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International Journal of Advanced Engineering Research and Technology (IJAERT) 80

Volume 4 Issue 4, April 2016, ISSN No.: 2348 8190

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HIGH STRENGTH AND LOW


SHRINKAGE CONCRETE
Dr.J.Jegan1, M.Sathish2
1

Asst professor, Dept of civil engineering, University college of Engineering, Ramanathapuram, Tamilnadu
2*
PG Scholar, Anna university Regional campus Madurai, Tamilnadu

Abstract
To study the suitability of Quarry dust as sand replacing
material and it has been found that Quarry dust improves the
strength of concrete as well as elastic modulus. To reduce
the impact of the quarry dust on environment and human,
this waste can be used to produce new products or can be
used as admixture in concrete so that the natural resources
are used efficiently and hence environmental waste can be
reduced. Partial replacement of quarry dust in concrete to
increasing the shrinkage problem. Thus the problem is
reduced by adding of fibres in concrete. We are using
natural fibres because these fibres are easily available. The
addition of small closely spaced and uniformly dispersed
fibres will improve the overall structural performance of the
concrete.

Table 2.1 Comparison of quarry dust and natural sand


Constituent
Quarryrock
Natural
dust(%)
sand (%)
62.48
80.78
SiO2
18.72
10.52
Al2O3
06.54
01.75
Fe2O3
04.83
03.21
CaO
02.56
00.77
MgO
Nil
01.37
Na2O
03.18
01.23
K2O
01.21
Nil
TiO2
00.48
00.37
Loss on
Ignition

Key words: Coconut fibre, Concrete, Quarry dust.

Coconut fibre
Coconut fibre is obtained from the husk of the
fruit of the coconut palm. The fibres are subtracted from the
husk with beating and washing. The fibres are strong, light
and easily withstand heat and salt water. After nine months
of growth, the nuts are still green and contain white fibre,
which can be used for the production of yarn, rope and
fishing nets. After twelve months of growth, the fibres are
brown and can be used for brushes and mattresses. The
combined use of coconut and sisal short fibres seem to
delayed restrained plastic shrinkage controlling crack
development at early ages.

1.

INTRODUCTION

Quarry dust has been proposed as an alternative to


river sand that gives additional benefit to concrete. Quarry
dust is known to increase the strength of concrete over
concrete made with equal quantities of river sand, but it
causes a reduction in the workability of concrete. The
successful utilization of quarry dust as fine aggregate would
turn this waste material that causes disposal problem into a
valuable resource. Quarry Dust Waste has the same physical
characteristics of fine aggregate, as its size and properties
are very to sand. In this investigation it is proposed to utilize
Quarry Dust Waste as replacement in the fine aggregate in
different proportions. The weakness in tension can be
overcome by the use of conventional steel bar reinforcement
and to some extent by the inclusion of a sufficient volume of
certain fibres. The use of fibres also alters the behaviour of
the fibre-matrix composite after it has cracked, thereby
improving its toughness. Addition of these natural fibres to
concrete helps to improve various mechanical performances
including flexural properties, impact resistance and fracture
toughness. More over the application of these natural fibres
is beneficial for consuming less energy, releasing less
greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, and costing less to
build and to maintain over time.

2. MATERIALS
Quarry dust
Quarry dust (QD) is one of the waste materials
abundantly available and unused in a quarry industry.
Previous finding showed that the substitution of QD as part
of pozzolana gives good performance at fresh stated
rheological properties and enhances compressive strength at
hardened state. It is economical alternative to the river sand.

3.

EXPERIMENTAL WORK

3.1 Compressive Strength Test


The test is carried out on 150x150x150 mm size
cubes, as per IS: 516-1959. The test specimens are marked
and removed from the moulds and unless required for test
within 24 hrs, immediately submerged in clean fresh water
and kept there until taken out just prior to test. A 1000 KN
capacity Compression Testing Machine (CTM) is used to
conduct the test. The specimen is placed between the steel
plates of the CTM and load is applied at the rate of 140
Kg/Cm2/min and the failure load in KN is observed from the
load indicator of the CTM.
Compressive strength = Load / Area N/mm2
3.2 Split Tensile Strength Test
The splitting tensile strength of concrete cylinder
was determined based on 516-1959. The load shall be
applied nominal rate within the range 1.2 N/ (mm2/min) to
2.4/ (mm2/min). The test was carried out on diameter of
150mm and length of 300mm size cylinder
Split Tensile Strength =

2P
LD

Where, P = Compressive Load in N


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International Journal of Advanced Engineering Research and Technology (IJAERT) 81


Volume 4 Issue 4, April 2016, ISSN No.: 2348 8190

L = Length in mm
D = Diameter in mm
3.3 Flexural Strength Test
The flexural strength of concrete prism was
determined based on IS: 516 1959. Place the specimen in
the machine in such a manner that the load is applied to the
upper most surface as cast in the mould along two lines
spaced 13.3cm a part. Apply load without shock and
increase continuously at a rate of 180 kg/min and it is
increased until the sample fails. Measure the distance
between the line of fracture and nearest support.
If a > 13.3cm then

P xl
b x d2
3P x a
fb=
b x d2

Modulus of rupture fb =

If a < 11, discard the specimen


Where, P = Maximum load applied to the specimen in
kN.
L= Supported Length in mm , d = Depth of the
specimen mm
a = Distance of the crack from the nearest support.

RESULT AND DISCUSSION

Table 4.1 Result for compressive strength


Description Average Compressive
Strength (N/mm2)
7 days

14 days

28 days

CM

16.37

18.25

23.64

10%QD+1
%CF
20%QD
+2%CF
30%QD+3
%CF

16.02

18.98

24.80

17.42

18.91

23.72

17.04

18.45

21.53

1
2
3
4

CM
10%QD+1%CF
20%QD +2%CF
30%QD+3%CF

Average
Flexural
Strength
(N/mm2)

Table 4.3 Result for flexural strength


DESCRIP
TION

4.

The result shows, when the dust content upto 10%


and 1% of fibre content the strength of the concrete will be
increased. But fibre content exceeds 1% the strength
decreased. The main purpose of fibre adding in concrete to
reduce the shrinkage cracks. From the Fig 5.1, In
compressive strength, concrete mix is suitable for 10% o
quarry dust and 1% of coconut fibre. In split tensile
strength, the same results to be established.

SL.NO

If a < 13.3

Fig: 4.2 Chart for split tensile strength

4.54
4.80
5.01
4.61

Fig: 4.3 Chart for flexural strength

Fig: 4.1 Chart for compressive strength


Table 4.2 Result for split tensile strength
Description
Average Split Tensile Strength
(N/mm2)
7 days
14 days
28 days
CM
1.70
2.40
2.95
10%QD+1%CF
1.87
2.31
3.23
20%QD +2%CF
1.65
1.96
2.95
30%QD+3%CF
1.51
1.79
2.69

From the Fig 5.3 shows the flexural strength increased for
20% dust content and 2% fibre. The result shows fibre
increased flexural strength. The dust content increased
30% compressive, split tensile as well as flexural strength
to be decreased.
5.

CONCLUSION

Based on this experimental investigation, it is found that


quarry dust can be used as an alternative material to the
natural river sand. When addition of quarry dust as 10% and
1% of natural fibre compressive strength and split tensile
strength increased. But flexural strength is suitable for 20%

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International Journal of Advanced Engineering Research and Technology (IJAERT) 82


Volume 4 Issue 4, April 2016, ISSN No.: 2348 8190

quarry dust and 2% of fibre because the fibre content will be


give better result for flexural strength. The physical and
chemical properties of quarry dust satisfy the requirements
of fine aggregate. Usage of quarry dust it will also reduce
the cost of concrete because it is a waste material from
quarries. Use of quarry dust in concrete will also reduce the
disposal problem. And also adding of natural fibre resist the
shrinkage cracks. If addition of natural fibre increasing the
flexural strength in 28 days.

REFERENCES
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Sai Teja, S.Kanakambara Rao (2013), Partial Replacement
of Sand with Quarry Dust in Concrete. International Journal
of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering
(IJITEE).
[2] Lohani T.K., Padhi M., Dash K.P., Jena S.(2012),
Optimum utilization of Quarry dust as partial replacement of
sand in concrete Int. Journal of Applied Sciences and
Engineering Research, Vol. 1, No. 2, 2012 .
[3] Sumit L. Chauhan, Raju A.Bondre, Partial Replacement
of Sand by Quarry Dust in Concrete, International Journal of
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rock dust and pebbles as aggregates in Portland cement
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[6] Yalley, P. P. and Kwan, A.S K, Use Of Coconut Fibres
As An Enhancement Of Concrete.
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of partial replacement of sand by Quarry Dust in concrete
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[8] H. S. Sureshchandra, G. Sarangapani, and B. G. Naresh
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