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VERITAS NetBackup 6.

5 media server nfs mounting

VERITAS NetBackup 6.5 media server nfs


mounting

The instructions provided in this document by Data Domain are for customer
convenience and are not warranted or supported by Data Domain. Data Domain
expects users to customize installation of third-party software for use at a particular
site, but Data Domain is not responsible for the usability of third-party software after
installation.
Copyright Data Domain, Inc. 2005 - 2007
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Table of Contents
1.
2.

Introduction................................................................................................................. 3
Tuning ......................................................................................................................... 3
2.1.
NetBackup 6.5 media server nfs mount option requirement ........................... 3
2.2.
OST duplication via gui on NetBackup 6.5 ...................................................... 4
2.3.
General for NetBackup with UNIX-Based Systems........................................... 4
2.4.
Memory on UNIX-Based Systems ..................................................................... 6
2.4.1.
Systems with 1 - 1.5 GB of RAM:.............................................................. 6
2.4.2.
Systems with 2 GB or more of RAM: ........................................................ 6
2.5.
Solaris Backup Servers ....................................................................................... 7
2.5.1.
Systems with about 1 - 1.5 GB of RAM:.................................................... 8
2.5.2.
Systems with 2 GB or more of RAM: ........................................................ 9
2.6.
HP-UX Backup Servers ...................................................................................... 9
2.7.
AIX Backup Servers ........................................................................................... 9
2.8.
Linux Backup Servers....................................................................................... 10
3. Replication ................................................................................................................ 11
4. Replication and Disaster Recovery........................................................................... 11
4.1.
Recovery procedures......................................................................................... 12
4.2.
UNIX Platforms ................................................................................................ 14
4.2.1.
Restore from a Replica using the Primary Media Server ......................... 15
4.2.2.
Restore from an Originator using the Secondary Media Server ............... 15
4.2.3.
Restore from a Replica using the Secondary Media Server ..................... 15
4.2.4.
Setup for Restoring a Catalog to a UNIX Media Server .......................... 16
4.2.5.
Restore a Catalog from a Restorer to a UNIX Media Server ................... 16
4.3.
Windows Platforms........................................................................................... 17
4.3.1.
Restore from a Replica using the Primary Media Server ......................... 17
4.3.2.
Restore from an Originator using the Secondary Media Server ............... 17
4.3.3.
Restore from a Replica using the Secondary Media Server ..................... 18
4.3.4.
Setup for Restoring a Catalog to a Windows Media Server ..................... 18
4.3.5.
Restore a Catalog from a Restorer to a Windows Media Server .............. 19
5. Replication and Vaulting .......................................................................................... 19

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1. Introduction
This technical note provides general information for NetBackup 6.5 media server nfs
mounting.

2. Tuning
2.1.

NetBackup 6.5 media server nfs mount option requirement

When using NBU 6.5.0, the following nfs mount option must be used on the media server
to mount the Data Domain DDR:

Linux: use nolock


Solaris: use llock
AIX: use llock
hp-ux: must use NBU 6.5.1 or later

Example (for Linux):


[root@mediaServer mnt]# mount -o hard,intr,rsize=32k,wsize=32k -nolock ddr:/backup /mnt/ddr/backup/

If the nfs mount option is not used, the backup will fail and the following log lines will be
generated in bpbrm log file found at /usr/openv/netbackup/logs on the NBU media server.
20:25:47.344 [13640] <2> vnet_vnetd_connect_forward_socket_begin:
vnet_vnetd.c.560: hash_str1: c44ef5e741c9d880b3132135a89d684b
20:25:47.464 [13640] <2> bpbrm Exit: OUT_SOCK from bpcr = 6
20:25:47.464 [13640] <2> bpbrm Exit: IN_SOCK from bpcr = 8
20:25:47.505 [13640] <2> bpcr_get_version_rqst: bpcd version: 06500000
20:25:47.555 [13640] <2> bpcr_get_version_rqst: bpcd version: 06500000
20:25:47.655 [13640] <2> bpcr_get_version_rqst: bpcd version: 06500000
20:25:47.707 [13640] <2> bpbrm Exit: client backup EXIT STATUS 14: file
write failed

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2.2.

OST duplication via gui on NetBackup 6.5

When using NBU 6.5.x gui for duplication, the Media ID must be chosen rather than
Disk Type, as shown in the screen shot below.

2.3. General for NetBackup with UNIX-Based Systems


On the NetBackup server, create a new storage unit with a Type of disk.
Specify the mounted backup directory that targets the restorer.
Leave the maximum fragment size at the default.
Increase maximum concurrent jobs to 4 and then adjust as needed.
Use this storage unit in a new or existing Policy.
Under Global NetBackup Attributes, set the maximum number of jobs per client to at
least the maximum number of disks per client.
For policies, re-consider any current limits on jobs per policy and select Allow
multiple data streams.
When specifying files, either backup all files as a single stream or use the
NEW_STREAM directive to specify file systems on each disk. The directive reduces
disk head thrashing. The following example shows a file list, with the first two
partitions on one disk, the second one on another disk, and the final three on another
disk:
NEW_STREAM
/

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/usr/
NEW_STREAM
/ export/home
NEW_STREAM
/a
/b
/c

For the disk storage units used with a restorer, set Maximum concurrent jobs to a
large number, such as 10. Leave the Maximum fragment size at the default.

You can view low-level operations of disk-based backups, such as the performance of
individual file writes and the utilization of the buffers set up in the
SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS and NUMBER_DATA_BUFFERS files. To view the
operations, create an area for a bpdm log:

Create a bpdm directory in the directory /usr/openv/netbackup/logs.

In NetBackup, set the bpdm log level to a nonzero value (such as 5).

Look at the bpdm logs generated by normal operations.

The restorer can attach to a backup server with a crossover cable for Gigabit speeds.
If using a crossover cable with a Gigabit network, consider using a private subnet.
Check with your local network administrator for subnet addresses.

NetBackup software automatically pauses when a backup device runs out of space for
the backup image. Data Domain recommends modifying the NetBackup script that
causes the pause so that the script sends email.
The script that creates a pause is:
/usr/openv/netbackup/bin/diskfull_notify
The line to modify and uncomment is the last line in the following sequence. Replace
someone_who_cares with a valid email address:
# might want to mail this info to someone
#
# cat $OUTF | mail -s "NetBackup disk full" someone_who_
cares

In NetBackup policies, disable compression and encryption whenever possible.


Compression done by a restorer is compromised if compression or encryption is done
before data reaches the restorer.

For automating tape-based backups after a disk backup completes, use the built-in
NetBackup hooks. The bpend_notify script, located in
/usr/openv/netbackup/bin/goodies, can be modified to kick-off tape
duplication once a backup successfully completes. The script has several parameters
passed to it, including: client name, policy name, schedule name, schedule type, and

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status. Based upon the parameters, you can launch tape copies of the backup for the
data you need to take off-site, such as monthly full backups.

A restorer makes it possible for individual users to initiate backups and restores. To
enable user-initiated backups and restores, create a user backup schedule within a
policy that points to the restorer as a disk storage unit.

2.4. Memory on UNIX-Based Systems


Size-specific parameters target NetBackup running on UNIX-based systems with about
1 - 1.5 GB of RAM or 2 GB or more of RAM.
2.4.1. Systems with 1 - 1.5 GB of RAM:
Using NetBackup versions 4.5 and earlier:

Check for the following two text files in the directory /opt/openv/
netbackup/db/config. If either or both do not exist, create the files and enter
the values given below. If the files do exist, make sure that the values in the files are
at least as high as the values given below. The files and values are:

SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS The file needs a value of at least 262144 (which is


256K bytes). However, the value should not exceed the maximum tape I/O
size supported by the tape drives or operating system.

NUMBER_DATA_BUFFERS The file needs a value of at least 16.

Note that the files are used globally by NetBackup version 4.5 and earlier for tape and
disk drives. The settings for disk degrade performance with tape drives.
Using NetBackup version 5 and later:

Check for the following two text files in the directory /opt/openv/
netbackup/db/config. If either or both do not exist, create the files and enter
the values given below. If the files do exist, make sure that the values in the files are
at least as high as the values given below. Both files affect only disk drives, not tapes.
The files and values are:

SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS_DISK The file needs a value of at least 262144


(which is 256K bytes). However, the value should not exceed the maximum
tape I/O size supported by the tape drives or operating system.

NUMBER_DATA_BUFFERS_DISK The file needs a value of at least 16.

2.4.2. Systems with 2 GB or more of RAM:


Using NetBackup versions 4.5 and earlier:

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Check for the following two text files in the directory /opt/openv/
netbackup/db/config. If either or both do not exist, create the files and enter
the values given below. If the files do exist, make sure that the values in the files are
at least as high as the values given below. The files and values are:

SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS The file needs a value of at least 262144 (which is


256K bytes). However, the value should not exceed the maximum tape I/O
size supported by the tape drives or operating system.

NUMBER_DATA_BUFFERS The file needs a value of at least 32.

Note that the files are used globally by NetBackup version 4 and below for tape and
disk drives. The files degrade performance with tape drives.
Using NetBackup version 5 and later:

Check for the following two text files in the directory /opt/openv/
netbackup/db/config. If either or both do not exist, create the files and enter
the values given below. If the files do exist, make sure that the values in the files are
at least as high as the values given below. Both files affect only disk drives, not tapes.
The files and values are:

SIZE_DATA_BUFFERS_DISK The file needs a value of at least 262144


(which is 256K bytes). However, the value should not exceed the maximum
tape I/O size supported by the tape drives or operating system.

NUMBER_DATA_BUFFERS_DISK The file needs a value of at least 32.

2.5.

Solaris Backup Servers

Note: When using NBU 6.5.0., for Solaris use -F and llock, but otherwise it's like the
directions under Linux Backup Servers.

On a Solaris backup server:


Create a file /etc/rc3.d/S90ddr. Enter the following two lines in the file to set
TCP parameters:
ndd -set /dev/tcp tcp_recv_hiwat 131072
(Sets the default receive window size in bytes.)
ndd -set /dev/tcp tcp_xmit_hiwat 131072
(Sets the default send window size in bytes.)

In the file /etc/system, add the following lines:


set nfs:nfs3_max_threads=16
Sets the number of kernel threads that perform asynchronous I/O for the NFS
client.

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set nfs:nfs3_async_clusters=4
Controls the mix of asynchronous requests generated by the NFS client by
controlling the number of requests of each type that are sent out before changing
types. The request types are: read-ahead, putpage, pageio, and readdir-ahead.
set nfs:nfs3_nra=16
Controls the number of read-ahead operations that are queued by the NFS client
when sequential access to a file is discovered. The read-aheads increase
concurrency and read throughput.
set rpcmod:clnt_max_conns=1
Controls the number of TCP connections the the NFS client uses when
communicating with each NFS server.
set fastscan=131072
The maximum number of pages per second that the system looks at when memory
pressure is highest.
set handspreadpages=131072
When memory is low, the number of pages to walk through before reclaiming
pages still marked as unused.
set maxpgio=65536
The maximum number of I/O requests (divided by 4) that can be queued by the
paging system. The number also controls process swapping.
Size-specific parameters target systems with about 1 - 1.5 GB of RAM or 2 GB or more
of RAM. The 2 GB system on which the 2 GB numbers were tested is a Solaris 8,
SunSPARC, SunFire 280R, with 2 dual 1.2 Gigahertz SPARC processors. Systems with
2 GB of RAM and slower processors probably give slower performance.
2.5.1. Systems with about 1 - 1.5 GB of RAM:
In the /etc/system file on the Solaris backup server, add the following lines:
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set

msgsys:msginfo_msgmnb=65536
msgsys:msginfo_msgtql=500
semsys:seminfo_semmni=300
semsys:seminfo_semmns=300
semsys:seminfo_semmsl=300
semsys:seminfo_semmnu=600
shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=10000000
shmsys:shminfo_shmmin=1
shmsys:shminfo_shmmni=100
shmsys:shminfo_shmseg=10

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2.5.2. Systems with 2 GB or more of RAM:
In the /etc/system file on the Solaris backup server, add the following lines:
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set

2.6.

msgsys:msginfo_msgmnb=65536
msgsys:msginfo_msgtql=500
semsys:seminfo_semmni=1580
semsys:seminfo_semmns=3780
semsys:seminfo_semmsl=1580
semsys:seminfo_semmnu=600
shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=4294967295
shmsys:shminfo_shmmin=1
shmsys:shminfo_shmmni=1380
shmsys:shminfo_shmseg=1290

HP-UX Backup Servers

Note: hp-ux must use NBU 6.5.1 or later.


On HP-UX 11.0 and 11i backup servers, set the TCP send and receive sizes.

To set the sizes immediately, enter the following two commands on the HP-UX
server and then remount the restorer NFS share to enable the values:
ndd -set /dev/tcp tcp_recv_hiwater_def 262144
ndd -set /dev/tcp tcp_xmit_hiwater_def 262144

To make the changes persistent over system reboots, create a startup script that runs
before the NFS automount. The numbering in the script name depends on how startup
scripts are set up on your system, but as an example: /sbin/rc3.d/S99dd. Enter
the following two lines in the script:
ndd -set /dev/tcp tcp_recv_hiwater_def 262144
ndd -set /dev/tcp tcp_xmit_hiwater_def 262144

2.7.

AIX Backup Servers

Note: When using NBU 6.5.0., for AIX use the llock option.
When mounting restorer directories on an AIX 5.2 client that uses NetBackup 6.0, Data
Domain finds that the following options lead to successful backups. Use a mount
command similar to:
mount -V nfs -o llock,intr,hard,rsize=32768,wsize=32768,
proto=tcp,combehind,timeo=600,retrans=2 192.111.8.2:/ddvar
/dd/ddvar

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mount -V nfs -o llock,intr,hard,rsize=32768,wsize=32768,


proto=tcp,combehind,timeo=600,retrans=2 192.111.8.2:/backup
/dd/backup
2.8.

Linux Backup Servers

Note: When using NBU 6.5.0., for Linux use the nolock option.
A Linux NetBackup Media or Master Server needs to mount restorer directories using
NFS. On the backup server:

Create a mount point (directory) such as /dd/rstr01/backup and create an


administrative mount point, such as /dd/rstr01/ddvar

NFS mount the directories on the new mount points:


mount -T nfs -o
nolock,hard,intr,nfsvers=3,tcp,rsize=32768,
wsize=32768,bg rstr01:/backup /dd/rstr01/backup
mount -T nfs -o
nolock,hard,intr,nfsvers=3,tcp,rsize=32768,
wsize=32768,bg rstr01:/ddvar /dd/rstr01/ddvar

Add the following lines to the file /etc/fstab. The lines mount the directories at
every reboot.
restorer:/backup /dd/rstr01/backup nfs hard,intr,vers=3,
tcp,rsize=32768,wsize=32768,bg 1 1
restorer:/ddvar /dd/rstr01/ddvar nfs hard,intr,vers=3,
tcp,rsize=32768,wsize=32768,bg 1 1

For systems with at least 2 GB of physical memory, add the following lines to the file
/etc/rc.d/rc.local. The lines increase the amount of shared memory
available to NetBackup.
echo 536870912 > /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax
echo 536870912 > /proc/sys/kernel/shmall

Data Domain strongly recommends creating one or more subdirectories for different
types of data under the restorer's mounted file system of /backup. You can then
easily display and compare compression for different types of data with the
filesys show compression command and a target subdirectory. Examples of
subdirectories are:
/dd/rstr01/backup/oracle
/dd/rstr01/backup/exchange

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/dd/rstr01/backup/client

3. Replication
For setting up replication between two restorers, regardless of the backup software that
communicates with the restorers, see the Replication chapter of the Data Domain
Restorer User Guide. A section of the chapter, with the heading Procedure: Set Up and
Start Replication, steps through the process. The rest of the chapter gives details about
administering replication between the two restorers.
When using directory replication with NetBackup: As a best practice, use the same path
for the source and destination data. NetBackup looks for the same path on the destination
restorer as was used on the source restorer when doing a restore or vault-to-tape operation
from the destination restorer. For example, when setting up the source and destination
pair:
replication add source dir://hostA/backup/oracle
destination dir:/hostB/backup/oracle
For details about replication and disaster recovery with NetBackup, see the next section
of this document. For details about replication and vaulting, see the Replication and
Vaulting section at the end of this document.

4. Replication and Disaster Recovery


Data Domain has successfully tested disaster recovery procedures using two NetBackup
media servers and a restorer replication pair. One media server (called the primary in this
document) points to the originator restorer and one media server (called the secondary)
points to the replica restorer. (See Figure 1 on the next page.)

Standard disaster recovery precautions and procedures must be followed, such as


backing up catalogs to allow recovery from a remote site. Where your site's current
disaster recovery procedures would move data and catalogs to a tape storage unit,
target a Data Domain restorer as the storage unit. Use the Data Domain
documentation set to integrate restorers into your current backup procedures.
Restoring data from the either side of a restorer replication pair can be done from the
primary media server or from the secondary media server.
The procedures in this section (Replication and Disaster Recovery) assume that one
of the media servers is a media master server so that both media servers share all
policies and other backup configuration information.
To allow moving a NetBackup catalog from a restorer to a UNIX media server,
follow the steps in "Setup for Restoring a Catalog" on page 16. To allow moving a

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NetBackup catalog from a restorer to a Windows media server, follow the steps in
"Setup for Restoring a Catalog to a Windows Media Server" on page 18.
Note: The only way to ensure data recovery when a primary media server is no longer
available or is replaced is to always backup the catalog after backing up data. Data
Domain strongly recommends always backing up the catalog.
4.1. Recovery procedures
With two media servers and a restorer replication pair, you can recover all data after the
loss of either media server, either restorer, or a media server and a restorer.

For recovery from the loss of the originator restorer, see "Restore from a Replica
using the Primary Media Server" on page 15 for NetBackup on UNIX and page 17 for
NetBackup on Windows. Also see Figure 2.
For recovery from the loss of the primary media server see "Restore from an
Originator using the Secondary Media Server" on page 15 for NetBackup on UNIX
and on page 17 for NetBackup on Windows. Also see Figure 3.
For recovery from the loss of the primary media server and the originator restorer, see
"Restore from a Replica using the Secondary Media Server" on page 15 for
NetBackup on UNIX and on page 18 for NetBackup on Windows. Also see Figure 4.

Figure 1 shows normal, non-disaster-recovery communications between media servers


and restorers. The main communications are backup and recovery data between the
primary media server and the originator restorer, and replicated data between the
originator restorer and the replica restorer. The primary media server also communicates
with backup client machines and, acting as the master media server, keeps the secondary
media server up-to-date with NetBackup configuration information, such as the list of
backup clients.
Figure 1: Normal communications

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Figure 2 shows communications between media servers and restorer when the primary
media server needs to restore data from the replica restorer.
Figure 2: Originator restorer not available

Figure 3 shows communications between media servers and restorer when the secondary
media server needs to restore data from the originator restorer.
Figure 3: Primary media server not available, recover from the originator

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Figure 4 shows communications between media servers and restorer when the secondary
media server needs to restore data from the replica restorer.
Figure 4: Primary media server and originator not available

4.2. UNIX Platforms


The following procedures explain the changes needed to restore data through a UNIX
NetBackup media server in the situations illustrated in Figures 2 through 4 above.

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4.2.1. Restore from a Replica using the Primary Media Server
When the originator restorer is not available, the primary media server can continue
operations using the replica restorer. See Figure 2.
1. On the primary media server, unmount (using the umount command) the originator
restorer and mount the replica restorer. For example, if the originator is origddr
mounted at the mount point:
/mnt/orig origddr:/backup
And the replica is repddr, then mount the replica as:
/mnt/orig repddr:/backup
2. From the primary media server, run a standard restore operation.
3. Use the VERITAS Activity Monitor to verify that the restore completes.
4.2.2. Restore from an Originator using the Secondary Media Server
When the primary media server is not available, the secondary media server can restore
data to backup clients using the originator restorer. See Figure 3.
To restore data to backup clients through a secondary media server, the catalog from each
backup must be copied to the originator restorer after each backup. Also, a policy must
exist on each media server to allow importing a catalog. See "Setup for Restoring a
Catalog" on page 16.
1. On the secondary media server, unmount (using the umount command) the replica
restorer and mount the originator restorer. For example, if the replica is repddr
mounted at the mount point:
/mnt/rep repddr:/backup
And the originator is origddr, then mount the originator as:
/mnt/rep origddr:/backup
2. Move catalogs from the originator restorer to the secondary media server. See
"Restore a Catalog from a Restorer" on page 16.
3. From the secondary media server, run a standard restore operation.
4. Use the VERITAS Activity Monitor to verify that the restore completes.
4.2.3. Restore from a Replica using the Secondary Media Server
When the primary media server and the originator restorer are not available, the
secondary media server can restore data to backup clients from the replica restorer. See
Figure 4.
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To restore data through a secondary media server, the catalog from each backup must be
copied to the originator restorer after each backup. A restorer replication pair
automatically moves a copy of any data on the originator restorer to the replica restorer.
Catalogs copied to the originator are then available from the replica. Also, a policy must
exist on each media server to allow importing a catalog. See "Setup for Restoring a
Catalog" on page 16.
1. Move catalogs from the replica restorer to the secondary media server. See "Restore a
Catalog from a Restorer" on page 16.
2. From the secondary media server, run a standard restore operation.
3. Use the VERITAS Activity Monitor to verify that the restore completes.
4.2.4. Setup for Restoring a Catalog to a UNIX Media Server
To set up a restorer replication pair that allows restoring a NetBackup catalog from a
restorer to a media server:
1. Create a policy named catarc. The policy must exist on the media servers for both
restorers in a replication pair.
Set the policy for user backup.
Make the policy inactive.
Point the policy to the /opt/openv/netbackup/db/images/ directory
under the Files tab.
2. After each backup, copy the DB (catalog) archive files from the media server to the
originator mount point. The DB archive files on a media server are located in
/opt/openv/netbackup/db/images/.
4.2.5. Restore a Catalog from a Restorer to a UNIX Media Server
To recover a catalog from a restorer:
1. If the restorer is a replica, run the command replication break.
2. Copy the catalog archive file from the restorer mount point back to its original
directory on the target media server: /opt/openv/netbackup/db/images/.

3. From the media server command line interface run the bpcatlist command piped
through the bpcatres command (both located in the NetBackup installation
directory). The following is a simple example. Note that the commands have
numerous options not used in the example. See the NetBackup command descriptions
for all possible command options.

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./bpcatlist -policy policy_name -date date(s)_of_files_to
_restore | ./bpcatres
The policy_name is the name of the policy that created the catalog, such as a policy
named daily. The bpcatres command uses the catarc policy to file the location of
the catalog archive file (ending in .f). The catalog archive file has a pointer to the
location of the image file that is on the restorer.
4.3. Windows Platforms
The following procedures explain the changes needed to restore data through a Windows
NetBackup media server in the situations illustrated in Figures 2 through 4.
4.3.1. Restore from a Replica using the Primary Media Server
When the originator restorer is not available, the primary media server can continue
operations using the replica restorer. See Figure 2.
1. On the primary media server, change the lmhosts file so that the originator path
points to the replica. The file location depends on the Windows release. Find the
WINNT folder and look under \system32\drivers\etc. In the lmhosts file,
find the originator entry and change the IP address to point to the replica. For
example, with an originator IP address of 192.168.10.11 and a replica IP address of
192.168.11.12, change the entry from:
192.168.10.11 \\originator\backup
To:
192.168.11.12 \\originator\backup
2. From the primary media server, run a standard restore operation.
3. Use the VERITAS Activity Monitor to verify that the restore completes.
4.3.2. Restore from an Originator using the Secondary Media Server
When the primary media server is not available, the secondary media server can restore
data to backup clients using the originator restorer. See Figure 3.
To restore data through a secondary media server, the catalog from each backup must be
copied to the originator restorer after each backup. Also, a policy must exist on each
media server to allow importing a catalog. See "Setup for Restoring a Catalog to a
Windows Media Server" on page 18.

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1. On the secondary media server, change the lmhosts file so that the restorer path
points to the originator. The file location depends on the Windows release. Find the
WINNT folder and look under \system32\drivers\etc. In the lmhosts file,
find the replica entry and change the IP address to point to the originator. For
example, with a replica IP address of 192.168.11.12 and an originator IP address of
192.168.10.11, change the entry from:
192.168.11.12 \\replica\backup
To:
192.168.10.11 \\replica\backup
2. Move catalogs from the originator restorer to the secondary media server. See
"Restore a Catalog from a Restorer to a Windows Media Server" on page 19.
3. From the secondary media server, run a standard restore operation.
4. Use the VERITAS Activity Monitor to verify that the restore completes.
4.3.3. Restore from a Replica using the Secondary Media Server
When the primary media server and the originator restorer are not available, the
secondary media server can restore data to backup clients from the replica restorer. See
Figure 4.
To restore data through a secondary media server, the catalog from each backup must be
copied to the originator restorer after each backup. A restorer replication pair
automatically moves a copy of any data on the originator restorer to the replica restorer.
Catalogs copied to the originator are then available from the replica. Also, a policy must
exist on each media server to allow importing a catalog. See "Setup for Restoring a
Catalog to a Windows Media Server" on page 18.
1. Move catalogs from the replica restorer to the secondary media server. See "Restore a
Catalog from a Restorer to a Windows Media Server" on page 19.
2. From the secondary media server, run a standard restore operation.
3. Use the VERITAS Activity Monitor to verify that the restore completes.
4.3.4. Setup for Restoring a Catalog to a Windows Media Server
To set up a restorer replication pair that allows restoring a NetBackup catalog from a
restorer to a media server:
1. Create a policy named catarc. The policy must exist on the media servers for both
restorers in a replication pair.
Set the policy for user backup.
Make the policy inactive.

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Point the policy to the install-path\openv\netbackup\db\images\


folder under the Files tab.

2. After each backup, copy the DB (catalog) archive files from the media server to the
originator. The DB archive files on a media server are located in install-path\
openv\netbackup\db\images\.
4.3.5. Restore a Catalog from a Restorer to a Windows Media Server
To recover a catalog from a restorer:
1. If the restorer is a replica, run the command replication break on the restorer.
2. Copy the catalog archive file from the restorer mount point back to its original folder
on the target media server: install-path\openv\netbackup\db\images\
client-name.
3. From a command prompt window on the media server, run the bpcatlist
command piped through the bpcatres command (both located in: installpath\openv\netbackup\bin\admincmd\). The following is a simple
example. See the NetBackup command descriptions for all possible command
options.
bpcatlist -policy policy_name -date date(s)_of_files_to
_restore | bpcatres
The policy_name is the name of the policy that created the catalog, such as a policy
named daily. The bpcatres command uses the catarc policy to file the location of
the catalog archive file (ending in .f). The catalog archive file has a pointer to the
location of the image file that is on the restorer.

5. Replication and Vaulting


Vaulting to tape can be done from the originator or replica of a restorer replication pair.

When vaulting from an originator restorer, do a standard vaulting operation using the
originator as a standard disk device.

When vaulting from a replica in a restorer replication pair:


Determine when the last backup completed.
Wait ten minutes after the last backup completed.
On the replica restorer, look at the Replica lag line from the command
replication status.

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Wait for the amount of time given in the Replica lag line.
Run a normal vault operation from the media server that mounts the replica
restorer.

For example, if a backup completes at 13:50, wait until 14:00 and then run the
replication status command. If the value in the Replica lag line is 30
minutes, wait until 14:30 to run the vault operation.

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