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MBA 2ND SEMESTER COURSE OUTLINES AND TEXT BOOK INFO.

MBA 2nd
Financial Accounting II
Micro Economics
Principle of Marketing
Statistical Inferences
Organizational Behavior

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING II
COURSE DESCRIPTION/OBJECTIVE
This course is built upon the Financial Accounting Course in the sense that it provides
advanced treatment of basic techniques learned in the first course of Financial
Accounting.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
After studying this course the student will be able to understand:
1. Conceptual framework of Accounting
2. Cash and short term investments management
3. Accounting for receivables
4. Inventory valuation methods
5. Accounting for Property ,Plant and equipment
1.

2.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF ACCOUNTING


1.1.
Accounting as an information system
1.2.
What is GAAP?
1.3.
Characteristics of accounting information

Relevance and Reliability

Comparability and Consistency


1.4
Recognition criteria & accrual basis accounting: Revenue & Expense
1.5
Measurement criteria: Historical costs.
1.6
Assumptions: Business entity. Unit of measure; Accounting period.
1.7
Implementation principles: Cost principle, Going concern, Objective evidence,
Revenue principle, Matching principle, Materiality, Full-disclosure principle, the
conservatism concept, the realization concept.
CASH AND TEMPORARY INVESMENT
2.1.
Nature and Composition of Cash
2.2.
Cash Management and Control

2.3.
2.4.
2.5.
2.6.
2.7.
2.8.

3.

4.

5.

Maintaining Bank Account


Steps in Preparing the Bank Reconciliation
The Imprest Fund System
The Voucher System
Short term investments
Accounting for Marketable securities.
Purchase of Marketable securities
Recognition of investment revenue
Sale of Marketable securities
Adjusting Marketable to market value

ACCOUNTING FOR RECEIVABLES


3.1.
Accounts receivables
3.2.
Uncollectable accounts
3.3.
Allowance for doubtful debts
3.4.
Writing off an uncollectable receivable
3.5.
Estimating Credit Losses
Balance Sheet Approach (Aging accounts receivables)
Income Statement Approach
3.6.
Recoveries of Bad debts
3.7.
Direct write off method
3.8.
Factoring accounts receivables
3.9.
Credit card sales
3.10. Accounting for Notes Receivables
INVENTORIES AND COST OF GOODS SOLD
4.1. Inventory defined
4.2. The flow of inventory cost
Specific Identification Method
Cost flow assumption
o First in, first-out (FIFO)
o Last-in, Last-out (LIFO)
o Average-cost method
4.3. FIFO, LIFO, Average inventory valuation methods under perpetual system
Recording inventory shrinkage losses
LCM and other write-downs of inventory
Year-end cutoff of transactions
Goods in transit
4.4. FIFO, LIFO, Average inventory valuation method under periodic inventory system
4.5. Estimation of ending inventory and COGS, Retail method, Gross Profit method
ACCOUNTING FOR PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPEMENTS
5.1. Property, Plant and Equipment
5.2. Lum-sum Purchase
5.3. Subsequent Expenditure
5.4.
Depreciation

5.5.
5.6.

5.7.
5.8.
5.9.
6.

7.

Causes of depreciation
Methods of depreciation
Straight line method
Declining-Balance method
MACRS
Unit-of-output method
Sum-of-years-digit method
Disposable of Property, Plant and Equipment
Intangible Assets and Amortization
Natural resources and Depletion

ACCOUNTING FOR MERCHANDISING ACTIVITIES


6.1.
Merchandising Companies
6.2.
Operating cycle of Merchandising Companies
6.3.
Income Statement of Merchandising Companies
6.4.
General and Subsidiary Ledger Accounts
6.5.
Perpetual inventory system
6.6.
Periodic inventory system
6.7.
Transactions relating to Purchases
6.8.
Transactions relating to Sales
STATEMENT OF CASH FLOW
7.1.
Purpose of the statement
7.2.
Classification of cash flows
Operating activities
Investing activities
Financing activities
7.3.
Preparing a Statement of Cash Flow
Direct method
Indirect method
7.4.
Managing Cash Flows

TEXT BOOK
1.
William, Haka, Bettner, Carcello, Financial and Managerial Accounting, latest
edition, Publisher Prentice Hall
2.
Meigs, William Haka & Bettner, Accounting: The Basic for Business Decisions,
latest edition, McGraw Hill.
REFERENCE BOOK
1.
Horngren, Sundem & Elliott, Introduction to Financial Accounting, 7th edition
Prentice Hall.
2.
Miegs and Meigs, Accounting for Business Decision, 12th/Latest Edition

MICRO ECONOMICS
Objective:
The course attempts to demonstrate the relevance and usefulness of economic analysis to
real world business situations. Emphasis is placed on optimal decisions making within
the firm and the strategic relationship with other businesses.
1.

BASIC ECONOMIC CONCEPTS

2.

1.1
Economics: Basic Themes and Nature
1.2
History
1.3
Micro versus Macro Economics
1.4
Positive versus Normative economics
1.5
Basic economic problems
1.6
Economics relevance to business organizations
DEMAND AND SUPPLY ANALYSIS

3.

2.1
The demand Analysis
2.2
The supply Analysis
2.3
Equilibrium of Supply & Demand
ELASTICITY OF DEMAND/ SUPPLY
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8

Elasticity
Price Elasticity of Demand
Point Elasticity
Arc Elasticity
Degrees of Elasticity
Income Elasticity of Demand
Cross Elasticity of Demand
Price Elasticity of Supply

4.

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
4.1.
Cardinal approach and consumer equilibrium.
4.2.
Ordinal approach and consumer equilibrium.
4.3.
Price, Income and Substitution effects on consumer equilibrium.

5.

PRODUCTION ANALYSIS
5.1
5.2
5.1
5.2

Basic production concepts.


Total, Average and Marginal Product
Returns to scale.
Short-run and long-run production.

5.3
5.6
6.

COST AND REVENUE ANALYSIS


6.1.
6.2.
6.3.
6.4.

7.

8.

Least-cost factor combination.


Producer equilibrium.

Various cost concepts.


The cost of production: Short-run cost, long-run cost.
Revenue and revenue curves: Total, average and marginal revenues.
Profit-Maximization

MARKET STRUCTURES AND PRICING


7.1.
Market and its forms.
7.2.
Short and Long run Price and out-put under perfect competition
7.3.
Short and Long run Price and out-put under monopoly
7.4.
Short and Long run Price and out-put under duopoly
7.5.
Short and Long run Price and out-put under oligopoly
7.6.
Short and Long run Price and out-put under monopolistic competition.
ANOVA
8.1
Overview and implication of anova

TEXT BOOKS.
1. Samuelson and Nordhaus, Economics, 16th Edition, New Delhi, Tata McGraw Hill,
1987.
REFERENCE BOOKS.
1.

Ruffin and Gregory, Principles of Economics 2nd Edition, Illionois: Scott


Foresman and Company, 1983.

2.

Scott and Nigro: Principles of Economics 2nd Edition, New York; Macmillan
Publishing Co., Inc., 1982.

3.
4.

G.S. Gupta, Managerial Economics, McGraw Hill.


David M. Winch, Micro Economics: Problems and Solutions, Oxford University
Press.

PRINCIPLE OF MARKETING
COURSE DESCRIPTION/OBJECTIVE
This course is designed to introduce foundations of marketing as they relate to the whole
business enterprise. This course will focus on developing an understanding of key
marketing concepts.
The objective of this course, specifically, is to enhance the conceptual knowledge of
marketing as applicable to decision making process with a focus on tactical marketing
mix decisions. Further it will provide the student with a comprehensive framework to
evaluate marketing decisions and to create successful marketing initiatives. The course,
will therefore, provide an understanding of the principles of marketing in relation to the
product and services including the planning process, organizing the marketing functions,
implementing the marketing decisions keeping in mind the ethical, legal and societal
consideration.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course it is expected that the student will be able:
1. Understand the marketplace and the consumers.
2. Understand the elements in marketing mix and their applicationin marketing
decisions.
3. Outline the functions of marketing communication.
4. Discuss social responsibility and ethics in marketing.
5. Understand the importance of customer relationship in marketing and the
creation of customer value.

1.

2.

INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING
1.1
Basic concepts of marketing
1.2
Marketing functions
1.3
Role of marketing for an organization
MARKETING AND THE FIRM
2.1
Marketing philosophies
2.2
Functions of marketing manager
2.3
Target marketing and a marketing mix
2.4
Marketing strategy, a marketing plan and a marketing program

3.

THE MARKETING ENVIRONMENT

4.

3.1
External environment: Macro environment & micro environment
3.2
An organizations internal environment
MARKET SEGMENTATION

5.

4.1
Understanding market
4.2
Defining market segmentation
4.3
Dimensions to segment markets
4.4
A seven step approach to market segmentation
THE PRODUCT

6.

5.1
The meaning of product
5.2
Classification of products
5.3
Product classes and marketing strategies
BRANDING AND PACKAGING

8.

6.1
Branding, brand name and trademark
6.2
Why to develop branding?
6.3
Kinds of brand & their use
6.4
Reasons for packaging
6.5
Packaging & social responsibility
6.6
Labeling: Types of labels
THE PRICE
7.1
Pricing objectives
7.2
Pricing setting
7.3
Pricing policy
7.4
Discount and allowance policies
THE PLACEMENT

9.

8.1
Various channel systems
8.2
Management of channels
8.3
Management of physical distribution
8.1
Retailing
8.2
Wholesaling
THE PROMOTION

7.

9.1
Meaning and importance of promotion
9.2
Determination of promotion mix
9.3
Determination of total promotional appropriation
9.4
Importance & nature of personal selling
9.5
Personal selling techniques
9.6 Sales managers functions
9.7 Advertising: Types, campaign and effectiveness
9.8 Sales promotion: Nature, objectives and strategies

9.9 Publicity: Nature and scope


9.10
Evaluation of Promotion Mix

TEXT BOOK
1.
McCarty &Perreault, Jr., Basic Marketing: A managerial approach, IRWIN.
2.
Philip Kotler, Principles of Marketing, Printice Hall
REFERENCE BOOKS
1.
Stanton &Futrell, Fundamentals of Marketing, McGraw Hill.
2.
Evancs& Berman, Marketing, Macmillan.

STATISTICAL INFERENCE
Objective:
The main objective of the course is to provide students with clear understanding of application of
statistical inference in business management situations.
1.
PROBABILITY
1.1
Basic concepts
1.2
Types and Rules
1.3
Conditional Probabilities
1.4
Bayes Rules
2.
MATHEMATICAL EXPECTATION
2.1
Expected value.
2.2
The EMV Decision criterion
2.3
Decision trees for EMV criterion
3.
PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION
3.1
Basic concept
3.2
Types of Probability Distribution.
3.3
Random variables
3.4
The Binomial distribution
3.5
The Poisson Distribution
3.6
The Hyper-geometric Probability Distribution
3.7
The Normal Distribution

Distribution of continues Random variable.

Sample regression and correlation.


4.
SAMPLING
4.1

Sampling and its various types

4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5

The Sampling Distribution of the Mean


Population and Sampling Distribution Mean.
Population and Sampling Standard Deviation
Relationship between Sample Size & Standard Error

5.

ESTIMATION

6.

5.1.
Basic concepts: Point Estimates & Interval Estimates.
5.2.
Confidence Interval and Interval Estimates.
5.3.
Interval Estimates of the Population Mean from Large Samples.
5.4.
Interval Estimates of the Population Proportion.
5.5.
Interval Estimates using Distribution.
5.6.
Determination of the Sample Size in Estimation.
TESTING OF HYPOTHESIS.

6.1.
6.2.
6.3.
6.4.

7.

Statement of Hypothesis
Type I and Type II Errors
The Level of Significance.
Hypothesis testing procedure

Mean-Large Samples with Population-Standard Deviation Known.

Proportions-Large Samples.

Means under different conditions.

For differences between Means and Proportions.


CHI-SQUARE TEST

7.1.
Chi-square as a test of Independence.
7.2.
Chi-square as a test of Goodness of fit.
TEXT BOOK.
1.

Levin I. Richard., Statistics for Management, 4th ed; McGraw Hill.

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Bown K. Earl & Starr K. Martin, Statistics for Business and Economics, McGraw
Hill.

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
COURSE DESCRIPTION/OBJECTIVE
Organizational behavior (OB) is an interdisciplinary field drawing from numerous disciplines
including psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, organization theory, statistics, and
many others. Effective management of human resources within organizations requires an
understanding of various behavior and processes. Managers need to know why people behave
as they do in relation to their jobs, their work groups and their organizations. This knowledge
of individuals' perceptions, motivational attitudes and behavior will enable managers to not
only understand themselves better, but also to adopt appropriate managerial policies and
leadership styles to increase their effectiveness.
INDENTED LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
1. Understand the components of individual behavior and group behaviors in the
organizational context.
2. Understand the relevance of the OB theories and practices, emphasized by Western
texts, in local settings.
3. Understand the Islamic perspective of understanding and directing human behaviour
towards achievement of goals.
4. Understand the causes of job dissatisfaction and stress as well as methods of improving
job satisfaction and dealing with stress.
1.

2.

3.

INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND


1.1
Organizational behavior: Key concepts.
1.2
An historical perspective on organizational behavior.
1.3
Organizational behavior and contemporary issues.
ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE

3.1
The dynamics of organizations culture
3.2
The basic approaches to organizational culture
3.3
The cross-cultural awareness
3.4
Total quality culture creation
3.5
Changing and developing cohesive organizations culture
ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT
4.1
4.2

The nature and typology of organizational change


The diagnosis of forces for change

4.

4.3
The models and dynamics of planned change
4.4
Resistance to change and its management
4.5
Techniques for managing change
4.6
Organizational development: Objective & model
4.7
Change management and contemporary issues in TQM.
FOUNDATIONS OF INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR

5.

5.1
The perception process
5.2
The attribution theory
5.3
Personality and organizational behavior
5.4
Attitudes, personal values and ethics: Learning & behavioral modification
BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION

6.

6.1
Behavioral learning models
6.2
Principles of behavior modification
6.3
The process of modifying on-the-job behavior
6.4
Behavioral self-management
SOCIALIZATION AND MENTORING

7.

7.1
The organizational socialization process
7.2
The socialization techniques
7.3
Mentoring
7.4
Organizational roles and norms
WORK GROUP BEHAVIOR

8.

7.1

Work group: Types, functions & development process

7.2

Work group structure, composition and effectiveness

7.3

Inter group interactions

7.4

Organization influence tactics

7.5

Organizations politics

7.6

Strategies for improving work group performance

ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICTS MANAGEMENT


8.1

The nature of conflict

8.2

Functional versus dysfunctional conflict

8.3

Approaches to effective conflict resolution

8.4

Conflict stimulation

TEXT BOOKS
1.
2.

Morehead, Organizational Behavior (Theory & Practice), Houghton Mifflin.


Judith R. Gordon, Organizational Behavior, Prentice Hall.

REFERENCE BOOKS.

1.
2.

Davis and Newstrom, Human Behavior at Work: Organizational Behavior,


McGraw Hill.

Robert Kreitner& Angelo KinickiOrganizational Behavior, IRWIN.