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Conditioning

Moisturization

Deposition

Film Formation

Conditioning

Moisturization

UCARE Polymers

Deposition Film Formation Conditioning Moisturization UCARE Polymers Cationic conditioners that revitalize hair and skin
Deposition Film Formation Conditioning Moisturization UCARE Polymers Cationic conditioners that revitalize hair and skin
Deposition Film Formation Conditioning Moisturization UCARE Polymers Cationic conditioners that revitalize hair and skin
Deposition Film Formation Conditioning Moisturization UCARE Polymers Cationic conditioners that revitalize hair and skin
Deposition Film Formation Conditioning Moisturization UCARE Polymers Cationic conditioners that revitalize hair and skin
Deposition Film Formation Conditioning Moisturization UCARE Polymers Cationic conditioners that revitalize hair and skin
Deposition Film Formation Conditioning Moisturization UCARE Polymers Cationic conditioners that revitalize hair and skin

Cationic conditioners that revitalize hair and skin

Deposition Film Formation Conditioning Moisturization UCARE Polymers Cationic conditioners that revitalize hair and skin

Cationic conditioners that repair hair and moisturize skin

The introduction of UCARE™ polymers over twenty years ago started a revolution in the development of multifunctional personal care products. The unique properties of UCARE Polymer JR pioneered the delivery of a conditioner from a surfactant system, and conditioning shampoos were born.

Today, UCARE polymers (INCI Name: Polyquaternium-10) are at work in a variety of personal care products as cationic, water-soluble, substantive conditioners. Highly versatile, UCARE polymers are compatible with a wide range of anionic, amphoteric, nonionic and cationic systems. And, they are formulation flexible to suit any conditioning requirement.

The key to the unique cationic conditioning properties of UCARE polymers is their ability to repair damaged protein substrates. Used primarily in hair care applications, they migrate directly to the point of damage to mend split- ends. Hair that has been permed or bleached is greatly enhanced with just a single application of a shampoo containing a UCARE polymer. A variety of grades, viscosities and degrees of substantivity allows you to select the functionality and aesthetics best suited to the goals of your product. There’s even a UCARE polymer grade that’s perfect for daily use shampoo products.

UCARE polymers have other advantages that have helped make them market favorites. Because they are nonirritating to the eye, they are ideal for inclusion in shampoos and facial cleansers. UCARE polymers also act as anti-irritants. So, they’re more than just mild. They can actually reduce the irritancy of surfactants and other harsh ingredients in your product.

But, UCARE polymers aren’t just for shampoos. In body washes, liquid soap systems and bar soaps, the film forming properties of UCARE polymers can enhance the efficacy of moisturizers. In addition, films formed by UCARE polymers effectively reduce moisture vapor transmission.

Benefits of UCARE polymers:

In Shampoo and Hair Care Systems, UCARE polymers:

Are substantive

Mend split-ends and frizzies

Form clear, continuous, nontacky films

Bring excellent wet combability to hair

Improve appearance and feel of damaged hair

Provide controlled conditioning

Will not irritate the eyes

Reduce eye irritation of surfactants

Provide controlled delivery of insoluble actives

In Cleansing and Skin Care Systems, UCARE polymers:

Are substantive

Help reduce moisture vapor transmission

Deliver an elegant after-feel

Ameliorate inflammatory skin reactions

Mitigate Pseudofolliculitis barbae

Are nonirritating

Reduce the irritation potential of surfactants and other ingredients

Help restore barrier function of skin

Enhance the efficacy of UV absorbers

In Formulations, UCARE polymers:

Enable the formulation of clear products

Are compatible with a wide variety of surfactants

Exhibit non-Newtonian, pseudoplastic properties

Are nontoxic

Offer higher molecular weight grades that contribute to viscosity

Support “natural” label claims

Good-natured chemistry from a full range of product grades

UCARE polymers have a cellulosic backbone derived from natural, renewable resources. Most often, the starting material is cotton or wood. UCARE polymers are polymeric, quaternary ammonium salts of hydroxyethylcellulose reacted with trimethyl ammonium substituted epoxide.

Cellulose is a straight chain polymer consisting of anhydroglucose sugars linked by ß-1,4 bonds. Each anhydroglucose sugar monomer has three available hydroxyl (-OH) groups. Cellulose, in its original state, has a regular, hydrogen-bonded, crystalline structure which is not readily water soluble. The addition of the hydroxyethyl groups on the cellulose backbone alters the crystalline structure and transforms the polymer into a water-soluble, easy-to-use product.

Quaternization of hydroxyethylcellulose results in the creation of multiple cationic sites to which the anionic head groups in a surfactant will be attracted.

Because shampooing or washing is typically done above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) in order
Because shampooing or washing is typically done above the critical micelle
concentration (CMC) in order to remove dirt and oil from the hair or skin,
the UCARE polymers stay solubilized during the cleaning process. Upon
rinsing, however, the shampoo, soap or body wash is diluted near its CMC
and the polymer is deposited as the surfactant is rinsed away. Figure 2
illustrates this phenomenon.
Figure 1: The Idealized Structure
of UCARE Polymers
HO
O
HO
HO
O
O O
Cl - (H 3 C 3 ) + N
O
O
HO
O
O
OH
O
O
HO
O O
OH
O
O
HO
O
HO
O
O
HO
O
O
OH
HO
O
O
OH
O
OH
O
HO
O
O
O
O
O
OH
HO
O
Figure 2: Mechanism of Dilution Deposition
(Polyquaternium-10 with Anionic Surfactant)
O
5
N + (CH 3 ) 3 CI -
O
OH
4
One Phase-Homogeneous
3
2
One Phase-Homogeneous
1
2-PHASE COMPLEX + SOLUTION
0
0.1
0.2
0.5
1
2
5
10
20
Polyquaternium-10
Concentration

Critical Micelle Concentration

Source: Lochhead, The History of Polymers in Hair Care, Cosmetics & Toiletries, Vol. 103, Dec., 1988

Select from many levels of substantivity and cationic substitution

In order to meet the broad spectrum of usage situations, hair and skin types and degrees of damage to the hair and skin, UCARE polymers offer a range of functionality with a variety of grades. Their levels of viscosity, substantivity and cationic substitution (indicated by the percent nitrogen on one polymer backbone), enable you to combine variables for the appropriate aesthetics and conditioning functionality desired by the target market segment. UCARE polymers allow you to blend form and function in exactly the way you need to give your product its best opportunity to gain a differential advantage in the market.

In addition, all solutions of UCARE polymers are non-Newtonian and show pseudoplasticity depending on the viscosity grade. Therefore, your product will formulate easily, maintain the form you intended, and have excellent aesthetic properties when applied.

Figure 3: Typical Properties of UCARE Polymers in Aqueous Solutions

UCARE

Viscosity

Concentration % by Weight

Viscosity

 

Product

Type

Grade

(cPs)

% Nitrogen

Polymer

JR

125

2

75–175

1.5–2.2

Polymer

JR

400

2

300–500

1.5–2.2

Polymer

JR

30M

1

1,000–2,500

1.5–2.2

Polymer

JR

30M

2

25,000–35,000

1.5–2.2

Polymer

LR

400

2

300–500

0.8–1.1

Polymer

LR

30M

1

1,250–2,250

0.8–1.1

Polymer

LR

30M

2

25,000–35,000

0.8–1.1

Polymer

LK

2

300–500

0.4–0.6

LVF Brookfield at 25°C.

World-class Hair Care Technology

World-class hair care technology helps fine-tune the performance of UCARE polymers in your products

Modeling deposition with Atomic Force Microscopy

Over the years, Amerchol Corporation has been at the forefront of developing and utilizing innovative methods for determining the amount of polymer adsorbed by a keratin substrate. These methods include radiotracer analysis, streaming potential measurement and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). Recently, a new and powerful group of analytical scanning probe microscopy methods for characterizing solid surfaces at the molecular level has been harnessed by various industries. One of them, atomic force microscopy (AFM), has proven extremely useful for imaging nonconductive substances.

In AFM, a probe attached to a cantilever is used to measure the surface topography of the sample which is scanned in the x, y plane. The displace- ment of the probe tip, whether in direct contact or tapping mode, is detected by a reflected laser beam and a photodiode. The feedback voltage provides the topographical (z) data. The AFM method is an exciting way to map polymeric films.

Figures 4 and 5: AFM Studies of Polymer Deposition

UCARE Polymer JR
UCARE Polymer JR
UCARE Polymer LK
UCARE Polymer LK

Utilizing AFM techniques, analysis of polymer deposition on negatively charged mica surfaces clearly demonstrates that UCARE Polymer JR lies flatter against the surface than the UCARE Polymer LK because of the stronger bonding mechanism of the UCARE Polymer JR.

Because hair and skin by nature have a topography all their own, the study of polymer deposition can be difficult. The scientists at Amerchol searched for a smooth material to which polymer films could be applied. Freshly cleaved mica became the surface of choice on which to examine polymer deposition. Mica has a net negative charge like hair or skin, but it presents a molecularly smooth surface that enables scientists to study the deposition profile of polymer films more readily than on hair and skin.

Analysis of AFM data in Figures 4 and 5 shows how different polymers deposit and bond to the negatively charged surface. UCARE Polymer JR

mV

deposits on the surface in a very flat manner. This indicates a strong bond to the surface because of the higher degree of cationic substitution due to the higher number of cationic sites of UCARE Polymer JR. Examining a UCARE polymer that has a lower level of cationic substitution and substantivity, like UCARE Polymer LK, shows a more irregular topography that would indicate weaker bonding to the surface. This irregular topography indicates a molecular tangling to the cellulosic backbone of the normally soft polymer. This would provide rigidity that will enhance the body of the hair and that may translate into styling or fixative properties. Subjective salon tests using a shampoo containing UCARE Polymer LK confirmed this light styling property.

Electrokinetic testing assists polymer selection

Electrokinetic testing used to determine the desorption of a cationic material from hair by measuring the zeta potential (mV) of the hair surface, proves that there are different levels of substantivity among the members of the UCARE polymer line.

Figure 6: Electrokinetics of UCARE polymers

30

25

20

15

10

5

0

-5

-10

-15

-20

-25

-30 0

0 -5 -10 -15 -20 -25 - 3 0 0 10 20 30 Rinse Time (Minutes)
0 -5 -10 -15 -20 -25 - 3 0 0 10 20 30 Rinse Time (Minutes)
0 -5 -10 -15 -20 -25 - 3 0 0 10 20 30 Rinse Time (Minutes)

10

20

30

Rinse Time (Minutes)

UCARE Polymer JR-30M UCARE Polymer JR-400 UCARE Polymer LK

Hydroxyethylcellulose Control Hair

Hair has a negative charge on its surface. This is evidenced by the -27mV reading on the surface of the control hair in Figure 6. Treatment of the hair with a positively charged cationic polymer substantially changes the surface charge from negative to positive, illustrating polymer adsorption. The graph in Figure 6 indicates the UCARE Polymer LK, while delivering substantive conditioning effects, has less of an affinity for the anionic substrate (hair) than UCARE Polymer JR-400 upon application and through sustained rinsing. UCARE Polymer JR-400 has less of an affinity for the hair than

World-class Hair Care Technology

World-class Hair Care Technology Before UCARE Polymer After UCARE Polymer UCARE Polymer JR-30M. The performance of

Before UCARE Polymer

World-class Hair Care Technology Before UCARE Polymer After UCARE Polymer UCARE Polymer JR-30M. The performance of

After UCARE Polymer

UCARE Polymer JR-30M. The performance of the UCARE Polymer LR family would fall between the UCARE Polymer JR family and UCARE Polymer LK. This is due to the levels of cationic substitution for the different UCARE polymers. Based on their positive zeta potential, all are still substantive. Uncharged hydroxyethylcellulose, the basic starting material of the UCARE polymer line, exhibits a lack of substantivity and minimal changes in the hair surface charge.

Clearly, this data demonstrates the different conditions under which each of the UCARE polymers will perform best. For virgin hair, or hair that is not damaged, where only light conditioning is required, UCARE Polymer LK would be the conditioning ingredient to include in your formulation. Also, UCARE Polymer LK is ideal for daily use shampoos because it’s more easily removed from the hair. Of course, UCARE Polymer JR and UCARE Polymer LR are still the conditioning ingredients of choice to deliver the mending required to make damaged, permed, bleached or treated hair look and feel healthy and natural.

Outstanding abilities to mend split-ends

Mending split-ends is one of the unique properties displayed by all members

of the UCARE polymer family.

In order to measure split-end mending, individual strands of virgin brown hair containing split-ends were mounted on a plastic stand for each shampoo tested. Each hair was then shampooed by inserting the individual hair into an eye dropper containing the test formulation. The strand was then rinsed with distilled water from a squeeze bottle and the process repeated to simulate the normal shampooing procedure.

The hairs were examined immediately by hand lens for mended split-ends, and again after drying for one hour at 50°C (122°F). To simulate combing, each hair was tapped ten times with a spatula and the number of splits still mended was recorded. After one hour at room temperature, the hairs were examined again.

A triethanolamine lauryl sulfate (TEALS) shampoo without a UCARE

polymer was included as a control. The results of this study are given in Figure 7. The tested members of the UCARE polymer family (UCARE Polymer JR-30M and UCARE Polymer LR-30M) proved equally effective

in mending split-ends in either the anionic or amphoteric surfactant system.

So whichever grade of UCARE polymer you might include in your product,

you can still deliver the promise of mending split-ends.

The micrographic photos on the left visually confirm the ability of UCARE polymers to mend split-ends.

Figure 7: Single Hair Split-End Mending with UCARE Polymers LR and JR

Sample

Immediately

Percent Mended

After Tapping

1 Hour After Tapping

Anionic Shampoos (TEALS Type)

UCARE Polymer LR-30M

100

100

100

UCARE Polymer JR-30M

100

100

100

Amphoteric Shampoos

UCARE Polymer LR-30M

100

100

100

UCARE Polymer JR-30M

100

100

100

Control Shampoo

100

70

70

Control Shampoo Formula

 

Component Triethanolamine Lauryl Sulfate High Purity Coconut Diethanolamide Water

% by Weight

20

2

78

To further support and understand these results, we investigated the surface deposition of UCARE Polymer JR using electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). The data revealed very interesting substantivity behavior. The surface composition of the hair samples show higher quaternary nitrogen levels on the tip of the hair as compared with the root. Inspection of the high resolution data confirmed preferential polymer adsorption at the tip ends. This differential adsorption behavior is due to the greater availability of ionic attachment sites on the tip of the hair. Higher mechanical damage due to combing and exposure is another reason for greater tip end adsorption.

Measuring relationships between polymer deposition and surfactant selection

The type of surfactant you combine with UCARE polymers can affect the degree of polymer deposition on the hair or skin. While the amount of polymer deposition can be controlled by selecting the appropriate grade of UCARE polymer, a similar lowering of deposition can be achieved by changing the surfactant used in your system.

This is particularly evident with shampoos, where the impact of various surfactants can be determined quantitatively by a radioisotope technique. The deposition profiles for UCARE Polymer JR-400 in a variety of surfactant systems are shown in Figures 8 and 9 (page 10). Virgin brown and bleached hair were tested in order to determine if hair type and condition had any effect on the deposition from similar systems.

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Nonionic Surfactant Imidazoline Amphoteric 50/50 Imidazoline Amphoteric/TEALS EO SULFATE TEALS and Betaine

Imidazoline Amphoteric Nonionic Surfactant 50/50 Imidazoline Amphoteric/TEALS Betaine EO Sulfate TEALS

Figure 8: Deposition Profile of UCARE Polymer JR-400 on Virgin Brown Hair in Various Surfactant Systems

1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 Uptake (µg/mg)
1.2
1.0
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
Uptake (µg/mg)

12345

Shampoo Cycles

Figure 9: Deposition Profile of UCARE Polymer JR-400 on Bleached Hair in Various Surfactant Systems

10 8 6 4 2 0 Uptake (µg/mg)
10
8
6
4
2
0
Uptake (µg/mg)

12345

Shampoo Cycles

The highest level of polymer deposition occurs with nonionic and imidazo- line amphoteric surfactants. Anionics all give consistently lower deposition of polymer. A 50:50 blend of anionic TEALS and imidazoline amphoteric gives a deposition pattern much closer to the TEALS curve than the high deposition imidazoline amphoteric.

These findings indicate that the amount of polymer deposition on hair can be controlled by the selection of the surfactant system, and that products such as shampoos and body washes can be tailor-made for a given type of hair or skin. In general, for bleached or otherwise damaged hair, UCARE polymers should be used in an imidazoline amphoteric surfactant system to achieve maximum conditioning effects. For oily hair, where minimal deposition of the polymer would be desirable, an alkyl ether sulfate or TEALS/betaine type system should be used.

When using anionic surfactants, care must be taken to maintain the proper ratio between the surfactant and the UCARE polymer. Anionic-cationic combinations in stoichiometric ratios are incompatible, usually leading to insoluble precipitates. A ratio of about 5:1 anionic surfactant to UCARE polymer, however, produces clear solutions. Thus, anionic surfactants can generally be used with UCARE polymers without difficulty, as long as the surfactant concentration is in sufficient excess.

Understanding thickener relationships to achieve ideal clarity and pourability

The impact of UCARE polymers on the appearance, rheology and aesthetics of a typical shampoo product with gel-like structure was compared with other polymeric conditioners. In our study, we used a combination of 8% sodium laureth sulfate, 2% cocamidopropyl betaine and 2% decyl glucoside as the surfactant base of the system. All systems contained 0.5% sodium chloride.

Figure 10 (page 12) shows that in products where PEG-150 distearate or lauramide DEA was used as the thickener, high molecular weight UCARE polymer enhanced the appearance and rheology of the test system better than Polyquaternium-7 or guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride. In systems where PEG-55 propylene glycol oleate was used as the primary thickener, all grades of UCARE polymer produced clear products, while the inclusion of the Polyquaternium-7 made the final product slightly hazy and the guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride made the product hazy. In a gel-like system containing 1% PEG-150 distearate, all tested grades of UCARE polymers formed smooth gels. The guar hydroxypropyltrimonium chloride and Polyquaterinum-7 formed stringy or choppy gels, respectively.

The conclusion is clear. In today’s shampoo and shower gel products, UCARE polymers are clearly superior in delivering the appearance, rheology and aesthetics that consumers expect from quality brands.

Figure 10: Effect of 0.2% Polymer in Combination With Various ThickeningAgents

60000 Thickener PEG-150 DS stringy gel smooth gel choppy gel 50000 40000 smooth 30000 liquid
60000
Thickener
PEG-150 DS
stringy gel
smooth gel
choppy gel
50000
40000
smooth
30000
liquid
20000
GLUCAMATE ™
smooth
DOE-120
liquid
pourable gel
high viscosity liquid
pourable gel
10000
PEG-55 PG
smooth
hazy viscous liquid
sl. hazy
viscous liquid
Oleate
liquid
viscous liquid
hazy liquid
liquid
liquid
LDEA
hazy liquid
0
Polymer
Contains 1% “thickener” in an 8% SLES/2%
cocamidopropyl betaine/2% decyl glucoside
surfactant system.
Viscosity (cPs)
No Polymer
G-HPTC
PQ-7
UCARE
Polymer JR-30M

UCARE polymers help skin stay smooth, moist and healthy

When it comes to keeping skin in top condition, nothing tops the conditioning power of UCARE polymers. Their substantivity to the skin translates into a protective film that not only leaves skin feeling smooth and silky, but helps the skin maintain moisture and combat the harmful defatting effects of soaps and the environment.

Today’s UCARE polymers fully support nonanimal testing claims. While much of the early work in assessing the performance of UCARE polymers was done on calf and rat skin, all recent testing has been done on humans. Since these early tests were done in the 1970s, nonanimal testing claims can still be made.

While the AFM studies on mica can be projected to prove the substantivity of UCARE polymers on skin, direct skin testing confirms the presence and longevity of UCARE polymers on skin even under harsh conditions. A lotion containing 0.2% C 14 - tagged UCARE Polymer JR was rubbed into calfskin swatches. After drying, the swatches were immersed in a 0.1% solution of a commercial dishwashing detergent at 50°C (122°F). At the intervals listed in Figure 11, the swatches were withdrawn for assay, using the liquid scintillation counting technique.

Figure 11: Substantivity of UCARE Polymers Under Harsh Conditions

Time of Immersion (minutes)

Percent of UCARE Polymer JR Retained on the Skin

0

100%

10

98

30

83

60

40

90

40

Keeping Skin Smooth and Moist

The staying power of UCARE polymers enables you to formulate creams, lotions, soaps, body washes, and cleansing cloths that deliver long-lasting benefits to your customers. In formulations containing active ingredients, such as antibacterial soaps, UCARE polymers may improve the long term efficacy of the active ingredient. Other tests prove the effectiveness of UCARE polymers in delivering multifunctional benefits like reduction of moisture vapor transmission and irritation.

Keeping Skin Smooth and Moist

Keeping moisture where it belongs

UCARE polymers have a positive effect on the barrier function of skin by lessening its degradation and providing a substitute when the natural barrier is lost and needs time to rejuvenate.

Moisture vapor transmission (MVT) experiments were conducted in vitro with special precautions taken to maintain the integrity of the stratum corneum membranes throughout the testing. Each membrane was sand- wiched between two pieces of plastic screen. The subject membranes were suspended in a 500 ml beaker in which a strong soap solution was gently stirred. Upon removal, the membranes were rinsed by immersion in three successive beakers of tap water and then air dried.

Diffusion cells were constructed from spherical O-ring joints (15 mm ID) by cutting and sealing one side of the joint to provide a reservoir 2 cm deep. The reservoir was stuffed with tissue paper to prevent splashing, and 2 ml of distilled water was added. A moistened membrane was then placed across the reservoir, followed by the O-ring and the opposite side of the joint. The entire unit was then clamped and placed in a desiccator over CaSO 4 . The mass of each cup was measured at 24 hour intervals until the mass loss per unit time became constant. This required three to five days.

Figure 12 presents MVT rates of the skin after exposures to tap water and solutions of UCARE Polymer JR-400. Figure 13 (page 15) shows similar data after the skin was exposed to soap and then treated with solutions of UCARE Polymer JR-400. It is apparent that the UCARE polymer reduces damage to the barrier function of the skin caused by either exposure to water or soap. It is also clear that a UCARE polymer incorporated into a liquid soap, body wash, shower gel, bath product, or soap bar can be deposited on the skin to prevent loss of moisture and that creams and lotions formulated with UCARE polymers can restore damaged skin to good health.

Figure 12: Effect of UCARE Polymer JR on Moisture Vapor Transmission

Treatment

Moisture Vapor Transmission mg/cm 2 /hour

Control (average of 3)

0.18±0.026

4

Hours in Tap Water, 23°C

0.49

16

Hours in Tap Water, 23°C

0.53

1

Hour in 0.1% UCARE Polymer JR-400, 23°C

0.18

6

Hours in 0.1% UCARE Polymer JR-400, 23°C

0.22

16

Hours in 0.1% UCARE Polymer JR-400, 23°C

0.20

1

Hour in 1.0% UCARE Polymer JR-400, 23°C

0.20

Tests on Neonatal Rat Stratum Corneum

Figure 13: Effect of UCARE Polymer JR on Moisture Vapor Transmission

Treatment

Moisture Vapor Transmission mg/cm 2 /hour

5X Tap Water (average of 2)

0.26±0.085

Soap (2.3% in Tap Water)

1X Soap (average of 3)

0.52±0.20

5X Soap (average of 3)

2.83±0.15

Soap (2.3% in Tap Water), Then Polymer JR-400

1X Soap then 1 hour UCARE Polymer JR-400 (0.1%)

(average of 2)

0.35±0.1

5X Soap then 1 hour UCARE Polymer JR-400 (0.1%)

1.3

5X Soap then 1 hour UCARE Polymer JR-400 (1.0%)

1.0

Tests on Neonatal Rat Stratum Corneum

Note: X = 10 minutes at 4050°C, 2 minutes rinse, air dry.

Combat the effects of harsh surfactants

UCARE polymers have the ability to moderate the defatting effects of alkaline systems, either by incorporation into those systems or by treatment after exposure.

In a study on detergent dermatitis, various concentrations of aqueous solutions of UCARE Polymer JR-400 were applied to test sites on the forearms of ten subjects each day for five days.

Figure 14: Moderation of SLS Reaction by Pretreatment with UCARE Polymer JR Solutions

Note: This study was conducted in December when reactions to anionic detergents are severe. A pilot study done in early November during an unusually mild period showed peak reactions of about 2.

 

0.1%

0.25%

0.5%

1.0%

2.0%

Control

Polymer JR

Polymer JR

Polymer JR

Polymer JR

Polymer JR

Subject

S

R

S

R

S

R

S

R

S

R

S

R

1 4

4

44

4

4

33

22

1

1

2 4

4

44

3

4

34

32

1

1

3 3

3

44

4

4

43

32

1

1

4 4

4

44

3

3

33

22

2

1

5 3

3

33

3

3

33

22

1

1

6 3

3

33

3

3

33

11

1

1

7 4

3

44

4

3

33

21

2

1

8 4

4

44

4

4

43

12

1

0

9 4

3

44

4

3

43

22

2

1

10 4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

2

1

1

0

Average

3.7

3.5

3.8

3.8

3.6

3.5

3.4

3.2

2.0

1.7

1.3

0.8

Key: Reactions were graded from 0 to 4 (S = scaling or dryness; R = redness). 5% SLS patched 1 hr./day for 5 days. Evaluated on 7th day. Winter conditions.

15

Keeping Skin Smooth and Moist

After the solution dried, a 1-inch square of nonwoven cloth moistened with 5% aqueous sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) was applied for one hour under occlusion. A control site on each participant did not receive the pretreatment with UCARE Polymer JR-400 prior to application of the SLS cloth. Three days after the fifth treatment/exposure, the skin sites were evaluated for scaling and redness. Figure 14 (page 15) details the results obtained. A 1% solution of UCARE Polymer JR-400 was able to reduce the inflammatory response by about 50%. Only very mild dermatitis occurred on those sites pretreated with a 2% solution.

In a separate study, UCARE Polymer JR-400 solutions were applied immediately after each one-hour exposure to SLS. Here, too, the inflammatory reactions were lessened with 1 and 2% solutions of UCARE polymer. The protective effect, however, was somewhat less than pretreatment, even though the films formed by UCARE polymers persisted on the skin between exposures to the SLS.

In other studies, UCARE polymers were found to alleviate the dryness and irritation caused by depilatory creams and suppress the allergic response to Rhus (poison ivy) dermatitis. And, because UCARE polymers form substantive films, their use in enhancing the effectiveness of sunscreens and waterproof cosmetics deserves further examination.

Formulating with UCARE polymers

Cationic polymers, like UCARE polymers, will interact with anionic surfactants and form a complex, which at a certain ratio will precipitate out of solution. To facilitate incorporation in the manufacture of surfactant-based systems, such as a shampoo, liquid soap or body wash, first prepare a pre-mix solution of the UCARE polymer in room temperature water. Then add that solution to the surfactant. As the cationic-anionic complex is formed, the excess surfactant immediately solubilizes the complex. This method avoids visible signs of the creation of the complex and shortens the dissolution time of the polymer. If the surfactant were added to the polymer solution, the complex formed would be much more visible and the dissolution time would be much greater.

More information about UCARE polymers

The formulations on the following pages provide examples of how UCARE polymers work in a variety of products. Also listed are a number of resources from which you can obtain more information about UCARE polymers and the various testing methods described in this brochure.

Hair Care Formulations

Conditioning Shampoo - E911-010-4M

Description: This clear, pale yellow, 2-in-1 conditioning shampoo is suggested for use on dry, damaged hair. A combination of UCARE Polymer LR-30M, SOLULAN™ L-575 and GLUCQUAT™ 125 were added for conditioning and foam quality enhancement. UCARE Polymer LR-30M and GLUCAMATE DOE-120 improve mildness. GLUCAMATE DOE-120 also contributes to the viscosity of this surfactant system.

Typical Viscosity: 4,300 cPs (20°C, LVT, 3, 12 rpm)

pH: 6.0

Formula

Sodium Laureth Sulfate (28% active) Disodium Cocoamphodiacetate (50% active) Cocamidopropyl Betaine (30% active) UCARE Polymer LR-30M (Polyquaternium-10) GLUCQUAT 125 (Lauryl Methyl Gluceth-10 Hydroxypropyl Dimonium Chloride) SOLULAN L-575 (PEG-75 Lanolin) GLUCAMATE DOE-120 (PEG-120 Methyl Glucose Dioleate) Deionized Water Citric Acid Preservative and Fragrance

Procedure: Prepare a premix solution by dispersing UCARE Polymer LR-30M in water with agitation. Begin heating to 50–60°C. Add the GLUCAMATE DOE-120 to the premix solution, stirring until dissolved. Remove heat. Combine the surfactants. Add the premix solution to the surfactant mixture. Add the remaining ingredients one at a time, waiting for each ingredient to dissolve before adding the next one. Adjust the pH to 6.0 with the citric acid.

25.00%

5.00

10.00

0.30

2.00

1.00

1.50

55.20

q.s.

q.s.

Frequent Use Shampoo - E941-129-10

Description: This pearlescent shampoo provides gentle cleansing with protective conditioning. UCARE Polymer JR-400 and GLUCAM™ E-20 have been included for conditioning and humectancy, respectively. GLUCAMATE DOE-120 thickens this mild cleansing system which contains cocoamphodiacetate and sulfosuccinate.

Typical Viscosity: 4,300 cPs (20°C, LVT, 3, 12 rpm)

pH: 6.5

Formula

Sodium Laureth Sulfate (28% active)

7.00%

Disodium Cocoamphodiacetate (30% active)

3.00

Glycol Distearate (and) Laureth-4 (and) Cocamidopropyl Betaine (45% active)

1.00

GLUCAMATE DOE-120 (PEG-120 Methyl Glucose Dioleate)

1.50

Deionized Water

84.30

UCARE Polymer JR-400 (Polyquaternium-10)

0.25

GLUCAM E-20 (Methyl Gluceth-20)

1.50

Sodium Chloride

0.45

Citric Acid

q.s.

Preservative and Fragrance

q.s.

Procedure: Prepare a premix solution by dispersing UCARE Polymer JR-400 in the water with agitation. Begin heating to 50–60°C. Add the premix solution to the surfactant mixture. Add the GLUCAM E-20. Add preservative and fragrance. Adjust the pH to 6.5 with the citric acid.

Zero VOC Hair Spray - T66-79-2

Description: UCARE Polymer JR-125 provides sheen and slip to the hair. KYTAMER™ PC serves as the hair fixative in this natural, water-based hair spray.

Formula

KYTAMER PC (Chitosan PCA)

0.35%

Dimethicone Copolyol

0.02

UCARE Polymer JR-125 (Polyquaternium-10)

0.15

Deionized Water

99.48

Preservative and Fragrance

q.s.

Procedure: Add ingredients at room temperature with agitation.

Daily Use Shampoo - E921-137-5

Description: UCARE Polymer LK provides the conditioning mechanism in this pearlescent shampoo to leave hair tangle- free, manageable and ready for styling. The basic surfactant system is thickened by GLUCAMATE DOE-120. GLUCAM E-20 is added for humectancy, and will also improve the feel and foam wetness properties.

Typical Viscosity: 6,100 cPs (20°C, LVT, 3, 12 rpm)

pH: 6.5

Formula

Sodium Laureth Sulfate (28% active) Cocamidopropyl Betaine (30% active) Glycol Distearate (and) Sodium Laureth Sulfate (and) Cocamide MEA (and) Laureth-10 (40% active) GLUCAMATE DOE-120 (PEG-120 Methyl Glucose Dioleate) Deionized Water UCARE Polymer LK (Polyquaternium-10) GLUCAM E-20 (Methyl Gluceth-20) Sodium Chloride Citric Acid Preservative and Fragrance

Procedure: Prepare a premix solution by dispersing UCARE Polymer LK in the water with agitation. Begin heating to 50–60°C. Add the GLUCAMATE DOE-120 to the premix solution, stirring until dissolved. Combine the surfactants. Add the premix solution to the surfactant mixture. Add the GLUCAM E-20 and other ingredients. Adjust the pH to 6.5 with the citric acid.

30.00%

10.00

1.00

1.50

55.15

0.45

1.50

0.40

q.s.

q.s.

High Gloss Styling Gel - T68-5-1

Description: A clear, viscous gel containing CELLOSIZE™ HEC QP 52000H which serves as the gelling agent. The incorporation of KYTAMER PC in conjunction with UCARE Polymer JR-30M provides the holding properties. GLUCAM E-20 and KYTAMER PC impart gloss.

Formula

Deionized Water

98.05%

CELLOSIZE HEC QP 52000H (Hydroxyethylcellulose)

1.50

KYTAMER PC (Chitosan PCA)

0.25

UCARE Polymer JR-30M (Polyquaternium-10)

0.10

GLUCAM E-20 (Methyl Gluceth-20)

0.10

Preservative and Fragrance

q.s.

Procedure: Dissolve the CELLOSIZE HEC QP 52000H in water at 20°C with good agitation, then heat to 70°C. Add the remaining ingredients in the order listed, allowing enough time for solution formation between steps while maintaining the temperature at 70°C. Cool to room temperature and add the preservative and fragrance.

Conditioning Creme Rinse - T55-101-1

Description: This creme rinse formula is enhanced by the conditioner, UCARE Polymer JR-30M, which is substantive to the hair. CELLOSIZE Polymer PCG-10 is added to build viscosity.

Formula

CELLOSIZE Polymer PCG-10 (Hydroxyethylcellulose)

0.50%

UCARE Polymer JR-30M (Polyquaternium-10)

0.50

Glycol Distearate

0.50

Cetearyl Alcohol

2.00

Cetyl Alcohol

0.50

PEG-100 Stearate

1.00

Stearalkonium Chloride

1.00

Citric Acid

0.05

Deionized Water

93.95

Preservative

q.s.

Procedure: Disperse the UCARE Polymer JR-30M and the CELLOSIZE Polymer PCG-10 in room temperature water with agitation. Heat to 70–75°C. In a separate container add the glycol distearate, cetearyl alcohol, cetyl alcohol and the PEG-100 stearate and heat to 70°C. When this separate mixture is at 70°C and uniform, slowly add it to the polymer solution. Mix until uniform. Add the stearalkonium chloride, citric acid and preservative. Mix until uniform. Cool to room temperature with agitation.

Skin Care Formulations

Moisturizing Lotion - T63-36-1

Description: This lotion moisturizes the skin with a softness that lasts through several washings. UCARE Polymer JR-30M delivers substantive conditioning to the skin. PROPAL™ NF leaves a water-repellent film on the skin. PROMULGEN™ G and PROMULGEN D bring body to the formulation and act as primary emulsifiers.

Formula

Oil Phase Mineral Oil PROMULGEN G (Stearyl Alcohol and Ceteareth-20) PROMULGEN D (Cetearyl Alcohol and Ceteareth-20) PROPAL NF (Isopropyl Palmitate) Dimethicone (100 cs)

Water Phase UCARE Polymer JR-30M (2% aqueous)

5.0%

3.0

3.0

2.0

1.0

(Polyquaternium-10)

25.0

Deionized Water Glycerin Preservative and Fragrance

Procedure: Prepare a 2% aqueous solution of UCARE Polymer JR-30M, by adding the polymer to water at room temperature with agitation. When dispersed add glycerin and the remaining water and heat to 75°C. Heat the oil phase to 75°C. Add the water phase to the oil phase at 75°C with rapid agitation. Continue mixing and cool to room temperature.

58.0

3.0

q.s.

Enriched Hand Lotion - T55-63-3

Description: White, glossy, medium viscosity lotion. UCARE Polymer JR-125 is a substantive polymer which contributes to the intensive conditioning of the skin.

Formula

Water Phase UCARE Polymer JR-125 (Polyquaternium-10)

0.25%

Propylene Glycol

4.80

Triethanolamine (99%)

0.95

Deionized Water

84.00

Oil Phase AMERCHOL™ C (Petrolatum and Lanolin and Lanolin Alcohol)

0.50

Cetyl Alcohol

0.40

PROMYR™ (Isopropyl Myristate)

2.40

Stearic Acid, xxx

2.90

Mineral Oil, 70 vis.

2.40

Glyceryl Stearate

1.00

Myristyl Myristate

0.40

Preservative and Fragrance

q.s.

Procedure: Heat oil phase to 70°C. Separately, add the UCARE Polymer JR-125 to the water. When hydrated, add the remaining water soluble ingredients and heat to 70°C. Add the water phase to the oil phase with vigorous agitation. Continue to mix to 35°C.

Skin Smoother - T68-21-1

Description: Clear, viscous, natural-based liquid with substantive film-forming properties provided by KYTAMER PC. UCARE Polymer JR-400 serves as the conditioning agent, while GLUCAM E-10 offers humectancy. CELLOSIZE HEC QP 52000H is added as a thickener.

Formula

Deionized Water

88.70%

CELLOSIZE HEC QP 52000H (Hydroxyethylcellulose)

0.40

Deionized Water

10.00

KYTAMER PC (Chitosan PCA)

0.40

UCARE Polymer JR-400 (Polyquaternium-10)

0.25

GLUCAM E-10 (Methyl Gluceth-10)

0.25

Preservative

q.s.

Procedure: Dissolve the CELLOSIZE HEC QP 52000H in water at 20°C with agitation, then heat to 70°C. In a separate container mix the KYTAMER PC with 10 parts water until clear, heating gently to 70°C. Add to CELLOSIZE HEC solution. Add remaining ingredients in the order listed, allowing time for solution formation while maintaining the temperature at 70°C. Cool to room temperature and add preservative.

Clear Facial Cleanser - T82-267-5

Description: This novel, moderately priced formula uses sodium cocoyl isethionate in a clear system. The UCARE Polymer LR-400 and GLUCQUAT 125 act as a two- conditioner system. GLUCAM E-10 provides humectancy while controlling viscosity. UCON™ 50-HB-660 mitigates the stringiness normally associated with ammonium lauryl sulfate, yielding a very mild facial cleanser that feels good when applied and conditions the skin while it cleans.

Typical Viscosity: 800 cPs (20°C, RVT, 3, 20 rpm)

pH: 6.0

Formula

Deionized Water Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate (80% active) Ammonium Lauryl Sulfate (33% active) Cocamidopropyl Betaine (35% active) UCARE Polymer LR-400 (Polyquaternium-10) Sodium Xylenesulfonate (40% active) UCON 50-HB-660 (PPG-12-Buteth-16) GLUCAM E-10 (Methyl Gluceth-10) GLUCQUAT 125 (Lauryl Methyl Gluceth-10 Hydroxypropyl Dimonium Chloride) DMDM Hydantoin

Procedure: Add the sodium xylenesulfonate to the water with stirring. Continue stirring while sprinkling in the UCARE Polymer LR-400. Once the polymer is completely dispersed, heat to 70°C. When the polymer is hydrated, add the sodium cocoyl isethionate, cocamidopropyl betaine and ammonium lauryl sulfate, in that order, waiting for each to dissolve before adding the next. Once uniform, add the remaining ingredients one at a time in the order listed. Allow to cool to at least 40°C, then add the preservative.

65.13%

2.5

13.30

14.30

0.10

1.25

0.02

1.00

2.00

0.40

Eye Makeup Remover - E931-035-13

Description: UCARE Polymer JR-125 delivers skin conditioning properties in this clear, lightly foaming makeup remover. GLUCAM P-10 is added for emollience. GLUCAMATE SSE-20 imparts a skin-refreshing feel to the product, while the GLUCAMATE DOE-120 contributes to emollience and mildness.

Formula

UCARE Polymer JR-125 (Polyquaternium-10)

0.05%

Deionized Water

92.95

GLUCAMATE SSE-20 (PEG-20 Methyl Glucose Sesquistearate)

1.50

GLUCAMATE DOE-120 (PEG-120 Methyl Glucose Dioleate)

1.50

GLUCAM P-10 (PPG-10 Methyl Glucose Ether)

1.00

Disodium Cocoamphodiacetate (50% active)

3.00

Triethanolamine

q.s.

Preservative

q.s.

Procedure: Disperse the UCARE Polymer JR-125 in the water. Heat to 45°C and dissolve the GLUCAMATE SSE-20 and the GLUCAMATE DOE-120. Remove heat. Add the remaining ingredients. Adjust pH to 7.0.

Toning Lotion and Skin Freshener - T55-115-2

Description: A base skin refining toner. This hydroalcoholic lotion gives substantive conditioning to the skin due to the inclusion of UCARE Polymer JR-125. GLUCAM E-10, a humectant, helps overcome the drying effect of the alcohol.

Formula

UCARE Polymer JR-125 (Polyquaternium-10)

0.25%

Deionized Water

77.75

SD Alcohol 40

20.00

GLUCAM E-10 (Methyl Gluceth-10)

2.00

Fragrance

q.s.

Procedure: Disperse the UCARE Polymer JR-125 in room temperature water with agitation. Heat to 60–70°C to accelerate the hydration and produce a uniform solution. Cool to room temperature. Dissolve the GLUCAM E-10 and the fragrance in the alcohol. Add to the polymer solution. Stir until uniform.

Body Care Formulations

Moisturizing Shower Lotion - E931-063-5

Description: The substantive UCARE Polymer JR-30M brings long-lasting barrier protection and conditioning to the skin in this moisturizing shower lotion. The mild cleansing system is thickened by GLUCAMATE DOE-120. CREMEROL™ HMG and GLUCAM E-20 are incorporated for moisturization and humectancy. PROMULGEN D adds creaminess to the product.

Typical Viscosity: 23,500 cPs (20°C, LVT, 4, 12 rpm)

pH: 6.5

Formula

20.00%

Sodium Laureth Sulfate (28% active) Cocamidopropyl Betaine (30% active) UCARE Polymer JR-30M

15.00

(Polyquaternium-10)

0.10

Deionized Water PROMULGEN D (Cetearyl Alcohol and Ceteareth-20) GLUCAM E-20 (Methyl Gluceth-20) GLUCAMATE DOE-120 (PEG-120 Methyl Glucose Dioleate) CREMEROL HMG (Hydroxylated Milk Glycerides) Mica (and) Titanium Dioxide Triethanolamine Citric Acid Preservative and Fragrance

Procedure: Heat half of the water to 75°C and add the PROMULGEN D. Disperse the UCARE Polymer JR-30M in the other half of the water while heating to 45–50°C. Add the GLUCAMATE DOE-120 and the CREMEROL HMG to the UCARE Polymer JR-30M solution. Once a uniform solution has formed add this mixture to the PROMULGEN D solution with gentle agitation. Add the remaining ingredients, mixing until uniform. Cool to 35°C while stirring. Adjust pH to 6.5 with citric acid.

60.05

1.00

1.00

1.50

1.00

0.35

q.s.

q.s.

q.s.

Conditioning Shower Creme - E921-133-10

Description: This creamy, pearlescent, 2-in-1 shower creme combines cleansing and conditioning properties. The combination of GLUCQUAT 125 and UCARE Polymer JR-30M provides immediate, perceptible and prolonged conditioning. GLUCAM E-20 Distearate acts as a mild surfactant to remove dirt and oil from the skin.

Typical Viscosity: 4,500 cPs (20°C, LVT, 3, 12 rpm)

pH: 6.5

Formula

Sodium Laureth Sulfate (28% active)

16.00%

Cocamidopropyl Betaine (30% active)

10.00

GLUCAM E-20 Distearate (PEG-20 Methyl Glucose Distearate)

1.50

Glycol Distearate (and) Laureth-4 (and) Cocamidopropyl Betaine (45% active)

2.00

GLUCAMATE DOE-120 (PEG-120 Methyl Glucose Dioleate)

1.25

UCARE Polymer JR-30M (Polyquaternium-10)

0.25

Deionized Water

65.55

GLUCQUAT 125 (Lauryl Methyl Gluceth-10 Hydroxypropyl Dimonium Chloride)

3.00

Sodium Chloride

0.45

Citric Acid

q.s.

Preservative and Fragrance

q.s.

Procedure: Disperse the UCARE Polymer JR-30M in the water with moderate agitation and gentle heating to 50°C. Add the GLUCAMATE DOE-120 and continue heating until dissolved. Add the GLUCAM E-20 Distearate and continue heating. Add the surfactants. Adjust the pH to 6.5. Add the GLUCQUAT 125, sodium chloride, fragrance and preservative.

Below is a list of resources for additional information about UCARE polymers, the measurement techniques cited in this brochure and other related subjects.

1.

Goddard, E. D., and Schmitt, R. L., “Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation into the Adsorption of Cationic Polymers,” Cosmetics & Toiletries, Volume 109, Number 4, pages 55-61, March 1994.

2.

Goddard, E. D., and Schmitt, R. L., “Atomic Force Microscopy (Part II): Investigation into the Adsorption of Cationic Polymers,” Cosmetics & Toiletries, Volume 109, Number 12, pages 83-93, December 1994.

3.

Rigoletto, R., Moral, L., and Pavlichko, J. P., “Differentiation of Cationic Polymers Based on Modern Analytical Techniques,” Cosmetics & Toiletries Manufacture Worldwide, 1996.

4.

Goddard, E. D., and Harris, W. C., “An ESCA Study of the Substantivity of Conditioning Polymers on Hair Substrates,” Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, July/August 1987.

5.

Faucher, J.A., Goddard, E. D., and Hannan, R. B., “Sorption and Desorption of a Cationic Polymer by Human Hair,” Textile Research Journal, September 1977.

6.

Scott, G. V., Robbins, C. R., and Barnhurst, J. D., “Sorption of Quaternary Ammonium Surfactants by Human Hair,” Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, February 1969.

7.

Goddard, E. D., “Substantivity Through Cationic Substitution,” Cosmetics & Toiletries, April 1987.

8.

Goddard, E. D., Phillips, T., and Hanan, R. B., “Water Soluble Polymer - Surfactant Interaction (Part I),” Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, September 1975.

9.

Goddard, E. D., Faucher, J. A., Scott, R. J., and Turney, M. E., “Adsorption of Polymer JR on Keratinous Surfaces - Part II,” Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, November 1975.

10.

Faucher, J. A., and Goddard, E. D., “Sorption of a Cationic Polymer by Stratum Corneum,” Paper Delivered at Society of Cosmetic Chemists meeting, May 1975.

11.

Edstrom, R. D., Yang, X., Lee, G., Evans, D. F., “Viewing Molecules with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy,” The FASEB Journal, October 1990.

12.

Goddard, E. D., and Harris, W. C., “Adsorption of Polymers and Lipids on Stratum Corneum Membranes as Measured by ESCA,” Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, September/October 1987.

13.

Goddard, E. D., and Chandar, P., “Deposition of Colloidal Silica as an Indicator of Polymer Adsorption on Keratin,” Colloids & Surfaces, 34, 1988/89.

14.

Faucher, J. A., Goddard, E. D., Hannan, R. B., and Kligman, A. M., “Protection of Skin by a Cationic Cellulose Polymer,” Cosmetics & Toiletries, June 1977.

15.

Goddard, E. D., and Leung, P. S., “Protection of Skin by Cationic Cellulosics: In-Vitro Testing Methods,” Union Carbide Document, October 1982.

16.

Goddard, E. D., and Leung, P. S., “Cationic Cellulosics in Lotions,” Cosmetics & Toiletries, March 1980.

17. Faucher, J. A., and Rosen, M. R., “Hair Conditioning by a ‘Chemical’ Comb,” Cosmetics & Toiletries, August 1977.

18. Hutter, J. M., Clarke, M. T., Just, E. K., Lichtin, J. L., and Sakr, A., “The Influence of Nonionic Cellulosic Polymers on the Uptake of Polyquaternium-10 by Bleached Hair,” Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, September/October 1992.

19. Faucher, J. A., and Goddard, E. D., “Influence of Surfactants on the Sorption of Cationic Polymer by Keratinous Substrates,” Journal of Colloid and Interfacial Science, May 1976.

20. Goddard, E. D., Leung, P. S., and Padmanabhan, P. A., “Novel Gelling Structures Based on Polymer/Surfactant Systems,” Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, January/February 1991.

21. Goddard, E. D., and Braun, D. B., “A New Surface Active Cationic Cellulosic Polymer,” Cosmetics & Toiletries, July 1985.

22. Goldemberg, R. L., “Anti-Irritants,” Journal of The Society of Cosmetic Chemists, December 1979.

23. Barbeito, C., Pavlichko, J. P., and Maso, H. F., “The Condition of Color,” SPC, November 1992.

Conditioning

Moisturization

Deposition

Film Formation

Conditioning

Moisturization

UCARE Polymers

For more information, complete literature, and product samples, you can reach a Dow representative at the following numbers:

From the United States and Canada

In Europe

In Other Global Areas

call 1-800-FOR ELEGANCE

(1-800-367-3534)

fax 1-989-832-1465

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Or you can contact us on the Internet at:

www.amerchol.com

Or you can contact us on the Internet at: www.amerchol.com Amerchol Corporation is a subsidiary of
Or you can contact us on the Internet at: www.amerchol.com Amerchol Corporation is a subsidiary of

Amerchol Corporation is a subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company

NOTICE: No freedom from any patent owned by Seller or others is to be inferred. Because use conditions and applicable laws may differ from one location to another and may change with time, Customer is responsible for determining whether products and the information in this document are appropriate for Customer’s use and for ensuring that Customer’s workplace and disposal practices are in compliance with applicable laws and other governmental enactments. Seller assumes no obligation or liability for the information in this document. NO WARRANTIES ARE GIVEN; ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE EXPRESSLY EXCLUDED.

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