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Roman and Greek Gods & Goddesses

According to Ancient Greek mythology and legends, detailed in the Greek Creation
Myth and adopted by the Roman Empire, the gods and goddesses consisted of three
major groups and generations:

The Primeval or Ancient Gods

The Titans

The Olympian Gods

The Olympian gods achieved supremacy over the older, first, primeval gods and the
giant Titan gods when they were victorious in the Battle of the Titans. The names and
roles of the principle Roman and Greek Gods and Goddesses that feature in ancient
mythology have been detailed in the following chart covering the Greek and Roman
counterparts of the Ancient first, or primeval gods, the Titans and the Olympian gods.
Roman and Greek Gods & Goddesses - Chart of the Olympians
In Ancient Greek mythology the counterparts of the Olympian Roman and Greek gods
are detailed in the chart:

Roman and Greek Gods


Chart of the Olympians - Roman & Greek Gods & Goddesses
List of Greek
Olympians

Roman Counterparts
of Olympians

Description / Roles of the Olympians

Zeus

Jupiter or Jove

King of the Olympian gods

Hera

Juno

Queen of the Olympian gods

Demeter

Ceres

Goddess of agriculture

Athena

Minerva

Goddess of wisdom

Artemis

Diana

Goddess of hunting

Apollo

Apollo, the Roman god

God of the sun and music

Ares

Mars

God of war

Hephaestus

Vulcan

God of fire and metal-working

Hermes

Mercury

Messenger of the Olympian gods

Aphrodite

Venus

Goddess of love and beauty

Hestia

Vesta

Goddess of the home and hearth

Hades

Pluto

God of the Underworld

Poseidon

Neptune

God of the Sea

Dionysus

Bacchus

God of wine, celebrations and fertility

List of Greek
Olympians

Roman Counterparts
of Olympians

Description / Role of the Olympians

Roman and Greek Gods


Chart of the Olympians - Roman & Greek Gods & Goddesses

Roman and Greek Gods & Goddesses - Chart of the Lesser Gods
In Ancient Greek mythology the counterparts of the Lesser Roman and Greek gods
are detailed in the chart:

Roman and Greek Gods


Chart of the Lesser Roman & Greek Gods & Goddesses
List of Greek
Lesser Gods

Roman Counterparts
of Lesser Gods

Description / Roles of the


Lesser Gods

Hebe

Juventas

Goddess of youth

Persephone

Proserpina

Goddess of spring and flowers,


queen of the Underworld

Charon

Charon

The Ferryman

Eros

Cupid

God of love

Atlas

Atlas

God of astronomy

Prometheus

Prometheus

God of forethought

Epimetheus

Epimetheus

God of afterthought

Let

Latona

Goddess of motherhood

Iris

Arcus

Goddess of the rainbow

Eos

Aurora

Goddess of the dawn

Asclepius

Aesculapius

God of Medicine and Healing

Notus

Auster

God of the South wind

Enyo

Bellona

Goddess of war and peacekeeping

Eris

Discordia

Goddess of discord

Pan

Faunus

God of the Wild and fertility

Zephyrus

Favonius

God of the west wind

Heracles

Hercules

God of strength

Nemesis

Invidia

Goddess of consequences and


revenge

No Greek
counterpart

Janus

God of doors, gates and new


beginnings

Thanatos

Letus

God of Death

Palaemon

Portunus

God of sailors

Amphitrite

Salacia

Goddess of war

Morpheus

Somnia

God of Dreams

Hypnos

Somnus

God of Sleep

Elpis

Spes

God of Hope

No Greek
counterpart

Terminus

God of Boundaries

Phobos

Timor

God of fear and panic

Hecate

Hekate (often confused


with Trivia)

Goddess of magic and witchcraft

Nike

Victoria

Goddess of victory

Eurus

Vulturnus

God of the east wind

Geras

Senectus

God of old age

Psyche

No Roman counterpart

Goddess of compassion

Eros, god of love

Cupid

God of Love

Selene

Luna

Goddess of the moon

Eos

Aurora

Goddess of dawn

Ariadne

No Roman counterpart

Goddess of passion and mazes

Aeolus

Vulturnus

God of winds

Asclepius

Aesculapius

God of medicine

Bia

No Roman counterpart

Goddess of force

Cratos

Potestas

God of strength and power

Deimos

Formido

God of terror

Harmonia

Concordia

Goddess of harmony, agreement &


understanding

Khione

Chione

Goddess of snow

Eileithyia

Natio

Goddess of childbirth

Momos

No Roman counterpart

God of mockery and blame

Moros

No Roman counterpart

God of Doom

Tyche

Fortuna or Abudantia

Goddess of luck, destiny and


fortune

Zelus

Invidia

God of dedication, rivalry and envy

Triton

No Roman counterpart

God of ships and Prince of Atlantis

Paean

No Roman counterpart

Doctor of the gods

Pallas

No Roman counterpart

Titan God of warfare

Melinoe

Orcus

Goddess of ghosts

Enyo or Eris

Bellona

War goddess

Eutychia

Felicitas

Goddess of success

Mithras

Mithras

God of soldiers, light, truth, and


honor

Eirene (one of the


Horae)

Abundantia

Goddess of plenty and prosperity

List of Greek
Lesser Gods

Roman Counterparts
of Lesser Gods

Description / Roles of the


Lesser Gods

Roman and Greek Gods


Chart of the Lesser Roman & Greek Gods & Goddesses

Roman and Greek Gods

Names of Roman & Greek Gods counterparts

Interesting information and Facts about Roman & Greek Gods counterparts

Roman & Greek Gods counterparts

Greek Mythology Roman & Greek Gods counterparts

Facts and information about Roman & Greek Gods counterparts for schools
and kids

Roman and Greek Gods & Goddesses - Chart of Ancient, Primeval Gods
In Ancient Greek mythology the counterparts of the ancient, primeval, Roman and
Greek gods are detailed in the chart:

Roman and Greek Gods


Chart of the Ancient Greek Deities - Roman & Greek Gods & Goddesses
Greek
Ancient Gods
Chaos

Roman Counterparts
of Ancient Greek Gods

Description / Roles of
Ancient Gods

Chaos

The first of all the gods, who


ruled over confusion

Nyx

Nox

Goddess of night

Erebus

Scotus

God of darkness

Aether

Aither

Goddess of the daytime

Hemera

Dies

Goddess of the daytime

Tartarus

Tartarus

God of the abyss beneath the


Underworld

Eros

Amor

God of procreation

Pontus

Pontus

God of the sea

Gaia

Terra Mater, Tellus or Maia

The Earth Mother

Ouranos

Uranus

God of the heavens

Eros

Amor or Cupid

God of procreation

Pontus

Pontus

God of the sea

Gaia

Terra Mater or Tellus

The Earth Mother

Ouranos (Uranus)

Caelus

God of the heavens

Greek

Roman Counterparts

Description / Roles of

Ancient Gods

of Ancient Greek Gods

Ancient Gods

Roman and Greek Gods


Chart of the Ancient Greek Deities - Roman & Greek Gods & Goddesses

Roman and Greek Gods & Goddesses - Chart of the Titans


In Ancient Greek mythology the counterparts of the Titan Roman and Greek gods are
detailed in the chart:

Roman and Greek Gods


Chart of the Titans - Roman & Greek Gods & Goddesses
Greek
Titans

Roman Counterparts
of Titans

Description / Roles of the


Titans

Cronus

Saturn

God of time

Rhea

Ops

Goddess of fertility and the


mother of gods

Coeus or Koios

Coeus

God of Intelligence

Phoebe

Dione

Goddess of the Moon

Oceanus

Oceanus

God of the ocean

Tethys

Thalassa

Goddess of the rivers

Iapetus or Iapetus

Iapetus

God of Mortal Life

Hyperion

Hyperion

Lord of light

Mnemosyne

Moneta

Goddess of memory, inventor


of words

Theia

Thea

Mother of the Sun and


Goddess of all that glitters

Crius or Krios

Crius

God of the constellations

Themis

Themis

Goddess of justice and order

Clymene

Fama

Goddess of fame and glory

Greek
Titans

Roman Counterparts
of Titans

Description / Roles of the


Titans

Roman and Greek Gods


Chart of the Titans - Roman & Greek Gods & Goddesses

Greeks in the Trojan War

Achilles - the leader of the Myrmidons, son of Peleus and Thetis, and the principal
Greek champion whose anger is one of the main elements of the story.

Agamemnon - King of Mycenae, supreme commander of the Achaean armies whose


actions provoke the feud with Achilles; elder brother of King Menelaus.

Ajax or Aias - also known as Telamonian Ajax (he was the son of Telamon) and Greater
Ajax, was the tallest and strongest warrior (after Achilles) to fight for the Achaeans.

Ajax the Lesser - an Achaean commander, son of Oileus often fights alongside Great
Ajax; the two together are sometimes called the "Ajaxes".

Calchas - a powerful Greek prophet and omen reader, who guided the Greeks through
the war with his predictions.

Cornilius - Depressed Greek known for his nihilistic rants aand prays for death as also
seen in the "bible"

Diomedes (also called "Tydides")() - the youngest


commanders, famous for wounding two gods, Aphrodite and Ares.

Helen - the wife of Menelaus, the King of Sparta. Paris visits Menelaus in Sparta. With
the assistance of Aphrodite, Paris and Helen fall in love and elope back to Troy, but in
Sparta her elopement is considered an abduction.

Idomeneus - King of Crete and Achaean commander. Leads a charge against the
Trojans in Book 13.

Menelaus - King of Sparta and the abandoned husband of Helen. He is the younger
brother of Agamemnon.

of

the Achaean

Nestor - of Gernia and the son of Neleus. He was said to be the only one of his
brothers to survive an assault from Heracles. Oldest member of the entire Greek army at
Troy.

Odysseus - another warrior-king, famed for his cunning, who is the main character of
another (roughly equally ancient) epic, the Odyssey.

Patroclus - beloved companion to Achilles.


Phoenix - an old Achaean warrior greatly trusted by Achilles, acts as mediator between
Achilles and Agamemnon.
Teucer - Achaean archer, half-brother of Ajax.

Troy

Aeneas - cousin of Hector, his principal lieutenant, son of Aphrodite, the only major
Trojan figure to survive the war. Held by later tradition to be the forefather of the founders of
Rome. See the Aeneid.
Agenor - a Trojan warrior who attempts to fight Achilles in Book 21.
Antenor - a Trojan nobleman who argues that Helen should be returned to Menelaus in
order to end the war.
Glaucus - co-leader of the Lycian forces allied to the Trojan cause with Sarpedon.

Hector - firstborn son of King Priam, husband of Andromache, father of Astyanax, leader
of the Trojan and allied armies and heir apparent to the throne of Troy.

Paris - Trojan prince and Hector's brother, also called Alexander; his abduction
of Helen is the casus belli. He was supposed to be killed as a baby because his sister
Cassandra foresaw that he would cause the destruction of Troy. Raised by a shepherd.

Polydamas - a young Trojan commander.

Priam - king of the Trojans, son and successor of Laomedon, husband of


Queen Hecuba, father of Hector and Paris, too old to take part in the fighting; many of his
fifty sons are counted among the Trojan commanders.

Sarpedon - co-leader of the Lycian forces allied to the Trojan cause with Glaucus. Son
of Zeus.

Family and Servants of Odysseus

Laertes - father of Odysseus.

Penelope - wife of Odysseus, mother of Telemachus, she is clever and loyal to


Odysseus, she is contrasted with Clytemnestra.

Telemachus - son of Odysseus and Penelope, matures during his travels to Sparta and
Pylos, fights Penelope's suitors with Odysseus.

Suitors of Penelope

Amphinomus

Antinous

Eurymachus

Mistresses

Briseis - mistress and love interest of Achilles, a woman captured in the sack of
Lyrnessos, a small town in the territory of Troy, and awarded to Achilles as a prize;
Agamemnon takes her from Achilles in Book 1 and Achilles withdraws from battle as a
result.
Chryseis - Chryses daughter, taken as a war prize by Agamemnon.
Helen - daughter of Zeus, former Queen of Sparta and wife of Menelaus, now espoused
to Paris.

Deities

Aphrodite - goddess of love, beauty, and sexual pleasure. Wife of Hephaestus, and
lover of Ares.

Apollo - god of the sun, light, knowledge, healing, plague and darkness, the arts, music,
poetry, prophecy, archery. Son of Zeus and Leto, twin of Artemis.

Ares - god of war. Lover of Aphrodite. Driven from the field of battle by Diomedes (aided
by Athena).

Athena - goddess of crafts, domestic arts, strategic warfare, and wisdom. Daughter of
Zeus.

Hera - goddess of birth, family, marriage, and women. Sister and wife of Zeus, queen of
the gods.

Hermes - messenger of the gods, leads Priam into Achilles' camp in book 24.

Iris - messenger of Zeus and Hera.

Poseidon - brother of Zeus, Greek god of the sea and earthquake, curses Odysseus.

Zeus - king of the Gods, brother of Poseidon and Hera and father of Athena, Aphrodite,
Ares, and Apollo.

Ten years have passed since the fall of Troy, and the Greek hero Odysseus still has not
returned to his kingdom in Ithaca. A large and rowdy mob of suitors who have overrun
Odysseuss palace and pillaged his land continue to court his wife, Penelope. She has remained
faithful to Odysseus. Prince Telemachus, Odysseuss son, wants desperately to throw them out
but does not have the confidence or experience to fight them. One of the suitors, Antinous,
plans to assassinate the young prince, eliminating the only opposition to their dominion over the
palace.
Unknown to the suitors, Odysseus is still alive. The beautiful nymph Calypso, possessed by love
for him, has imprisoned him on her island, Ogygia. He longs to return to his wife and son, but he
has no ship or crew to help him escape. While the gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus
debate Odysseuss future, Athena, Odysseuss strongest supporter among the gods, resolves to
help Telemachus. Disguised as a friend of the princes grandfather, Laertes, she convinces the
prince to call a meeting of the assembly at which he reproaches the suitors. Athena also
prepares him for a great journey to Pylos and Sparta, where the kings Nestor and Menelaus,
Odysseuss companions during the war, inform him that Odysseus is alive and trapped on
Calypsos island. Telemachus makes plans to return home, while, back in Ithaca, Antinous and
the other suitors prepare an ambush to kill him when he reaches port.
On Mount Olympus, Zeus sends Hermes to rescue Odysseus from Calypso. Hermes persuades
Calypso to let Odysseus build a ship and leave. The homesick hero sets sail, but when
Poseidon, god of the sea, finds him sailing home, he sends a storm to wreck Odysseuss ship.
Poseidon has harbored a bitter grudge against Odysseus since the hero blinded his son, the
Cyclops Polyphemus, earlier in his travels. Athena intervenes to save Odysseus from
Poseidons wrath, and the beleaguered king lands at Scheria, home of the Phaeacians.
Nausicaa, the Phaeacian princess, shows him to the royal palace, and Odysseus receives a

warm welcome from the king and queen. When he identifies himself as Odysseus, his hosts,
who have heard of his exploits at Troy, are stunned. They promise to give him safe passage to
Ithaca, but first they beg to hear the story of his adventures.
Odysseus spends the night describing the fantastic chain of events leading up to his arrival on
Calypsos island. He recounts his trip to the Land of the Lotus Eaters, his battle with
Polyphemus the Cyclops, his love affair with the witch-goddess Circe, his temptation by the
deadly Sirens, his journey into Hades to consult the prophet Tiresias, and his fight with the sea
monster Scylla. When he finishes his story, the Phaeacians return Odysseus to Ithaca, where
he seeks out the hut of his faithful swineherd, Eumaeus. Though Athena has disguised
Odysseus as a beggar, Eumaeus warmly receives and nourishes him in the hut. He soon
encounters Telemachus, who has returned from Pylos and Sparta despite the suitors ambush,
and reveals to him his true identity. Odysseus and Telemachus devise a plan to massacre the
suitors and regain control of Ithaca.
When Odysseus arrives at the palace the next day, still disguised as a beggar, he endures
abuse and insults from the suitors. The only person who recognizes him is his old nurse,
Eurycleia, but she swears not to disclose his secret. Penelope takes an interest in this strange
beggar, suspecting that he might be her long-lost husband. Quite crafty herself, Penelope
organizes an archery contest the following day and promises to marry any man who can string
Odysseuss great bow and fire an arrow through a row of twelve axesa feat that only
Odysseus has ever been able to accomplish. At the contest, each suitor tries to string the bow
and fails. Odysseus steps up to the bow and, with little effort, fires an arrow through all twelve
axes. He then turns the bow on the suitors. He and Telemachus, assisted by a few faithful
servants, kill every last suitor.
Odysseus reveals himself to the entire palace and reunites with his loving Penelope. He travels
to the outskirts of Ithaca to see his aging father, Laertes. They come under attack from the
vengeful family members of the dead suitors, but Laertes, reinvigorated by his sons return,
successfully kills Antinouss father and puts a stop to the attack. Zeus dispatches Athena to

restore peace. With his power secure and his family reunited, Odysseuss long ordeal comes to
an end.

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