Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 40

ODI 12c - Repositories

Before You Begin.


Purpose
This tutorial walks you through the steps that are needed to create and connect to the Oracle Data Integrator
(ODI) Master Repository and the ODI Work Repository using Repository Creation Utility (RCU) and ODI
Studio.

Time to Complete
Approximately 1 hour.

Introduction
Repositories are schemas and tables in a database that hold information about ODI Designs, Topologies, and
Security. There is a one-to-many relationship between Master and Work repositories. An example of why you
might want to have multiple work repositories is for separating development and production designs. The
repository schemas and tables can be created either manually using ODI Studio or automatically using
Repository Creation Utility (RCU). RCU is the preferred method of maintaining the repositories. The database
storing the repository can be Oracle Database 12c or several other supported databases.
This is the first in a series of four OBEs in the Oracle Data Integrator 12c: Getting Started
(https://apex.oracle.com/pls/apex/f?
p=44785:24:15503233161396::::P24_CONTENT_ID,P24_PREV_PAGE:7952,24) series.

Scenario
Linda works as a database administrator for Example Enterprise Corp (http://www.example.com). In Example
Enterprise, Linda is responsible for performing database management and integration tasks on the various
resources within the organization. In particular, Linda is responsible for data loading, transformation, and
validation.
To begin working on her projects (such as exporting a flat file to a relational table), she needs to create the
new Master repository and Work repository. This is her first task. Following this, she will make a flat file to
relational table project. Following that, she will make an agent. These other tasks are covered in later OBEs.

Hardware and Software Requirements


The following is a list of software requirements:

A supported operating system (the OS shown here is 64-bit Oracle Enterprise Linux release 6.7 (Santiago),
other versions such as Windows are supported as well)
Oracle Database (the version shown here is Enterprise Edition 12.1.0.2.0, other versions are supported as
well)
Oracle Data Integrator 12c (the version shown here is 12.2.1)
The following is a list of OPTIONAL software:
Oracle WebLogic Server (WLS) 12c (other versions are supported as well)
Oracle SQL Developer 12c (included with Database 12c install)
If WLS is present, it must be in the same Middleware HOME directories as ODI.

Prerequisites
Before starting this tutorial, you should have:
Started Oracle Database services and components such as the Listener.
A Database user with DBA role privileges such as the SYS or SYSTEM account.
Installed the HR schema included in the Oracle Database. The Sample Schemas Installation Guide is part of
the Oracle Database documentation set, and is also available online at: http://otn.oracle.com
(http://otn.oracle.com).
Already installed, but not configured, ODI.
Mapped a plan for passwords. Best practices are MixedCase, at least eight characters in length, and contain
a number. Examples: MyPasswd99 , Welcome1 .

1. Creating Repositories with RCU


Throughout the screen captures, passwords you type will display as dots, for example
. If you type
Welcome1 , it will display as eight dots, but if you come back to view it later, it may display as a different
number of dots (to hide the true password length.) For purposes of training, you may make all the passwords
the same; but in a production environment, they might likely be different.
Also in the screen captures, if you see items in red (red boxes or red arrows), they are not part of the product,
but were added as part of the course to draw attention to things you need to change (enter or select or
deselect). Also, the cursor is usually pointing to the last thing you need to do, for example, click OK.

In the task instructions, field prompts will be bold, such as Hostname. Values you type in the fields or on
copmmand lines will be bold blue Courier font, such as localhost .
To do create the Master and Work repositories with Repository Creation Utility (RCU), perform the following
steps:

1.1 Running RCU


RCU can be used to create or to drop repositories. In this first step, you will create a repository.

Installing ODI adds the RCU bits to the Middleware HOME. Navigate to the proper directory and launch RCU.

OS Prompt
[myuser@myhost~]$ cd$FMW_HOME/oracle_common/bin
[myuser@myhostbin]$ pwd
/u01/app/oracle/Middleware/Oracle_Home/oracle_common/bin
[myuser@myhostbin]$ ./rcu

You may find copies of RCU shell scripts elsewhere. This is the one you want.
The Welcome page is displayed. There is nothing to select.

Click

Next

to continue.

On the Create Repository page, select Create Repository and System Load and Product Load (which is the default). This will require DBA
privileges such as the user SYS or SYSTEM would have.

Click

Next

to continue.

On the Database Connection Details page, enter a Host Name such as

localhost or an IP address, Database Listener Port such as

1521 , Database Service Name such as orcl.example.com (note this is not the instance name), Database Username such as
sys , and the corresponding Password which will not display. The Role will change automatically as you type a Username.

Click

Next

to continue. You may see the following warning, depending on your database configuration.

If you are using Latin alphabets for languages such as English, click

Ignore

to continue. A progress bar displays.

When the progress bar reaches 100% and all the lines have green checks, click

OK

to continue.

On the Select Components page, select Oracle Data Integrator. Selecting that one line item will automatically select several other
components as indicated by the black checks. Notice the DEV prefix on some of the schema names. You can change the default prefix, as will
be needed if you ever add additional repositories.

Click

Next

to continue. A progress bar displays.

When the progress bar reaches 100% and all the lines have green checks, click

OK

to continue.

On the Schema Passwords page, enter the same password twice.

In a training environment, it is acceptable to use the same password for all schemas; but in a production environment, you would likely use
different passwords. Click

Next

to continue.

On the Custom Variables page, enter the same Password in four places, enter a Work Repository Type of
Name of

D , and a Work Repository

workrep .

Note that the Supervisor password is for ODI Studio, and the Repository password is for the database user. These eventually will be stored in
Oracle Wallet. Click

Next

to continue.

On the Map Tablespaces page, there is nothing to do, the defaults are fine. Note the prefix of
the tablespace names.

DEV throughout. The asterisks are not part of

Click

Next

Click

OK

to continue. A Confirmation dialog box will pop up.

to continue. A progress bar displays.

When the progress bar reaches 100% and all the lines have green checks, click

On the Summary page, there is nothing to do, just review.

Click

Create

to continue. A progress bar displays.

OK

to continue.

When the progress bar reaches 100% and all the lines have green checks, it will automatically go to the Completion Summary page.
On the Completion Summary page, you have the option to view the various log files.

Note that this phase on this machine took about 4 minutes to complete on a typical PC. Click

Close

to continue.

In summary, you have used RCU to create various schemas on an Oracle database to support ODI.
Remember the passwords, you will need them later.

1.2 Deleting Repositories with RCU (OPTIONAL)


Suppose you have a repository that you need to delete. Perhaps it was created by mistake. Perhaps you
just want to start from a clean slate. Before deleting any repositories, make sure that all applications are
disconnected from using those schemas and tables.

Start RCU just the same way you did to create repositories, only this time you will drop repositories.

OS Prompt
[myuser@myhost~]$ cd/u01/app/oracle/Middleware/Oracle_Home/oracle_common/bin
[myuser@myhostbin]$ ./rcu

You may find it convenient to define optional environment variables such as

$FMW_HOME and $ODI_HOME to speed up this directory

navigation. Those would complement the required environment variables such as

The Welcome page is displayed. There is nothing to select.

$ORACLE_HOME and $JAVA_HOME .

Click

Next

to continue.

On the Create Repository page, select Drop Repository. (The page name on the top banner and left navigation will change from "Create" to
"Drop" when you select Drop below. The number of steps will change as well.)

Click

Next

to continue.

On the Database Connection Details page, enter a Host Name such as


Name such as

localhost or an IP address, Port such as 1521 , Service

orcl.example.com (note this is not the instance name), Username such as sys , and the corresponding

Password which will not display. The Role will change automatically as you type a Username.

Click

Next

to continue. A progress bar displays.

When the progress bar reaches 100% and all the lines have green checks, click

OK

to continue.

On the Select Components page, use the with prefix pulldown to select the schemas to drop. The example shows selecting JUNK. Note the
prefixes of the components in the background reflect your choice.

Click

Next

to continue. A progress bar displays.

When the progress bar reaches 100% and all the lines have green checks, click

On the Summary page, there is nothing to do, just review.

OK

to continue.

Click Drop to continue. A progress bar displays.

When the progress bar reaches 100% and all the lines have green checks, it will automatically go to the Completion Summary page.
On the Completion Summary page, you have the option to view the various log files.

Click

Close

to continue.

In summary, you used RCU to remove unwanted schemas from the database based on prefixes. Generally
speaking, this is an unrecoverable action. It is recommended to backup any repository data just in case.
You can do this either from the database using utilities such as RMAN, or from ODI Studio.

1.3 Verifying Schemas with SQL Developer (OPTIONAL)


This is just to show you where some of the tables are stored. Just look, do not modify anything in here.

Start your favorite SQL editor. You can use TOAD, SQL*Plus, or any similar tool. This example uses SQL Developer, a GUI which is included
with Oracle Database 12c.

How you start SQL Developer is installation dependent. You may have a desktop icon to start it.
Create a New Connection. Right-click on Connections, then click the + green plus.

There are multiple ways to create a connection, any one of them is valid.

On the Database Connection page, enter a Connection Name such as


corresponding Password. Enter the database Hostname such as

mydba , a DBA-authorized Username such as sys and the

localhost , the Port such as 1521 and the SID such as orcl

(note this is instance, not the service name.) Verify the appropriate Role; for example, sys requires SYSDBA. Click

Test

to continue.

If the test is successful (that is, if a connection can be established and the credentials are correct), it will reply, Status: Success in the lower
left corner.

Click Connect to continue. You can use this connection for the rest of the tutorial.

Query the registry table. Enter

SELECT

*FROMschema_version_registry in the Query


Builder.

Click the

green arrow in the top menu bar to display the table. Nothing to do here, just look. These were inserted by RCU.

Query the count of tables in one of the objects, the

DEV_ODI_REPO component. Enter SELECTcount(*)

FROMall_tablesWHERE
owner='DEV_ODI_REPO' in the Query Builder.

Click the

green arrow in the top menu bar to display the table count. Wow, over two hundred tables just for ODI. Nothing to do here, just

look. These were created by RCU.

In summary, you have used SQL to verify that RCU built the repositories correctly.

2. Connecting to Repositories with ODI Studio


Oracle Data Integrator 12c Studio provides a graphical tool for manipulating the repository's designs,
operators, and topologies. You can have several work repositories, such as DEV (development) and PROD
(production), or you can do everything in one work repository.

To connect to a particular set of master and work repositories, perform the following steps:

2.1 Using Oracle Wallet to Manage User IDs and Passwords


Navigate to

$ODI_HOME/studio . In this example, that is

/u01/app/oracle/Middleware/Oracle_Home/odi/studio . Start ODI Studio by running script odi.sh .

OS Prompt
[myuser@myhost~]$ cd$ODI_HOME/studio
[myuser@myhoststudio]$ pwd
/u01/app/oracle/Middleware/Oracle_Home/odi/studio
[myuser@myhoststudio]$ ./odi.sh
OracleFusionDataIntegratorStudio12c
Copyright(c)1997,2013,Oracleand/oritsaffiliates.Allrightsreserved.

A progress bar displays.

Midway through the progress bar, and only the very first time, Confirm Import Preferences dialog box will pop up and ask if you want to
import preferences from a previous installation. If there is no previous installation, there is nothing to select.

Click

No

to continue. The progress bar resumes.

In the left panel, click Connect To Repository...

There are other places on the menu bar to do the same thing.
On the Login panel, to add a new login, click the + green plus.

Strictly speaking, the yellow pencil (edit) and the red X (delete) should be greyed out since there is nothing to edit or delete yet.

Fill in all of the Connection information. This must match what you created using RCU and is case-sensitive.

Field Prompt:

Value:

Login Name:

DEV_ODI_REPO

ODI User:

SUPERVISOR

Password:

(notdisplayed)

Master User:

DEV_ODI_REPO

Master Password:

(notdisplayed)

Driver List:
Driver Name:
Url:

Oracle JDBC Driver (pick from pull-down list)

oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver
jdbc:oracle:thin:@

localhost:1521:orcl

(pick template from list, then edit

Click on the magnifying glass

<placeholders> )

to display a list of valid work repositories.

This was created as part of RCU. Select workrep and click

Click

Test

to make sure that everything is correct.

OK . This populates the Work Repository field.

If Information popup box replies, "Successful," then click

OK .

Only on the very first time, New Wallet Password asks you to define a password and an expiration time. When using a wallet to store the ODI
credentials, ODI Studio will ask you for the Wallet password prior to logging in. You will not need to enter the ODI credentials again (User
password).

Click

OK

to continue. This stores the wallet information (and other preferences) in the hidden directory in your home directory:

~/.odi/oracledi/ewallet . You can view it with the GUI tool owm (Oracle Wallet Manager).
If you ever deinstall ODI, the wallet is not removed automatically.
From now on, the ODI Login page will be prepopulated with this information.

Click

OK

to continue.

If the connection was successful, you will have information under the three tabs in the left panel.

It is possible to store the login information without using Wallet as an alternative.

In summary, you have defined the connection for ODI to use the repository you created with RCU. That
information is stored in Oracle Wallet in your home directory.

2.2 Connecting to a New Work Repository (OPTIONAL)


There are three ways to create another new work repository. The first way is to use RCU, as shown in the
previous steps. That method will not be repeated at this point. The second way is to reuse an existing ID
such as DEV_ODI_REPO but that is not recommended since it will overlay (replace) the existing work
repository. The third (and recommended) way to create a second new repository and to keep the first one,
is to create a new DB user such as DEV_ODI_REPO3 and then proceed with the steps below.
As a DBA, use

sqlplus , or SQL Developer, or the SQL tool of your choice to create a new DB user.

OS Prompt
[myuser@myhost~]$ sqlplus/assysdba
SQL*Plus:Release12.1.0.2.0ProductiononFriSep2005:21:082013
Copyright(c)1982,2013,Oracle.Allrightsreserved.
Connectedto:
OracleDatabase12cEnterpriseEditionRelease12.1.0.2.064bitProduction
WiththePartitioning,OLAP,AdvancedAnalyticsandRealApplicationTestingoptions
SQL> createuserDEV_ODI_REPO3identifiedbyWelcome1
Usercreated.
SQL> grantdbatoDEV_ODI_REPO3
Grantsucceeded.
SQL> exit

DisconnectedfromOracleDatabase12cEnterpriseEditionRelease12.1.0.2.064bitProdu
WiththePartitioning,OLAP,AdvancedAnalyticsandRealApplicationTestingoptions
[myuser@myhost~]$

In real life, the DBA role may be a bit excessive, you would probably use a lower set of permissions.
You already have one work repository connected from RCU. To create another new work repository, in the left panel, click the Topology tab,
then expand
Repositories, then right-click Work Repositories, then click New Work Repository.

The panel opens on the right.


On the Specify ODI Work Repository connection properties panel, enter the following information:

Field

Value:

Prompt:
Technology:

Oracle (pick from pull-down list)

JDBC

oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver (pick from

list)

Driver:
JDBC Url:

jdbc:oracle:thin:@

localhost:1521:orcl

(pick template from


User:

list, then edit edit

<placeholders> )

DEV_ODI_REPO3
If you use the same User again as previously used, for example

DEV_ODI_REPO , then this will replace the repository. If the DBA

creates a new user in SQL*Plus as recommended, then this step in ODI creates a second repository and leaves the first intact.
Password:

(notdisplayed,but
matchestheonejustcreated
insqlplus)

You can click Test Connection if you wish. Click

Next

to continue.

The warning about not using localhost is a good suggestion, but it is okay to use it for training purposes. Click

On the Specify ODI Work Repository properties panel, enter the following information:

Field Prompt:

Value:

Name:

WORKREP3

Password:

(notdisplayed)

Work Repository Type:

Development (pick from pull-down list)

Yes

to continue.

Click

Finish

to continue. A progress bar displays.

On the Confirmation dialog box, click

Yes

to continue.

On the Create Login dialog box, enter a login name, such as

DEV_ODI_REPO3 . Click OK to continue.

On the Enter Wallet Password dialog box, enter a password (which will not display). Click

OK

to continue.

You have now created a new work repository which is in addition to the old work repository.
To verify that the new work repository is fully populated, you can click Open to see information about it.

Nothing to do here, just look. Note that the old name workrep remains on the left, the old work repository is still good, you now have two work
repositories.

In summary, the original work repository was fine, but this created a new work repository. Since it is a
replacement, it may have been necessary to back up (export) the previous one if you ever need it back.

3. Importing Previous Repositories (OPTIONAL)


Over time you may develop repositories that would be useful to either move to other machines or clone on
other machines. One way to do this is to export the repositories to a zip file. The process of how to do the
export is not covered in this OBE, it is assumed that the zip files already exist. The zip file contains XML
metadata that can be loaded on a new repository. If the new repository already contains information, you can
choose to update or replace "duplicate" rows.
To import both a master and/or work repository, copy the zip files to the target machine and perform the
following steps:

3.1 Importing a Master Repository


On the left panel, click the Topology tab, then click the blue factory pulldown icon on the top right of the tab column. Select Import...

In the Import Selection dialog box, select Import the Master Repository.

Click

OK

to continue.

In the Import a Master Repository dialog box, select Import From a Zip File. Either browse for the file using the
type the name of the zip file.

Click

OK

to continue. A progress bar displays.

magnifying glass, or

Depending on the XML file size, this can take several minutes to complete.
An Import Report displays. Nothing to do here, just look.

Click

Close

to continue.

In summary, you can import a previously saved Master Repository from a zip file.

3.2 Importing a Work Repository


This is almost identical to the previous procedure, except it is done in a different tab. On the left panel, click the Designer tab, then click the
red triangle pulldown icon on the top right of the tab column. Select Import...

In the Import Selection dialog box, select Import the Work Repository.

Click

OK

to continue.

In the Import a Work Repository dialog box, select Import From a Zip File. Either browse for the file using the
type the name of the zip file.

magnifying glass, or

Click

OK

to continue. A progress bar displays.

Depending on the XML file size, this can take several minutes to complete.
An Import Report displays. Nothing to do here, just look.

Click

Close

to continue.

In summary, you can import a previously saved Work Repository from a zip file.

4. Testing Repository Connections


If you have gotten this far in the OBE sequentially, then obviously your repository connections work just fine. If
at a later date you want to come back to either verify or modify the connection information, you can re-test the
connections.
To test the repository connections, perform the following steps:

4.1 Viewing Repository Configuration Information


On the main menu bar, navigate to ODI > Repository Connection Information...

This presumes that you are already connected to an active repository.


In the Repository Connection Information dialog box, you can view (but not change) the parameters.

Click

OK

to close the dialog box.

In summary, one way to view the active connection information is from the main menu under ODI.

4.2 Editing Repository Configuration


On the ODI main menu bar, select ODI > Disconnect then select ODI > Connect. The wallet dialog box may appear. Then the ODI Login
dialog box appears.

Click the yellow pencil to edit the existing parameters.


In the Repository Connection Information dialog box, you can view and/or change the parameters.

Once you are satisfied with the values, click

Click

OK

Test

to test the connection. If everything is correct, a success message displays.

to close the dialog box. Note that even though the test appeared to be completely successful, there may still be problems.

Occasionally messages will display in the terminal session used to start ODI Studio (it may be behind the active Studio window). If you see
these, you may be instructed to do something or contact someone.

In summary, there are several ways to see, edit, and test the connection information.

Want to Learn More?


In this tutorial, you should have learned how to:
Store ODI user ID/passwords in Oracle Wallet
Create Master and Work repositories using RCU
Connect to Master and Work repositories using ODI Studio
Import previous repository zip files
Test repository connections

Resources
The following are conceptual or procedural Help topics relevant to the topic of this tutorial:
Online documentation, viewlets, samples, and OLN URLs on OTN:

Current version: here (http://docs.oracle.com/middleware/1221/odi/index.html)


Older versions: here (http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/dataintegrator/documentation/index.html)
The following specific courses:

D82167GC10 (http://placeholder) Oracle Data Integrator 12c: Integration and Administration


(replaces D64974GC20 Oracle Data Integrator 11g: Integration and Administration Ed2)
D82171GC10 (http://placeholder) Oracle Data Integrator 12c: New Features
External Web sites for related information:

www.oracle.com/goto/odi (http://www.oracle.com/goto/odi)

OTN Community Forums


(https://forums.oracle.com/community/developer/english/business_intelligence/system_management_and_integrat
To learn more about Oracle Data Integrator 12c, refer to additional OBEs in the Oracle Learning Library
(http://www.oracle.com/goto/oll), or on the ODI Studio Start Page.

Credits
Lead Curriculum Developer: Elio Bonazzi
Other Contributors: Viktor Tchemodanov, Alex Kotopoulis, Julien Testut
About Oracle (http://www.oracle.com/corporate/index.html)
Legal Notices (http://www.oracle.com/us/legal/index.html)

Contact Us (http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/contact/index.html)
Terms of Use (http://www.oracle.com/us/legal/terms/index.html)

Your Privacy Rights (http://www.oracle.com/us/legal/privacy/index.html)


Copyright 2015, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.