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ME165-3

SOLAR AND WIND UTILIZATION


KENNARD M. MATURGO

24 SEPTEMBER 2016
WEEK 01
2016 2017 / 2T

KENNARD M. MATURGO || Geothermal Reservoir Engineer

Master of Engineering major in Mechanical Engineering


De La Salle University
Postgraduate Certificate in Geothermal Energy Technology
University of Auckland
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
De La Salle University

Safety moment

ORIENTATION

MCL Vision
Malayan Colleges Laguna shall be a global steeple
of excellence in professional education and
research.

Mission
To provide the students the learning environment that would
transform them into globally competitive professionals.
To produce social wealth from the generation of new knowledge.
To contribute to the solution of industrys and societys problems
by the expert application of knowledge.

Program educational objectives


The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
program aims to:
Enable its graduates to practice as successful engineers to
advancement of society; and
Promote professionalism in engineering practice.

Assignment No. 1 5 x 8 index card

2x 2
ID Photo

LAST NAME, FIRST NAME, M.I.


STUDENT ID
COURSE / SECTION

CONTACT NO.
EMAIL ADDRESS

WHY MECHANICAL ENGINEERING?


TOP 3 DESIRED MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CAREER/INDUSTRY
WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF 5 YEARS FROM NOW?

Student outcomes
a. Apply knowledge of mathematics and science to solve engineering
problems
b. Design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
c. Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within
realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political,
ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability, in
accordance with standards

Student outcomes
d. Function in multidisciplinary teams
e. Identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
f. Understand professional and ethical responsibility
g. Communicate effectively

Student outcomes
h. Demonstrate knowledge on broad education necessary to understand
the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic,
environmental, and societal context
i. Recognized the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning
j. Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary issues
k. Use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for
engineering practice

COURSE SYLLABUS

Course description
Introduction to solar energy and its conversion for use on earth
Fundamentals of solar collection and thermal conversion; solar heating
and cooling systems
Introduction to wind energy and the systems conversion to mechanical
energy
Siting of wind machines and design of wind power machines

Course outcomes
1. Discuss and explain the basic solar energy including its processes and
applications;
2. Solve problems on solar using solar declination, latitude, hour, altitude,
azimuth and zenith angles; solve problems involving equation of time,
apparent solar time and local standard time; compute for the day
length, sunrise and sunset times;
3. Discuss and explain the basic wind energy including its processes,
applications and siting of wind machines;

Course outcomes
4. Solve for the winds total, maximum and actual power; compute for the
winds lift and drag forces;
5. Explain the different techniques in designing solar and wind energy
systems; and
6. Discuss and explain latest update and development in solar and wind
energy conversion technologies.

Solar Energy Week 1


Orientation
Brief survey of Energy Demand and Resources
Introduction to Solar Energy
Early Applications of Solar-Mechanical Conversion

Applications of Solar Energy in the Philippines

Solar Energy Week 2


Extraterrestrial Solar Radiation

Mean Sun Time

Terrestrial Solar Radiation

Apparent Solar Time

Earth Sun Angles

Local Standard Time

Hour Angle

Latitude Angle

Solar Energy Week 3


Solar Altitude Angle

Day Length

Solar Azimuth Angle

Sunrise and Sunset Time

Solar Zenith Angle


Air Mass

Clearness Index

Solar Energy Week 4


Solar Angle Calculations
Incident Angle
Incident Angle for a Tilted Surface
PRELIMINARY COURSE ASSESSMENT

Solar Energy Week 5


Solar Electric Conversion System
Heliostat
Solar Thermal Central Receiver Systems
Receiver

Solar Energy Week 6


Heat Transport System
Thermal Storage System
Solar Heating and Cooling Systems
Distributed Solar Thermal Systems

Solar Energy Week 7


Solar Collector
Repowering
Hybrid Plants

Solar Energy Week 8


Solar Ponds
Solar Cell
Semi-conductors
MIDTERM COURSE ASSESSMENT

Solar Energy Week 9


Photo-voltaic calculation
Photo-voltaic energy storage
Satellite Solar Power Systems

Wind Energy Week 9


Introduction to Wind Energy
Early Applications of Wind Energy

Wind Energy Week 10


Wind Turbine Operation
Principles of Wind Power
Site Characteristics

Wind Energy Week 11


New Developments
Darrieus Machine Madaras
Rotor Wind Machine
Other Wind Turbine Design

Textbook and references


Goswami, Yogi D. and Kreith, Frank, (2007), Energy Conversion, 1st
Edition, CRC Press.
Kalogirou, Soteris A., (2014), Solar Energy Engineering: Process and
Systems, 2nd Edition, Elsevier Inc.
Jha, A. R., (2011), Wind Turbine Technology, Taylor & Francis Group.

Web references
www.eere.energy.gov
www.nrel.gov
www.doe.gov.ph

Course requirement: 60% passing grade


Course Assessments
Preliminary Course Assessment
Midterm Course Assessment
Final Course Assessment

60%
(20%)
(20%)
(20%)

Other Class Activities


Quiz
Seatwork/Board Work/Class Participation
Homework

40%
(20%)
(15%)
(5%)

Course policies
Aside from academic deficiency, other grounds to fail the course are the following:
Intellectual dishonesty (cheating and plagiarism) during examinations and other
requirements;
Per Section 1551 of CHEDs Manual of Regulations for Private Educational Institutions, a
student who has incurred more than 20% of the total number of school days (i.e., 5
unexcused absences) shall not be given credit to the course regardless of class standing. For
further provisions of the said policy, please refer to the MCL Student Catalogue.
Other grounds as stipulated in the MCL Student Catalogue, and other relevant policies and
regulations that may be promulgated from time to time.

Other course policies


LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION
English is the medium of instruction. Lectures, discussions, and documentation will be in
English. Code switching is highly discouraged and the use of other languages aside from
English in communicating and in presenting course works will be a valid ground for
demerits in that given exercise.

HOMEWORK, WRITTEN REPORTS AND REACTION PAPERS


All homework and other assigned coursework must be submitted on time.

Other course policies


COURSE PORTFOLIO
All exercises and requirements for the course are to be compiled by the students as part
of their portfolio. The same must be made available for inspection by the instructor
before the end of the term.
HONOR, DRESS, AND GROOMING CODE
Other provisions stipulated in the MCL Student Catalogue will be enforced in and out of
the classroom. Students who have violated the dress code policy and other related
offenses will not be permitted to attend classes without being cleared by the Student
Affais Office or the Guidance Office.

Consultation schedule

SATURDAY
7:00 AM 8:30 AM
VENUE TBA
kmmaturgo@mcl.edu.ph