called
shots inflict a specific injury whenever your character loses one
or more health points, including implied health loss; specialized
called shots still require the loss of two or more health points.
Hit Location: It is usually necessary to determine the location of your characters injury by making a d12 roll. The GM may
also allow for alternative rolls if the attack/spell was delivered
from a lower position (d6) or from a higher position (d6+6), such
as when creatures of significantly different sizes attack each other
with melee attacks. If a target lacks certain body parts simply
reroll for a different location or select one that serves a similar
function. For instance, xsessyri have long serpentine tails instead
of legs, but their tails serve the same purpose in terms of mobility.
Note that called shots automatically indicate which location is hit,
while mental damage always affects your characters head.
Severity: Once the hit location has been determined, roll d10
and add any severity modifiers to the result to discover the extent
of the injury. Inflicting additional health loss, including implied
health loss, increases the severity by +1 for each additional health
point. For instance, a normal attack that manages to inflict the loss
of three health points would increase its severity by +1, whereas a
standard called shot that inflicted the same amount of health loss
would have increased its severity by +2. Certain weapons and
attacks that possess the Vicious special quality can increase the
severity of specific injuries by +1, as can the inherent qualities of
certain monsters and species, such as orcs. All severity modifiers
stack freely with one another, regardless of their source.

GAMEPLAY
Injuries/Penalties: Penalty modifiers are treated as damaged faculties. Those that result from impaired, broken, or destroyed/severed body parts or permanent afflictions cannot be
restored until the injury itself has been healed. Refer to General
Rules: Healing later in this chapter for more information.
Bleeding (living only): Certain specific injury results also
cause your character to begin bleeding (marked in red). He must
make a free Constitution check at the beginning of each of his
turns. Failing the check with a result of 4 or lower worsens subsequent checks by imposing a cumulative 1 penalty; a negative
result also incurs the loss of one health point. Note that some severity results also indicate a further cumulative bleeding penalty
of 1 or 2 (also marked in red).
For example, getting a severity result of 7 would impose
a bleeding penalty of 1, whereas getting a severity result of 9
would not impose any additional penalty at all. Getting a severity
result of 12 or higher always imposes a bleeding penalty of 2.
Bleeding automatically stops whenever one health point is
healed or if the Healing discipline is successfully used on your
character (specifically to stop the bleeding). Achieving a result of
8 or higher on one of the bleeding Constitution checks means that
the bleeding stops on its own.
Your character may only suffer from one bleeding effect at a
time, despite receiving multiple specific injuries. Each additional
bleeding result simply imposes a further cumulative 1 penalty,
beyond what is indicated, to all bleeding Constitution checks until
the bleeding stops. Severity results that already impose a 1 or 2
bleeding penalty are worsened to 2 or 3, respectively.

Bleeding
Result
8+
5 to 7
0 to 4
Negative

Outcome
Bleeding stops
No change; check again next round
Bleeding worsens (additional cumulative
1 penalty); check again next round
Lose one health point; bleeding worsens
(additional cumulative 1 penalty);
check again next round

1, 2, or 3
4 or 5
6 or 7

TORSO
5 to 7

8 or 9

10 or 11

12+
1, 2, or 3
4 or 5
WING
8

(use Torso
if wingless)

6 or 7
8 or 9
10 or 11
12+
1, 2, or 3
4 or 5

ARM
9 or 10

6 or 7
8 or 9
10 or 11
12+
1, 2, or 3
4 or 5

Specific Injuries

[Hit Location: d12 whole, d6 lower, d6+6 upper]


[Severity: d10 + modifiers; red results also cause bleeding]
Location Severity
Injuries/Penalties
1, 2, or 3
1 Run Speed, 1 Running
4 or 5
2 Run Speed, 2 Running
2 Run Speed, 2 Running,
6 or 7
1 Defense (land and water);
LEG
1 bleeding
1 to 4
8 or 9
Crippled Leg (R1; impaired)
10 or 11
Crippled Leg (R2; broken)
Crippled Leg (R2; destroyed/
12+
severed); 2 bleeding

6 or 7
HEAD
11 or 12

8 or 9
10 or 11

12+

1 Might, 1 Brute Force


2 Might, 2 Brute Force
2 Might, 2 Brute Force,
1 Base Resilience; 1 bleeding
Internal injuries , impaired:
2 Might, 2 Brute Force,
1 Base Resilience
Cracked ribs , broken:
2 Might, 2 Brute Force,
1 Base Resilience
Shattered spine , destroyed:
body is paralyzed from the
waist down; 2 bleeding
1 Flight Speed, 1 Flying
2 Flight Speed, 2 Flying
2 Flight Speed, 2 Flying,
1 Defense (air); 1 bleeding
Crippled Wing (R1; impaired)
Crippled Wing (R2; broken)
Crippled Wing (R2; destroyed/
severed); 2 bleeding
1 to all Precision checks and
damage checks with injured arm
1 to all actions and damage
checks with injured arm
2 to all actions and damage
checks with injured arm;
1 bleeding
Crippled Arm (R1; impaired)
Crippled Arm (R2; broken)
Crippled Arm (R2; destroyed/
severed); 2 bleeding
1 Intellect, 1 Concentration
1 Intellect, 1 Concentration,
Deaf (R1; impaired)
1 Intellect, 1 Concentration,
Blind (75% chance R1, 25%
chance R2; impaired);
1 bleeding
2 Intellect, 2 Concentration,
Deaf (R1; permanent)
2 Intellect, 2 Concentration,
Blind (75% chance R1, 25%
chance R2; permanent)
Head destroyed/severed (kills
most creatures); GM will select
penalties for those that survive,
in addition to 2 bleeding

107

CHAPTER 4

COMBAT ACTIONS & TACTICS


This section highlights various specialized combat actions
that your character can attempt, as well as the tactical mechanics
regarding movement and position. It also describes some of the
most common situational conditions that can arise during battle.

COMBAT ACTIONS

Your character may attempt a variety of specialized combat


actions beyond simply making attacks with his weapon, such as
bullrushing or disarming an enemy.

Attacking Objects

Attacking an object directly works in much the same way as


attacking a creature. Attended objects, or those that are equipped,
use the Defense stat of the creature that is holding them and also
require a called shot to hit. Unattended objects, or those that are
not equipped by a creature, use the minimum Defense value that
corresponds to their equivalent size (see below).
Attacking Moving Objects (unattended): Moving objects
are harder to hit and impose a minimum penalty of 2 on your
characters Precision check according to their speed (GMs call).
Attacking Through Full Cover: Situations can arise where
your character (or a monster) may wish to attack an opponent
through full cover, such as when an archer shoots an arrow
through a glass window or when a giant punches through the roof
of a building. Note that if your opponent has partial cover, rather
than full cover, then a normal attack is used instead.
Begin by applying a penalty to your characters Precision
check: 2 if your opponents precise location is known; 4 if it is
not. Next, if the attack hits the cover, make a damage check and
treat the cover as either an object or a barrier (GMs call). Lastly,
if the attack also hits your opponents Defense stat, and assuming
that there is still excess damage remaining after the object/barrier
is destroyed, then the remaining damage is applied toward your
opponents Total Resilience stat. Keep in mind that the Damage:
Mental spell effect and similar mental attacks are still penalized
for cover (2 or 4 to their spellcasting discipline checks), but
that their damage checks bypass the cover entirely and are instead
compared against your opponents Base Resilience stat.
Area-Effect Damage: Area-effect attacks inflict their damage against all affected creatures and unattended objects. For the
sake of simplicity, attended objects are not usually affected by
area-effect attacks. This rule is a necessary concession so that the
game doesnt slow to a crawl while the GM is forced to check
damage against every piece of gear for every affected creature.
Attended objects can still be attacked directly with a normal single target attack by making a standard called shot.
Breaking Objects: Objects have Resilience values based
upon their primary material and equivalent size (see below). If the
damage check against an object equals or exceeds its Resilience
value then it is weakened and may suffer minor penalties pertaining to its function (GMs call). A critical success, or another
success if already weakened, breaks the object instead.

108

Breaking Barriers/Shields: Barriers are objects that are


typically considered immovable, such as doors, walls, and barricades; shields are also treated as barriers. Unlike standard objects,
barriers are assigned a durability value of 3. Damage checks that
equal or exceed the barriers Resilience value reduce its durability
by one point for each success and critical success. The barrier is
broken once its durability value reaches 0 (barriers and shields
do not suffer from a weakened state like standard objects and
weapons). It is ultimately left up to the GMs discretion to decide
whether or not an object qualifies as a barrier.
Additionally, the size of the attack relative to the size of the
barrier should be taken into account. Against larger barriers, such
as buildings, an attack may only weaken or destroy a portion of
the structure rather than the whole thing. For instance, attempting
to bash through a wall may only weaken or destroy an equivalent
segment of the whole wall. The GM will determine when this rule
applies and how the targeted barrier is affected.
Breaking Weapons: Every weapon is assigned its own
unique Resilience value, which is based upon its type, special
qualities, grade, and the corresponding creature size for which
it was designed. If the damage check against a weapon equals or
exceeds its Resilience value it is considered weakened and suffers
a 1 penalty to both its Precision checks and damage checks until it is repaired. A critical success, or another success if already
weakened, breaks the weapon instead.
Repairs: In most cases, weakened objects and weapons can
be repaired for a cost equal to about 25% of their base value;
barriers and shields that have lost durability can also be repaired
for this amount, which fully restores their durability to 3. Broken
objects and weapons may or may not be able to be repaired at all
(GMs call); broken barriers and shields cannot be repaired.

Material Resilience Values


Material
Glass/Ceramic
Leather
Wood

Resil.
2
4
6

Material
Soft Metal
Stone
Hard Metal

Resil.
8
10
12

Object Size Values


Object's
Equivalent Size
Tiny
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Enormous
Gigantic
Colossal

Defense
2
2
1
1
1
0
0
0

Resilience
Modifier
2
1
0
+2
+4
+7
+10
+14

GAMEPLAY

Bullrushing

A bullrush attempts to push one or more targets backwards,


in a straight line, forcing them to surrender their ground. Your
character must perform the bullrush as part of his movement for
the round, and it may even be combined with sprinting if he is
willing to accept multiple action penalties.
Begin by making a Might check of SV 5, which establishes
an initial value referred to as momentum. Your characters Combat Maneuvers stat is added to his result and additional +1 bonuses are also granted if wielding a shield (excluding bucklers) and/
or from having the Enhanced Unarmed Attack: Horns/Tusks trait.
Momentum is based on your characters creature size, with
larger creatures having a distinct advantage against smaller targets. Each success and critical success on your characters Might
check contributes a specific number to his momentum value, as
indicated below. For instance, a medium character who achieves
two critical successes would have a momentum value of 12 points.

Creature
Size
Tiny
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Enormous
Gigantic
Colossal

Momentum/Counter
(per success/critical)

1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128

If his Might check succeeds then he may proceed with the


bullrush by attempting to move forward against his targets 5
feet at a time. All targets, including allies, that are currently in
the space (or spaces) where he intends to move, and all successive targets that are directly behind those (and so on), must each
choose to either attempt to evade or resist the bullrush:
Attempting to Evade: A target whose movement is unrestricted may attempt to evade the bullrush by succeeding
on a free Agility check of SV 5. Each success and critical
success allows him to immediately move 5 feet, for free,
into an unoccupied space beyond the immediate spaces
that your character is attempting to move during his bullrush. The path to the space and the space itself must both
be unobstructed and offer enough room to accommodate
the targets size. If the target fails he must instead attempt
to resist the bullrush as a last resort, which increases the
difficulty of his Might check to SV 8 (see below).
Attempting to Resist: A target who wishes to resist the bullrush (SV 5), or who is forced to do so as a last resort from
failing to evade (SV 8), must make a free Might check to
counter your characters momentum. Each targets Combat Maneuvers stat is added to his result and additional +1
bonuses are also granted if wielding a shield (excluding
bucklers) and/or from having the Enhanced Unarmed Attack: Horns/Tusks trait. Each success and critical success
on a targets Might check contributes a specific number
that serves to counter your own characters momentum,
as indicated in the table above.

Gaining Ground: For each 5-foot increment of progression


all targets that successfully manage to resist the bullrush subtract
their counter values from your characters momentum (specifically, only targets affected by the current 5-foot advance), prior to
determining whether or not your character moves forward. Note
that each targets counter value is only subtracted once during the
entire bullrush, even if the target is pushed back multiple times.
As long as your characters momentum remains above 0 he
can continue moving forward. However, each step forward counts
as double movement since he is essentially moving through zones
of control. He may continue moving forward in 5-foot increments,
if desired, but any new targets that have not yet attempted to resist
must do so and subtract their counter values from your characters
momentum. Targets that have already subtracted their counter
values do not do so again but are instead pushed back until your
characters momentum reaches 0. The bullrush also ceases if your
characters movement runs out or if he willfully decides to end
the maneuver. Lastly, there may be additional consequences if
targets encounter a barrier or other dangers (see below).
Barriers & Other Dangers: All targets that are unable to
surrender ground due to a wall or other barrier, or because those
behind them are blocked by a barrier, suffer automatic crushing
damage equal to d4 + your characters Brute Force stat; the bullrush also ceases. Targets that are able to surrender ground ignore
the crushing damage but are still forced backwards 5 feet.
Targets may also be pushed over ledges or into other dangers
(fire pits, area-effect spells, etc.). In such cases the GM should
allow affected targets to make another free Agility check (or a
similar check) of SV 8 to avoid the danger. Note that unlike in
other perilous situations where SV 5 is typically sufficient, the
SV in this instance is higher since each target has already had
a chance to evade the bullrush and failed, and is therefore more
likely to be off-balance.

Charging

Your character can make a melee charging attack by moving


forward in a straight line a minimum distance, as noted in the
table below. His first attack receives a +2 bonus to its damage
check if its hits, but your character is considered distracted until
his next turn. Note that the bonus damage only applies to the first
attack, regardless of success or failure, and that even if it misses
your character is still considered distracted. This is an optional
maneuver on your characters part, so simply moving in a straight
line does not force a normal attack to become a charge.
Mounted Weapons: Making a charging attack using a weapon with the Mounted special quality while riding a mount that has
combat training grants a +1 bonus to the attacks Melee Precision
check and grants an additional +1 bonus to its damage check if
it hits (in addition to the +2 damage bonus from charging). Additionally, the first melee attack of both the rider and his mount may
each benefit from the charge. However, the required distance for
a mounted charge is based upon the mounts creature size instead
and the mount is considered distracted. Refer to General Rules:
Pets & Mounts later in this chapter for more information.
Horns/Tusks: Creatures with the Enhanced Unarmed Attack: Horns/Tusks trait gain an additional +2 bonus to their damage checks when using their horns/tusks for charging attacks.

109

CHAPTER 4
Ettins: When an ettin makes a charging attack both of its
minds may apply its benefits on their first melee attacks, but the
ettin is considered distracted until its next turn (despite being
harder to distract in other ways).

Charging Distance
Creature Size
Tiny
Small/Medium
Large/Huge
Enormous/Gigantic
Colossal

Minimum Distance
3 squares (15 feet)
4 squares (20 feet)
5 squares (25 feet)
6 squares (30 feet)
7 squares (35 feet)

Defending

Your character can opt to forgo all other actions on her turn
in order to bolster her defenses. Doing so grants a +1 bonus to her
Concentration, Defense, and Fortitude stats until her next turn.
While defending she can still move her base Speed and may perform free actions, but sprinting and other actions are not allowed.
Regarding ettins, if either mind defends then the ettin gains
a +1 bonus to its Defense stat (the bonus is capped at +1 even
if both minds defend). Only a mind that defends applies the +1
bonus to its Concentration and Fortitude stats; however, the other
mind may still perform actions, including sprinting (if dominant).
Defensive Weapons: When defending, if your character has
a weapon held at the ready that possesses the Defensive special
quality then she gains an additional +1 bonus to Defense (making
her total Defense bonus +2). Note that her Concentration and Fortitude stats still only receive a +1 bonus.
Impaling Weapons: When defending, if your character has
a weapon held at the ready that possesses the Impaling special
quality then she can make a free melee attack at any target who
attempts to either bullrush or charge into or through her threatened
range (including the weapons reach, if applicable).

Disarming

Your character can attempt to disarm an opponent, thus causing him to drop a carried item or weapon. Begin by attempting a
specialized called shot aimed at one of your opponents arms, and
if it succeeds, you can also choose to make a damage check. Note
that inflicting damage is entirely optional and that the disarming
attempt proceeds regardless of whether or not damage is inflicted.
Next, if the called shot was successful, then your opponent
must make either a free Agility or Might check (his choice), to
which he adds his Combat Maneuvers stat. The SV is equal to 5
+ your characters own Combat Maneuvers stat. If your opponent
fails his check then the item/weapon is disarmed and falls in his
space; failing by at least 3 points hurls it d4 squares away in a
somewhat random direction, typically away from the direction
of the attack. The GM may grant other creatures near the items
path a chance to catch it by making a free Agility check of SV 8.
Special Considerations: The following conditions apply to
all disarming attempts:
Bucklers and weapons that possess the Attached special
quality cannot be disarmed.

110

GAMEPLAY
Disarming attempts made with a weapon that has the Disarm special quality add +1 to your opponents SV.
Items/weapons that are being held with two or more hands/
appendages are harder to disarm and grant a +1 bonus
to your opponents check for each extra hand/appendage holding the item (up to a maximum bonus of +4).

Grappling

Your character can attempt to grapple an opponent, thereby


keeping him from being able to move or act until he breaks free or
is willingly released. Melee grappling attempts can only be made
using suitable natural appendages (arms, tentacles, etc.) or bites/
stingers (via the Enhanced Unarmed Attack: Bite/Stinger trait),
and then only against opponents that are directly adjacent to your
characters occupied space, despite having greater natural reach.
Begin by attempting a specialized called shot aimed at any
location of your choosing. If successful, grappling attempts that
are made using bites/stingers are also allowed to make damage
checks, which is one of the intrinsic benefits of such attacks; grappling attempts that are made with natural appendages do not get
to make damage checks (at least not initially; see Inflict Wrestling
Damage below). The grappling attempt then proceeds regardless
of whether or not damage is inflicted.
Next, if the called shot was successful, then both you and
your opponent must make free opposed Agility or Might checks
(each combatants choice), to which you add your respective
Combat Maneuvers stats. If your opponent wins then the grapple
was unsuccessful. If you win, then the grapple holds. However,
while the grapple holds, both your character and her opponent
are considered distracted, plus neither combatant exerts a zone of
control or threatens nearby spaces.
Breaking Free (opponent): Your opponent may attempt to
break free of the grapple at the beginning of each of his turns
by making another opposed check against your character, both
of which are free actions. If your opponent wins he manages to
break free and may immediately act without restriction. If he fails
he loses his ability to move or sprint for the round and may only
perform non-physical actions (such as casting mental spells [M]).
Follow-Up Moves (your character): Once your character
has successfully grappled an opponent she can perform a variety
of actions against him, but first she must attempt another opposed
check (see above) for each action. However, be aware that your
characters checks for follow-up moves are not considered free
actions, unlike your opponents checks, which are always free;
each move requires its own check and accrues its own multiple
action penalty. She can perform multiple follow-up moves during
her turn, but each type may only be attempted once per round.
Succeeding on the opposed check allows your character to
perform one the following actions (failing does not release your
opponent from the grapple):
Inflict Weapon Damage: If your character wins the opposed check and is currently wielding a Light or Small
one-handed melee weapon (including ranged weapons
that are Melee Capable) or has an Enhanced Unarmed
Attack (except for barbs or a hind kick) she may automatically inflict its standard damage against her opponents Total Resilience stat.

Inflict Wrestling Damage: If your character wins the opposed check she automatically inflicts d4 damage + her
Brute Force stat against her opponents Base Resilience
stat; wearing armor spikes or having barbs also adds
an additional +2 bonus (spikes and barbs do not stack).
Move, Push, or Drag Opponent: If your character wins
the opposed check she may automatically move, push
or drag her opponent, but your character must remain
adjacent to her opponent and all movement costs are
doubled (sprinting is not possible). Your character may
then release her opponent as a free action, such as when
dropping him over the edge of a pit or cliff, and doing
so ends the grapple. In such cases, the GM should generally grant him a free Agility check of SV 5 to avoid
falling by grabbing onto the ledge. Lastly, note that typically the differences in size and strength between your
character and her opponent are already factored into
the outcome by applying Combat Maneuvers to each
of your opposed checks; however, in situations where
your character wishes to actually lift her opponent into
the air then the GM may request an additional free
Might check (without applying Combat Maneuvers) to
see if she can lift her opponents total weight, assuming
that her opponents total weight exceeds her free limit.
Pin Opponent: If your character wins the opposed check
she automatically pins her opponent to the ground or
against a nearby vertical surface (wall, column, etc.),
which renders him prone and grants your character a +2
bonus on further opposed checks as long as he remains
pinned. If your opponents creature size is equal to or
larger than your characters own creature size then your
character is also rendered proneyour character is not
rendered prone when pinning smaller opponents. While
an opponent is pinned your character may attempt to
restrain him using shackles, rope, or other such devices
by succeeding on another opposed check (treated as a
separate follow-up move).
Silence Opponent: If your character wins the opposed
check she may muffle her opponents ability to speak,
scream, or otherwise make noise. Certain creatures that
do not possess a mouth and who speak through other
methods, such as lavossi, may not typically be silenced.
Creature size can also be a limiting factor since a much
smaller creature is unlikely to be able to reach and/or
fully cover an opponents mouth (GMs call).
Number of Arms/Appendages: Typically, your character
must have at least one free hand/appendage in order to attempt
a melee grapple (in this instance, wielding a Light or Small
one-handed melee weapon also counts as having a free hand);
grappling attempts made with bites/stingers are exempt from this
rule. Having more than two arms/appendages that are capable of
assisting with a grapple grants a +1 bonus on opposed checks for
each additional arm/appendage (up to a maximum bonus of +4).
However, having only one arm/appendage capable of performing
the grapple imposes a 2 penalty instead (two-handed weapons
can be held in a single hand during the grapple, if desired, but that
hand/appendage cannot be used to assist with the grapple).

111

CHAPTER 4
Ranged Grappling: Certain ranged weapons (nets), biological attacks (slime, webs, etc.), and the Entangle spell effect are
capable of making special ranged grappling attempts. Unlike a
melee grappling attempt, no called shot is required, your character and her opponent are not grappled together, and only her
opponent is considered distracted. Your character may perform
other actions normally while her opponent struggles to break free.
Follow-up moves are not permitted with ranged grapples.
Your opponent may break out of the grapple by succeeding
on an Agility or Might check of SV 5; note that Combat Maneuvers is not applied by either combatant. Winged creatures that are
affected by a ranged grapple while flying or gliding must succeed
on a free Flying check of SV 5 every round while grappled or they
begin to fall as if tripped (20 feet per point of failure).

Tripping

Your character can attempt to trip an opponent, thus causing


him to fall prone. Begin by attempting a specialized called shot
aimed at your opponents leg, and if it succeeds, you may also
choose to make a damage check. Note that inflicting damage is
entirely optional and that the tripping attempt proceeds regardless
of whether or not damage is inflicted.
Next, if the called shot was successful, then your opponent
must make a free Agility check, to which he adds his Combat Maneuvers stat. The SV is equal to 5 + your characters own Combat
Maneuvers stat. If your opponent fails then he falls prone.
Flying Opponents (wings): Your character can also make
tripping attempts against winged flying opponents, either with
ranged attacks or melee attacks that are within reach. The process is much the same, except that your character aims for his
opponents wing instead of his leg. If the called shot succeeds,
an optional damage check can be made, and then your opponent
must make a free Flying check (instead of Agility), to which he
adds his Combat Maneuvers stat. The SV is still equal to 5 +
your characters own Combat Maneuvers stat. Each point of failure causes your characters opponent to fall 20 feet before he is
able to right himself, thereby risking falling damage if he hits the
ground, after which he is considered prone. For instance, failing
by 3 points would cause him to fall 60 feet, whereas failing by 5
points would cause him to fall 100 feet, and so forth.
Opponents that are flying due to mystical means, such as the
Flight: Mystical trait or the Flight spell effect, cannot be tripped
since falling prone is meaningless while flying. Winged creatures
are able to be tripped because they require the full use of their
wings to remain aloft.
Swimming Opponents: Swimming opponents cannot be
tripped since falling prone is meaningless while swimming.
Special Considerations: The following conditions apply to
all tripping attempts:
Tripping attempts made with a weapon that has the Trip
special quality add +1 to your opponents SV.
Creatures with more than two legs are harder to trip (on
land) and gain a +1 bonus to their Agility checks for
each additional pair of legs (up to a maximum bonus
of +4). Creatures that possess the Awkward Form: No
Legs trait, such as lavossi and xsessyri, are immune to
land-based tripping attempts.

112

MOVEMENT AND POSITION

Each of the three forms of movementflying, running, and


swimminghas its own Speed stat that determines how far your
character may move in a round. These stats are derived from your
characters respective Dexterity-based disciplines and his creature size; the Flight Speed stat and the Flying discipline are both
unavailable for characters and creatures who lack the ability to
fly. All forms of Speed have a minimum value of 0, which equates
to being unable to move via that particular form.
On each of your characters turns he can freely move a number of squares equal to his chosen form of travel (only one form of
movement is able to be used per turn). All movement, including
additions from sprinting, must be performed at the same time and
may not be split up among other actions. For instance, your character could attack, move, and then attack again, but he could not
move, attack, and then move some more.
Diagonal Movement Cost: The cost of moving diagonally
on the movement board is also adjusted for direction. The first
diagonal step counts as one square, but the next diagonal step
counts as two squares no matter where it occurs during movement. This pattern repeats as needed (one-two-one-two). Moving
in three-dimensions also follows this rule, such as when flying or
swimming. Any unspent movement is lost.
Sprinting: Your character can increase his movement for the
round by sprinting. A discipline check of SV 5 grants a specific
bonus for each success and critical success achieved: +2 Swim
Speed (Swimming), +3 Run Speed (Running), or +4 Flight Speed
(Flying). Remember that all movement for the round, including
contributions from sprinting, must be performed at the same time.
Rough Terrain: Moving across or through rough terrain
usually slows your character down by doubling the movement
cost for each step (GMs call). Examples include moving over
rubble or up steep slopes on land, swimming against opposing
currents in water, or flying against strong winds in the air. In extreme cases the GM may even rule that movement is impossible.

Zones of Control

Each combatant exerts a zone of control around themselves,


whereby hostile movement is made more difficult due to pushing,
shoving, and risk of attack. Attempting to move through or out
of an enemys zone of control doubles the cost of movement for
each step, but moving the first step into a zone of control still only
costs the standard amount. Rough terrain and zones of control do
not stack, such that the cost of movement is still only doubled.
A creatures zone of control is equal to its natural threat
range. The Extended Reach creature trait extends a creatures
zone of control by a specific distance (kreevogs, lavossi, etc.), but
weapons that possess the Reach special quality do not.
Friendly/Neutral Zones: Moving through friendly zones
of control does not impede your characters movement. Neutral
zones of control may or may not impede your characters movement according to the situation (GMs call). For instance, a frightened bystander might allow your character to pass without issue,
but a frightened animal might not be so cooperative.
Suspended Zones: A creatures zone of control is suspended
temporarily whenever it is unable to act, such as when unconscious, surprised, helpless, grappled, or otherwise restrained.

GAMEPLAY

Moving Through Occupied Spaces

Your character may attempt to move through an occupied


space (treated as rough terrain), but an occupants disposition can
impose additional restrictions. Regardless, your character must
have sufficient movement remaining to reach an unoccupied
space or he cannot even attempt this maneuver.
Hostile Spaces: Moving through a hostile occupied space
requires an Agility check against the Defense stats of all affected
targets. Success allows your character to proceed through to an
unoccupied space, but failure prevents the maneuver and ends
his movement for the round; other actions can still be attempted,
however. This maneuver is an exception to the rule that prevents
movement from being split up among other actions, so your character is able move before and/or after the action (if it succeeds).
Friendly/Neutral Spaces: Moving through a friendly occupied space does not require an Agility check or count as an action,
but your character must still have enough movement remaining to
reach an unoccupied space. Neutral occupied spaces may be considered friendly or hostile depending on the situation (GMs call).

Falling Prone

Falling prone, either from being tripped or from laying


down, imposes a 1 penalty to your characters Defense stat, all
physical actions, and all physical damage checks. Mental spells/
abilities [M] and attacks with Mechanical weapons are not penalized. Your character can willingly fall prone as a free action.
Crawling and Standing: Your character can crawl while
prone at a rate of half his Run Speed (rounded down) or one
square per round if disabled. Standing up from a prone position
costs all of your characters base movement for the round, but
sprinting can be attempted once your character stands back up.
Being Pinned: Being pinned while grappling also renders
your character prone. However, it is also possible that your character can become pinned against vertical surfaces like walls and
columns. In such cases, your character still suffers the standard
penalties for being prone, but the penalties are instantly removed
once he manages to free himself (he does not have to spend his
base movement to stand back up since he is already standing).
Flying and Swimming: Being prone while in flight, while
gliding, or while swimming essentially has no effect and can be
ignored since your character can easily right himself. Winged
creatures that are tripped while flying or gliding are considered
prone after they hit the ground.

Being Tethered

There are various methods in which a creature can become


tethered, such as when leashed, captured by a lasso or man catcher, or injured by a harpoon. Being tethered limits how and where
a creature can move. Flexible tethers like ropes and chains only
limit a creatures maximum distance according to the tethers
length. Solid tethers like a man catcher set a specific distance that
must be maintained between the creature and the tethers anchor.
Tethering a Creature: Tethering an unwilling creature often
requires a Precision check, which may also require a specialized
called shot depending on the type of tether or weapon. The result
is compared against the creatures Defense stat, and if successful,
then the creature is tethered (harpoons must inflict health loss).

Securing or Releasing the Tether: A tether can either be


anchored to some kind of mooring object, such as a column or
post, or it may be held by or even tethered to another creature
(holding a tether requires at least one free hand). Concerning
moored tethers, it is typically preferable to secure the tether to
its mooring prior to tethering a creature, but attempting to secure
an already-tethered creature to a mooring can still be achieved by
succeeding on an opposed Tinkering check versus the creatures
free Might check, with both combatants applying their respective Combat Maneuvers stats to their results. Unfastening a tether
from its mooring also requires the same sort of check if the tethered creature is fighting against the tether.
A tether that is being held may be released for free at any
time, even outside of the holders turn. A tether that has been released or pulled away from it holder/mooring can be grabbed by
other nearby combatants via an Agility check of SV 5. The GM
will determine the tethers precise location as the creature moves.
Controlling a Held Tether: The tethers holder and the tethered creature both have the options of either trying to pull or push
the tether, with each requiring an opposed Might check (considered a normal action for the initiator and a free action for the
defender) and applying their respective Combat Maneuvers stats
to their results. Each success and critical success allows the defender to be forcefully moved 1 square, and a critical success also
forces the defender to make another free Agility check of SV 5 to
keep from falling prone. If the action succeeds then it consumes
all of the initiators base Speed for the round (the defenders base
Speed is unaffected). Remember that the tethers holder can always release the tether for free to avoid being forcefully moved.
Pulling the Tether: If the tether is solid or if it is flexible and pulled taut, the initiator can pull the defender
closer while remaining stationary (closing the distance
between them) or moving (retaining the distance).
Pushing the Tether: If the tether is solid, such as a man
catcher, the initiator can move and push the defender
in any direction (retaining the distance between them).
Escaping the Tether: A tethered creature has three options
when trying to free itself:
Attacking the Tether: The tether itself can be attacked and
severed. Its Resilience value varies according to its material and size. However, the GM can rule that certain
unarmed attacks are ineffective against a flexible tether,
such as attempting to strike a rope with ones fists.
Pulling Away from the Mooring: If the tether is anchored
to a mooring then the SV to break free is equal to 3
+ either the moorings Resilience value or the tethers
Resilience value, whichever is lowest (this indicates
which one breaks). Success means that the tether/mooring is weakened; a critical success, or another success
if already weakened, breaks the tether/mooring instead.
Removing the Tether: Most tethers are able to be removed
by succeeding on an Agility check of SV 8; a harpoon
allows for an Agility or Might check of SV 5 but has
additional consequences. Tethers that are fastened to a
creature via a collar or manacles can be removed with
a Tinkering check, but the SV varies according to their
quality (manacles also require the use of lockpicks).

113

CHAPTER 4
Multiple Tethers: It is possible for multiple tethers to be
attached to a single target, especially when a team of handlers
are attempting to control a much larger creature. In such cases,
the GM will determine how the Might checks are applied, and
whether one, some, or all of the handlers are affected. Remember
that Might results are able to be combined together without limit.

SITUATIONAL CONDITIONS

All characters would do well to be mindful of situational


conditions, such as the proper use of cover, accurate knowledge
of an enemys resistances and weaknesses, and the optimal positioning of templates when using area-effect abilities.

Area-Effect Templates

Each area-effect ability takes the form of one of the following template shapes: rectangular prism, sphere, thin cone, or wide
cone. Each templates size must also be designated as being either
small or large.
Template Rules: The upside to using an area-effect ability
is that it affects all targets whose occupied spaces overlap with its
template, regardless of how much of a targets space is actually
being covered (unless otherwise state). However, the downside
is that a penalty is applied to your characters discipline check
according to the templates size: small (2) or large (3).
An area-effect template must remain stationary once its location has been determined, unless the description of its particular
ability or spell states otherwise. Also, keep in mind that while
an area-effect template is represented by a two-dimensional sheet
that its actual volume is really three-dimensional, exactly as if
its template were spun completely about its axis. Flying opponents, exceptionally tall opponents, and variations in elevation
can sometimes make it difficult to determine whether or not an
opponent is affectedhowever, if in doubt, it is usually best to
assume that a target is not affected.
Point of Emanation: Each template is marked with a little
black dot that represents its point of emanation. For reach abilities
and spells this point must be positioned inside a square within
your characters natural reach. For ranged abilities and spells this
point may be positioned inside any square within the abilitys
range (a portion of the template itself may even extend beyond
this range to affect targets outside of the effects standard area).

Cover

Your character has partial cover any time that at least a third
of her body is blocked from view by an unattended object; other
creatures never count as cover (see below). Any opponent whose
line-of-effect is partially blocked suffers a 2 penalty to his Precision checks against your character. Non-Precision effects and
spells that rely on line-of-effect still function normally and are
completely unaffected by partial cover.
Full Cover: If your characters entire body is blocked from
view she has full cover, which negates line-of-effect and all abilities and spells that require it. Most attacks and spells (including
mental abilities and spells) cannot be made against her without
first attacking through cover. Refer to Combat Actions: Attacking
Objects earlier in this chapter for details.

114

Other Creatures & Line-of-Effect: Other creatures never


count as cover, but special situations may arise where a particularly large creature is able to block line-of-effect (GMs call). For
instance, a dragon that is sleeping in front of a smaller doorway
would block the line-of-effect into and out of the connecting hall
or chamber. However, this is rarely an issue in combat since even
big creatures are constantly moving, dodging, and weaving about.
Obscurement Penalty: The 2 penalties from obscurement
and partial cover are stacked together (4 total) whenever your
characters vision is obscured and her opponent has partial cover.

Distracted

Your character is only able to focus her attention on only so


much before she becomes distracted. Once distracted, all attacks
against her gain a +1 bonus to their Precision checks (the Damage: Mental spell effect gains a +1 bonus to its Mysticism check).
Distraction vs. Surprise: Penalties for being distracted
and surprised do not stack togethersurprise takes precedence.
Gaining surprise against an opponent who is also distracted only
grants a +2 bonus to your characters Precision check (not +3).
Sources of Distraction: The following situations can cause
your character to become distracted:
Multiple Melee Opponents: Your character is considered
distracted whenever shes within the zones of control
of more than one opponent. Note that an ettin still only
counts as one opponent.
Intimidation: Being targeted by the Intimidation discipline
can cause your character to become distracted.
Performing Certain Tasks: Some tasks that require heightened focus or concentration can cause your character
to become distracted until her next turn, such as when
using the Tinkering discipline.
Miscellaneous Sources: There are many additional ways
in which your character may become distracted, such as
exposure to intense environmental conditions, suffering critical failures when attempting certain disciplines
like Swimming, or from being affected by the Distract
spell effect or bardic melody.

Occupied Space & Threat

Your characters creature size determines how much space


his counter occupies on the movement board, as measured in
1-inch squares (2 x 2 denotes an occupied space of 4 squares).
The length of his occupied space also determines how far he naturally threatens in all directions, including full diagonals.
Confined Spaces: There are situations where your character
must squeeze into a smaller occupied space, such as when moving through rooms or passages with low ceilings. Your character
can actually fit into the occupied space of the next smaller size,
but his threat range is also reduced to that of the smaller size and
he suffers a 2 penalty to Defense, most physical actions (GMs
call), and melee and ranged damage checks. This penalty is never
applied to the discipline checks or damage checks of spells, mental abilities, or attacks with Mechanical weapons.
Your character can even attempt to squeeze through doors
or openings that are two sizes smaller, but doing so requires an
Agility check of SV 5. Failure blocks his passage for the round/

GAMEPLAY
attempt, while a result that is at least 3 points lower than the SV
causes him to become stuck. Being stuck means that he cannot
move and may only attempt limited actions (GMs call). He also
suffers the same penalties listed above, but his Defense stat is
reduced to its minimum value for his creature size (see below). A
new Agility check can be attempted each round to break free, but
a 2 penalty is imposed due to being stuckif successful he can
only pull back out into his original space, whereas a critical success allows him to squeeze through to emerge on the other side.
Tiny/Small Adjustments: Since there are not any smaller
creature size tiers below tiny, simply halve the space and threat
values for tiny and small creatures that are attempting to fit into
confined spaces or squeeze through openings.

Occupied Space & Threat


Creature
Size
Tiny
Small
Medium
Large
Huge
Enormous
Gigantic
Colossal

Occupied
Space
x
1x1
1x1
2x2
3x3
4x4
5x5
6x6

Threat

1
1
2
3
4
5
6

Minimum
Defense
2
2
1
1
1
0
0
0

Resistances & Immunities

Having a resistance reduces the amount of damage that your


character suffers from a particular damage type, while having an
immunity renders him impervious to all such damage. For instance, having a heat resistance of 4 reduces all heat damage by
4 points from every attack, while having heat immunity allows
him to ignore heat damage altogether.
Attacks with Multiple Damage Types: Some attacks are
capable of inflicting multiple damage types at the same time, such
as attacks that utilize the Augmented Damage combat technique
or attacks that are made with weapons that possess the Damage
Bonus magical quality. Note that only the portion of the damage
that corresponds to the resistance or immunity may be negated.
Stacking: Multiple resistances of the same type cannot be
stacked togetheronly the strongest value is applied. Resistances
and weaknesses can be stacked together, but they counteract each
other and leave only the difference. For instance, if your character
has an inherent heat resistance of 4 and equips a cursed magical
item that imposes a heat weakness of +2 then the overall modifier
would be a heat resistance of 2.
In the case of an immunity being stacked with a weakness
the weakness is always ignored. In other words, immunity to a
particular damage type cannot be lessened or circumvented.

Visibility & Obscurement

Your character suffers a 2 penalty to all discipline checks


and profession checks involving visual tasks whenever his vision
is obscured, which includes all Precision checks and spellcasting

discipline checks, except for those that only target your character;
tasks that do not rely on vision are never penalized. Disciplines
that are usually penalized include: Agility, Awareness, Climbing,
Healing, Initiative, Jumping, Survival, Tinkering, and Tracking.
Darkness is the most common form of obscurement, but fog,
mist, smoke, swarms of insects, heavy rain/snow, dust, and murky
water can also impose this penalty. Unlike partial cover, there is
no partial equivalent regarding obscurementeither something
is visible or it is not. Generally, obscurement penalties are only
applied due to near total darkness (nighttime darkness without a
full moon), extremely dense fog or smoke, thick swarms of insects or clouds of dust, and so forth. The GM will determine when
obscurement is sufficient to warrant visual penalties. Note that
obscurement never blocks or negates line-of-effect.
Partial Cover Penalty: The 2 penalties from partial cover
and obscurement are stacked together (4 total) whenever your
characters vision is obscured and his opponent has partial cover.
Blindness/Invisibility: The penalties that are imposed due
to obscurement, invisibility, and/or the Blind (R2) disadvantage
do not stack together since they are all essentially the same. The
Blind (R1) penalty of 1 is superseded by the 2 penalty of either
obscurement or invisibility (i.e. the maximum penalty is still 2).
Light Sources: Candles, lanterns, torches, and other light
sources produce light in a sphere that has a radius equal to the
length of the occupied space of the lights corresponding size
multiplied by a specific value: 10 ft for candles or 20 ft for lanterns/torches. For instance, a medium torch illuminates 20 feet in
all directions (1 x 20 ft), while a large torch illuminates 40 feet in
all directions (2 x 20 ft). Obscurement penalties are applied for
visual checks that are made beyond the illuminated area.

Weaknesses

Having a weakness amplifies incoming damage of a particular type from each attack, up to the base amount of the type of
damage that is inflicted. For instance, if your character has an acid
weakness of +4 and is hit by an attack that inflicts 3 points of acid
damage he would suffer a total of 6 points of acid damage (3 base
+ 3 weakness); if he is hit by an attack that inflicts 5 points of acid
damage he would instead suffer 9 points of acid damage (5 base
+ 4 weakness).
Attacks with Multiple Damage Types: Some attacks are
capable of inflicting multiple damage types at the same time, such
as attacks that utilize the Augmented Damage combat technique
or attacks that are made with weapons that possess the Damage
Bonus magical quality. Note that only the portion of the damage
that corresponds to the weakness is applicable when applying the
additional damage.
Stacking: Multiple weaknesses of the same type cannot be
stacked togetheronly the strongest value is applied. Resistances
and weaknesses can be stacked together, but they counteract each
other and leave only the difference. For instance, if your character
has an inherent acid weakness of +4 and is affected by the Resistance: Acid spell effect so that he gains a resistance of 2 then the
overall modifier would be an acid weakness of +2.
In the case of a weakness being stacked with an immunity
the weakness is always ignored. In other words, immunity to a
particular damage type cannot be lessened or circumvented.

115

CHAPTER 4

GENERAL RULES
This section details the various rules that pertain to general
gameplay. Of course, many of these rules may still be applied to
combat situations, but overall they tend to affect your character
mostly outside of battle.

ALCOHOL

For many battle-weary heroes, downing a few pints of ale


at the local tavern is the perfect conclusion to a lengthy adventure. While having a couple of drinks is fine, having too many
will cause your character to become drunk. Note that only living
creatures may become drunk; some non-living creatures can still
drink alcohol but are immune to its effects, such as vampires.
Alcoholic drinks vary according to the amount of liquid consumed and its potency. A weak drink (beer) constitutes a tankard,
a moderate drink (wine) is equivalent to a glass, and a strong
drink (liquor) is measured in shots. Obviously, your character can
get drunk more quickly by consuming shots of liquor, but enough
tankards of beer will certainly do the job.

Alcohol Level

Your character is assigned a temporary alcohol level when


he drinks, which starts at 0 and increases by +1 each time he consumes a drink. Once his alcohol level equals 3 he becomes drunk
(tier 1) and he begins to suffer penalties, as noted on the table
below. He becomes even more impaired when his alcohol level
reaches 6 (tier 2) and 9 (tier 3), but his Fortitude stat and Toughness discipline gain slight bonuses as his drunkenness increases.
Furthermore, once his alcohol level reaches 6 (tier 2), and
for each drink thereafter, your character must make a Constitution
check of SV 5 to determine if he suffers
any additional consequences of being
drunk (i.e. how well he can hold his
liquor). Success means that he suffers
no additional adverse effects. Failure
causes him to vomit, which lowers his
alcohol level by 1 point, and failing
by at least 3 points also results in
accidental incontinence. Suffering
a critical failure or two consecutive
failures causes your character to fall
unconscious for at least six hours,
and if he is forcibly roused he must
succeed on a Perseverance check
of SV 5 once per minute or he falls
unconscious again.
Sobering Up: Your characters alcohol level automatically decreases by one point every hour. As
it drops lower, his impairments are also adjusted accordingly,
and once it drops to 2 or less he is considered sober. However,
upon waking the next morning he must succeed on another Constitution check with an SV equal to the highest alcohol level he
attained on the previous day (only if he became drunk) or he suf-

116

fers from a hangover. A hangover doubles the time that is required


to recover stamina through rest or sleep to one stamina point per
four hours (normally one point is regained every two hours). Failing by at least 3 points or suffering a critical failure also imposes a
1 penalty to all of his discipline, profession, and damage checks.
These penalties persist until a full nights sleep is obtained.

Effects of Being Drunk


Faculties
Concentration,
Defense, and all
discipline and
profession checks
(except for
Toughness)
Fortitude and
Toughness

Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3


[35] [68] [9+]

+1

+2

ASSISTING OTHERS

It is sometimes possible for multiple characters to combine


their efforts in order to achieve greater results. First, the primary
or initiating character makes a standard discipline check according to the task at hand. Each assisting character then makes their
own checks, but their outcomes apply a specific modifier to the
primary characters result, up to the maximum
combined bonus of +4 (see below). Note
that profession checks may never benefit
from assisting others.
Acceptable Disciplines: Assisting others can only be attempted for disciplines and
professions that can realistically benefit from
cooperation toward a single objective. Healing,
Intimidation, Investigation, Might, Persuasion,
Survival, Tinkering (except when picking locks),
and Tracking are the disciplines that are generally
allowed, but other disciplines may be permitted as
well, per the GMs discretion.
Unacceptable Disciplines: Combining efforts to
achieve individual actions is never possible, such as
for Awareness checks, Creature Lore or Social
Knowledge checks, or other individual tasks
where each character is relying solely on his or
her own ability or knowledge to achieve success.
Maximum Combined Bonus: The maximum combined bonus that can be granted to the primary characters
result is +4, except for uses of the Might discipline, which has no
limit. In situations where the capacity to offer assistance is hindered, such as when working in confined spaces, assisting others
may be restricted in other ways or may not be permitted at all.

GAMEPLAY

Assisting Others
Assisting Character's Result
Success or Critical Success
Failure
Failure (by at least 3 points)
Critical Failure

Modifier
+1 per
0
1
2

CHARACTER POINTS

The Vexith Roleplaying Game utilizes a point-buy system,


referred to as character points, which allow you to improve and
customize your character. All creatures measure their relative
power using a character point value (CPV for short), which is the
sum of the values of all of their faculties, traits, and spells/songs:

CPV: Unspent Points / Total Value


For example, having a CPV of 15/163 would mean that your
character has 15 character points that have not yet been spent on
faculties or traitsthink of the unspent points as your characters
yet unrealized potential. She has a total character point value of
163, which already includes her 15 unspent points.
New Characters: All new characters begin the game with a
total CPV of 125 points, regardless of species (except for shades).
All of the playable species are assigned a value that summarizes
the costs of all of their inherent species traits, typically ranging
from 30 to 35. This species value is located in brackets within
your characters species box and is subtracted from the total CPV
to determine her beginning number of unspent points.
For example, a new arnurian character has a species value
of 30. This is the overall cost of all of her inherent species traits,
both positive and negative, which all arnurians share. A new
character has a total CPV of 125, so after subtracting the species
value a new arnurian character would have 95 unspent character
points (125 30 = 95). Her CPV would then be listed as 95/125,
which would mean that she has 95 points to spend on attributes,
disciplines, and advantages during character creation.
Species Balance: Despite the fact that all playable species
have different species values they are all essentially equal to one
another regarding overall balance. This is because those species
with lower species values end up having more unspent character
points to allocate on faculties and traits, whereas those with higher species values begin with slightly fewer unspent points. Rolgareks, for instance, have a species value of 34 and begin with a
CPV of 91/125 (4 fewer unspent points than arnurians). Basically,
this means that a rolgareks inherent traits are worth slightly more
than an arnurians, but an arnurian makes up for this discrepancy
by having slightly more points to spend on faculties and traits.
GM-Designed NPCs & Creatures: When designing NPCs,
the GM is not restricted by the 125 CPV benchmark that new
PCs must adhere to but may instead design NPCs freely to have
any CPV. Those who possess higher CPVs represent more seasoned adventurers or veterans, whereas those with lower CPVs
represent common folk and non-adventurers. Other creatures and
monsters may also be designed by selecting their various inherent
traits from the Creature Traits section in Chapter 7.

Spending Character Points

Your character is able to spend her unspent character points


whenever there is suitable downtime during play (GMs call) or in
between gaming sessions. All faculties and advantages have costs
that are listed in green, which you deduct from your characters
unspent points; the total value remains unchanged. For instance,
if your characters CPV is 5/175 and she acquires a new advantage with a cost of 3 then her CPV would change to 2/175.
Disadvantages & Detrimental Traits: All disadvantages
and detrimental traits have red negative costs that add additional
unspent points in exchange for various consequences; the total
value remains unchanged. For instance, a CPV of 12/125 would
change to 16/125 after selecting a disadvantage with a cost of 4.
Disadvantages and detrimental traits may only be selected
during the creation process and a 10 point limit exists to restrict
the number of additional character points that can be acquired. It
is still possible for some disadvantages to be acquired over the
course of the game due to injuries or other events, but these never
increase your characters number of unspent character points.
Spending Options: Unspent character points may be spent
on any of the following options:
Increasing the rank of an attribute, discipline, or profession (increasing the rank of an attribute or certain disciplines also increases their corresponding stats)
Acquiring a new advantage or increasing an advantages
rank (many advantages only have a single rank)
Buying-off a disadvantage (doing so is only possible for
those that were selected during the character creation
process; requires GMs approval)
Learning a new spell or bardic song (standard spells or
bardic songs cost 1 character point each; spells that use
a freeform effect [F] cost 3 character points each)

Acquiring New Character Points

The default method for awarding new character points is for


all characters to earn 1 new point for every session hour that is
playedabsent players do not earn points for their characters.
Newly acquired character points are added both to your characters unspent points and her total value. For instance, if she begins
a gaming session with a CPV of 7/150 and plays for 5 session
hours she would then have a CPV of 12/155.
Alternative Methods (optional): Some gaming groups may
prefer to use a goal-based method for acquiring new character
points instead of automatically receiving them for the number of
session hours played. Other alternative methods exist as well, and
groups are encouraged to devise a system that suits their preferred
play style and pace of character growth.

DETECTION CHECKS (GM)

Whenever the PCs or a group of NPCs comes within range


of something that they could potentially detect, such as a hidden
or easily-overlooked object, creature, trap, or clue, the GM makes
a special d8 roll. Any character or NPC with a Notice stat that is
equal to or greater than the d8 result is then permitted to make a
free Awareness check, the SV of which varies according to how
difficult the object, creature, trap, or clue is to perceive. GMs are

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encouraged to keep an ordered list of the PCs Notice stats easily
accessible so that detection checks can quickly reveal which PCs
are allowed to make Awareness checks and which are not.
Detection checks cannot max or critically fail, and modifiers
are never applied to their results. They are used exclusively by
the GM to minimize the need for all players and/or NPCs to constantly be making Awareness checks. Without this rule, a groups
chances of detecting hidden or subtle details would be too great,
especially in larger groups, since so many checks would be permitted (i.e. the more checks allowed the more likely that at least
one would succeed). Therefore, detection checks allow the GM to
maintain the challenge and thrill of discovery, while at the same
time avoiding much of the tedium associated with having to make
numerous Awareness checks.
Roleplaying Concerns: It is often necessary for a player to
have to roleplay his character as if he were oblivious to the presence of nearby undiscovered objects, creatures, traps, or clues.
This occurs whenever an Awareness check is failed, meaning that
the player is alerted that something is hidden nearby but that his
character did not perceive anything. Therefore, players should
strive to roleplay their characters using in-game knowledge only
(using only what each character actually knows).
Skipping Detection Checks: Detection check are reserved
for groups rather than for individuals, and may be skipped for
single characters or NPCs (an Awareness check is still necessary,
however). There are also special situations where Awareness
checks are made without first requiring a detection check, such
as when making reaction checks to certain spell effects or when
there is a sudden need for your sleeping character to wake up.
Granting a New Detection Check: In order to grant a new
detection check either the conditions of a situation must have
changed significantly (GMs call) or an area must be actively
searched. Actively searching often requires considerable time and
careful examination of an area.

DISEASES & POISONS

Diseases and poisons are two of the deadliest afflictions that


your character may be forced to endure, and each is unique in
how it affects its victims. Only living creatures are susceptible to
diseases and poisons; non-living creatures are immune to both.
Application: There are four different methods for how a disease or poison may be delivered:
Damage: The victim must suffer damage from an attack
that is capable of delivering the disease or poison directly into the bloodstream. If health is lost then the
disease/poison is automatically contracted. If it fails to
inflict health loss then the victim is not affected.
Ingestion: The victim must ingest something that has
been contaminated, and in so doing automatically contracts the disease/poison.
Inhalation: The victim must breathe in air that has been
contaminated, and in so doing automatically contracts
the disease/poison. Prior to entering an area known to
be contaminated sapient creatures that are aware of the
disease/poison may attempt to hold their breath, which
delays contraction and may even avoid it completely

118

if they can continue doing so until they leave the area;


bestial and mindless creatures do not tend to realize this
danger and may not hold their breath. Refer to Holding
Your Breath later in this section for more details.
Touch: The victim must come into physical contact with
a source of contamination, such as by handling a contaminated object. The disease/poison must come into
physical contact with a victims skin or other exposed
body parts, which automatically results in the disease/
poison being contracted. Clothing and armor prevents
contamination, which forces attacks that are attempting
to deliver the disease/poison via touch to have to succeed on a non-damaging called shot in order to make
sufficient contact (applying poison to a glove and then
trying to rub it onto a victims skin).
Potency: Some diseases and poisons are far more potent
than others. Each is assigned a modifier that usually ranges from
+2 (mild) to 2 (deadly), which is applied to all of the victims
Constitution checks that are made to resist the disease/poison.
Frequency: Once a disease or poison has been contracted,
the victim must make a free Constitution check after a specific
time interval has passed, and subsequent checks must continue
to be made after each additional time interval until either the
affliction is cured or the victim perishes. There are five potential time intervals: rounds, minutes, hours, days, and weeks. For
instance, contracting a poison that has a frequency measured in
rounds forces the victim to make a free Constitution check at the
beginning of his next turn and then at the beginning of each of
his following turns thereafter until he is either cured or is killed.
Effects: Beyond the standard risk of further progression
many diseases and poisons impose additional penalties or afflictions, such as paralysis, loss of health or stamina, or penalties
to the victims faculties. Even if the disease or poison is cured
its effects must still be recovered separately. Effects may even
be healed through magical means without necessarily curing the
disease or poison, but most effects are likely to reoccur as the
affliction continues to run its course.

Diseases & Poisons


Result
8+
5 to 7
0 to 4
Negative

Outcome
Cured (25% chance for
temporary immunity)
No change
Progression (additional
cumulative 1 penalty)
Progression (additional
cumulative 1 penalty);
unconscious/killed

Conditions of Diseases & Poisons

Depending on the result of the Constitution check the victim


can be affected by several conditions:
Cured: The victim is no longer afflicted by the disease or
poison and can cease making Constitution checks. There
is also a 25% chance that the victim retains a temporary

GAMEPLAY
immunity to the same affliction if exposed again within a
time period equal to the next higher frequency tier (a frequency measured in weeks grants immunity for a month).
Progression: The disease or poison progresses further and
begins imposing an additional cumulative 1 penalty to
the victims further Constitution checks (only in regards
to this particular affliction). Specific diseases and poisons
may also impose other penalties and effects, as detailed in
their descriptions. Subsequent Constitution checks must
continue to be made according to afflictions frequency.
Unconscious/Killed: The victim falls unconscious and is
considered helpless. He cannot be roused, even via magic,
until his affliction is cured. If another Constitution result
is negative then the victim is killed. However, if it is cured
he may make a new Constitution check of SV 5 immediately (or after battle has ended, if in combat) and then
once again every hour to see if he rouses on his own. A
successful use of the Healing discipline (SV 5) can also
rouse him but only if performed out of combat.

Multiple Exposures

For the sake of simplicity, there is no additional risk of contracting the same disease or poison multiple times. For instance, if
your character has already been poisoned by a rattlesnake then he
cannot be poisoned again from further rattlesnake bites until the
poison has been cured. However, he can still contract other diseases or poisons, such as from other species of snakes, and they
are all treated as separate afflictions with their own Constitution
checks, potencies, frequencies, and effects.

Healing Discipline & Cures

The Healing discipline can be used to grant a +1 bonus to a


victims periodic Constitution checks for each success and critical
success (SV 5 for treating others or SV 8 for self-treatment). This
bonus only applies to the Constitution checks of the affliction that
is specifically being treated, but it persists until the disease/poison
is cured or the victim perishes. Note that bonuses from multiple
attempts do not stack, but assisting others is possible.
Antidotes: Many diseases and poisons have antidotes that
can be applied to provide a cure. Their specific application can
also vary, but ingestion is the most common delivery method.
Whether or not a specific antidote is available, or even possible,
is entirely up the GM. Many antidotes must be researched at great
length, and some require rare ingredients. Certain antidotes may
even be able to be purchased from shops, but their costs vary
greatly according to the rarity of their ingredients and other factors (GMs call). Alternatively, the Cure spell effect can be used
to cure any disease or poison, but it requires a critical success to
do so; a standard success merely slows the frequency.

Example Afflictions

In order to provide GMs with a suitable basis for comparison


several real-world afflictions are listed below:
Common Cold [Disease]
Application: inhalation or touch
Potency: +2
Frequency: days

No Effects: The victim suffers symptoms that do not typically affect gameplay (runny nose, coughing, etc.).
Rabies [Disease]
Application: damage
Potency: 1
Frequency: weeks (accelerated to days after two progression results occur; remains as days thereafter)
Unique Effects: After the frequency is shortened to days
the victim suffers a 1 penalty to his Intellect attribute
each time that the progression condition occurs. Additionally, he also shows increasing signs of aggression,
anxiety, and paranoia as the disease progresses.
Rattlesnake Venom [Poison]
Application: damage
Potency: 2
Frequency: hours
Stamina Loss: One point of stamina is lost each time that
the progression condition occurs.

FALLING DAMAGE

Falling damage is inflicted at a rate of 1 point for every 5 feet


that a creature or unattended object falls (rounded down), which
is then multiplied by a corresponding surface hardness multiplier.
For instance, if your character falls 17 feet onto packed dirt he
would suffer 12 total points of damage (17 / 5 = ~3; 3 x 4 = 12).

Surface Hardness
Yielding (deep snow, water)
Soft (leaves, sand, straw)
Moderate (grass, soil)
Hard (packed dirt, wood)
Rigid (metal, stone)

Multiplier
x1
x2
x3
x4
x5

In most situations your character is also allowed to make a


free Agility check of SV 5 to potentially avoid some of the damage but only if his movement is unrestricted (rolling to distribute
the force, diving into water, etc.). Each success and critical success reduces the total falling damage by 5 points.
Once the total damage has been calculated it is then compared against your characters Base Resilience stat to determine
the extent of his injuries. Note that creature size and armor offer
no protection when falling, which is why Base Resilience is used.
Additional Hazards: Falling onto spikes, spears, jagged
rocks, or other dangers adds an additional d8 points of damage to
the total. The damage is still compared against Base Resilience.
Flying/Gliding Creatures: Winged creatures that are flying
or gliding can still suffer falling damage by being tripped, being
grappled (ranged), being knocked unconscious, or from suffering
a critical failure when attempting to sprint. Those that are flying/
gliding due to mystical means do not usually risk falling damage.
Catching a Falling Creature/Object: If your character is
within reach of a falling creature or object he may attempt to
catch it in or order to lessen the impact. Your character must first
succeed on a free Agility check of SV 5, which can be attempted
for outside of his regular turn. Failure means that he misses and
the falling creature/object sustains falling damage normally.

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If the Agility check is successful then your character must
attempt a free Might check of SV 5 to see if he can support the
total weight of the falling creature/object (including all equipped
gear), assuming that it exceeds his free limit. Failing to support
the total weight of the creature/object means that it suffers falling
damage normally, but your character also suffers half of the damage (rounded down), and both of you are knocked prone. In failed
attempts where a falling creature/object would continue falling
even further down, such as over the edge of a cliff or into a pit,
then the GM may also require your character to make an another
free Agility check of SV 5 to see if he is pulled down as well.
Succeeding on the Might check or being able to avoid it if
the total weight is less than your characters free limit does not
automatically prevent falling damage. Instead, the hardness multiplier is reduced to x1 (yielding), but both your character and the
falling creature/object are subjected to the full damage. However,
you may each attempt free Agility checks to avoid some of the
damage, but the SV is increased to 8.
Attended Objects: Attended objects are not typically subjected to falling damage, but the GM can rule otherwise in some
situations, especially for objects that are fragile (potion flasks/
vials, Brittle weapons, etc.). This typically occurs when a falling
creature either fails to make its Agility check or is denied a check
altogether, or when it is killed in the fall.
Simplicity vs. Realism: Lastly, it should be understood that
the exact mechanics of falling damage (like many rules) do not
mimic real-world physics. Instead, they are designed to allow for
a quick and simplistic resolution of such events, while still maintaining a moderate degree of fairness and balance.

FATIGUE PENALTIES

Whenever your character loses a health or stamina point its


token is removed from its corresponding row on your characters
status mat and placed into the fatigue row. For every two tokens
in the fatigue row, regardless of their types, your character suffers
a cumulative 1 penalty to all discipline, profession, and damage
checks, up to the maximum penalty of 2 (Initiative checks that
are made to determine turn order in combat are not affected).
Once a health or stamina point has been recovered its token
is removed from the fatigue row and returned to its corresponding
row. The order of tokens in the fatigue row is irrelevant and can
be rearranged as needed.

FEAR CHECKS

Your character must endure a fear check whenever he is subjected to a truly horrific event. A special reverse d8 roll is made
against his Fortitude stat, which for your character means that
success is bad and failure is good. A fear check is capable of maxing, critically succeeding, or critically failing.
Exactly what constitutes a truly horrific event is ultimately
the GMs call, but keep in mind that adventurers (like the PCs)
routinely confront evil monsters, vengeful undead spirits, and
savage beasts as part of their chosen livelihood. Therefore, simply encountering a group of skeletal warriors or coming upon the
scene of a brutal murder is not likely to warrant a fear check.

120

However, most commoners and non-adventuring folk would


probably have to endure a fear check in these situations in order
to keep their composure.
There are some situations that require fear checks regardless
of being an adventurer or of ones past experiences. These include
being the victim of the Fear spell effect, possessing the Fearful
disadvantage and having to overcome ones phobias, or encountering a monster with the Frightening Presence creature trait.
Modifiers: Some fear effects may apply a special modifier
to the fear checks result, as noted in their descriptions. Be aware
that negative modifiers benefit your character, whereas positive
modifiers are a detriment (due to the reverse d8 roll).
Group Checks: In most situations a single fear check is
made against all affected creatures. The result should be noted
so that in the event that miscellaneous effects change some of
the creatures Fortitude stats, such as the Improve Faculties spell
effect, that the specific fear conditions can also be adjusted. For
instance, a creature that is terrified might improve to only being
unnerved if its Fortitude stat can somehow be increased.
Fear Duration: Most fear conditions persist until the source
of the fear itself is no longer present (GMs call), which can vary.
If a monster is the source then this could mean that the conditions
last until it is either defeated or subdued, whereas a horrific scene
might inspire fear until it is cleansed, covered up, or bypassed.
Additional Consequences: The Fear spell/song and the
Frightening Presence creature trait are all capable of inflicting
additional negative consequences, depending on the result. Some
examples include acquiring a permanent phobia to the source of
the fear or even literally being scared to death.

Fear
Result
Failure (by at least 3 points)
or a Critical Failure
Failure
Success
Critical Success

Conditions of Fear

Outcome
Bolstered
No effect
Unnerved
Terrified

Depending on the result of the fear check your character can


be affected by several conditions:
Bolstered: Rather than becoming fearful your characters
determination allows him to stand resolute, bolstering his
courage! He gains a +1 bonus to all discipline, profession,
and damage checks on his next turn.
Unnerved: Your character is visibly disturbed and suffers
a 1 penalty to all discipline, profession, and damage
checks until the source of the fear is no longer present.
Note that this penalty stacks with the 2 penalty that is imposed by the successful use of the Intimidation discipline.
Terrified (sapient or docile bestial): All sapient creatures
and docile bestial creatures are overcome with an intense
desire for self-preservation. If escape is possible they will
attempt to flee at their full Speed away from the source
of the fear, including sprinting. If escape is not possible

GAMEPLAY
they will cower in fear and cannot move or act, but they
may still defend themselves accordingly. This condition
persists until the source of the fear is no longer present.
Terrified (aggressive bestial): In the case of aggressive
bestial creatures, rather than attempting to flee or cower,
they will instead become hostile and may attempt to attack
other nearby creatures within reach, including friendly
targets (or even their riders in the case of mounts); assume
a 50% chance per round of making one attack against a
randomly-chosen target. This condition persists until the
source of the fear is no longer present and the creature can
be successfully calmed via a Persuasion check against its
Fortitude stat (usually at a 2 penalty unless your character is able to communicate with bestial creatures).

FORTUNE POINTS

Your character begins the game with one fortune point,


which is represented on her status mat using a green fortune token
or gem (NPCs and monsters do not use fortune points). Fortune
points represent an opportunity to influence an event or change
its outcomebeing more than just luck, fortune points symbolize
your characters potential for affecting her own destiny.
Fortune points are extremely powerful and their use can
make a dramatic impact on how the game unfolds. As such, your
character may only possess one fortune point at a time, and once
used, it is gone until your characters total CPV reaches or surpasses intervals that are evenly divisible by 10 (140, 150, 160,
etc.). Fortune points overwrite one another, preventing multiple
points from being saved, so either use them or lose them.
A fortune point can be used at any time, even outside of your
characters turn, to achieve one of the following effects:
Personal Discipline/Profession Reroll: Your character is
able to reroll her most recent discipline/profession check
(except for Initiative checks that are made to determine
turn order in combat). The new roll also ignores all penalties from multiple actions, fatigue, and tough breaks;
all other kinds of penalties are still applied. Furthermore,
while it is still possible for the new roll to fail it cannot
critically fail. However, the new result must be used even
if it somehow manages to be lower than the initial result.
Note that for Precision checks the decision to reroll must
be made prior to rolling for damage. Also, if a 1 is rolled
on a discipline or profession check then it may only be
rerolled if done so prior to checking for a critical failure
(once a critical failure is confirmed it is too late to reroll).
Enemy Discipline/Profession Reroll: Your character may
force an enemy to reroll his most recent discipline or profession check but only if it would have directly affected
your character in some way, such as an attack, spell, or
hostile action. The check is rerolled and the lower of the
two results is applied. Note that for Precision checks the
decision to force an enemys reroll must be made prior to
his damage check.
Recover Health/Stamina: Your character is instantly able
to recover up to one health point, which also stops bleeding, or two stamina points, even if wounded or exhausted
(though not if your character has been killed/destroyed).

HEALING

When injured, your character can make a Constitution check


of SV 5 at the beginning of each day to determine if some of
her wounds have healed but only if she was able to obtain a full
nights rest (at least 6 hours of sleep). One health point is restored
for each success and critical success achieved. Failure means that
no health points were restored, while a critical failure also results
in a complication. Non-living creatures may not attempt daily
Constitution checks and must instead rely on magical healing.
Complications: A complication, such as an infection, causes
your character to lose one health point immediately. All further
daily Constitution checks also become more difficult (SV 8) until
all of your characters health points have been restored.
Furthermore, while the complication persists, failing another
daily Constitution check means that your character loses another
health point and she is overcome with symptoms that necessitate
complete bed rest for the whole daytaking any physical actions
incurs the loss of one stamina point for each minute of activity. If
a daily Constitution check causes the loss of your characters last
health point, or if another critical failure occurs, then she dies.
Healing Discipline: A successful use of the Healing discipline by another character or NPC (SV 5) grants a +1 bonus to
your own characters daily Constitution check for each success
and critical success. Self-treatment is also possible but is more
difficult to accomplish (SV 8). Note that bonuses from multiple
attempts do not stack, but assisting others is possible.
Healing Supplies: Healing supplies can be used to grant a
+1 bonus to any one specific Healing check, but doing so consumes one application of the supplies even if the attempt fails.
Healing supplies typically include bandages, special ointments,
healing herbs, and other medicinal items. Self-healing checks can
also benefit from the use of healing supplies. Note that only one
application of supplies may be used when assisting others and
that the +1 bonus is applied to the primary result rather than to
individual checks.

Unconsciousness

It is possible to rouse an unconscious target by making a


Healing check of SV 5 but only outside of combat. Unconscious
creatures may also make a Constitution check to rouse on their
own once combat has ended (SV 5), and then once again every
hour thereafter.
Sleeping vs. Unconsciousness: Being asleep is not the same
thing as being unconscious. Sleeping creatures must succeed on
an Awareness check of SV 5 to waken, but they also rouse automatically if damaged.
Resuscitate from Drowning/Suffocation: Your character
may attempt to resuscitate victims that have fallen unconscious
due to drowning or suffocation, assuming that they can first
be moved to safety (pulled from the water, sufficiently able to
breathe, etc.). Resuscitation requires a Healing check of SV 5, but
each minute that has passed since the victim lost consciousness
imposes a cumulative 1 penalty to your characters check (more
than one minute 1, more than two minutes 2, etc.), but after
five minutes the victim automatically perishes. Only one attempt
at resuscitation may be made per victim, but assisting others is
allowed. Obviously, self-treatment is not possible.

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Bleeding

It is possible to stop an adjacent target from bleeding with


a successful use of the Healing discipline (SV 5), but the targets
total bleeding penalty is also applied to the check. Self-treatment
is also possible, but doing so is more difficult (SV 8).

Specific Injuries

Impairments and broken bones typically require extensive


recovery times. Constitution checks are not permitted until a specific amount of time has passed, but they ignore fatigue penalties
and other situational modifiers; the Healing discipline cannot be
used to affect the results. Additionally, if your character has not
taken proper care of her injury (kept a broken arm in a sling, used
a crutch, etc.) then the GM should impose strict penalties.
Note that these rules only apply to injuries that were suffered
during play. Disadvantages that were willfully selected during
character creation must be bought-off using character points, per
the GMs approval, and may still require magical healing.
Impairments: After one week, and then each day thereafter,
your character can attempt a new Constitution check of SV 5 to
see if the impairment has healed.
Broken Bones: After one month, and then each additional
week thereafter, your character can attempt a new Constitution
check of SV 5 to see if the bone has mended.
Severed/Destroyed Parts & Permanent Injuries: Unfortunately, severed and destroyed body parts and permanent injuries
cannot be healed naturally. They can only be restored through the
use of powerful magic or the Regeneration creature trait.

122

Damaged Faculties

Your character may make a Constitution check at the start


of each day to restore damaged faculties (separate from the daily
check to restore health). Every success and critical success may
restore 1 point from each damaged faculty. For instance, if your
character has damaged faculties of 1 Dexterity and 2 Might
then a standard success would leave him with a 1 Might penalty,
while a critical success would restore both faculties fully.
Penalties to Multiple Checks: Damaged faculties that are
applied to multiple checks count for double in regards to their
recovery requirements. For instance, if your character suffers a
damaged faculty of 1 to all Precision checks then a standard success is not enough to restore it, but two successes that are achieved
on separate days or a single critical success would suffice.
Ongoing Afflictions: When a damaged faculty is the result
of an ongoing affliction, such as a disease, poison, or specific injury, the affliction itself must always be cured before any attempts
to restore the damaged faculty can succeed.
Non-living Creatures: Non-living creatures are typically
unable to restore damaged faculties on their own unless they also
possess traits that allow them to recover health (Regeneration,
Vampirism, etc.). Otherwise, they are forced to rely on magic to
do so, such as the Recovery spell effect.

Disease and Poison

Contracting a disease or poison forces a victim to have to


endure a series of Constitution checks according to the afflictions frequency. However, the Healing discipline can be used to

GAMEPLAY
grant a +1 bonus to the victims periodic Constitution checks for
each success and critical success (SV 5 for treating others or SV
8 for self-treatment). This bonus only applies to the Constitution
checks of the affliction that is specifically being treated, but it persists until the disease/poison is cured or the victim perishes. Note
that bonuses from multiple attempts do not stack, but assisting
others is possible.
Antidotes: Many diseases and poisons have antidotes that
can be applied to provide a cure. Their specific application can
also vary, but ingestion is the most common delivery method.
Whether or not a specific antidote is available, or even possible,
is entirely up the GM. Many antidotes must be researched at great
length, and some require rare ingredients. Certain antidotes may
even be able to be purchased from shops, but their costs vary
greatly according to the rarity of their ingredients and other factors (GMs call). Alternatively, the Cure spell effect can be used
to cure any disease or poison, but it requires a critical success to
do so; a standard success merely slows the frequency.

Mental Conditions

The majority of mental conditions and mental disadvantages


(those that primarily affect the mind) cannot be healed naturally,
and the few that can tend to require recovery times of months or
even years. Magical healing is normally the only suitable option
for a timely recovery, such as via the Cure spell effect or similar
powerful magic.

HOLDING YOUR BREATH

Your character can attempt to hold her breath for a variety


of different reasons (swimming underwater, trying not to inhale
poisonous gas, etc.). She must make a free Constitution check
of SV 3 after every 30 seconds that she holds her breath. Each
new check, regardless of success or failure, imposes a cumulative
penalty of 1 to all further breathing checks until she is able to
breathe freely. Failure forces your character to attempt to breathe
(filling her lungs with water, exposing her to poisonous gas, etc.),
but there is no additional penalty for suffering a critical failure.
If your character is unable to breathe she immediately begins to
drown or suffocate (inhaling poisonous gas still counts as breathing and does not typically cause suffocation).
Drowning/Suffocating: Beginning to drown or suffocate
shortens the time between Constitution checks to every round (instead of every 30 seconds). Cumulative penalties are still applied
and continue to accrue each round. At this point, failure causes
your character to fall unconscious, but there is no additional penalty for suffering a critical failure. A character that falls unconscious will die after 5 minutes unless she can be resuscitated by
the successful use of the Healing discipline, which requires that
she first be moved to safety (pulled from the water, sufficiently
able to breathe, etc.).
Creatures with the Extended Breath trait receive a +3 bonus
to their Constitution checks that are made for holding their breath.
Creatures with the Amphibious or Awkward Form: Aquatic traits
cannot drown, but both may still suffocate (creatures with the
Awkward Form: Aquatic trait risk suffocation if they leave the
water). Non-living creatures cannot drown or suffocate.

PETS & MOUNTS

Pets can serve as companions and may fulfill a variety of


trained roles, while mounts often grant increased mobility and
expanded tactical options on the battlefield.
Temperament: Every bestial creature is designated as being
either aggressive or docile, and some may be of either temperament according to their specific breeds. This determines how they
react to fear and how their unique behaviors should be portrayed.
Training: Bestial creatures can be trained to function reliably in specific roles and situations. Each type of training imparts
unique benefits but is costly and requires d4 weeks to complete:
Combat Training: The creature remains calm and no longer has to make fear checks due to combat. It can also
be commanded to attack the handlers enemies (aggressive creatures are easier to command in this respect; see
below). Bestial creatures without combat training must
make a fear check whenever they enter combat.
Mount Training: The creature is able to serve as a reliable
mount. Bestial creatures without such training can still
be ridden but will often struggle and attempt to buck
their riders at random times, as determined by the GM,
which forces a rider to succeed on an Agility check of
SV 5 to avoid being thrown and potentially suffering
falling damage. Untrained creatures also suffer a 1
penalty to all actions that are initiated by their riders.
Task Training: Type: The creature has been trained to reliably perform a specific set of tasks, such as Couriering,
Entertainment, Manual Labor, or Tracking (requires
the Heightened Sense: Scent trait). Other types of tasks
may also be allowed, per the GMs discretion.
Control: During combat a pet shares its handlers initiative
order, including any lucky or tough breaks. The pets handler may
issue commands by making a Persuasion check against its Fortitude stat, applying a 2 penalty if it has not be trained to perform
the specific task (this penalty is always negated if the handler can
communicate with bestial creatures). Any pet that has bonded to
its handler can be commanded to perform basic tasks (stay, come,
sit, etc.), regardless of its training. A critical success is required
to persuade a pet to perform tasks that are against its nature, such
as commanding a docile pet to attack. A critical failure causes an
aggressive pet to attack its handler or causes a docile pet to flee
(only for the round). Once commanded, a pet will continue to perform its task until it receives another command or it loses focus,
such as when it suffers health loss, smells food, etc.
Bestial mounts and work animals are commanded a bit differently while being ridden or driven. Persuasion checks are not
required unless a task conflicts with the animals nature, as when
commanding a docile mount to attack. However, the rider/driver
accrues and shares all multiple action penalties with the animal.
Pet Limit: As a general rule, PCs may not control more than
one pet, enchanted companion, animated minion, or summoned
creature during a battle (mounts do not count). If your character
has multiple creatures and minions then one must be chosen to
assist during battle and it should be assumed that the others are
occupied with non-combative tasks (guarding the partys rear,
waiting in reserve, etc.). Note, however, that GM-controlled monsters and NPCs are not required to follow this rule.

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Mounts

Generally, mounts must be at least one size tier larger than


their riders (a medium size rider requires a large size mount). Certain species may have limitations as to the kinds of mounts they
can ride, and some species, like centaurs, may be unable to ride
mounts due to their unique body types.
Occupied Space and Threat: Concerning the movement
board, the riders counter is placed atop his mounts counter and
centered in the exact middle. The rider retains his personal threat
range so that he is forced to reach past the mounts counter in
order to make melee attacks. Therefore, riders of mounts that are
more than one size tier larger may require the use of a weapon that
has the Reach special quality in order to attempt melee attacks.
Injuries: Whenever the rider or his mount suffers health loss
he must make a free Agility check of SV 5 to keep from falling
off and potentially suffering falling damage (area-effect attacks
that affect both the rider and his mount only require one check).
Riding without tack incurs a 2 penalty to the riders checks; possessing the Riding Expertise trait grants a +2 bonus to his checks.
Dominant Faculties: A rider and his mount act as a team in
combat, allowing them to function almost as a combined entity.
Certain faculties of the rider or his mount are considered dominant and are always used while the rider is mounted:
Defense (mount): The mounts Defense stat is always used
even if the riders stat is greater. Single target attacks
automatically affect the mount unless a called shot is
made to hit the rider; called shots that attempt to hit a
specific location of the rider are also possible, but an
additional 2 penalty is applied (increasing the total
called shot penalty to 4). Area-effect attacks affect the
mount and the rider if both are partially within their
templates. A riders shield adds its block value to the
mounts Defense stat but only if the mounts full occupied space is within the riders reach. Lastly, a mount
without tack suffers a 1 penalty to its Defense stat
while carrying a rider due to the awkward distribution of weight, but riders that are at least two size tiers
smaller than the mount do not impose this penalty.
Initiative (rider): The riders Initiative discipline is used to
determine the turn order for the pair in combat, even if
the mounts Initiative discipline is superior.
Movement (mount): The mounts Speed stats (all forms)
are dominant, as are the following disciplines: Climbing, Flying, Jumping, Running, and Swimming.
Other Faculties (varies): All other faculties vary according to each situation, per the GMs discretion.

STAMINA

One of your characters stamina points is lost whenever he


must endure physical hardship or perform prolonged strenuous
activities. This loss may either be automatic or the GM may allow
for a Perseverance check (typically SV 5; there is no penalty for
a critical failure or benefit for a critical success). Casting spells or
using certain abilities also risks the loss of stamina. Lost stamina
points are removed from your characters stamina row and are
placed into his fatigue row.

124

Interpreting Stamina: Exactly how the concept of stamina


is interpreted differs depending on whether a creature is classified
as living or non-living. In the case of living creatures, stamina
serves as their biological energy, which is replenished through
sleep and by the consumption of food. However, in the case of
non-living creatures, stamina serves as their mystical or spiritual
essence, which is replenished automatically over time since they
have no need to sleep or consume food.

Exhausted

Your character can continue to move, act, and function normally as long as he has at least one remaining stamina point in
his stamina row (taps do not count). However, once all of his
stamina points are lost he is considered exhausted and must make
an immediate free Perseverance check, applying penalties from
fatigue and from additional implied stamina loss (see below); this
particular Perseverance check cannot critically fail. The result determines the extent of your characters exhaustion.
Having one or more stamina points restored means that your
character is no longer considered exhausted and he may once
again move, act, and function normally. Each time that an event
reduces his stamina point total to zero he is again considered exhausted and must make a new Perseverance check.
Implied Stamina Loss: Any event or situation that removes
your characters final stamina point can also imply additional
stamina loss. Each point of implied stamina loss imposes a cumulative 1 penalty on your characters Perseverance check, in
addition to fatigue penalties.
For example, if your character only had one stamina point
remaining and was then targeted by the Siphon: Stamina spell
effect, which imposed the loss of two stamina points, he would
suffer a 1 penalty on his Perseverance check, in addition to any
penalties from fatigue. He only had one actual stamina point left
to lose, so the loss of the other stamina point would be implied.
Subsequent events that occur after all of your characters
stamina has been depleted can also imply stamina loss, which automatically causes his exhausted condition to worsen according
to how many points are implied. For instance, if your character
is already tired and then suffers stamina loss from another event
he would become drained if the loss of one point were implied
or killed outright if the loss of two or more points were implied.

Exhausted
Result
10+
5 to 9
0 to 4
Negative

Conditions
Second Wind
Tired
Drained/Incapacitated
Destroyed/Killed

Conditions of Exhaustion

Depending on the result of the Perseverance check your


character can be affected by several conditions:
Second Wind: Your character has managed to tap into an
unexpected reserve of stamina, which allows him to continue to move, act, and function normally for up to one

GAMEPLAY
hour (he is still exhausted and his lost stamina points still
count toward fatigue). Once the hour passes he automatically becomes tired (see below) unless at least one stamina
point has been restored. Suffering further implied stamina
loss during this time automatically reduces his condition
to tired (1 implied point), drained/incapacitated (2 implied
points), or destroyed/killed (3 or more implied points).
Tired: Your characters energy is almost completely spent.
All of his Speed stats are reduced by half (rounded down),
he may not sprint, he may not attempt multiple actions,
and he is considered distracted. For each additional hour
that passes he must succeed on a Perseverance check of
SV 5 or he automatically becomes drained/incapacitated
(see below). Suffering further implied stamina loss during
this time automatically reduces his condition to drained/
incapacitated (1 implied point) or destroyed/killed (2 or
more implied points).
Drained (living only): If living, your character falls into a
deep state of sleep and is considered helpless. He remains
asleep for at least two hours or until at least one point of
stamina is restored, assuming that the time passes peacefully and that no further stamina loss is implied. Even if
forcibly roused he is so exhausted that he cannot remain
awake for very longhe still suffers the same penalties
for being tired and must succeed on a Perseverance check
of SV 5 every minute or he falls back into a deep sleep.
Suffering further implied stamina loss (any number of
points) automatically kills your character.
Incapacitated (non-living only): If non-living, your character cannot move or attempt significant actions, such as
attacks, abilities, or spells (even mental abilities and spells
are prohibited). He remains alert and can communicate,
if able but is otherwise completely helpless. This condition persists indefinitely until at least one stamina point
is restored. Suffering further implied stamina loss (any
number of points) automatically destroys your character.

Stamina Recovery

Living creatures automatically regain one stamina point for


every two hours of rest or sleep obtained, assuming that they have
consumed sufficient food and water. Non-living creatures automatically regain one stamina point every two hours and never
need rest, sleep, food, or water.
Resting (living only): Rest is only achieved by relaxing and
avoiding strenuous physical activity. Leisurely and intellectual
tasks are still permitted, but performing most kinds of physical
tasks interrupts rest (GMs call). Be aware that traveling is never
treated as being restful unless it is done so purely as a passenger
aboard a vehicle; riding a mount, driving a vehicle, or working as
a crew member on a vehicle are all considered strenuous activities
and can even result in stamina loss over time.
Sleeping (living only): Going without sleep for a full 24
hours suspends your characters ability to recover stamina points,
despite resting. Stamina recovery does not resume until at least
2 hours of uninterrupted sleep are obtained (stamina may not be
recovered during these initial 2 hours). Furthermore, at least 6
hours of sleep is generally needed each day, and while it is cer-

tainly possible to make due with only minimum periods of sleep


over the course of a few days, eventually the GM should suspend
stamina recovery until sufficient sleep has been obtained.
Hunger/Thirst (living only): Going without sufficient food
(at least two meals) or water for a full day suspends your characters ability to recover stamina points, despite resting. Stamina
recovery does not resume until sufficient amounts of food and
water have been consumed. Consuming small amounts can avoid
this form of stamina suspension temporarily, for a day or two,
but eventually it will still occur (GMs call). Prolonged starvation
and thirst may also manifest as a cumulative 1 penalty to all of
your characters discipline and profession checks as his degree of
starvation/thirst progresses, per the GMs discretion; this penalty
is treated as a damaged faculty with starvation/thirst serving as
the affliction. Note that the Sustenance spell effect can be used to
instantly sate your characters hunger and thirst.

Stamina Loss

There are many different ways in which your character may


lose stamina, but the following causes are the most common:
Advantages & Traits: Some advantages and traits may grant
special abilities that can incur stamina loss when used.
Casting Spells: All spells risk stamina loss when they are
cast. Whenever your characters discipline roll is a 1 he
immediately loses one point of stamina, regardless of the
modified result and whether or not the spell succeeds;
spells marked with the stamina loss spell descriptor [S]
are exceptions and always incur stamina loss (see below).
Diseases & Poisons (living only): Some types of diseases
and poisons can impose stamina loss.
Extreme Temperatures (living only): As described below,
exposure to extreme temperatures for extended lengths of
time can quickly drain your character of stamina, and may
even drain his health as well.
Strenuous Physical Activities: Most forms of manual labor
can result in stamina loss, the rate of which depends on
the degree of exertion and the length of time that the task
is performed (GMs call).Traveling, unless done so purely
as a passenger aboard a vehicle, is always strenuous.
Stamina Loss Spell Descriptor [S]: Casting a spell or using
a magical ability that is marked with the stamina loss spell
descriptor [S] always incurs the loss of one stamina point,
regardless of success or failure. Rolling a 1 does not incur
further stamina loss.

Extreme Temperatures (living only)

Being exposed to extreme temperatures can quickly cause


living creatures to lose stamina points, and possibly even health
points too. There are four temperature tiers, both for cold and hot,
which are measured in degrees Fahrenheit. Each tier also corresponds to a specific exposure time interval.
After each full interval of exposure time your character must
make a new Constitution check, applying any modifiers that are
imposed due to his choice of apparel (see below), resistances, or
weaknesses; the SV varies according to each specific temperature
tier. Success means that no stamina is lost, but new checks must
still be made for as long as he remains exposed. Failure incurs the

125

CHAPTER 4
loss of one stamina point, whereas a critical failure incurs the loss
of two stamina points. Failing two consecutive checks, and each
failed check thereafter, also incurs the loss of one health point
(frostbite, burns/blisters, etc.).

Extreme Temperatures
Cold (F)
0 to 30
20 to 1
40 to 21
Below 40

SV (Interval)
3 (1 hour)
5 (45 minutes)
8 (30 minutes)
12 (15 minutes)

Hot (F)
90 to 109
110 to 124
125 to 139
140 or above

Apparel Modifiers
Armor/Clothing
Nude
Poor Clothing
Common, Wealthy,
or Formal Clothing
Winter Clothing
Light Armor
Moderate Armor
Heavy Armor

Cold
2
1

Hot
+2
+1

+2

2
1
1
2

+1
+1

Rough terrain and weather includes any conditions that slow


or impede travel, such as swamps, uneven or steep ground, dense
vegetation, shallow water, heavy precipitation, or wind storms
(just to name a few). The GM will decide if such conditions are
present and what portion of the journey they affect.

Traveling Times
Method of Travel
Air Travel
Flight, Mystical
Flight, Winged
Mounted, Mystical
Mounted, Winged
Land Travel
Walking
Cart/Wagon
Carriage/Chariot
Mounted
Water Travel
Swimming
Mounted
Oar Propulsion
Sail Propulsion
Oar and Sail Propulsion

Speed
6 mph
6 mph
12 mph
12 mph

Stamina Loss

2 hours
2 hours

3 mph
4 mph
6 mph
6 mph

4 hours
4 hours
4 hours
4 hours

2 mph
4 mph
4 mph
5 mph
6 mph

30 minutes
2 hours
2 hours
4 hours
2 hours

TRAVELING TIMES

Over the course of her adventures your character will often


need to travel, sometimes across vast distances. Most methods of
travel are taxing on your characters body and require her to make
periodic Perseverance checks of SV 5, with failure incurring the
loss of one stamina point (there is no penalty for a critical failure or benefit for a critical success). The time interval between
each Perseverance check varies according to the chosen method
of travel. Traveling speeds are also indicated and are measured in
miles per hour (mph).
Be aware that both a rider and her mount are susceptible to
stamina loss, as are all of the work animals and crew members
of vehicles. However, a vehicles passengers are not usually at
risk of stamina loss unless they are also working as members of
the crewpassengers are typically considered to be resting and
may recover stamina normally except during rough travel (rough
roads, severe or extreme weather, etc.).
Quickened Travel: All methods of travel may be quickened
(except for mystical flight). Doing so doubles a methods speed,
but its time interval between Perseverance checks is halved and
its difficulty is increased to SV 8.
Rough Terrain/Weather: Traveling across rough terrain
or through rough weather halves the methods speed unless your
character makes a Survival check of SV 8. Success extends this
benefit to your characters whole group, but particularly large
groups like armies may require multiple successful checks. Even
if this check is failed quickened travel may still be used to help
achieve standard speeds. Traveling in extreme temperatures is
handled separately and may incur additional stamina loss.

126

WEATHER (GM)

Weather conditions and temperatures are often chosen by


the GM, but they may also be determined randomly according to
the adventures climate, season, and geographical features. These
rules are also pertinent to the Weather Control spell effect, which
can magically shift temperatures and weather severity.
Climate & Geography: A regions climate affects the kind
of weather conditions and average seasonal temperatures that it
typically experiences. Geographical locations can also affect the
frequency of weather changes (coastal regions tend to experience
more sudden shifts, whereas deserts rarely change at all).

Temperature

The following table lists the average seasonal temperatures


for different climate types, as measured in degrees Fahrenheit.
However, keep in mind that the listed values are actually averages
for the whole day, meaning that daytime temperatures are slightly
warmer and nighttime temperatures are slightly cooler.
Arid Nighttime Fluctuations: Arid environments tend to
experience more dramatic nighttime temperature fluctuations.
Exceptionally dry air quickly loses its heat at night and causes
temperatures to drop significantly, often by about 30 or more.
Other Climate Types: The five climate types listed below
serve as broad groupings to help provide the GM with points of
reference. There are many other climate types, including those
that experience much greater or even negligible seasonal variations and those with far more extreme average temperatures.

GAMEPLAY

Average Seasonal Temperatures


Climate Type
Torrid/Hot
Tropical/Warm
Temperate/Moderate
Boreal/Cool
Frigid/Cold

Temperatures (F)
Sum Fall Win Spr
95
90
85
90
80
75
70
75
75
55
30
55
55
40
15
40
30
10 10 10

Weekly Fluctuations: Prolonged temperature fluctuations


may also occur due to changing weather patterns, which apply a
modifier to all daily temperatures according to the season. A new
check should generally be made every week or so of game time.
For example, in a temperate/moderate climate during summer the average daily temperature would be around 75 degrees.
If the GMs weekly fluctuation roll is an 11 then the average daily
temperature would be increased by +10 to 85 degrees.

Weekly Temperature Fluctuations


Result
1
2 or 3
4 to 7
8 or 9
10 or 11
12

[Roll: d12]
Temperature Adjustments (F)
Summer/Fall
Winter/Spring
10
+10
5
+5
Base temperature Base temperature
+5
5
+10
10
+15
15

Weather Severity

There are five tiers of increasing weather severity that range


from calm to extreme. GMs who prefer to have weather conditions determined randomly should check for shifts in severity
periodically throughout each day of game time, usually every 6
hours or so. Regions that are particularly prone to sudden weather
changes may require more frequent checks, such as coastal areas
and tropical climates. Also, keep in mind that weather conditions
tend to favor returning to a calm state.

Calm Mild Moderate Severe Extreme


()
(+)

Changing Weather
Result
1 or 2
3 to 5
6 to 8
9 to 11
12

[Roll: d12]
Severity Shift
2 tiers
1 tier
No change
+1 tier
+2 tiers

Potential Weather Conditions

Weather severity determines the kinds of potential weather


effects experienced in a particular region. As noted above, the
GM should take into account the regions climate, temperature,
geography, and any seasonal variations.
Arid Climates: Deserts and other arid climates only rarely
experience precipitation, and usually only during specific periods
throughout the year. During dry seasons the GM should ignore
the precipitation results and special weather chances for these
regions (wind conditions are typically unaffected). Instead, arid
climates may experience intensified temperature fluctuations according to the weathers severity, which manifests as an increase
for hot climates or as a decrease for cold climates: mild +/ 5,
moderate +/ 10, severe +/ 15, or extreme +/ 20.
Precipitation: The temperature determines whether rain or
snow occurs, and its volume may impede travel and cause other
hindrances due to flooding or snow accumulation. There is also a
percentage chance that special weather conditions may manifest,
such as thunderstorms, dense fog, hail, sleet, or ice storms.
Wind: The force of the wind can affect air-based effects like
certain forms of visual obscurement, flight, tracking by scent, and
the dispersal rate of toxins or spores (GMs call). There is also a
percentage chance that windstorms may develop, such as dust or
sand storms, tornadoes, or hurricanes.

Potential Weather Conditions


Severity
Calm
Mild
Moderate

Severe
Extreme

Precipitation
None
Light periodic
(10% special)
Light sustained,
heavy periodic
(30% special)
Heavy sustained,
torrential periodic
(50% special)
Torrential sustained
(70% special)

Wind
Light periodic
Light sustained
Light sustained,
heavy periodic
(10% windstorm)
Heavy sustained,
destructive periodic
(30% windstorm)
Destructive sustained
(50% windstorm)

WILLPOWER CHECKS

Whenever your character is required to exercise self-control


or mental restraint she must make a special reverse d8 roll against
her Fortitude stat, which for your character means that success
is bad and failure is good. If the result is less than your characters Fortitude stat then she successfully resists the specific urge
or compulsion. If the modified result is equal to or greater than
her Fortitude stat then she succumbs to the temptation and acts
accordingly. A willpower check is capable of maxing, but there is
no additional outcome for a critical failure.
Modifiers: Some situations may apply a special modifier
to the willpower check result, as noted in their descriptions. Be
aware that negative modifiers benefit your character, whereas
positive modifiers are a detriment (due to the reverse d8 roll).

127

MAGIC

CHAPTER 5
MAGIC

he ability to cast spells is a powerful asset and can allow


your character to accomplish amazing things. However, the
act of channeling magical forces can be extremely taxing on your
characters body, often resulting in the loss of stamina points or
other more serious consequences.

CASTING SPELLS

Your character can learn to cast spells by purchasing the


Spellcasting advantage and selecting one of its six types: Arcane,
Divine, Elemental, Mental, Nature, or Shadow. The Spellcasting
advantage may be purchased multiple times, but your character
must choose a different spellcasting type for each selection. Other
advantages and species traits may also grant access to specific
spell effects, such as the malgoths Psychic Bolt trait.
Your characters chosen spellcasting type determines which
spellcasting discipline is used when casting spells. Note that the
Spell Precision discipline is used when casting the Damage spell
effect, regardless of your characters particular type of magic.

Spellcasting Type
Arcane
Divine
Elemental
Mental
Nature
Shadow

Discipline
Sorcery
Mysticism
Geomancy
Mysticism
Geomancy
Sorcery

The result of your characters spellcasting discipline check


or Spell Precision check is compared against SV 5 or the targets
Concentration, Defense, or Fortitude stat. If the result meets or
exceeds the indicated value then your characters spell succeeds.
Risk of Stamina Loss: All spells risk stamina loss when
they are cast. Whenever your characters discipline roll is a 1 he
immediately loses one point of stamina, regardless of the modified result and whether or not the spell succeeds; spells with the
stamina loss spell descriptor [S] are exceptions and always incur
stamina loss when attempted.
One Free Hand: Your character must have at least one free
hand in order to cast spells, except for those with spell effects that
are marked with the mental casting spell descriptor [M]. A particular limb that is used to cast a spell cannot also be used to make
an attack during the same round. Casters that choose to wield
two-handed weapons may still cast spells by temporarily holding

the weapon in their other hand, but they cannot also attack with
the weapon in the same round since it requires the use of both
hands. Weapons may be enchanted with the Channeling magical
quality to act as conduits for spellcasting, which allows spells to
be cast through them as if they were a free hand and even permits
them to make an attack in the same round, if desired (multiple
action penalties are still accrued normally).
Verbal Commands: Spell effects require verbal commands
in order to cast unless they are marked with the mental casting
spell descriptor [M]. Being unable to speak does not completely
prevent attempts at casting, but it imposes a 2 penalty on your
characters Spell Precision and spellcasting discipline checks.

Casting Modifiers

Each spell effect has a base casting modifier (CM for short)
that is listed in parenthesis after its title, as do all of its general
options. All of a spells casting modifiers are added together and
the total modifier is applied to its discipline check whenever the
spell is cast. Essentially, a spells CM represents its relative power
and complexity.

Ending/Releasing Duration Spells

A spellcaster may freely end any of his active spells that


have non-instant durations, including spells that are being held
with taps. No discipline check is needed.
Dangerous Situations: In situations where suddenly ending
a spell would pose an immediate danger to other creatures the
GM should typically allow those affected to make a free Agility
check, or a similar check, of SV 5 to either avoid or to lessen the
severity of the outcome. For instance, creating a magical bridge
over a pit and then ending the spell when enemies are trying to
cross should grant each victim a chance to safely reach one of the
pits sides, perhaps by allowing a free Jumping check.

Purchasing & Adjusting Spells

You must purchase your characters spells individually at a


cost of 1 character point each for standard spells or 3 character
points each for spells that use freeform effects [F]. Most casters
will find it advantageous to possess multiple spells, and there is
no limit to the number of spells that may be acquired.
Sub-Effects: Some spell effects are further divided into
sub-effects (listed in blue text), which must be selected as part of
the spells design. For instance, the Cure spell effect is subdivided
into Disease, Mental Condition, and Poison.

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CHAPTER 5
Daily Spell Preparation: A spells effect and its sub-effect,
if required, are permanent choices that can never be changed.
However, each morning, assuming that your character obtains a
full nights rest (at least 6 hours of sleep), you may modify any
or all of her spells general options, including their target areas,
ranges, and durations; freeform spell effects [F] are able to modify
their general options without daily spell preparation (see below).
For example, if one of your characters spells was designed
to make use of the Damage: Heat spell effect then it must forever
do so. You could change its target area from affecting a single
target into using a sphere area-effect template, but the Damage
spell effect and its Heat sub-effect could never be changed.

Spell Descriptors

Many spell effects are marked with descriptors that indicate


the use of special rules and mechanics. If applicable, descriptors
are listed in brackets after a spells CM, sub-effects, or bolded
rules. There are four unique types of spell descriptors:
Freeform Effect [F]: This spell effect is able to be adjusted
on-the-spot to use any general options without the need
for daily spell preparation, meaning that your character
only needs to purchase a single spell that selects this effect
in order to cover all of its variations. However, a freeform
spell costs 3 character points (instead of 1 character point).
Mental Casting [M]: This spell effect is cast purely through
mental thought and does not require vocal commands or
even a free hand, nor does it limit physical attacks that are
made by your characters head in the same round (bites,
head-butts, etc.). Therefore, it is not affected by conditions that restrict sounds or movement (the Paralyze or
Silence spell effects, the Mute disadvantage, etc.). However, mindless creatures are immune to spell effects that
possess this descriptor.
Reagent Consumption [R]: This spell effect may consume
magical reagents whenever it is successfully cast.
Stamina Loss [S]: This spell effect always incurs the loss of
one stamina point when attempted, regardless of success
or failure. However, rolling a 1 on the spells discipline
roll does not incur further stamina loss, as is the case for
other spells. Lastly, spell effects that are marked with the
stamina loss spell descriptor can never be held as taps.

Style & Descriptive Details

Beyond the selection of general options and spell effects,


you are free to customize the style of each of your characters
spells, such as their appearances, sounds, and other descriptive
details. Adding personal touches to a spells design can make
identical spells appear unique when cast by different casters.
For example, lets assume that two arcane casters each
have a spell that uses the Damage Aura: Electricity spell effect.
One casters aura might produce blue arcs and frequent zapping
sounds, whereas the other casters aura might glow green and
emit a constant crackling hum while it remains active.
Customizing a spells style is entirely optional and is done so
purely for roleplaying purposes. As such, it cannot affect a spells
rules or provide other gameplay benefits to your characterit is
simply a way to add unique flare to your characters spells.

130

Sources of Magical Power


The Six Spellcasting Types
Arcane Magic

Often regarded as the most primal form of magic,


arcane spellcasting involves the use of runes and sigils,
the true power of names, knowledge of long-forgotten
secrets, and the direct channeling of magical energy
in its rawest form. The Sorcery discipline governs the
casting of arcane spells.

Divine Magic

Faith, spirituality, and miracles are the hallmarks of


divine spellcasting. Gods, demigods, demon lords, and
other divinely spiritual beings often lend their magical
powers to their most devoted mortal servants, including
the abilities to grant blessings, to heal the wounded, and
even to resurrect the dead. The Mysticism discipline
governs the casting of divine spells.

Elemental Magic

The foundation of elemental spellcasting lies in the


manipulation of the physical realm. More specifically,
the four elementsair, fire, stone, and watercontain
links to the very essence of magic, which grants the
caster power over the creation, control, and destruction
of matter itself. The Geomancy discipline governs the
casting of elemental spells.

Mental Magic

Sapient thought is sometimes able to be focused


so clearly that mental spellcasting can be achieved. By
adjusting ones perceptions of reality the power of the
mind is able to willfully manifest and control psychic
magical energy and to exert control over the minds of
others. The Mysticism discipline governs the casting of
mental spells.

Nature Magic

The combined life force of the world generates its


own unique form of magic that serves as the basis for
nature spellcasting. Control over animals, plants, and
even the weather are all made possible through the use
of nature magic. The Geomancy discipline governs the
casting of nature spells.

Shadow Magic

Darkness is much more than just the absence of


lightit is also a very real and tangible force that can
be accessed and shaped by those who dare to unlock
the mysteries of shadow spellcasting. Practitioners of
shadow magic are able to curse their foes and may even
harness the very essence of death itself. The Sorcery
discipline governs the casting of shadow spells.

MAGIC

DESIGNING SPELLS
Each of your characters spells must be designed individually. Begin by selecting one spell effect from his repertoire of
known effects, as determined by his Spellcasting type and rank,
then select each of the spells general options: target area, range,
and duration. The casting modifiers from each of these options
(listed in parenthesis) are then added together to calculate the
spells total CM.

SPELL EFFECT

There are 76 unique spell effects to choose from, but your


characters selected spellcasting type restricts which spell effects
are available. The rank of his Spellcasting advantage also limits
his number of known spell effects:

Spellcasting
Rank
Rank 1
Rank 2
Rank 3

Known
Spell Effects
1
3
All

Known Spell Effects vs. Number of Spells: It is important


to recognize the distinction between your characters number of
known spell effects and his actual number of spells. As shown
above, his spellcasting rank determines the number of known
spell effects he is able to access when designing new spells, but
he is able to purchase any number of spells that use these effects.
For example, lets assume that your character has purchased
the Spellcasting: Nature (R2) advantage. This allows him to know
three nature spell effects, such as Detect Creatures, Resistance,
and Shapechange. He could then purchase any number of spells
that utilize these three spell effects, including any of their allowed
sub-effects, but he could not design a spell using the Sleep spell
effect or another nature spell effect unless he first increased his
Spellcasting: Nature advantage to Rank 3.
Sub-Effects: To be clear, specific sub-effects do not have to
be selected as part of known spell effects. For instance, if your
character knows the Resistance spell effect then he can design
spells using any of its sub-effects that are allowed by his spellcasting type (Acid, Cold, or Electricity for nature magic).

GENERAL OPTIONS
Target Area: Select 1 Option

Self Only (+1): This spell may only affect the caster. It must
also select reach as its range option unless the spell effect
description states otherwise.
Single Target (0): This spell may affect either the caster or
a single target within range.
Multiple Targets (varies): This spell may affect up to 4
separate targets (the caster is able to designate himself as
one of the targets). The number of targets may be adjusted

on the spot, per each casting of the spell, but the casting
modifier varies accordingly: 1 or 2 targets (2), 3 targets
(3), or 4 targets (4).
Area-Effect Template (varies): This spell affects all targets within a specified area-effect template (rectangular
prism, sphere, thin cone, or wide cone). The templates
size may be adjusted on the spot, per each casting of the
spell, but the casting modifier varies accordingly: small
(2) or large (3). However, the templates shape can only
be adjusted via daily spell preparation. Refer to Situational Conditions: Area-Effect Templates in Chapter 4 for
more information.

Range: Select 1 Option

Reach (+1): This spell requires all targets to be within the


casters natural reach. Area-effect templates must position
their points of emanation within the casters reach, but
they may still affect targets beyond this range due to their
greater target area. Casting a reach spell also ignores the
standard 2 penalty that distance spells suffer when cast
within the threat range of hostile targets.
Distance (0; special): This spell may affect targets at any
distance, but each successive tier beyond the first range
increment imposes a cumulative 1 penalty to the casters
casting modifier. The casters creature size determines
the range increment for all of his spells. For instance, the
range increment for a medium size caster is 5 squares, so
he would apply the following casting modifiers: 0 for up
to 5 squares away, 1 for 610 squares away, 2 for 1115
squares away, and so on. Note that if the multiple target
option is selected for the target area then casting modifiers
are applied separately for each target, respectively; if the
area-effect template option is selected then the position of
the templates point of emanation determines the CM penalty. Lastly, attempting to cast a distance spell within the
threat range of a hostile target causes the caster to suffer
a 2 penalty on his discipline check due to the heightened
risk of attack (spells with the mental casting spell descriptor [M] are not penalized). Surprised or helpless targets
do not threaten the caster since they do not exert zones of
control, but the spell is still penalized if the caster is also
threatened by other targets.

Spell Range Increments


Creature Size
Tiny
Small/Medium
Large/Huge
Enormous/Gigantic
Colossal

Range
Increment
4
5
6
7
8

131

CHAPTER 5

Duration: Select 1 Option

Instant (0): This spell occurs immediately. It does not have


a duration and may not be held with a tap. This option
must always be selected if indicated by the spell effect.
Set Number (varies): This spell remains active for a number of specified units of time (rounds, minutes, hours,
etc.), as noted by the spell effect. In the case of rounds an
effect lasts for the remainder of the round in which it is
cast plus the number of rounds selected. For all other units
of time the effect lasts until the specified time has elapsed
(two hours, five days, etc.). This options casting modifier
varies according to how many units of time are selected:

Number of
Units
2
5
10

Casting
Modifier
0
1
2

Variable Number (1): This spell remains active for a variable number of specified units of time (rounds, minutes,
hours, etc.), as noted by the spell effect but otherwise
functions like the set number option above. Immediately
upon successfully casting the spell a special d10 roll is
made, which determines how many units of time the spell
remains activethis roll may not critically fail or max.

132

EXAMPLE SPELLS

The following three example spells highlight an assortment


of different spell effects and general options:
Bond of Flames (Fire Control): This spell has the freeform
effect descriptor [F], which means that it costs 3 character points to purchase (instead of 1). The caster may
freely adjust any of its general options on the spot and
never needs to purchase any other spells that select Fire
Control. However, since freeform spells tend to be more
complicated, players are encouraged to assemble notes,
printouts, or copies of the spell general options and any
duplicated spell effects for quick reference during play.
Taunting Voices (Distract): This spell is very straightforward,
but it is assumed that its caster is small or medium size,
which is why it lists its distance range increment as being
5 squares (the range increment would need to be adjusted
for casters of other sizes). Also note that the spells duration lasts for the remainder of the round in which it is cast
plus 2 additional rounds.
Zhilgors Healing Wave (Restore: Health): This spell uses a
wide cone area-effect template for its target area. The templates point of emanation needs to be positioned within
the casters natural reach, but it can still be placed in such
a way so that the caster is affected as well. Attempting to
cast this spell always incurs the loss of one stamina point
since it has the stamina loss spell descriptor [S].

MAGIC

Spell Name
Type

Elemental

Discipline

Spell Descriptors
Free Form [F] 3
Mental [M]
Reagents [R]
Stamina [S]

Target Area

Any

Range

Any

Duration

Any

Geomancy

Varies

CM

SV

Unique Abilities: Accelerate Burn (CM 1, rounds), Extinguish Flames


(CM +1, instant), and Flare Flames (CM +1, instant).

Duplicated Spell Effects (additional CM 2): Damage: Heat, Damage


Field: Heat, and Obscurement. Damage: Heat uses the Spell
Precision discipline and the target's Defense stat.

Spell Name

Spell Effect

Taunting Voices

Mental

Fire Control

Description/Notes

General Options

Type

Spell Effect

Bond of Flames

Discipline

Spell Descriptors
Free Form [F]
Mental [M]
Reagents [R]
Stamina [S]

Mysticism

+1

CM

Distract
Concentration

SV

Description/Notes
If successful, the target is considered to be distracted.

General Options
Target Area

Single Target

Range

Distance: 5

versa). While both durations persist the target can still be distracted
normally from multiple melee opponents, use of the Intimidation

Rounds: 2

Duration

Spell Name
Type

discipline, and other sources.

Spell Effect

Zhilgor's Healing Wave

Divine

Discipline

Spell Descriptors
Free Form [F]
Mental [M]
Reagents [R]
Stamina [S]
General Options
Target Area

A-E: Wide Cone

Range

Reach

Duration

This spell negates the benefits of the Concentrate spell/song (and vice

Instant

Mysticism

CM

Varies

Restore: Health
SV

Description/Notes

All targets instantly heal one health point for each success and critical
success achieved. Health points can be healed regardless of when
they were lost.

The CM varies according to the size of the area-effect template, per


each casting: 2 for a small wide cone or 3 for a large wide cone.

133

CHAPTER 5

SPELL EFFECTS
Spell Effect
Air Control [F]
Alarm
Animate Minion: Type
Animate Object
Bad Luck
Charm: Type
Commune: Type
Comprehension
Concentrate
Containment
Counterspell
Creation
Cure: Type
Damage: Type
Damage Aura: Type
Damage Field: Type
Death
Death Ward
Detect Afflictions
Detect Creatures: Type
Disintegrate
Distract
Dream Craft
Entangle: Type
False Memories
Fear
Fire Control [F]
Flight
Freedom
Hasten
Illusion [F]
Improve Faculty: Type
Insanity
Invisibility
Light
Luck
Mind Reading: Type
Mind Scanning
Mind Shield
Object Reading
Obscurement: Type
Paralyze
Phase Shift
Plant Control [F]

134

E
3

3
S

3
3
S
S

S
S

3
3
3
3
3
S
S
S

3
S
S
S

S
S
S

S
S
S

S
S
S

S
S
S
3

3
3
S

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Spell Effect
Preservation
Quick Heal
Recovery: Type
Reinforce: Type
Resistance: Type
Restore: Type
Resurrection
Root
Rouse
Scrying
Sensory Augmentation: Type
Sensory Deprivation: Type
Shapechange
Silence: Type
Siphon: Type
Siphon Faculty: Type
Sleep
Slick
Slow
Steal Magic
Stone Control [F]
Summon Creature
Suppress Magic
Sustenance
Telekinesis: Type
Telepathy
Teleportation: Type
Wall
Ward: Type
Water Control [F]
Weaken: Type
Weather Control [F]

D
3
3
3
S
3
3

3
S

3
3
3
S

S
3

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

Spellcasting Types

3
3
3
S
3
3
3

S
3
3

S
3

A Arcane

M Mental

D Divine

N Nature

E Elemental

S Shadow

Spell Effect Access


3 Complete

S
3

S Limited

MAGIC

Air Control (CM varies) [F]

Elemental
SV varies, duration varies
This spell effect allows the caster to control the element of
air. It cannot create air but rather manipulates existing air. Note
that since this effect is freeform it can be tailored on the spot to
use any general options (duplicated spell effects must still adhere
to the options that they are normally allowed to select; see below).
Air Creatures: Creatures that are composed of air, such as
those who possess the Elemental Form: Gaseous creature trait,
are not inherently vulnerable to this spell effect any more so than
are standard creatures.
Unique Abilities: The following abilities are unique to the
Air Control spell effect and can be attempted without the penalties imposed by duplicated spell effects:
Breeze (CM +2, SV 5, rounds): This ability conjures a
moderate wind to blow in a specific direction, which
may be freely selected and changed by the caster each
round; wind strength may be increased with a critical
success. It can be used to achieve a variety of minor
tasks, such as clearing an area of air-based obscurement
effects in d4 rounds or instantly with a critical success
(dust, insect swarms, etc.), increasing the speed of a
sailing ship by +2 miles per hour (requires holding the
spell with a tap), or by shielding the area against ranged
attacks and the Damage spell effect (imposes a 2 penalty against all attacks that are made into, through, or
from within the affected area; generally only affects
distance spells of acid, cold, heat, and physical damage types). Other applications may also be permitted,
per the GMs discretion. This ability may only use an
area-effect template for its target area, and its position
must be designated as either being stationary (locked
onto a specific location) or mobile (able to move along
with and centered onto a selected object or creature).
Easy Breathing (CM 0, SV 5, minutes): This ability lets
the target breathe normally despite any hostile conditions, such as being underwater or being surrounded by
toxic or poisonous gases, spores, or particles. Breathable air is magically filtered from the surrounding air
or water and requires no conscious effort by the target.
Creatures with the Awkward Form: Aquatic trait may
even breathe while out of water, but their capacity to
move and act may still be restricted.
Suffocation (CM 2, SV Concentration, rounds) [S]: This
ability instantly draws all of the air out of the targets
lungs and causes him to begin to suffocate (new air may
not be breathed until the spells duration has ended).
The target must succeed on a free Constitution check of
SV 3 every round or he falls unconscious (there is no
additional penalty for suffering a critical failure). Each
new check, regardless of success or failure, imposes
a cumulative penalty of 1 to all further suffocation
checks. A target that falls unconscious will die after 5
minutes unless he can be resuscitated by a successful
use of the Healing discipline, assuming that the spells
duration has ended.

Duplicated Spell Effects: Air Control may also mimic other


existing spell effects, but doing so imposes an additional CM of
2 to the casters discipline check and the spell effect may also
be restricted in other ways. The following spell effects may be
duplicated by Air Control:
Flight: No Speed bonus is granted for achieving a critical
success and the spell effect cannot be tapped. Landing
is also more difficult than it is for standard Flight and
requires the target to succeed on a free Agility check of
SV 3 each time he attempts to land, or he falls prone.
Obscurement: Light debris, such as leaves, dust, sand,
and smoke, may be used to create a field of obscurement, assuming that a sufficient volume of such debris
is present in the general area (GMs call).
Telekinesis: Throw: A forceful push of air can be used
to knock-back or throw creatures or objects (air itself
does not result in collision damage but colliding creatures/objects are susceptible). The Disarm and Levitate
sub-effects cannot be duplicated by Air Control.

Alarm (CM +1)

Arcane
SV 5, hours
This spell effect imbues an area or objects so that an alarm is
emitted whenever the area is breached or an affected object is manipulated. The caster may be as vague or as detailed as she desires
concerning the conditions that trigger the alarm, which can be
adjusted on the spot, per each casting of the spell. Conditions can
include restricting certain types of creatures (or specific individuals), requiring a password, or may even be as simple as hostile
intent or enemies. However, the GM is encouraged to interpret
the spells triggering conditions in as literal a manner as possible.
Once an alarm is triggered it emits a single auditory or mental signal (see below) that lasts for one full round. Afterwards, the
effect ends despite any remaining duration or tap, and the alarm
cannot be triggered again unless the spell is recast. Only a single
alarm is produced according to the first breach of an affected area
or the first manipulation of an affected object.
Auditory vs. Mental Signals: The caster must designate
whether an alarm produces an auditory sound or a mental warning
when triggered (freely determined per each casting). An auditory
sound originates from the center of the affected area or from the
location of an affected object, and its selected volume may vary
per the casters choosing from the level of a whisper to that of a
church bell. A mental warning has unlimited distance, produces
no audible sound, and only the caster is made aware that the alarm
has been triggered.
Area Alarm: This alarm is triggered whenever an area is
breached by the physical presence of designated creatures. A
breach occurs regardless of how a designated creature enters the
area (crossing the perimeter, teleporting directly inside, etc.).
Non-physical presences do not trigger the alarm, such as creatures that possess the Incorporeal trait or those affected by the
Phase Shift spell effect, unless they first assume a corporeal form.
The Scrying spell effect and similar abilities that allow for remote
viewing of a particular location are also considered non-physical
and do not trigger the alarm.

135

CHAPTER 5
Object Alarm: This alarm is triggered whenever an object is
manipulated according to the specified conditions. All objects that
are fully contained within the affected area at the time of casting
may be imbued, but the caster may freely limit which objects are
affected and which are not. Affected objects are able to be moved
beyond the initial area after the spell is cast, but keep in mind that
only the first object manipulated (as specified) actually triggers
the alarm, which is emitted from the objects current location.
General Options: The general options for this spell effect
must adhere to the following special rules:
Target Area: Only area-effect templates are allowed for
this spell effect, or it may utilize its own special area
rules, as measured in 10-foot cubes. Each additional
cube beyond the first adjusts the spells CM by 1 (the
first cube is free). All cubes must remain adjacent to
one another, but they may be shaped and/or reduced in
volume so that they can encompass entire rooms, structures, and specific areas.

Animate Minion: Type (CM varies) [R]

Elemental, Shadow
SV 5, minutes (special)
This spell effect creates a specific animated minion in the
form of either an Elemental creature (elemental magic only) or
an Undead creature (shadow magic only), which serves and/or
fights for the caster. Most animated minions act on their casters
turn, beginning on the next round after the spell is cast. Each
minion requires its own separate spell.
Refer to the Animated Minions section at the end of this
chapter for rules and instructions on how to design an animated
minion. The spell effects CM and magical reagent cost (if any)
are determined by this process.
General Options: The general options for this spell effect
must adhere to the following special rules:
Target Area: This spell effect does not require that a target
area option be selected. There is no CM adjustment.
Range: The minion can be made to appear at any point
within the spells range, but if it cannot physically fit
then the spell automatically fails.

Animate Object (CM varies)

Arcane
SV 5 or Fortitude (special), rounds
This spell effect magically animates a single object to perform one specific function entirely on its own. The caster must
issue an initial mental command to the object upon casting the
spell, such as which target to attack (weapon) or who to protect
(shield). The object will ceaselessly continue to perform its function until its task is complete or the effects duration endsthe
caster may not issue new commands to an object but must instead
cast the spell again. Animated objects begin performing their
functions immediately in the same round that the spell is cast.
Animating Attended Objects: Attempting to animate an
attended object compares the casters result against the targets
Fortitude stat (instead of SV 5). If the object is actually being held
it is also considered grappled and must immediately attempt to
break free before it can perform its function (see below).

136

Types of Objects: The most common applications for this


effect involve animating melee weapons, shields, and tools (other
kinds of objects may also animated, per the GMs discretion):
Melee Weapons: An animated melee weapon attempts
to attack a specified target each round on the casters
turn. It uses a d8 for its Melee Precision checks and
uses its standard damage die if it hits, both modified by
its equivalent size (according to the size of the creature
that would typically wield it). The weapons Defense
stat is also determined by its size. Only standard melee
attacks can be attempted, so special types of attacks like
called shots cannot be performed. Ranged and thrown
weapons must also attempt melee attacks and may not
make ranged attacks (ranged weapons suffer a 2 penalty to their Melee Precision checks and damage checks
unless they possess the Melee Capable special quality).
Most of a weapons special qualities are still applicable,
but some may be irrelevant (Attached, Defensive, Fast,
Mounted, etc.). Reach weapons always attempt to move
to a suitable distance from their target so as to avoid
penalties but will still attack if such a position cannot
be attained; Slow weapons attack every other round.
Lastly, an animated weapon counts as one source of
distraction but only against its specified target.

Weapon's
Melee
Damage Defense
Equivalent Size Precision
Tiny
+1
2
5
Small
0
1
4
Medium
0
0
4
Large
1
+2
3
Huge
1
+4
3
Enormous
2
+7
2
Gigantic
2
+10
2
Colossal
3
+14
1
Shields: An animated shield attempts to follow and block
incoming attacks for a specified target. It moves on top
of the targets own occupied space and attempts to move
with the target on his turn, for as much as its own Flight
Speed stat allows (see below; it may need to catch up
over the course of multiple turns). A shield applies its
block value to the targets Defense stat but cannot be
stacked with the targets own shield, if applicable (only
the better of the two shields is used). The target is also
restricted to only being able to use animated shields
that correspond to his particular sizeshields that are
designed for creatures of a different size than the target offer no defensive benefit. Lastly, a shield can be
animated to serve exclusively as a weapon, instead of
protecting a specified target.
Tools: An animated tool is able to perform a simple task
that requires little concentration. Examples include a
broom sweeping a floor, a hammer smoothing-out a
dent in a piece of armor, a sewing needle and thread
stitching an article of clothing, etc. Essentially, any

MAGIC
trivial task that would not require a discipline or profession check is a suitable task for an animated tool,
but tasks that do require checks cannot be performed
by animated tools.
Mentality & Senses: Being mindless, an animated object
lacks a Fortitude stat and is therefore immune to all spell effects
with the mental casting spell descriptor [M], fear, Intimidation,
Persuasion, and all abilities/checks that require Fortitude. It has
the following faculties: Concentration 5, Notice 2, Agility d4,
Awareness d41, Initiative d41 (despite always acting on the
casters turn), and Might d4. It also has standard senses that are
affected normally by obscurement, spells, and other conditions.
Movement & Tactics: An animated object has a Flight
Speed of 4 and may move freely in any direction, but it may not
sprint; when underwater, it has a Swim Speed of 2. An animated
object is a simple automaton that is incapable of utilizing tactics.
If the object is prevented from performing its task it will remain
motionless until it can resume or until the spells duration ends.
Grappling: An opponent can attempt to grapple an animated
object to keep it from performing its function, but a specialized
called shot is still required. The animated object may attempt to
break free at the beginning of each of its turns by making a d8 roll
and applying a Combat Maneuvers modifier equal to the creature
size for which it was designed: tiny 2, small 1, medium 0, large
+1, huge +2, enormous +4, gigantic +6, colossal +9. In addition
to the standard grappling follow-up moves, an opponent can also
attempt to make attacks with the animated object itself, but he
suffers a 1 penalty to his Precision checks and damage checks
due to the objects reluctance to cooperate.
Overriding Anothers Spell: Attempts by another caster to
animate an existing animated object are more difficult to achieve.
A 2 penalty is applied to the casters check, but success grants
full control over the animated object and ends the original spell.
General Options: The general options for this spell effect
must adhere to the following special rules:
Target Area: Only the single target option may be selected
for this spell effect. The objects equivalent size (corresponding to the creature size for which it was designed)
determines its occupied space and the spell effects CM:

Object's
Equivalent Size
Tiny
Small/Medium
Large/Huge
Enormous/Gigantic
Colossal

Occupied
Space
x
x
1x1
2x2
3x3

Casting
Modifier
+1
0
1
2
3

Range: The selected range indicates the initial distance


from the caster to the object. However, once the spell
has been cast the object will continue to perform its task
despite moving out of range of the caster.
Duration: As stated above, new commands may not be
issued to an animated object. An animated object that
completes its task remains motionless until the spells
duration ends, but the caster may still choose to end the
spell at any time.

Bad Luck (CM 2)

Shadow
SV Concentration, special duration
This spell effect afflicts the target with bad luck. All of the
targets discipline checks, profession checks, and damage checks
are made twice and the lesser of the two results is used. Note that
this spell effect does not apply to Initiative checks that are made
to determine turn order in combat.
General Options: The general options for this spell effect
must adhere to the following special rules:
Duration: This spell effect has a special duration that lasts
until the end of the targets next turn; it may not be held
with a tap. There is no CM adjustment for duration.

Charm: Type (CM 2; special) [M, S]

Mental, Nature
SV Fortitude, rounds
This spell effect allows the caster to take control of the targets mind. It may affect either Bestial creatures (nature magic
only) or Sapient creatures (mental magic only).
Achieving a standard success means that the target will only
obey neutral orders, such as those that do not clearly put him in
danger or oppose his interests (the caster is viewed as a neutral
party). Achieving a critical success permits all types of actions,
such as ordering the target to attack his allies or having him enter
into dangerous situations (the caster is viewed as a close friend).
Casting Modifier & CPV: A further cumulative 1 penalty
is applied to the spell effects CM if the targets CPV exceeds the
casters CPV, and again for every additional 25 points thereafter.
For example, if the casters CPV is 170 then a target with a
CPV of 170 or less would impose no additional penalty. However,
a target with a CPV from 171 to 195 would impose an additional
1 penalty, a target with a CPV from 196 to 220 would impose an
additional 2 penalty, and so on.
Giving Commands: Commanding the target is most often
accomplished by issuing oral commands, but visual gestures and
even written instructions from the caster may also suffice as long
as the target believes them to be authentic. The target continues
with his current orders until they have all been completed, and
will then resume his own interests or tasks until new orders are
issued. However, he will not take any actions against the caster,
but he may still prove hostile to the casters allies or create other
concerns unless additional preventative orders are also issued.
The issuance of simple commands to charmed targets during
battle is treated as a free action, whereas the issuance of lengthy
or complicated commands is treated as a trivial action. Charmed
targets continue to act on their own turns regarding Initiative
checks, and they accrue their own multiple action penalties. The
GM controls charmed targets according to how he believes they
would interpret the casters commands.
Language & Communication: Language barriers are not
an issue when spoken from the caster to the target since the magic
automatically translates the casters meaning (visual gestures and
written instructions are not automatically translated). However,
reverse communication from the target to the caster is restricted
by language barriers unless other spell effects are also employed,
such as Commune or Comprehension.

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Suicidal Actions (critical successes only): Commanding a
target to perform a suicidal or self-harming action grants him a
willpower check, applying a 2 modifier, to immediately break
free from the spell. Success is bad for the target and means that
he dutifully follows through with the action as commanded, but
each additional suicidal command (if even possible) grants him a
new willpower check. Note that suicidal commands may only be
issued to a charmed target if a critical success was achieved on the
casters spellcasting discipline check.
Targets Awareness: Once the spell ends, a charmed target
may make a free opposed Awareness check against the casters
Stealth check to determine if he realizes that the caster has manipulated him, regardless of whether or not he understands that the
use of magic was involved. Success means that the target is fully
aware that the caster was somehow responsible, whereas failure
means that he is left confused and instead attributes his strange
behavior to other factors.
Charming Anothers Minion: This spell is more difficult
to cast when attempted against anothers minion (charmed targets, enchanted companions, animated minions, or summoned
creatures). A 2 penalty is applied to the casters result but only
against a target that is still under its masters control. The original
master also regains full control of his minion once the spell ends,
assuming that his duration of control is still in effect.

Commune: Type (CM 0)

Mental, Nature, Shadow


SV 5, minutes
This spell effect allows the target to communicate freely
with other creatures despite language barriers. Such communication is fully two-way but is restricted to speech, sounds, and
visual gestures; written language and symbols are not able to be
translated. The target and other creatures may still choose to be
deceptive, if desired.
Creature Types: There are three distinct sub-effects that
vary according to the type of magic being used:
Bestial (nature magic only): This sub-effect permits
communication with bestial creatures, including bestial undead creatures (except for disembodied spirits)
and bestial plants (most plants are actually mindless
and thus incapable of communication). The method of
communication varies accordingly, with animals generally speaking orally (barks, screeches, etc.) or via
movements, and with plants tending to communicate
through slight movements and vibrations. Concerning
bestial animals, be aware that they cannot distinguish
between cultural terms unless they are inherently familiar with such things. For instance, a dog that grows up
in a human village may think of all humanoids as being
human, whereas a dog that grows up in a trade city with
exposure to lots of different humanoid species would
probably be able to recognize basic differences, within
reason. Concerning bestial plants, their responses are
often very difficult and alien to interpret. Unless the
plant in question has unique senses it may not be able to
relate certain details. For instance, asking a bestial plant
that lacks sight if orcs have passed through the forest

138

recently is likely to get no response, whereas asking if


any creatures have brushed against its bark or trodden
upon its roots would tend to be more forthcoming.
Sapient (mental magic only): This sub-effect permits
communication with sapient creatures, including sapient undead creatures (except for disembodied spirits)
and sapient plants.
Undead (shadow magic only) [R]: This sub-effect permits communication with sapient undead creatures,
which includes disembodied spirits. Undead creatures
that are physically present may be communicated with
freely, without consuming magical reagents. Disembodied spirits do not have to be present, but the caster
must first possess a remnant of the creatures worldly
body (bone, hair, etc.), and if the spell succeeds then
it consumes a varying amount of magical reagents according to the length of time that has elapsed since the
creature died:

Elapsed Time
Less than a year
Less than a decade
Less than a century
One century or longer

Magical
Reagents
25g
50g
100g
200g

Comprehension (CM +1)

Arcane
SV 5, minutes
This spell effect allows the target to comprehend unfamiliar
languages (including spoken and written forms), symbols, and
gestures. However, it does not allow the target to communicate to
others using a language with which he is unfamiliar.
Achieving a standard success only translates major words
and meanings, which can sometimes leave the overall translation
as being somewhat cryptic or incomplete, per the GMs discretion. Achieving a critical success allows the target to perform a
thorough translation.

Concentrate (CM +1) [M]

Mental
SV 5, rounds
This spell effect imbues the target with a heightened sense
of focus, preventing her from becoming distracted. Being caught
by surprise is still possible, however. A target who is also affected
by the Distract spell/song has its penalties temporarily suspended,
essentially canceling-out both effects while their durations overlap, but while both effects persist the target may still be distracted
normally (multiple melee opponents, Intimidation, etc.).

Containment (CM 1) [S]

Arcane
SV Concentration, hours
This spell effect attempts to trap multiple targets within a
translucent magical field, thus preventing them from affecting the
environment beyond the spells area. Targets are contained within

MAGIC
and cannot escape through any means, not even through the use
of magicthe one exception is the Suppress Magic spell effect,
which may be cast against the field either from outside or from
within. Furthermore, targets that are trapped inside may not make
attacks or cast spells that are aimed beyond the field, but attacks
or spells that are aimed within the field are still permissible.
The field can be destroyed if damaged from the outside, but
attacks from the inside cannot harm it. The field has a Defense
stat of 0. It has a Resilience stat that is equal to 8 if a standard
success was achieved by the caster, or 12 if a critical success was
achieved. The field is instantly destroyed if any damage check
equals or exceeds its Resilience value, which immediately ends
the spell and frees all of the targets that are trapped inside.
Until the field is destroyed or suppressed all targets that are
trapped inside are rendered impervious to all forms of damage,
hostile effects, and hazards that originate from outside. Effects
or hazards that are already present within the field at the time of
the spells casting may still pose a danger to those trapped inside,
such as poisonous gases or enemy occupants. Light, darkness,
and non-hazardous environmental conditions (sound, wind, precipitation, temperature, etc.) may still pass through freely.
Willing Targets: This effect may be cast on willing targets
using SV 5 (instead of Concentration), including even the caster
himself. Like other spells, the caster may freely end this spell at
any time, including from within the field if necessary.
Containment Site [R]: A permanent containment site can
be built to serve as a focal point for this spell effect, which is
often engraved into stone or clearly marked in some other way,

and then enchanted. The spell must still be cast each time, but if
centered on the site its duration is increased to days (instead of
hours) and the casters own spells may penetrate the field freely
without dispelling it. Containment sites often serve as temporary
prisons for spellcasters and other magical creatures. Creating a
containment site consumes magical reagents worth 250g, and this
is in addition to any material and labor costs that are necessary for
the sites construction.
General Options: The general options for this spell effect
must adhere to the following special rules:
Target Area: Only area-effect templates are allowed for
this spell effect. Only targets that are fully contained
within the template are affected, but if a single target
either resists the spell or is only partially contained
within the area then the entire spell automatically fails.

Counterspell (CM 2)

Arcane
SV 5, rounds
This spell effect allows the caster to attempt to negate an
enemys spell or magical ability, including bardic songs, magical
combat techniques, and triggered magical items. It can even be
used to counter the effects of magical traps but only if the trap
was successfully detected beforehand.
Once this spell has been activated the caster can choose to
release it, outside of his turn, whenever an enemy begins casting
a spell or using a magical ability, or when a magical trap is triggered. The enemy or trap must be within the casters line-of-effect

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and no more than 50 feet away. The caster makes a special d8 roll,
the result of which is subtracted from the enemys or traps result
(this roll may max, but it cannot critically fail). A +1 modifier is
also applied to the casters d8 roll for each critical success that
was achieved when activating the counterspell. The counterspell
ends after it has been attempted, even if some of its duration still
remains. Only one counterspell may be active on the caster at a
time, regardless of whether it is duration-based or held with a tap.
For example, assume that the enemys spellcasting result is a
9. If the caster then makes his d8 ro