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OPERATIONS

BULLETIN
No.07/ 2002

Issued: 25th July 2002

PIRACY
Shipping warned to steer clear of pirate-infested
Somali coast
London, 24 July 2002 - Ships unlucky enough to develop engine trouble
after straying too close to the shores of Somalia are virtually certain to fall
victim to armed gangs who will extort a stiff ransom from the owners.
Tensions between rival warlords make everyday life
The latest six-monthly piracy report by ICC's crime and piracy-fighting
difficult in Mogadishu
International Maritime Bureau highlights the dangers facing ships whose
masters set a course less than 50 nautical miles from the coast of war-ravaged Somalia. To be safe, IMB advises
ships to keep 100 nautical miles from the shore.

The report advised shipping: "This is a high risk area for hijackings. Armed pirates in speedboats and gunboats open
fire on ships and rob or hijack them. The use of radio, including VHF, in these waters should be kept to a minimum.
"Ships anchoring near the Somali coast should note that they will be seized by one of the warring factions from shore,
who have extorted substantial sums from owners for the return of the vessel and crew." The IMB said ransom
demands could be for as much as half a million dollars.
Captain Jayant Abhyankar, IMB Deputy Director. said: "With weapons and ammunition openly flowing into the country,
despite a United Nations arms embargo, Somalia's national waters are among the most dangerous in the world."
Somalia has been in the grip of armed factions and warlords since the collapse of Mohammed Siad Barre's regime in
January 1991. Foreigners visiting the capital, Mogadishu, are in peril of kidnapping and need the protection of armed
escorts.
In the most recent attack in Somali waters, a Cyprus-flag freighter, the Panagia Tinou, carrying a multi-million dollar
cargo of fertilizers, was fought over by rival gangs, one of which mounted a 50 mm gun on the ship.
Worldwide, the piracy statistics are on the increase, with 171 incidents reported so far for the first six months of this
year, compared with 165 for the same period in 2001. Indonesia continues to record the highest number of attacks,
with 44 reported incidents. There were 12 attacks in Indian waters and 11 off Bangladesh.

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OPERATIONS BULLETIN

No.07 / 2002

Issued: 25th July 2002

Weekly Piracy Report


16 - 22 July
The following is a summary of the daily reports broadcast to all shipping by the IMB's Piracy Reporting
Centre on the SafetyNET service of Inmarsat-C .

Recently reported incidents


Actual and attempted attacks
22.07.02 at 0330 LT at Tarahan port, Indonesia.
Three pirates armed with knives boarded a bulk carrier at berth. They entered the engine room and
stole engine spares. Master feels shore watchmen may have colluded with pirates.
20.07.02 at night at Rio Haina Roads, Dominican Republic.
Pirates boarded a tanker proceeding to pick up pilot and stole one life raft. Incident was unnoticed
by crew.
20.07.2002 at Pertigalete Bay-Guanta, Venezuela.
Pirates armed with guns boarded a ship at anchor. They stole cash, crew personal effects and
escaped in a motorboat. Master called port authorities but did not receive a response.
20.07.02 at 0320 LT at Santan anchorage, Indonesia.
An unlit boat approached stern of a gas carrier. Duty officer went aft to investigate. At the same time
two armed boarded the ship at forecastle. They held the duty A/B at knifepoint, broke in to forward
store and stole two mooring ropes. It seems the aft boat was used as a decoy. Master tried to call
Santan port control but did not receive a response.
18.07.2002 at 2115 LT at Guayaquil outer anchorage, Ecuador.
Ten pirates armed with guns boarded a ship near the data pilot buoy. They broke in to a container on
deck. Master reported to pilot station and a patrol boat was sent to the area.
17.07.2002 at port of La Libertad, Ecuador.
While at anchor, pirates boarded a tanker via anchor chain, stole one life raft and ship's stores.
17.07.2002 at 2200 LT at Vung Tau outer anchorage, Vietnam.
Five armed pirates boarded a general cargo ship, stole ship's stores and escaped in a motorboat.
14.07.02 at 2240 LT at 20:38N - 106:53E, Haiphong anchorage, Vietnam.
Four pirates armed with long knives boarded a bulk carrier at forecastle. They lowered ship's stores
in boats waiting below. Alert crew raised alarm and mustered. Pirates jumped overboard and
escaped.
Bangladesh - Chittagong and Mongla at berth and anchorage. Ships have reported theft of zinc anodes welded to
ship's sides and stern
India - Chennai, Cochin, Haldia, Kandla and Tuticorin anchorages;
Indonesia - Belawan, Balikpapan, Lawi Lawi, Merak, Panjang, Samarinda and Tanjong Priok (Jakarta), ships have
reported numerous attacks whilst at berth and anchor. Other areas include Bangka, Berhala and Gelasa Straits
Malacca straits - avoid anchoring along the Indonesian coast of the straits. Coast near Aceh is particularly risky for
hijackings

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OPERATIONS BULLETIN

No.07 / 2002

Issued: 25th July 2002


Malaysia - Bintulu, Penang and Sandakan; Philippines Davao; Thailand - Koh Si Chang Vietnam - Vung Tau
Africa and Red Sea - Abidjan, Bonny River, Conakry, Dakar, Dar Es Salaam, Douala, Lagos, Luanda, Owendo and
Tema; Gulf of Aden - between four to six fast boats have attempted to board ships around coordinates Lat 14:34N Long 051:22.5E
Somalian waters - high-risk area for hijackings. Keep at least 50 miles and if possible 100 miles from the Somali
coast. Use of radio communications including VHF in these waters should be kept to a minimum
Brazil - Fazendinha, Guiba Islands, Santana, Santos, Sepetiba, Rio De Janeiro and Rio Grende Port.
Colombia - Buenaventura and Cartagena; Dominican Republic - Rio Haina; Ecuador - Guayaquil
Peru Callao; Venezuela - Guanta, Lake Maracaibo and Puerto La Cruz.
Reporting of incidents Ships are advised to maintain anti-piracy watches and report all piratical attacks and
suspicious movements of craft to the IMB Piracy Reporting Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

End

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