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PROJECT PROPOSAL RFP 661002 Submitted to the Purchasing Department Office of Secretary of State VOTER

PROJECT PROPOSAL RFP 661002

Submitted to the Purchasing Department Office of Secretary of State

VOTER EDUCATION AND OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES

RFP RESPONDENT / PROPOSER:

Burson-Marsteller 98 San Jacinto Boulevard Suite 1450 Austin, TX 78701

PROPOSER’S IDENTIFICATION NUMBER:

TIN # 13-1493710 Federal Employer ID # 26-2471086 Corporate Charter # 3553242

 
 

Mark Riordan Senior Director, Burson-Marsteller Mark.Riordan@bm.com Office: (214) 224-8411 Cell: (202)817-9541

 

CONTACTS:

Raul Garza Owner, TKO Advertising raul@tkoadvertising.com Office: (512) 472-4856 Cell: (512) 415-8825

PROJECT MANAGER

Allison Yeaman Manager, Burson-Marsteller Allison.Yeaman@bm.com Office: (214) 224-8421 Cell: (214) 475-6934

Michael Dorff Manager, Burson-Marsteller Michael.Dorff@bm.com Cell: (512) 584-5577

 
 

Proposer hereby accepts by the submission of its proposal the specifications and terms and conditions contained in this Request for Proposal 661002.

 

ACCEPTANCE OF SPECIFICATION, TERMS & CONDITIONS:

ACCEPTANCE OF SPECIFICATION, TERMS & CONDITIONS: December 18, 2015

December 18, 2015

Mark Riordan

December 18, 2015

DATE RECEIVED BY SOS:

(SOS Purchasing staff will initial, date and record time proposal is received.)

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18, 2015 DATE RECEIVED BY SOS: (SOS Purchasing staff will initial, date and record time proposal
SECTION 3.2: UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROJECT AND METHODOLOGY A WATERSHED MOMENT: BUILDING ON THE SUCCESS

SECTION 3.2: UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROJECT AND METHODOLOGY

A WATERSHED MOMENT: BUILDING ON THE SUCCESS OF VOTE TEXAS

The 2016 election cycle will be high-profile, high-impact and most importantly, has the potential to be a very high-turnout year for Texas voters. The national average for voter turnout is typically 20 percentage points higher during presidential elections than in off-year elections. This holds true for Texas, too. Since this is the first presidential election since SB 14 was passed in 2011 where photo ID requirements will be enforced statewide, the 2016 election will offer the most significant opportunity to date to heighten Texas voters’ knowledge and participation in the election process.

Because of the year-over-year measureable success of the Secretary of State’s efforts to educate voters regarding photo ID requirements, voters across all demographics demonstrate greater awareness of the law’s requirements. In the 2014 cycle alone, research showed that, on average, awareness of the photo ID requirements increased from 65 percent to 73 percent.

While the momentum continues to build toward greater awareness, areas for improvement remain.

This is the heart of the Secretary of State’s RFP: continue to raise awareness of voting requirements and process, in particular those regarding photo ID, in a manner that is consistent with and builds upon the success of previous programs. In 2016, voter education efforts must build on the awareness gained while pivoting to a strong call to action: Vote, Texas.

Healthy voter awareness combined with the importance of the upcoming cycle provides a watershed moment for the Secretary of State. Leveraging heightened voter interest and awareness in this presidential election year and the established Vote Texas platform, the Secretary of State can now begin to change the culture of voting in Texas a culture of awareness and participation.

BUILDING ON THE SUCCESS OF VOTE TEXAS

Vote Texas will be competing for air-time, impressions, news coverage and social media engagements with every other voter-focused initiative this election cycle.

In this crowded space, the Secretary of State’s program will need to be fresh and more actionable to resonate with voters. Staying true to and leveraging the brand promise Vote Texas has made serving as the trusted, official voting information resource for Texans we can create an imperative higher than mere awareness.

We propose evolving Vote Texas from a bold statement to a bold challenge and creating an invitation to the Texas of the future: Vote, Texas. In the process, we will create a platform whereby Texans can improve key indicators of voter participation, in which, according to research conducted by the Pew Charitable Trusts, Texas ranks poorly in registration (44 th ) and turnout (48 th ) nationally.

CREATING A CATALYST FOR ACTION

Since 2012, the Secretary of State has maintained a consistent message, building not only awareness among voters but also trust in the brand as the go-to place for reliable and authoritative voting information. The best method of ensuring that awareness is solidified in the minds of voters is to provide the catalyst for action.

That is the Vote, Texas brand story: building upon trust and creating a foundation for action.

Evolving that bold statement into a bold challenge and invitation to the future of Texas will require the Secretary of State’s vision, along with a team of experts working to bridge the gap between awareness and action. Because this program has been and remains evidenced-based, every decision, activation or engagement will be audience-tested, baselined and measured. Working with our partners at Penn Schoen and Berland, Sarver Strategies and TKO Advertising, we offer a clear path to executing this subtle but transformative brand evolution. We are ready to launch as soon as the Secretary of State is ready. We have researched, strategized, designed, tested and are poised to purchase media. We are ready now.

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of State is ready. We have researched, strategized, designed, tested and are poised to purchase media.
THE PATH TO VOTE, TEXAS Burson-Marsteller and TKO Advertising have been honored to work as

THE PATH TO VOTE, TEXAS

Burson-Marsteller and TKO Advertising have been honored to work as trusted partners of the Texas Secretary of State since 2006. We understand the DNA of this initiative and we know how to plot a successful path forward. Over the years, as the themes and messages have been refreshed, and tactics and execution adapted, to address current trends and changing populations, Vote Texas kept raising levels of awareness even as Texas’ population grew at unprecedented levels.

Perhaps the most important next step for Vote Texas is to lean into culture, to issue a bold challenge to our state to create a new Texas, one that is aware of all voting requirements and votes. Vote, Texas. An initiative built around action creating a culture of participation allows Vote Texas and Secretary Cascos to elevate the discussion about how important it is to participate while reinforcing the core awareness messages regarding photo ID requirements. It also allows for a seamless pivot if the courts invalidate or change in any way SB 14.

Section 3.3: Exceptions

None

Section 3.4: Proposed Activity Plan

ELEMENT 1: RESEARCH Consistent with previous Vote Texas programs, we will work with the Secretary of State’s office to develop key metrics to be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the Vote Texas program. Building on past success, we propose to use PSB’s Program Impact Tracking method to track awareness and the impact of our efforts. PSB has extensive experience working with the Secretary of State’s office on the Vote Texas program, specifically.

We recommend conducting tracking studies at several points:

1)

Benchmark wave prior to Phase I

2)

Mid-wave at the conclusion of Phase I and start of Phase II

3)

Post-wave at the conclusion of Phase II

The tracking polls will be designed to measure Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for the program and to specifically track awareness, perceptions of and receptivity toward the photo ID requirements throughout the course of the program. This will help us to understand whether the program is having the desired impact, and to inform course corrections to our efforts as necessary. The initial wave will also provide specific feedback on the creative elements to allow for optimization as well as allow us to compare previous years to understand how perceptions have changed, and how and why this program performs relative to previous years.

Specifically, the tracking polls will be designed to understand:

Awareness of the advertising

Impact of the advertising;

o

Believability/credibility;

o

Affinity/favorability;

o

Impact on key attributes (informative, attention-grabbing, memorable, etc.); and,

o

Impact of the advertising on behavior (likelihood to visit VOTETEXAS.gov/likelihood to vote).

Ways in which attitudes about voting have been altered;

Key demographic characteristics of target markets/audiences; and,

Level of awareness and understanding of:

o

How to register to vote;

o

Voter photo identification required by SB 14;

o

Polling place processes and procedures; and,

o

How to properly cast a ballot,

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required by SB 14; o Polling place processes and procedures; and, o How to properly cast
Tracking will allow for the Vote, Texas program to measure the communications program among stakeholder

Tracking will allow for the Vote, Texas program to measure the communications program among stakeholder audiences and its effectiveness, and to identify the need to refine communications as necessary. PSB will develop the questionnaire/survey in partnership with the Secretary of State’s office, building off of past research. Consistent with previous waves, the research will be conducted online.

We recommend conducting this research online with a total of 900 respondents per wave, including:

300 registered Texas voters (generally representative across the state)

Oversample of 200 registered Texas voters ages 18-24

Oversample of 200 registered Texas voters age 65+

Oversample of 200 registered Texas voters who identify as Hispanic

Oversample of 100 registered Texas voters who identify African-American

Oversample of 75 registered Texas voters who identify as Asian-American

In order to be consistent in our measurements, these samples match the research that was conducted in 2012 and 2014. This will allow for apples to applescomparisons against previous waves, as needed. Costs will stay consistent with previous waves.

ELEMENT 2A: ADVERTISING STRATEGY In order to show the movement from Vote Texas to Vote, Texas, our recommended advertising campaign invites all Texans to a single destination: Vote, Texas, and provides the information, tools, and resources needed to arrive at that destination. Building on previous programs’ success in achieving statewide voter awareness, Vote, Texas educates voters about photo ID requirements, while fostering positive attitudes toward voting and inviting Texans to the idealized Texas of the future: Vote, Texas.

The Vote, Texas advertising campaign positions the Texas Secretary of State as a trusted guide who helps all eligible Texas voters understand:

Who is invited to Vote, Texas = ALL Texans

What to take to Vote, Texas = Approved forms of photo ID

When to go to Vote, Texas = Registration and voting deadlines

Where you can find Vote, Texas = Polling locations and online resources

Why you should go to Vote, Texas = Important for ALL Texans

How to get to Vote, Texas = Registration process and resources

To reach Texans in every county with timely information, our recommended paid media approach incorporates a blend of traditional media (print, TV, radio) and digital media (online banners, smartphone banners, social media). Our advertising placement plan ensures that Texans of special populations, including Texans with disabilities and Spanish-speaking audiences, receive relevant paid advertising messages in their preferred format and language.

Creative Execution The Vote, Texas advertising campaign’s executional elements – look and feel take root in previous successful Texas Secretary of State voter education programs. From that foundation, the advertising campaign evolves to both educate about photo ID and address statewide attitudes toward voting.

For 2016, previous creative campaigns’ signature colors come to life in 3D digital applications, and Texas-friendly typography and visuals welcome audiences back to “voting season” in Texas. Phrases such as, “Welcome to…” and “We’re glad you’re here…” offer an inclusive, invitational context to the important educational messages, and deliver a positive message that will stand out in a potential sea of hard-hitting political campaign advertisements.

Our team’s work on the four most recent Secretary of State voter education efforts informs us that Texans crave a trusted source for voter information. They want the facts, and they identify with authentic Texan voices. With that in mind, our dynamic 2016 creative campaign prominently features a trusted Texan, Secretary Cascos, and proves that voting is accessible and truly Texan. The campaign accomplishes this by depicting the journey from potential voter to registered voter as a fulfilling journey to Vote, Texas. In an effort to lead the statewide conversation about photo ID our Vote, Texas creative campaign clearly communicates the details of the official requirements to Texans.

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photo ID our Vote, Texas creative campaign clearly communicates the details of the official requirements to
Broadcast advertising blends reality and simulated-reality to create a visual Vote, Texas location that incorporates

Broadcast advertising blends reality and simulated-reality to create a visual Vote, Texas location that incorporates Texas’ best and best-loved

icons.

The 2016 Vote, Texas advertising campaign showcases:

Approved forms of photo ID presented in a friendly tone, relevant to Texans;

Texas lifestyle cues (from barbecue to football to scenery) to create the Vote, Texas landscape;

Texas Secretary of State positioned as trusted expert on voting;

Bold colors and designs consistent with previous Vote Texas advertising creative; and,

Call-to-action to visit VOTETEXAS.gov, Texas’ official voting resource.

With broad appeal to our diverse target audiences, and a flexible, entertaining and creative format, Vote, Texas is an advertising campaign audiences will understand, appreciate, and share via social media and word of mouth.

(Note: Additional creative examples can be found under “Creative Concepts” in the addendum.)

can be found under “Creative Concepts” in the addendum.) ELEMENT 2B: PAID MEDIA Paid advertising during
can be found under “Creative Concepts” in the addendum.) ELEMENT 2B: PAID MEDIA Paid advertising during
can be found under “Creative Concepts” in the addendum.) ELEMENT 2B: PAID MEDIA Paid advertising during

ELEMENT 2B: PAID MEDIA Paid advertising during key election periods will position voter education messages to audiences statewide, while bringing visibility to the Vote, Texas brand. The paid advertising plan incorporates high-reach vehicles blanketing all counties of the state with highly- targeted vehicles reaching senior, Hispanic, African-American, Asian-American and first-time voters. The campaign prioritizes the Secretary of State’s goal to ensure all Texans are aware of the SB 14 photo ID requirements.

The Texas Media Landscape Texas’ population increase reflects growth among Hispanic and African-American residents, while aging Baby Boomers continue to boost growth in pockets of the state. Young Texans of all ethnicities drive the biggest population growth in Texas, mainly in urban areas.

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of the state. Young Texans of all ethnicities drive the biggest population growth in Texas, mainly
Recent elections suggest the possibility of a trend reversal with the 2016 Presidential elections. Coupling

Recent elections suggest the possibility of a trend reversal with the 2016 Presidential elections. Coupling this data with the recent midterm and constitutional election participation, we identify an encouraging trend towards increased civic participation in Texas.

The positive tone and inclusive messaging of Vote, Texas reflect this trend. The meticulously designed paid media plan leverages it.

Texas Voter Registration and Turnout (Citizens) Nov Elections People Aged 65+ People Aged 18-24 Hispanics
Texas Voter Registration and Turnout (Citizens)
Nov Elections
People Aged 65+
People Aged 18-24
Hispanics
 

Voter

Voter

Voter

Year

Registration

CVAP Turnout

Registration

CVAP Turnout

Registration

CVAP Turnout

2014

73.4%

54.5%

36.4%

12.1%

46.2%

22.4%

2012

83.3%

73.8%

43.1%

25.4%

54.5%

38.8%

2010

74.7%

55.8%

40.6%

16.1%

53.3%

23.1%

2008

77.0%

69.4%

50.5%

36.6%

54.3%

37.8%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Media Process To maximize the Secretary of State’s investment in voter education, our team will execute a thorough process to evaluate and incorporate paid media opportunities:

Step 1 Identify the target audience and timing: Analyze research, voting patterns and registration to determine audience demographics, lead times and effective media flight dates.

Step 2 Evaluate the markets: While the campaign will reach the entire state, each market will receive a tailored mix of media most likely to achieve impact in its unique population.

Step 3 Select media: Use market landscape data, budget and campaign timing to determine which media will most effectively inform the key targets.

Step 4 Crunch the numbers: Assess the value of each media by reviewing rates, audience composition and value-added opportunities to determine the final media mix.

Step 5 Fight for every dollar for the Secretary of State: Negotiate, negotiate and negotiate to maximize the value of every paid media dollar.

Target Audience Voting age target is 18+, taking into consideration special populations and first-time voters.

Timing Phase I: March Primaries: late JanuaryMarch 1

Phase II: General Election: SeptemberNovember 8 (option to start digital late August)

Market Selection Our campaign reaches voters in every Texas county:

Radio and Cable TV reach all Texas Designated Market Areas (DMA)

Specific Radio formats and Cable networks reach subgroup targets within each DMA that receive voter education messages.

Spanishlanguage Broadcast Television reaches voters in the top six Texas Hispanic markets i Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, Austin, El Paso and the Rio Grande Valley

Digital media banners, popups, and videos reach voters across the state, based on their media consumption

Community Newspapers reach AfricanAmerican and Spanishspeaking voters statewide

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their media consumption  Community Newspapers reach African – American and Spanish – speaking voters statewide
Media Mix Texans’ media consumption and online behaviors inform our selection of paid media vehicl

Media Mix Texans’ media consumption and online behaviors inform our selection of paid media vehicles that deliver maximum impact.

93 percent own a cellphone

64 percent use social media

19 hours a week average spent online

60 percent access Internet via cellphone

spent online  60 percent access Internet via cellphone DIGITA L RADIO Stations Include: Includes: Paid

DIGITA L

 60 percent access Internet via cellphone DIGITA L RADIO Stations Include: Includes: Paid Online Banner;

RADIO

Stations Include:

Internet via cellphone DIGITA L RADIO Stations Include: Includes: Paid Online Banner; Mobile Phone Banner; Paid
Internet via cellphone DIGITA L RADIO Stations Include: Includes: Paid Online Banner; Mobile Phone Banner; Paid
Internet via cellphone DIGITA L RADIO Stations Include: Includes: Paid Online Banner; Mobile Phone Banner; Paid

Includes: Paid Online Banner; Mobile Phone

Banner; Paid Social Media; Online Radio

Banner; Mobile Phone Banner; Paid Social Media; Online Radio 3 1 % 6 % 3 SECRETA
3 1 % 6 % 3 SECRETA RY OF STATE MEDIA MIX % 8 2
3
1
%
6
%
3
SECRETA RY OF STATE
MEDIA MIX
%
8
2
5
%
1 % 6 % 3 SECRETA RY OF STATE MEDIA MIX % 8 2 5 %

CABLE TV/ BRO ADCA ST

Stations Include:

PRINT

Outlets Include:

TV/ BRO ADCA ST Stations Include: PRINT Outlets Include: Radio Radio is the most cost –

Radio Radio is the most costeffective medium to reach our target populations. Our radio plan includes three levels of coverage.

1. Top ranked radio stations in each Texas market will deliver mass reach and targeted impressions via station formats and language. We will ensure we honor the commitment to reach all Texans 18+ while paying close attention to each market’s population makeup in order to work with stations that enable us to reach our young and mature voters as well as minority voters.

2. News/Weather/Traffic sponsorships. These shorter messages drive traffic to VOTETEXAS.gov in the top four markets (Houston, Dallas, Austin and San Antonio). These sponsorships enable us to deliver the needed amount of impressions necessary to change audience behavior while also adding to the credibility of the overall message Vote Texas is the go-to source for voter information appearing on the TV channels and programs that Texans trust for their news and other important information.

3. Texas State Networks, a network of 112 Texas radio stations with a focus on rural communities and 65+ Texans, ensures we reach the far corners of the state that may not have coverage from a larger market outlet.

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and 65+ Texans, ensures we reach the far corners of the state that may not have
Digital – General Texans are increasingly on-the-go and linked to their technology devices and social

DigitalGeneral Texans are increasingly on-the-go and linked to their technology devices and social networks. Therefore, our paid media plan includes robust presence on the networks, sites and tools most popular with our target audience. This ideal combination of placements will deliver strong performance, as it has for previous Vote Texas campaigns.

Vote, Texas digital advertising placement on Texans’ desktops, laptops, tablets and smartphones target potential voters by demographics, interest, lifestyle, behaviors, and language. Through this approach the campaign reaches audiences when they are accessing news feeds, searching for voter-relevant information and even playing online games.

All digital advertising placements link directly to VOTETEXAS.gov, creating an immediate connection to important voter information.

Online banners targeted to Texans favorite websites, in their language of preference

Online Radio Experiences on Pandora and Batanga, create custom experiences for listeners

Social media ad placement on Twitter and the right side of Facebook

Expandable ad units to display all acceptable photo ID formats, and present videos

DigitalFirst-Time Voters Digital technology enables us to place advertising where first-time voters are most likely to access their smartphones.

College Students

o

Places: universities, colleges, libraries, student dorms

o

Targeting hours: All day, with focus on later afternoons and evenings

Millennial Music Lovers

o

Places: Concerts, music festivals, music retail stores, ticket box offices

o

Targeting hours: Several hours before and after events

Young Working Professionals

o

Places: Office parks, commuter stations, coffee shops, restaurant locations

o

Targeting hours: Early morning, lunch and before end of day

Happy Hour Attendees

o

Places: Bars, restaurants and pubs

o

Targeting hours: Weekdays after 5 p.m.

Cable TV Cable TV spot placement in Texas DMAs guarantees 100 percent coverage of all Texas TV markets. Our plan includes Time Warner TX Select Zone, which reaches more than 1.2 million households in Texas, and covers the following markets: Dallas/Fort Worth, Austin, San Antonio, Waco, El Paso, Laredo, Corpus Christi, Beaumont, Wichita Falls, Del Rio and the Rio Grande Valley. The media plan includes seven weeks of cable TV, three weeks leading up to the primary election and four weeks leading up to the general election.

SpanishLanguage Spot Market TV The state’s largest Hispanic populations are located in the top media markets of Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, the Rio Grande Valley, El Paso, and Austin. Specifically, more than 80 percent of Hispanics age 18+ call one of these cities home. Though the media plan includes some cable and spot radio coverage, adding broadcast TV expands the local market reach tremendously within the Spanishspeaking segment of this consumer target. All spots will run during prime time as well as during the daytime hours, and will mirror the same flights as cable TV.

Print: Community Newspapers Spanishlanguage and African American newspapers are trusted information sources deeply rooted in Texas communities. Traditionally, these outlets reach community leaders and influencers. Our campaign builds on community newspapers’ legacy of trust, and incorporates four-color advertising placement in newspapers statewide during key election dates.

Added Value All radio and TV partners will endeavor to run matching PSA spots for all spots purchased for this campaign. Texas State Networks will strive to run two added value spots for each paid spot. However, since this political cycle will likely break media spending records, we cannot forecast how many PSAs will air due to inventory constraints.

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cycle will likely break media spending records, we cannot forecast how many PSAs will air due
However, we are able to bring other ideas to the table, given our media partnerships

However, we are able to bring other ideas to the table, given our media partnerships throughout Texas. Two elements will be added to the conversation to extend the reach of our message well beyond the paid media portion.

First, for the primary election, we have secured an added value “Countdown to Election Day” campaign that features bonus radio and outdoor digital assets. Five days before the primary election, a flight of broadcast :30 spots, and two digital outdoor billboards (one in Dallas and one in Houston) will begin a countdown to remind people the primary election vote is coming. Each message will include a reminder about photo ID and drive people to VOTETEXAS.gov.

In the fall, our message will be tagged to “Rock The Vote” celebrity integrations that have been a feature of election season for the last 25 years. Some of the biggest names in the music industry will encourage young people to vote. We will attach our message and drive audiences to VOTETEXAS.gov at no cost.

As part of our overall radio campaign, we will also receive digital exposure on our partner station websites. This will add up to approximately 1 million impressions statewide over the course of the campaign.

impressions statewide over the course of the campaign.  Radio partners will also handle added value

Radio partners will also handle added value production free of charge.

ELEMENT 3: MEDIA RELATIONS While recent research indicates awareness among Texas voters is at an all-time high, there remains a need to continue to raise awareness of voting requirements, photo ID requirements, in particular. While the media landscape continues to evolve, traditional media including TV, newspaper and radio are still identified by Texas voters as their top source of information pertaining to the voting process, according to research conducted after the 2014 election.

As we’ve discovered in past voter education initiatives, media can be a powerful conduit to getting out key messages quickly and efficiently. To effectively harness the reach and impact media can possess, we have outlined a strategy below that is designed to not only help maintain voter awareness about approved forms of photo ID and voting processes, but help increase participation among Texas voters across all demographics in the 2016 election cycle.

Spokesperson Training While the team creates new media outreach materials and refreshes successful pre-existing materials for the 2016 election cycle, we will work with the Office of the Secretary of State’s communications staff to ensure the appropriate spokesperson(s) are trained and prepared to deliver key messages specific to the Vote, Texas program. With evidence-based messages refreshed and tailored to each audience, we will work with the Secretary of State’s team to prepare internal and external spokespeople to represent the Secretary of State in media opportunities.

In the past, we have seen county election officials become effective, local spokespeople. To amplify our efforts, we would share Vote, Texas key messages with them to help ensure the delivery of consistent messaging across the state. This will help maximize impact and ensure everyone is “operating from the same playbook” throughout Phase I and Phase II.

News Bureau To quickly and proactively disseminate key messages from the Vote, Texas program, we will engage the proactive news bureau program that’s been successful in the past to reach key media targets across the state. Our news bureau will serve as the central hub for communication with media outlets, able to distribute information, answer questions and also rapidly respond to correct misinformation with a credible response from the Secretary of State. The news bureau would be accessible and familiar to major news outlets such as The Dallas Morning News, Houston Business Journal and WBAP, as well as second- and third-tier outlets in smaller media markets and rural areas.

Virtual Collateral Library As in years past, the materials created for the news bureau can be catalogued at VOTETEXAS.gov. This creates a central resource for fact sheets, press releases, talking points, photos and other shareable graphics. We can work with the Secretary of State to update these items and the Vote, Texas website, if needed. VOTETEXAS.gov can also feature feeds from the Secretary of State’s online properties, a news feed featuring media coverage, press releases and press event information, and graphics and relevant collateral pieces on the voting process and acceptable forms of ID.

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press event information, and graphics and relevant collateral pieces on the voting process and acceptable forms
Media Tours Media tours have been an extremely successful and effective avenue to spread key

Media Tours Media tours have been an extremely successful and effective avenue to spread key messages to as many Texans as possible and quickly. To attract attention and engage voters across all demographics, we recommend the following tactics designed to maximize reach on behalf of Vote, Texas.

Secretary Cascos Appearances: We can vet and identify relevant and “mediable” public events or speaking opportunities already scheduled to take place in Texas in 2016 for the Secretary of State or other trained spokespeople to attend in the days leading up to the primary election March 1 and the general election November 8. Additionally, we could leverage Secretary Cascos’ own voting when he votes in his hometown of Brownsville, Texas.

Radio Tours: We also recommend scheduling strategic radio media tours during drive-times for the Secretary of State and other spokespeople on the days leading up to both election days in 2016. These timeframes present a prime opportunity for the Secretary of State to remind voters about proper forms of ID and remind them to vote. We will also disseminate one-sheet readers for radio stations to use on air as well as pre-drafted Twitter and Facebook posts for media outlets to push out on their own social media properties during these crucial weeks. In 2012 and 2014, this approach netted strong results.

Local Media Tours: We recommend setting up local media tours for the Secretary of State and county election officials in markets around the state, such as: Abilene, Amarillo, Austin, Beaumont, Corpus Christi, Dallas/Fort Worth, El Paso, Houston, Laredo, Lubbock, Midland/Odessa, Tyler, San Angelo, San Antonio, Sherman, Waco, Temple, Killeen and Wichita Falls. As outlined earlier, selected officials would be prepped and armed with the news bureau collateral, allowing unified Vote, Texas messages to be disseminated across the state.

Op-Eds/Bylined Articles Op-eds penned by the Secretary of State have been particularly successful in past Vote Texas programs. We recommend drafting an op-ed distributed to major daily newspapers around the state that outlines the evolution of Vote Texas to Vote, Texas, and the start of a real culture of voting in Texas a culture of awareness and participation. The op-ed would highlight the great success achieved by Vote Texas to date and how the Secretary of State is leveraging the all-time high-level of voter awareness to create a foundation for action among Texas voters.

We will submit this to outlets such as The Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Houston Chronicle, Austin American- Statesman, San Antonio Express-News and El Paso Times.

Reaching Target Audiences with Targeted Messages Given that groups such as military personnel stationed out-of-state or overseas, minority populations, and young and elderly voters are among the most likely to be impacted by photo ID requirements, we recommend targeting these groups through media outlets they already trust and through media relations surrounding community events. We will take the Vote, Texas message where they live.

Student Media: To reach college students, we recommend outreach to the college newspapers of major Texas universities, such as The Daily Texan, The Battalion, The Daily Toreador, North Texas Daily, the SMU Daily Campus and UT-El Paso’s Prospector, among others. Recognizing that this generation spends a significant amount of their time online, we recommend that Burson-Marsteller and the appropriate Secretary of State spokesperson utilize digital platforms such as SKYPE to host live chat sessions, engage and answer questions via Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and post videos on the our YouTube channel to answer any specific questions from young voters.

Cultural Media: During media tours, we will also arrange meetings with top Spanish-language media outlets, such as Univision and Telemundo affiliates and Spanish-language newspapers. The Secretary of State and bilingual spokespeople can work with these outlets to provide resources specifically designed for the Spanish-speaking population.

Military Media: Realizing Texas’ military installations represent a huge group of Texas voters, we will conduct outreach to on- base newsletters and websites for Texas’ military installations, partnering with armed forces deployment experts to provide tips and relevant information specifically tailored to armed forces members. We will work with the Secretary of State to reach out to American Citizens Abroad and the Overseas Vote Foundation to provide information for their newsletters and web sites, host online forums and distribute information to their constituents. We would recommend providing information to embassies about

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forums and distribute information to their constituents. We would recommend providing information to embassies about 10
Texas’ electronic voting options for ov erseas citizens and reach out to online portals including

Texas’ electronic voting options for overseas citizens and reach out to online portals including blogs, Facebook groups, pages and forums for Texans living abroad.

Special Needs Outreach: Voters with special needs have a number of options under the current photo ID law, including the “motor voter” option – all polling locations have a device allowing people with disabilities to vote from their vehicles. It is important these voters know they can follow certain procedures for an exemption from the photo ID requirement, and we believe these options represent opportunities to earn media and spread the message about how, when and where to vote.

We will work with advocacy organizations as appropriate and include Texans with disabilities at media tour stops and news conferences, whenever possible.

ELEMENT 4: COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT A key component of educating and communicating with Texans in preparation for the 2016 primary and general elections is active engagement with communities around the state. Whether it’s connecting with first-time voters or reinforcing voting fundamentals with lifetime voters, community relations provides the Secretary of State with the opportunity to reach multiple demographics in a single setting. Within each phase, our efforts must include engaging events and build, maintain and nurture relationships with civic organizations, elected officials and Community and Faith-Based Organizations (CFBOs). Relationships with these groups not only amplify vital messages, but ensure Texans are hearing these messages from influencers they know and trust. We’ve outlined below various tactics to reach voters through community relations efforts.

Phase I

Attracting New Voters For younger and newly minted voters, 2016 represents a milestone year their first presidential election. With activities around the state in a lull during the early part of 2016, this is a prime time to target this group of voters. This can be accomplished several ways:

First, we can work with school districts to develop student government partnerships. These non-partisan groups serve as leadership organizations that students hold in high regard. The Secretary of State can leverage these relationships to demonstrate to younger voters how, when and where to vote as well as the importance of voting. These messages could be further enhanced by a visit from the Secretary of State during a pep rally or assembly.

Additionally, we will identify larger events attracting young voters to achieve maximum impact in this demographic. Whether it’s the University Interscholastic League (UIL) basketball quarterfinals in late February or the UIL Congress Contest in mid-January, the Secretary of State can have an active, energetic presence at these events, encouraging the younger audience to register and vote.

Finally, to reach the youngest strata of potential voters, we recommend tapping in to the Project V.O.T.E. curriculum and leveraging the mock elections to create activations that reinforce awareness and participation among high school students in particular. Visiting schools and grades of all levels to discuss the election, how elections work and encouraging those of age to register to vote impresses the importance of voting from an early age, leading to more engaged voters for future generations.

Additionally, if feasible, the Secretary of State or representatives from his office should teach a class at select schools, and specifically, teach the curriculum designed for Project V.O.T.E.

Partner with Non-Partisan Organizations Partnerships with non-partisan organizations, such as the League of Women Voters and Nonprofit VOTE allow the Secretary of State to reach engaged voters that can help translate the Secretary of State’s message to non-engaged voters. These organizations provide existing events where the Secretary of State can have a presence supported by the credibility of a non-partisan organization. These programs share a fundamental mission with the Vote, Texas effort to help expand our reach, efficiently use resources and bring the key messages about voting in Texas to more people.

Phase II

Leading up to the general election, the majority of our efforts will be focused here in the form of a three-pronged approach to reach existing voters, new voters and community partners.

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be focused here in the form of a three-pronged approach to reach existing voters, new voters
Roadshow Roadshows provide a unique opportunity to reach the intersection of new and existing voters

Roadshow Roadshows provide a unique opportunity to reach the intersection of new and existing voters in communities across the state. Whether it’s a bus with interactive displays, a wrapped truck that travels from city to city accompanied by a Vote, Texas mascot, or simply a booth with relevant information to voters, we can scale and execute the event depending on the Secretary of State’s needs. We envision this roadshow being held in conjunction with existing events around the state that have a built-in audience, such as the State Fair of Texas in September and October, or Austin City Limits in September or El Paso’s Alfresco Fridays in August. A spokesperson from the Secretary of State’s office would also be present to discuss the voting process.

College Tour Similar to the high school events in Phase I, a college tour provides another opportunity for the Secretary of State to reach younger voters. We can help the Secretary of State engage with colleges and universities around the state to host voter registration drives and create media events around these drives. This could even take place during the formative first few weeks of the school year when students make key decisions on joining clubs and activities. Designated spokespeople in these media markets can speak to how, when and where to vote in Texas.

Equipping Partners For all CFBOs, we will develop a comprehensive toolkit to lighten the burden on our partners and ensure a consistent message is delivered throughout the state. This toolkit will take into account the specific needs and demographics of each target audience. Using approved messaging, we will create content in an easy-to-understand format including information critical to registration and voting. The toolkit will be designed as a multipurpose/multiplatform kit to allow for both digital use and onsite distribution and will be provided in English, Spanish and other languages as needed. We will provide all content including creative, copywriting and editing.

Pieces of the kit could include:

Communications timeline with key election milestones;

Posters, fliers and official materials for voter registration;

Fact sheets and FAQs tailored for different audiences;

Digital tools, such as draft social media content, shareable videos; and,

Background information on voter registration and voting.

New for the 2016 election, we envision the toolkit moving to a modernized, online platform that partners can easily access. Additionally, we suggest making a representative from the Office of the Secretary of State available to speak to group members and clients in a town-hall-like format. These environments are perfect for engaging speakers to address the concerns of CFBO audiences.

ELEMENT 5: SPECIAL EVENTS Events can be expensive and extremely challenging, however, when done correctly, they can be a strong vehicle to communicate a message to an audience effectively. We recommend the Office of the Secretary of State focus on doing simple, targeted events, and strategically insert spokespeople, specifically Secretary Cascos, into key events throughout the state. Doing so will save time, money and resources. Some of these events may include, throwing the first pitch at a major or minor league baseball game, riding a float at the River Parade during San Antonio’s or simply passing out fliers and talking to residents at the Plano Balloon Festival. By interacting with residents at a grassroots level, it will allow potential voters to understand the significance and meaning behind their vote.

Grassroots/Telethons In cases of major news events that affect a wide swath of the public, major market TV stations are open to conducting phone banks during their 5 and 6 p.m. newscasts. Secretary Cascos, or another spokesperson, would appear live, in studio, during the broadcasts to be interviewed as a guest discussing photo ID requirements and the voting process with local county election officials staffing the phone bank to answer viewer questions. The TV stations will promote the event ahead of time, which portrays them as an active community partner. Additionally, this allows us to directly interact with the public to answer questions about the upcoming elections.

Crisis and Critical Issues Response The crisis and critical issue response counselors at Burson-Marsteller believe that in the case of a statewide program of this importance, it is always wise to prepare a crisis response plan. Working with the Secretary of State’s team, we will refine the existing crisis or critical issue response plan that builds upon the infrastructure necessary to respond effectively in the event of a crisis, or to prevent an issue from becoming a crisis. The overarching strategy will be simple: Prepare comprehensively. Respond forcefully and effectively.

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a crisis. The overarching strategy will be simple: Prepare comprehensively. Respond forcefully and effectively. 12
Crisis response preparations will include:  Establishment of a core crisis team comprising Burson-Marsteller and

Crisis response preparations will include:

Establishment of a core crisis team comprising Burson-Marsteller and the Office of the Secretary of State staff;

Research and evaluate potential vulnerabilities;

Development and implementation of plans;

Preparation of materials;

Establishment of a team-member contact; and,

Monitor and evaluation of crisis media coverage.

In the event a ruling or decision is issued that impacts the voting process or acceptable photo ID, we have the capabilities and bandwidth to move quickly to update materials and inform the public.

ELEMENT 6: COUNTY AND ELECTED OFFICIAL ENGAGEMENT Accepting an invitation to Vote, Texas requires elements of trust and credibility, and we therefore believe it is important for invitations to come from respected county and elected officials.

Educating and Inviting Outreach to officials in the past has focused on building relationships and positioning the Secretary of State as the official voting resource. As the Vote Texas campaign evolves, we want to encourage officials to educate their constituents with facts about voting and take the next step to actively challenge and invite their constituents to vote.

Officials will be invited to attend community outreach events and encouraged to actively participate in Vote, Texas campaign activities. This will raise the profile of campaign events and empower officials to support the broad, non-partisan objectives of the campaign. By reaching voters through constituent services, community meetings, events and town halls, we will ask officials to serve as important partners in driving traffic to VOTETEXAS.gov

In addition to county election officials, we will equip elected officials at all levels with tools to share facts about voting:

o

Mayors

o

State Legislators

o

U.S. Representatives and Senators

Supplying officials with simple, engaging tools will put critical information in the hands of individuals who are trusted sources of information, allowing offices to proactively share Vote, Texas messages and respond to constituents.

County Election Officials The officials who oversee elections at the county level are an extension of the Vote, Texas campaign.

We will share creative assets with these officials so that the Vote, Texas brand and message is spread far and wide across Texas.

Because many county election offices now have very significant social media followings, we will also include them as insiders in social media campaigns and provide first-look access to multimedia materials before they are available to the public.

Bringing election officials under the tent in these ways will generate excitement and a sense of inclusion in the campaign that will help to amplify the Vote, Texas message.

Mayors Mayors are a direct line to local communities and have the ability to quickly get face-to-face with voters. They are also intimately familiar with the value of inviting people to visit Anytown, Texas. Who better to serve as an ambassador inviting and welcoming people to Vote, Texas?

Mayors will be provided professional toolkits and materials and encouraged to remind citizens about the need to vote with an approved ID, and we will ask them to promote VOTETEXAS.gov as a destination at public events, town halls and appearances.

We will also include mayors in all road show events and campus visits.

State Legislators

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town halls and appearances. We will also include mayors in all road show events and campus
SB 14 has been in place for several elections now and legislators are intimately familiar.

SB 14 has been in place for several elections now and legislators are intimately familiar.

We believe legislators and their constituents will benefit from Vote, Texas pocket cards. Having clear messages and shareable materials in their hip pockets will empower legislators to join in the voter education campaign as we encourage as many Texans as possible to learn how to comply with the law.

In Austin and in district offices, we will ensure that consistent communications make it clear that the Vote, Texas campaign is providing resources to voters and empowering people to comply with the Photo ID law.

U.S. Representatives and Senators Federal officials have district offices that are well versed at handling constituent inquiries, and they will inevitably field a large number of calls if any changes occur regarding enforcement of SB 14. We will provide toolkits to district offices, so staff can share accurate information with voters who call, write and visit their offices.

Putting Vote, Texas materials in the hands of these high-profile offices will equip voters and enhance the visibility of the campaign and VOTETEXAS.gov

Toolkits Toolkits are a critical component of outreach to county and elected officials. We will develop a variety of professionally-designed resources designed to drive research-based messages directly into the hands of voters. These resources will be distributed digitally and in hard copy as necessary. Working together with SOS, we will develop and share materials such as:

Stickers

Posters

Fact Sheets

Pocket Cards

Post Cards

News release templates

Sample social media calendars

Banners

Logos

Video

Materials will rely on the program’s evolving visual theme, provide direct info about photo ID and drive voters to VOTETEXAS.gov.

Timeline Outreach to elected officials around the state will be an organic process of relationship-building and positioning ourselves as resources as the four major voting milestones occur.

Phase I

1. Primary Voter Registration Period

Send initial email to introduce campaign

Distribute initial toolkit materials with key information

Follow up with phone calls to answer follow-up questions

Serve as ongoing resource for elected officials and staff

2. Primary Election Date

Send email to update offices with additional campaign materials

Follow up with phone calls to answer follow-up questions

Serve as ongoing resource for elected officials and staff

Phase II

1. General Voter Registration Period

Send reminder emails with voter registration deadline

Serve as ongoing resource for elected officials and staff

2. General Election Date

Send email to update offices with new campaign materials

Re-distribute full toolkits upon request, with key information

Serve as ongoing resource for elected officials and staff

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full toolkits upon request, with key information  Serve as ongoing resource for elected officials and
ELEMENT 7: DIGITAL AND SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY During the course of the Secretary of State

ELEMENT 7: DIGITAL AND SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY During the course of the Secretary of State’s partnership with Burson-Marsteller and TKO Advertising, the Vote Texas digital presence has experienced enormous growth measured by the development of an established, active following across social media platforms.

Together, we have demonstrated effective use of the Vote Texas social media function by:

Participating in the online conversation as the branded voice and authoritative source on voting information, and

Monitoring the attitudes, perceptions and opinions expressed on social media to engage with Texans and respond effectively to voting-related inquiries.

While Vote, Texas digital properties remain committed to raising awareness of voting requirements in particular to those regarding photo ID Vote, Texas social media content is primed to leverage voter awareness into voter activation. This confluence of awareness and participation is the entry point to cultivating a culture of voting in Texas.

Social media is about more than the tools it is about what the tools enable. The Vote Texas digital strategy has been about establishing an online presence and developing an audience. Our previous programs have worked to accomplish this objective and expand the reach of the Vote, Texas message. At the heart of the Vote, Texas digital strategy is connecting people with information and other people.

Leverage a Mindset Digital and social media use is highest among Texas millennials (ages 18-34) with more than 83 percent visiting a social networking site regularly. Given that this generation is the largest and most diverse in Texas, millennials are ushering in different types of mindsets among their peers, families and other spheres of influence. When asked what is more important to them today, significant percentages reported “travel, adventure, as well as excitement” as priorities. It is through this lens, that we must pay significant attention to a mindset that is focused on a journey.

The journey mindsetallows users to reach a destination: Vote, Texas.

Engage through Storytelling Today’s social and digital world is geared toward this journey mindset, with social media enhancing it through storytelling. Facebook now allows you to not only check into physical places but also permits users to show where they’re traveling, how they’re feeling and what they’re eating. Snapchat encourages users to create their own stories through filtered pictures and video. Twitter is also curating trending content through its new Twitter Moments feature on its mobile app. And, users on Instagram are documenting their journeys as well through hashtags that are connected to a community.

Through Secretary of State-owned channels, we will offer a storytelling experience that captures the essence of Vote, Texas. Some of these tactics include:

Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: High reach and high impact. We want to engage our users through lifestyle content that is sharable and gives the Secretary of State the ability to be part of a larger conversation.

Promoted posts: By utilizing paid social media on Facebook and Twitter, the Secretary of State has the ability to target and optimize various pieces of content by age, location, language (English, Spanish, bilingual) and interest. Burson-Marsteller and TKO Advertising will identify promoted posts through a monthly content calendar and phase through program objectives.

Filters: Through localized media efforts, Snapchat can allow users to select a Vote, Texas filter for their Snapchat story. On Twitter, we can create a way for users to update their profile pictures using Twibbon.

for their Snapchat story. On Twitter, we can create a way for users to update their

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for their Snapchat story. On Twitter, we can create a way for users to update their
Listicles and quizzes: These share-worthy content pieces are popular today on sites like Buzzfeed and

Listicles and quizzes: These share-worthy content pieces are popular today on sites like Buzzfeed and allow users to create an emotional connection with the campaign.

Gaming: Along with any journey comes adventure. Tapping into gaming gives users the ability to learn about the Vote, Texas program in an interactive way.

Navigation mobile apps: Navigation apps such as Waze allow brands to display location-based ads to users. This could help aid users in their search for polling places.

Measure through sentiment We will measure the Vote, Texas program through sentiment on social media. Measuring sentiment allows the Secretary of State to accurately measure what kind of attitudinal impact the campaign has on users. This also creates a feedback and optimization loop that Burson-Marsteller and TKO Advertising can utilize through well-informed analysis to impact both creative and community management.

Utilizing the journey mindset’s sentiment, feelings of “uncertainty, anxiety and unfamiliarity” can be felt through the voting process. Through social media, we can measure how the campaign can shape attitudes for Texans to become “confident, informed and included” by being a part of Vote, Texas.

Pre-campaign sentiment

Post-campaign sentiment

Uncertain

Confident

Anxious

Informed

Unfamiliar

Inclusive

SECTION 3.6: EXPERIENCE AND CAPABILITY

VOTE TEXAS TEAM The Vote Texas team is a group of seasoned public affairs, digital media and advertising practitioners with experience executing complex public education programs. We blend global best practices and local expertise to deliver statewide programs that leverage local relationships, culturally sensitive communications and connections to hard-to-reach audiences. Our public education experience includes multi-million dollar programs such as the 2006, 2012, 2013 and 2014 HAVA programs and 2015 Vote Texas program for the Texas Secretary of State, the 2011 HAVA program for the Board of Elections of New York City, the introduction of electric deregulation for the Public Utilities Commission of Texas, a program to educate Texans about available insurance options for the Texas Department of Insurance, the Texas “beach watch” program for the Texas General Land Office, and water quality and conservation programs with Dallas Water Utilities and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Additionally, we have been pleased to work recently with a range of clients in Texas, such as the George W. Bush Presidential Center, T.D. Jakes’ MegaFest, Texas Health Resources, Southern Methodist University and Blue Bell Creameries. We are Texans, working for Texas.

Karen Hughes Strategic Advisor (Billing Rate: $309.75)

Worldwide Vice Chair More than 35 years of public policy, communications and political experience, from helping lead winning presidential campaigns to serving at the highest levels of government

Phi Beta Kappa and summa cum laude graduate of Southern Methodist University

Served as Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, and Counselor to President George W. Bush

Served as communications director in the office of Texas Governor George W. Bush and on his two winning gubernatorial campaigns Mark Riordan Client Leader (Billing Rate: $309.75)

Senior Director Nearly 30 years of experience Bachelor of Arts in Politics, The Catholic University of America; Master of Arts in Journalism, Florida A&M University

Managed political campaigns, ballot initiatives and branding campaigns, and has led public relations campaigns at the local, regional and national levels

Led media relations teams at two research universities and a variety of state agencies

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and national levels  Led media relations teams at two research universities and a variety of
Jenifer Sarver – Strategic Advisor (Sarver Strategies) (Billing Rate: $309.75)  Principal – 16 years

Jenifer Sarver Strategic Advisor (Sarver Strategies) (Billing Rate: $309.75)

Principal 16 years of experience Bachelor of Journalism and a Bachelor of Science in Communication Studies, UT Austin; Master in Public Administration, American University

Message development and media training expert

Experienced at overseeing and executing public education campaigns, including leading Vote Texas 2014 program and supporting 2012 Texas HAVA efforts Allison Yeaman Project Manager and Director of Media Relations (Billing Rate: $252)

Manager 11 years of experience Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, University of North Texas

Directed media relations for the 2012 Texas HAVA and 2015 Vote Texas programs

Experience with local, state and national public awareness and government programs

Texas event and media relations expert Michael Dorff Co-Project Manager and Director of Community Engagement (Billing Rate: $252)

Manager 11 years of experience Bachelor of Arts in Corporate Communications and Public Affairs, Southern Methodist University

Supported media relations, community and legislative outreach during 2012 Texas HAVA, served as day-to-day lead of 2014 Texas HAVA and 2015 Vote Texas programs

Plan and manage national and international outreach efforts and targeted advocacy campaigns Amy Garza Digital Strategist (Billing Rate: $199.50)

Senior Associate six years of experience B.A., Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago

Finance, Communications and Field experience on local, state and federal political campaigns

Supported social and traditional media relations for 2015 Vote Texas program

Provide day-to-day client support and execution of message development, content strategy and media outreach

Mattie Walker Media Relations (Billing Rate: $199.50)

Senior Associate six years of experience Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, Oklahoma State University

Managed community and public outreach efforts on behalf of City of Dallas Water Utilities’ water conservation and grease abatement programs

Supported social and traditional media relations for 2015 Vote Texas program

Communication and marketing support across multiple lines of business for Bank of America including Merrill Edge, Merrill Lynch and U.S. Trust Whitney Williamson Community Engagement & Media Relations (Billing Rate: $157.50)

Associate four years of experience Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Business Administration, Southern Methodist University

Supported community-based outreach for 2014 HAVA and 2015 Vote Texas programs

Secured coverage and interest in national, local and trade publications

Provided logistics and executive staffing support for events and conferences Kelsie Aziz Digital Outreach & Media Relations (Billing Rate: $78.75)

Client Staff Assistant one year of experience Bachelor of Arts in Public Relations, Texas Tech University; Master of Arts in Strategic Communication, University of Oklahoma

Manages and plans events to garner significant media attention

Supported social and traditional media relations for 2015 Vote Texas program

Assists with building coalitions to support business objectives while working for North Texas’ largest health care system Katie Fikes Digital Outreach & Media Relations (Billing Rate: $78.75)

Client Staff Assistant one year of experience Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, University of Oklahoma

Develops and implements media plans

Supported social and traditional media relations for 2015 Vote Texas program

Creates and drives social media content for government organizations

Raul Garza Executive Creative Director (Billing Rate: $250)

Executive Creative Director and Cofounder of TKO Advertising 20 years of experience Bachelor of Arts in Advertising, University of Texas; Master of Arts, St. Edwards University

Served as Executive Creative Director for the 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 Texas Secretary of State voter education campaigns

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as Executive Creative Director for the 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 Texas Secretary of State voter
 Specializes in creative production and media buying strategies for statewide, multi-cultural, multi-language efforts

Specializes in creative production and media buying strategies for statewide, multi-cultural, multi-language efforts programs for Texas public agency public awareness campaigns including Texas Department of Insurance, Texas Workforce Commission, Texas Attorney General’s Office, Texas Public Utility Commission and the Texas Department of Housing and Community of Affairs Todd Alley Creative Director (Billing Rate: $200)

Creative Director 25 years of experience Bachelor of Science in Advertising, University of Texas

Wrote and produced creative materials for several Texas Secretary of State voter education efforts dating back to 2006

Extensive experience leading creative for statewide campaigns including Texas Department of Transportation, Texas Department of State Health Services, Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Texas Health and Human Services, Texas Economic Development and Texas Tourism Marisa Limón Paid Media & Creative Account Manager (Billing Rate: $150)

Creative Account Manager 16 years of experience Bachelor of Arts in English and Spanish Literature, University of Notre Dame; Master of Education, University of Notre Dame

Served as Assistant Director of Community Engagement and Multicultural Outreach for the Austin Independent School District

Manages several high-profile accounts including the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Texas Cultural Trust and Valvoline Christina Lopez Dunk Hispanic Media Strategist (Billing Rate: $150)

Digital Media Strategist eight years of experience – Bachelor of Arts in Marketing, St. Edward’s University

Served as digital media coordinator for Dallas Water Utilities and Department of State Health Services “Healthy Texas Women” campaign in English and Spanish

Specializes in digital and social media strategies for national, stateside, multi-cultural, multi-language campaigns; supported many public agency and business clients, such as the Texas Department of Insurance, Four Hands Home, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Santa Fe Convention and Visitors Bureau, Superior HealthPlan, Texas Department of State Health Services, Dallas Water Utilities and Texas Veterans Land Board Noe Perez Web & Digital Director (Billing Rate: $175)

Web + Interactive Director 12 years of experience Associate of Science in computer animation, The Art Institute of Houston; Bachelor of Fine Arts in communication design, Texas State University

Served as the interactive lead for the Texas Secretary of State HAVA programs in 2012, 2013 and 2014 including rollout of the Secretary of State’s first smartphone application

Creator of award-winning interactive and graphic design projects for public agency clients including the Texas Department of State Health Services, the Texas Department of Insurance, the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, and the New Mexico Retiree Health Care Authority Matt Reyes Content Director (Billing Rate: $150)

Content Director eight years of experience Bachelor of Science in Public Relations, University of Texas

Specializes in digital and social media strategy and production with experience in multicultural campaigns for a wide array of clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies (including Target, Lowe’s, Mars, Inc., Anheuser-Busch, Sprint) to nonprofits like Voto Latino and Rock the Vote.

COMPANY HISTORY & DESCRIPTION

Burson-Marsteller Founded in 1953, Burson-Marsteller is a leading global public relations and communications firm. Our strategic insights and innovative programming build and sustain strong corporate and brand reputations. We provide our clients with counsel and program development across the spectrum of public relations, public affairs, reputation and crisis management, digital strategy, advertising and other communications services. Our clients are state agencies, global companies, industry associations, nonprofits, professional services firms, governments and other organizations. We develop client programs using an evidence-based communications approach by working with our colleagues at Penn Schoen Berland (PSB), a global research-based consultancy that specializes in messaging and communications strategy for political, corporate and entertainment clients. As Burson-Marsteller’s sister company, PSB is uniquely positioned to deliver research and insights for successful campaigns. Evidence-based communications is a scientific approach to communications, driven by data at the beginning, the middle and the end. Burson-Marsteller is part of the Young & Rubicam Group, working as partners for some of the world’s strongest brands. We further expanded our client-service capabilities when Young & Rubicam Group became a member of WPP plc, the world’s most comprehensive communications services group.

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Young & Rubicam Group became a member of WPP plc, the world’s most comprehensive communications services
TKO Advertising, Inc. TKO is a full-service, creative-driven advertising agency founded in 1998. TKO is

TKO Advertising, Inc. TKO is a full-service, creative-driven advertising agency founded in 1998. TKO is a Minority-Owned Business Enterprise, and a certified Texas Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) with offices in Texas and New Mexico. With nearly two decades of multimedia account creation and implementation, TKO has earned a stellar reputation for producing memorable creative solutions and generating groundbreaking campaigns for clients from public agencies to Fortune 500s to start-ups. TKO has guided extraordinary branding and integrated marketing campaigns for statewide public information clients including the Texas Secretary of State, Texas Office of the Attorney General, Texas Commission on the Arts, Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs, Texas Education Agency, Texas Public Utility Commission, Texas Workforce Commission and Texas Health and Human Services. TKO’s private sector experience includes working with both start-up and established retail and services companies. The TKO team is especially adept at crafting innovative creative campaigns targeting at-risk populations including minority, low-income and low-literacy populations. Our creative outreach combines traditional mediums such as print and broadcast with paid social media, smartphone platforms and website design.

CASE STUDY: VIRGINIA ENERGY SENSE “VALUE YOUR POWER” Virginia Energy Sense (VES) engaged Burson-Marsteller in 2015 to develop and execute a comprehensive strategic plan to compel Virginians to take the next step to become smarter and more efficient users of electricity, meeting Virginia’s goal to reduce consumer energy consumption by 10 percent by 2020.

Burson conducted a survey of general population Virginians to guide strategy development, which revealed Virginians widely recognize energy efficiency is possible to achieve without negatively affecting their lifestyles. From our research, Burson determined the Virginia Energy Sense campaign had a solid foundation but lacked a creative, memorable and credible communications to consumers that leveraged pocketbook appeal to elevate the program and motivate electricity users to take the next step toward energy conservation.

Our research found that Virginians wanted concrete examplesrather than generic conceptsof how energy efficiency translates into savings. After crafting a number of messages, we tested these with Virginians to determine which ones resonated best with them. Using the valuable existing insights, as well as input from the SCC and the field survey we conducted with our research partner, PSB, we updated the messages being used to reflect what motivates Virginians.

With these refreshed messages, we proposed the follow integrated communications plan:

Advertising to raise awareness about the benefits of energy efficiency and to direct consumers to the website for more information.

Media relations to amplify our messages through trusted sources.

Partnerships and grassroots outreach to build credibility and use our allies’ communications networks to echo and extend the reach of our messages.

Innovative digital and social tools to engage consumers in a personal dialogue to help them achieve their own next step to becoming more energy efficient.

Consumer education programs that will reach energy users where they live, work, shop, play, surf and traditionally seek out information on energy efficiency. Among the most impactful tactics we surveyed were providing coupons for energy efficiency materials or appliances through a hardware store or an online quiz or contest, and distributing educational information.

First Six Months Results

In April 2015, Burson revamped the VES social media content strategy, focusing on positioning its Facebook and Twitter accounts as resources for Virginians and as a motivator to get people thinking about energy use.

Paid advertising campaign to help VES reach more Virginians. In March 2015, before Burson-Marsteller’s engagement began, VES engaged an average of 16 Facebook users in 28 days. By July, that number increased to 2,650.

Facebook “likes” have increased by 69 percent since May. On Twitter, Burson-Marsteller has grown the VES following by 47 percent during that same timeframe.

In addition, Burson launched an email program for VES to maximize reach to Virginians by disseminating action alerts and energy-saving tips to their inboxes. VES had an existing list of around 1,500 email addresses upon launch of the campaign. Through an email acquisition program, Burson-Marsteller has already doubled that email list and will reach thousands of new Virginians over the next few months.

Burson implemented a text message program with the goal of reaching top energy savers in Virginia and sending text message reminders about what they can do to quickly and easily save energy and money on their electric bills.

Burson Grassroots worked to enhance and grow VES presence in communities across the state. VES has had a presence at more than two dozen highly trafficked community events, reaching Virginians directly. In addition, partnerships have been established with more than 50 local chambers of commerce, cities, colleges and businesses.

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partnerships have been established with more than 50 local chambers of commerce, cities, colleges and businesses.
CASE STUDY: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INSURANCE | TEXAS CONSUMER HEALTH ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (CHAP) Texas Department

CASE STUDY: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF INSURANCE | TEXAS CONSUMER HEALTH ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

(CHAP) Texas Department of Insurance (TDI) lacked the tools to educate audiences about healthcare coverage eligibility and was lost in the media clutter regarding the Affordable Care Act.

The Department of Insurance engaged TKO Advertising to:

Equate health care coverage attainment to improved quality of life

Build simple, Web-based tools to educate potential employees

Create compelling infographics to showcase real life scenarios that illustrate the financial impact of health care coverage

Provide TDI with direct mail pieces in English, Spanish and Chinese to further the campaign’s reach

Results

73 percent increase in Texas PCIP (preexisting condition) enrollment

216 percent increase in Web visits from April to September 2011

5 percent increase in the number of inquiry calls answered by TDI in response to the advertising campaign

CLIENT REFERENCES

Andy Farmer Education Resources Manager Virginia State Corporation Commission Richmond, VA Phone: (804) 371-9928 Email: Andy.Farmer@scc.virginia.gov

Burson-Marsteller is working with Virginia Energy Sense to executive a strategic public education program encouraging Virginians to reduce electricity usage. The program uses social media earned and paid content, media relations and traditional advertising.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Kristi Holmes Vice President of Marketing Fresenius Health Partners Austin, TX Phone: (512) 410-6922

TKO Advertising created a total brand refresh and a targeted collateral campaign to promote a new Scott & White health plan. TKO Advertising also worked with this client in her marketing role at Superior HealthPlan to create and place English and Spanish radio spots across Texas.

Burson-Marsteller LLC, is a Young & Rubicam Group Company which is wholly owned by WPP Group PLC. WPP is a public company listed on the NASDAQ in the U.S., as well as on the London Stock Exchange. Therefore, the Group is subject to the provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and may not supply revenue and other financial data which are not consistent with GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles). The financials for all WPP companies are consolidated into WPP’s audited financial reports. Therefore, we must refer to WPP’s annual reports for all financial information. Such reports can be obtained at www.wppinvestor.com. For more information, contact Sharon Balkam at Sharon.Balkam@bm.com or (202) 530-4504.

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obtained at www.wppinvestor.com. For more information, contact Sharon Balkam at Sharon.Balkam@bm.com or (202) 530-4504. 20