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Science

Curriculum
MYP 6-10
Revised for teaching Fall 2014



Parent Copy

Science Unit Sequence


Grades 6-10

Core
Exploring Ourselves and Energy Transformation
theme Our Universe

6th Grade
7th Grade
1
Matter and Humans
Mechanical Energy



Chemical
a
nd
P
hysical
2
The Atom
Changes


3
Motion and Forces (8)
Ecology (8)

Solar System and Space


Exploration (4)


Cell Organization and
Life Processes



Puberty and
Reproduction

Climate Change

Human Health

Sustainable
Survival
10th Grade
Electrical Power
Generation

8th Grade
Electricity and Heat

9th Grade
Light and Sound

Chemical Reactivity and


Solutions

Health and Disease


Hormones and
Homeostasis

Chemical Energy

Digestive System

Fluids

Chemical Bonding

Genes and
Variation.
Evolution and
Natural Selection

Simple Machines

Breathing and Circulation

Energy Transformations in
Living Things


Time guidance:





Most Units are 6 weeks long (16 lessons) unless otherwise stated. Ex.(7) denotes a 7 week unit for example.
Double units are 12 weeks long. A Trimester is 12 weeks long (32 lessons). We are in school 180 days= 36 weeks =20 cycles
7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 6
MYP Units
Revised for teaching Fall 2014


Grade 6: Chemistry
Grade Level Theme: Exploring Ourselves and Our Universe
Time Frame: 6 weeks
Matter and Humans

Content

1. Define matter as anything that has both mass and volume.
2. Observe and record the properties of elements representative of the first 20 of
the Periodic Table (Mg, C, S, H, Fe, Al, O, He). Some should be teacher
demonstrated only (Ca, Na, Ne, Hg).
3. Utilize the periodic table as a tool to locate the first 20 elements and identify
symbols.
4. Describe the general properties of matter through observation (solid, liquid,
gas, color, luster, hardness, density, reaction to acid/heat and special properties
(magnetism/smell/ability to conduct electricity).
5. Investigate placing substances in a flame (magnesium, salt, plastic, aluminum
foil/iron/glass/ceramic) in a flame in the context of reaction to heat.
6. Outline the basic atomic nature of matter.
7. Explain that all matter is made of elements (pure, mixed together of bonded
together).
8. Use appropriate instruments and units to measure quantities such as mass,
length, time, and temperature (see skills column).
9. Be able to explain why a beaker is not an accurate way to measure liquids.
10. Calculate the volume of regular and irregularly shaped objects.
11. Calculate density and explore its meaning.
12. Explore volume changes in matter as they relate to temperature and density.
13. Investigate phase changes in simple elements and compounds (sulfur, water,
glass, chocolate).
14. Explain what happens during a phase change (using both macroscopic and
microscopic views).
15. Investigate the relationship between matter and energy.
16. Evaluate the role of material engineering (a rapidly expanding field of
engineering) in innovation.

MYP
Concept

Systems

Related
Concepts

Form
Models
Interaction

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Scientific and
Technical
Innovation



Statement of Inquiry

Humans manipulate the
different properties of
matter to improve our way
of life.

Factual: What are the
different properties of
matter?

Conceptual: What is the
relationship between
temperature and the
properties of matter?

Debatable: How is an
elements use influenced
by environmental,
economic and social
factors?








Terminology: mass, weight, volume, melting point, boiling point, condensation, density,
luster, hardness, solid, liquid, gas, theory, phase, recycle, boiling, evaporation,
condensation, solidification, accuracy, metric, grams, mm, cm, m, seconds, minutes,
Celsius, tare, meniscus, x axis, y axis, line of best fit, gravity.

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 6. Chemistry
Grade Level Theme for Year: Exploring Ourselves and Our Universe
Timeframe: 6 Weeks
Chemical and Physical Changes

Content

MYP Concept


Relationships
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Relate phase changes to physical changes that are reversible.


Distinguish between pure substances and mixtures.
Create homogeneous and heterogeneous mixtures.
Outline the nature of simple solutions.
Recognize that solutions mix a variety of states of matter:
a. Gas in gas (air)
b. Gas in liquid (soda pop)
c. Liquid in liquid (vodka - ethanol and water)
d. Solid in a liquid (seawater)
e. Solid in a solid (copper and tin in bronze)

6. Apply simple separation techniques to separate simple mixtures. Ex.
a. Sulfur and iron filings (density and magnetism)
b. Pen ink (chromatography)
c. Dirty rock salt and water (filtration, evaporation)
d. Inky water (distillation)
e. Vodka -ethanol and water (boiling point differences in distillation)

7. Explain the difference between distilled water and tap water.
8. Identify evidence that suggests a chemical change or a physical change has occurred
9. Identify Reactants and Products
a. Perform a test for Hydrogen (squeaky pop)
b. Perform a test for oxygen (relights glowing spill)
c. Perform a test for CO2 (puts out a glowing spill/turns limewater milky)
d. Collect gas over water

10. Evaluate the positive and negative environmental impacts of the development of
chemical reactions that have allowed us to create plastic as it relates to practical
considerations (light/cheap/ easily molded into many forms), health (disposable
needles/easy clean surfaces and objects/trash containment), its disposal as a waste
substance (created by a chemical reaction that is practically irreversible, ocean gyre
build up, animals trapped).
11. Justify the need to recycle man made objects.

Related
Concepts

Form
Conditions
Transfer

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Scientific and
Technical
Innovation



Statement of Inquiry

Students will
recognize that
humans exploit the
relationship between
matter and change to
improve social
conditions.

Factual: How does
man utilize simple
scientific processes to
separate matter?

Conceptual: Is it
possible to get all
substances back after
they have combined
with other
substances?

Debatable: How
should humans
dispose of materials
in ways that are more
sustainable?



Terminology: Homogeneous, heterogeneous, element, atoms, compounds, molecules
solution, chromatography, filtration, distillation, chemical change, physical change, recycle,
gyre

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 6: Physics
Grade Level Theme for Year: Exploring Ourselves and Our Universe
Timeframe: 8 weeks
Motion and Forces

Content


1. Define ways to describe the motion of an object (displacement, speed, velocity,
acceleration).
2. Explain what is meant by motion is relative.
3. Distinguish between mass and weight.
4. Distinguish between instantaneous and average values of speed.
5. Give examples of ways to show that an object is accelerating.
6. Draw and interpret position-time and velocity-time graphs.
7. Describe the motion of a free falling object (simple understanding that speed
increases by 10m/s every second).
8. Define force as a push or pull.
9. State the different types of force (tension, friction, air resistance, thrust, etc.)
10. Draw and label force body diagrams (the amount of force can be represented
through the lengths of the arrows)
11. Determine the net force of an object.
12. Show an understanding of Newtons three laws of motion
13. Apply the calculation F= m x a
14. Discuss what is meant by inertia.
15. Give examples of daily life situations involving inertia.
16. Define weight as the force of gravity on an object.
17. Discuss the relationship between mass, acceleration and net force.
18. Identify action-reaction forces and give examples of situations involving
Newtons 3rd law of motion.
19. Define momentum as inertia in motion.
20. Describe ways to increase/decrease the momentum of an object.
21. Discuss how impulse changes momentum.
22. Explain how the force of gravity affects the motion of objects.
23. Give examples of objects experiencing centripetal force (like motion of planets
around the sun).
24. Explain different factors affecting the flight of a bottle rocket.

MYP
Concept

Related
Concepts

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Statement of Inquiry



Change



Motion,
Forces



Orientation in
Space and Time




Humans manipulate the
interaction and balance of
forces to control movement.


Factual: What are ways to
describe the motion of an
object?

Conceptual: How does force
affect the motion of an
object?

Debatable: What safety
specifications should be given
to car manufacturers and city
planners to ensure safer
roads?


Terminology: displacement, distance, gravity, speed, velocity, acceleration,
deceleration, time, rate, instantaneous, free fall, motion graphs, force, tension, friction,
air resistance, thrust, inertia, action-reaction, proportional, directly proportional,
inversely proportional, momentum, force of gravity, acceleration due to gravity,
centripetal force, etc.

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 6: Physics
Grade Level Theme for Year: Exploring Ourselves and Our Universe
Timeframe: 4 weeks

Earth, Solar System and Space Exploration

Content

MYP
Concept

Related
Concepts

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Statement of Inquiry



Systems



Movement
Interaction
Models



Orientation in Space
and Time





1. Describe the earths physical attributes (such as having an atmosphere,
lithosphere and hydrosphere).
2. List the conditions that allow life to thrive on earth.
3. Describe how day, month and year length is determined.
4. Discuss the role of the earths tilt on uneven heating of the surface,
seasons and daylight hours.
5. Describe the position of the earth, the moon, and the sun during
eclipses.
6. Explain how objects on or near earth are pulled towards earths center
by gravitational force.
7. Describe the position of the earth, the moon and the sun during tides.
8. Outline the history of the development of the two models of the solar
system (geocentric vs. heliocentric).
9. Identify components of the solar system and our galaxy, including the
sun, the earth, and other planets, natural satellites, comets, asteroids,
and meteoroids; and describe their physical characteristics in
qualitative terms.
10. Model scale of objects and distances in the solar system
11. Explain why the planets revolve around the sun.
12. Describe the differences between the planets in the solar system.
13. Identify the objects in space that emit light and those that reflect light.
14. Identify the technological tools and devices needed to space
exploration (e.g. telescopes, spacecraft, life-support systems).
15. Explain how humans meet their basic biological needs in space (e.g.
obtaining (and recycling) water, air and food).
16. Discuss the benefits of space exploration.
17. Analyze advantages of using technology in comparison to problems
created.

Terminology: tides, seasons, telescopes, stars, comets, planets,
asteroids, satellites, orbit, eclipse, geocentric, heliocentric, models,
scale, atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, etc.



Students will understand that
the earth is a part of a large
interrelated system, hence,
changes in this system may
affect the earth.


Factual: What are the
different bodies in the solar
system and in the universe?

Conceptual: How do the
different positions and
interactions of the earth, sun
and moon cause different
natural phenomena?

Debatable: Are the economic
costs of space exploration
justified?

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 6: Biology
Grade Level Theme for Year: Exploring Ourselves and Our Universe
Time Frame: 6 Weeks

Puberty and Reproduction

Content

MYP
Concept

Related
Concepts

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Statement of Inquiry


Structure and
Function

Inter-
relationships


An inquiry into
the nature of
the self and
relationship to
others





1. Describe sexual reproduction and fertilization as the fusion of
Change
the nucleus of the egg and sperm cell.
2. Identify the importance of the placenta in supplying food for a
developing fetus.
3. Describe differences between the gestation periods and the
independence of the young of humans and other mammals
4. Describe the menstrual cycle.
5. Determine that egg cells are released from the ovaries at regular
(approximately monthly) intervals.
6. Recognize that menstruation is a monthly cycle that stops during
pregnancy.
7. Explain how egg and sperm cells are specialized
8. Describe how egg and sperm cells carry the information for
development of a new life.
9. Describe the function of the main female and male reproductive
organs.
10. Determine that the fetus develops within a membranous bag
and is supported and cushioned by amniotic fluid.
11. Demonstrate that the placenta supplies nutrients and oxygen to
the foetus via the umbilical cord, and removes carbon dioxide
and other waste products (reference to the term diffusion).
12. Deduce that harmful substances and viruses can cross the
placenta into the foetus and affect development.
13. Explain that uterine muscle contracts during birth, expelling the
foetus and placenta through the vagina.
14. Outline how the baby is nourished by milk from mammary
glands, which provides nutrients and protects from infection.
15. Determine that periods of rapid growth occur during the human
life cycle.
16. Infer that cell division and increased cell size lead to growth of
the body.
17. Determine how changes in hormone concentrations result in the
development of secondary sexual characteristics and emotional
changes at puberty.
18. Describe IVF (in vitro fertilization) as the fusion of sperm and
egg nucleus outside the body in a petri dish.

Terminology: fertilization, reproduction, uterus, embryo, fetus,
gestation, placenta, umbilical cord, penis, vagina, ovaries, eggs,
sperm, testes, menstrual cycle, menstruation, in vitro fertilization,
diffusion


Students will learn that humans
change and develop at puberty and
that those changes will allow them
to reproduce. Students will learn
how the structure of reproductive
organs and cells make humans well
adapted for the role of
reproduction and that there is a
close relationship between the
mothers body and the health her
offspring.

Factual: How is the fetus protected
from the outside world before
birth?

Conceptual: How could your
lifestyle affect the health of your
children in the future?

Debatable: Should parents be able
to artificially select the
characteristics that their children
inherit?

Grade 6: Biology
Grade level Theme: Exploring Ourselves and Our Universe
Time Frame: 6 Weeks
Cells Alive! - Plant and Animal Cells
Content

1. Recognize that complex living organisms are made of cells, tissues,
organs and organ systems.
2. Recognize that all organisms have life processes in common i.e.
MRS GREN
3. Relate the basic components of the cell theory; and the
importance of the cell theory
4. Annotate a cell diagram (cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm,
mitochondria, cell wall, chloroplast, vacuole)
5. Recognize and differentiate between animal or plant cells.
6. Analyze a model of the major organelles of plant cells and animal
cells and relate the function of each organelle
7. Explain that plants and animals grow by increasing the number of
cells through cell division
8. Demonstrate that there are some specialized cells and be able to
recognize specialized cells from drawings / pictures/ micrographs
9. Explain how each of the cells are specialized to carry out particular
functions
10. Compare specialized and non-specialized cells (stem cells)
11. Relate the specialized cells of plants to plant reproduction.
12. Document that most cells are microscopic
13. Determine that cells obtain nutrition through Diffusion and
osmosis

Terminology: Tissue, organ, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm,
mitochondria, cell wall, chloroplast, vacuole, organism, organelle,
microscope, stem cell, specialized cell, diffusion, osmosis

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Statement of Inquiry

MYP Concept Related Concepts


Systems

Structure
Function

An inquiry into the


interrelationship of the
natural world, human
societies and the built
environment


Students will understand


that the structure and
function of a biological
component is related to its
role in living systems.

Factual: How do the parts of
the cell work together to
make a more complex unit?

Conceptual: What are the
potential relationships
between cells and new
technology?

Debatable: Why is stem cell
research important?

Grade 7
MYP Units
Revised for teaching Fall 2014

Grade 7: Physics
Grade Level Theme for Year: Energy Transformation
Timeframe: 6 Weeks

Mechanical Energy

Content

MYP Concept

Related Concepts

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Statement of Inquiry



Change



Energy
Conservation
Transformation

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

Describe the relationship between work and energy.


List different types of energy.
Define potential and kinetic energy.
State factors affecting how much potential or kinetic energy an object have.
Distinguish between gravitational potential energy and elastic potential energy.
Apply knowledge to simple calculations on potential and kinetic energy.
Identify and describe conversions from one form of energy (Hairdryer/Light
bulb/Car engine/ Steam engine.)
Draw diagrams to illustrate energy transformations.
Explain the law of conservation of energy.
State the meaning of power.
Compare energy and power.


Terminology: work, energy, mechanical, kinetic, potential, elastic, energy conversion,
transformation, conservation, power, rate, etc.



Scientific and
Technical innovation



Students will
understand that energy
changes from one form
to another and although
it is conserved, some of
it is transformed to a
less useful form.

Factual: What are the
different forms of
energy?

Conceptual: How is
energy transformed
from one form to
another?

Debatable: If energy is
always conserved,
why do we need to
save energy?

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 7. Chemistry
Grade Level Theme for Year: Energy Transformation
Timeframe: 6 Weeks

The Atom


1. Outline the basic structure of an atom (simple Bohr model to include protons,
electrons, neutrons)
2. Recall the concept of chemical versus physical changes
3. Understand the terms atomic number and atomic mass
4. Utilize the periodic table as a tool to identify the atomic number and atomic
mass of an element
5. Explain what an isotope is
6. Determine the stability needs of each of the first 20 elements utilizing the
simple 2,8,8,2 model of electron shell configuration
7. Determine an atoms valence
8. Identify atoms with similar and complimentary valence needs in the periodic
table.
9. Explain what an ion is.
10. Apply knowledge of valence needs to simple covalent bonding (CO2/H2O)
11. Apply knowledge of valence needs to simple ionic bonding (NaCl, MgO)
12. Recognize patterns in the periodic table.
13. Distinguish between:
a. Single atoms
b. Molecules composed of atoms from one element (H2 /O2/S8)
c. Molecules composed of atoms of different elements in compounds
(CO2/H2O/CH4/O2)

14. Create models (using existing molecule modeling kits) of common molecules of
elements and a compounds.
15. Identify Reactants and Products ex. CH4+ O2 ------> CO2 + H2O
16. Conduct simple combustion reactions and construct combustion equations
17. Balance simple equations.
18. Experiment with Group 1 and 2 metals when they are introduced to a flame.
19. Relate the displacement of electrons to energy emission.
20. Explain why Group 1 and 2 metals are used in fireworks

MYP
Concept

Relationships

Related
Concepts

Change
Interaction
Models

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Identities and
Relationships


Statement of Inquiry

Students will understand the
relationship between atomic
structure and changes that occur
when elements are exposed to one
another or to energy.


Factual: What are the basic needs of
atoms of an element?

Conceptual: Why do substances react
with one another?

Debatable: Is Hydrogen in the right
place in the periodic table?











Vocabulary: Model, Protons, Electrons, Neutrons, atomic number, atomic mass,
periodic table, isotope, valance, ion, covalent boding, ionic bonding, molecule,
compound, combustion, reactants, products, chemical equation, metal, non-metal.

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 7: Biology
Grade Level Theme for Year: Energy Transformations
Time Frame: 8 Weeks
Ecology

1. Recognize that ecology is the study of how living things interact with each other and the
environment, and that environmental science is an applied science where ecological knowledge
is used to solve environmental questions or problems.
2. Explain that the biosphere has a thickness above and below sea level within which organisms
interact.
3. Identify biotic and abiotic factors in the predominant ecosystems of Earth (oceans, freshwater,
forests, wetlands and deserts).
4. Make links between the diversity of ecosystems and biodiversity.
5. Identify the organizational relationship levels used by ecologists -Organism, Species, Population,
Community, Ecosystem.
6. Summarize the role of a Producer (autotroph), Consumer (heterotroph), Decomposer,
Carnivore, Omnivore and Herbivore.
7. Apply knowledge of pre-fixes to new words.
8. Describe relationships within and between species (predators and prey)
9. Identify symbiotic relationships between species (mutualism, commensalism, parasitism).
10. Describe competition for resources and identify limiting factors to population growth.
11. Investigate the concept of exponential growth.
12. Investigate growth and competition in duckweed -the dynamics of exponential growth in
duckweed and population limitation.
13. Make links between the diversity between and within species, and the simple idea of genetic
information and the transmission of traits from generation to generation
14. Recall that the arrow represents the direction of flow of energy in the community.
15. Construct food chains to represent feeding relationships within a given Community.
16. Show the structure of a food chain depicted as an Energy Flow arrow.
17. Explain that between successive trophic levels, total biomass decreases when 10% of energy is
lost from the system at each level.
18. List the ways that energy is lost as you go up the food chain.
19. Determine the three main environmental problems (resource depletion, pollution, extinction)
20. Apply knowledge of biotic and abiotic factors to identify why organisms are less or more
successful in an environment using the term adaptation and phrase survival of the fittest.
21. Evaluate the implications of a meat rich human diet on land use.
22. Calculate ecological footprint and or create a land use map.
23. Outline the concept of factory farming.
24. Identify the polluting elements of factory farming.
25. Make links between factory farming and the adaptation of bacteria to disease via the use of
antibiotics.
26. Compare and contrast the environmental relationships associated with farming animals
traditionally and via factory farming.

Related
Concepts


Relationships Energy
Connection
Environment

MYP Concept

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Globalization and
Sustainability


Factual: What
relationships exist
between organisms
in an ecosystem?


Conceptual: What is
the relationship
between energy loss
in the food chain
and relative
numbers and types
of organisms?


Debatable: Is
innovation always a
good thing and
should humans
continue to factory
farm organisms to
satisfy their energy
needs?



Statement of Inquiry

Students will
recognize that
complex energy
relationships exist
between organisms
in the living world
and that the human
populations reliance
on ecological
resources has
survival implications.


Vocabulary: Ecology, Environmental Science, Biotic, Abiotic, Organism, Species, Population, Community,
Ecosystem Producer (autotroph), Consumer (heterotroph), Decomposer, Carnivore, Omnivore and
Herbivore, Trophic level, Biomass, Biodiversity, Adaptation, Symbiosis, Mutualism, Commensalism,
Parasitism, Biodiversity, Extinction, Resource, Exponential, food pyramid, food chain, depletion,
diversity, sustainable, traits. Notes: Farm Visit Possible /Utilize Greenhouse
7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 7: Biology
Grade Level Theme for Year: Energy Transformations
Time Frame: 6 Weeks
Energy Transformations in Living Things

Content

MYP Concept

Related
Concepts

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Statement of Inquiry



1. Explain that the sun is the source of energy for all systems on Earth Relationships Energy
2. Use term chlorophyll for the green color in leaves
Function
3. Identify that plants are producers or autotrophs that manufacture
Interaction
their own food using sunlight, carbon dioxide from the atmosphere

and water and mineral nutrients absorbed through the soil or
other growing media.
4. Identify the leaves as organs where food is produced
5. Describe the role of the roots in production of food
6. Describe why we use fertilizers
7. Determine the human impact of crop growth and how the demand
for food can lead to negative environmental impacts like
eutrophication
8. List some factors that can affect the growth of crops
9. Describe adaptations of some plants in their leaf, stem and root
structure which allow them to be successful as autotrophs
10. Describe how all plants go through a chemical reaction known as
photosynthesis
11. Explain the word equation for photosynthesis and know the
correct chemical and symbolic representations of the
photosynthetic equation
12. Describe how plants manufacture starch, a chemical energy
storage compound, and the significance of starch to all food chains
13. Conduct an iodine starch test to determine what substances
contain starch
14. Define the term biofuel and discuss their potential use as a fuel
source
15. Describe how all cells, even plant cells, go through a chemical
reaction known as cellular respiration
16. Explain the word equation for cellular respiration as well as the
chemical and symbolic representations of cellular respiration
17. Deduce that cellular respiration occurs 24 hours a day in all living
things
18. Design a model that will allow for the collection of data to show
that cellular respiration is taking place.

Terminology: photosynthesis, chlorophyll, autotroph, producer,
fertilizer, eutrophication, leaf, stem, roots, starch, balanced equation,
iodine, starch test, biofuel, cellular respiration, chemical reaction,
reactants, products, datalogger

Globalization
and
Sustainability


Students will investigate the function of


and the relationship between,
Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration in
plants and animals.


1. Factual: How do plants make their
own food?

2. Conceptual: How is photosynthesis
related to respiration?

3. Debatable: Do biofuels have a
sustainable application in our
society?

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 7 Science Biology


Energy Transformations
Time Frame: 6 Weeks
Digestion

MYP
Concept

Related
Concepts

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Statement of Inquiry


Identify food as an energy source.
Systems
Identify unhealthy and healthy foods.
Interpret food nutritional labels.
Recognize that to remain healthy we need a varied diet and exercise.
Describe what happens when we eat too much or too little in terms of obesity and
malnutrition.
Describe the function of the 5 food groups and understand that varying amounts
of each group are needed every day. (Fruits, vegetables, grains, proteins, dairy).
Deduce that vitamins and minerals are an essential part of a healthy diet.
Demonstrate and explain what happens to food in the digestive system in terms
of mechanical and chemical digestion.
Explain and annotate a model of the digestive system, the major organs and their
function.
Model how enzymes break down food molecules.
Explain why digestion is needed re. size of molecules / absorption.
Deduce that digested molecules are absorbed through the wall of the small
intestine and carried through the blood to be a source of energy for cells.
Be able to link the structure of the following tissues to their function: Esophagus,
Stomach, Small Intestine, Villi.
Explain that there are three main types of molecule obtained from food (proteins,
fats, carbohydrates).
Determine that bacteria are a large and essential component of the digestive
system.


Structure
Function
Energy

Content

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Identities and
Relationships




Students will understand
how the structure and
function of parts of the
digestive organs are related
to their role in living
systems.

Factual: How does
structure relate to function
in the digestive system?

Conceptual: How are
different carbohydrates
digested differently?

Debatable: Is there such a
thing as a perfect diet?


Terminology: Mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, villi, large intestine, colon,
anus, enzyme, amylase, mechanical digestion, chemical digestion, hydrochloric acid
(HCl), fruits, vegetables, grains, protein, dairy, calorie, fat, carbohydrate

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 7: Physics
Grade Level Theme for Year: Energy Transformation
Timeframe: 6 Weeks
Simple Machines

Content


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

Identify when work is done on an object.


State the factors that affect how much work is done on an object.
Describe the different types of simple machines.
Distinguish between effort and load.
Identify the relative displacements of the effort and of the load.
Deduce the Principle of the Lever using exploratory/guided lab tasks.
Apply the Principle of the Lever to Wheel and Axle lab tasks using
exploratory/guided lab tasks.
Deduce the proportionate relationships between effort force and distance and
resistance force and distance using various pulley setups using
exploratory/guided lab tasks.
Deduce the proportionate relationships between effort force, resistance force
and inclined plane heights and lengths using exploratory/guided lab tasks.
State the relationship of screws and wedges to inclined planes.
Outline the structure, operation, and applications of the following simple
machines: Inclined plane, pulley, block-and-tackle, lever, wheel-and-axle.
Define mechanical advantage.
Explain what machines do and how they make work easier.
Identify the simple machines that make up compound machines and in
everyday objects.
Solve problems involving simple machines.
Design a compound machine (out of 3-4 simple machines) that can perform a
simple task .

MYP
Concept


Relationship

Related
Concepts


Work
Proportion
Development

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)


Scientific and
Technical
Innovation




Statement of Inquiry


Students will understand
that humans design
machines to make work
easier by manipulating the
proportionate relationship
between force (resistance
and effort) and distance.

Factual: How do simple
machines do work easier?

Conceptual: What is the
relationship between effort
force and distance and
resistance force and
distance in simple
machines?

Debatable: Have machines
replaced the human work
force?


Terminology: work, simple machines, effort, load, resistance, force, distance, lever,
wheel and axle, inclined plane, pulley, proportionate, compound machine, mechanical
advantage, etc.

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 8
MYP Units
Revised for teaching Fall 2014

Grade 8: Chemistry
Grade Level Theme for Year: Climate Change
Timeframe: 12 Weeks

Chemical Reactivity and Solutions

Content

1. Describe what is meant by a reactivity series of elements.
2. Explain how a reactivity series can be used to predict the products of a
replacement type of chemical reaction.
3. Describe and give examples of the decomposition type of chemical reaction.
4. Describe solutions in terms of solute, solvent, solubility, concentration, and
saturation.
5. Describe and give examples of gaseous, liquid, solid, and aqueous solutions.
6. Demonstrate how the formation of solutions can lead to chemical reactions and
vice versa (ex. 9. acid + base = salt and water).
7. Describe the properties of acids and bases and apply methods, e.g. indicators, to
identify familiar materials as acids, bases, or neither.
8. Define pH as a measure of the degree of acidity or basicity of solutions, and
demonstrate the use of indicators or electronic devices to measure pH.
9. Demonstrate and explain the neutralization of acids and bases. Leading to the
formation of salts.
10. Demonstrate and explain the chemical reactivity of acids and bases and their
effects to cause chemical reactions or to increase the rate of reactions.
11. Explain how other factors such as temperature and reactant concentration
affect the rate of chemical reactions in solution.
12. Discuss environmental consequences related to the nature of solutions and
chemical reactions producing air and water soluble materials as products of power
generation, mining, or other industrial processes.

Terminology: Reactivity, solution, solvent, solubility, concentration, saturation, acid,
base, pH, neutralization

MYP
Related Concepts
Concept


Change Consequences
Interaction
Environment

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Globalization and
Sustainability


Statement of Inquiry

The interactions of
different materials cause
changes that may have
environmental
consequences.


Factual: Which factor/s
have the biggest influence
on rates of reaction?

Conceptual: If one
material is chemically
more reactive than
another material under
one set of conditions,
does that order of
reactivity apply under
other conditions?

Debatable: Can we
effectively apply chemical
changes as
countermeasures against
undesirable changes that
are affecting or have
affected the
environment?

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 8 Science Biology


Grade Level Theme for Year: Climate Change
Time Frame: 6 Weeks
Breathing and Circulation

MYP
Concept


1. Describe the circulatory system as a system of tubes with a pump and valves to ensure one way Systems
flow of blood throughout the body

2. Describe the double circulation in terms of a low pressure circulation to the lungs and a high
pressure circulation to the body tissues and relate these differences to the different functions
of the two circuits
3. Describe the structure of the heart including the muscular wall and septum, chambers, valves
and associated blood vessels
4. Describe the function of the heart in terms of muscular contraction and the working of the
valves
5. Investigate, state and explain the effect of physical activity on pulse rate
6. Describe coronary heart disease in terms of the blockage of coronary arteries and state the
possible causes (diet, stress and smoking) and preventive measures
7. Describe the structure and functions of arteries, veins and capillaries
8. Describe the transfer of materials between capillaries and tissue (diffusion and osmosis)
9. Explain that oxygen is required by all cells to carry out cellular respiration (more complicated
knowledge of the process is not required)
10. Identify red and white blood cells as seen under the light microscope on prepared slides, and in
diagrams and photomicrographs
11. List the components of blood as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and plasma
12.
State the functions of blood:
Red blood cells hemoglobin and oxygen transport
White blood cells phagocytosis and antibody formation
Platelets causing clotting (no details)
Plasma transport of blood cells, ions, soluble nutrients, hormones, carbon dioxide, urea
and plasma proteins
13. List the features of gas exchange surfaces in animals
14. Identify on diagrams and name the larynx, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli and
associated capillaries
15. State the differences in composition between inspired and expired air
16. Use lime water as a test for carbon dioxide to investigate the differences in composition
between inspired and expired air
17. Investigate and describe the effects of physical activity on rate and depth of breathing
18. Describe the role of the ribs, the internal and external intercostal muscles and the diaphragm
in producing volume and pressure changes leading to the ventilation of the lungs
19. Explain the role of mucus and cilia in protecting the gas exchange system from pathogens and
particles
20. Explain the link between physical activity and rate and depth of breathing

Terminology: double circulation, septum, left atrium, right atrium, left ventricle, right ventricle,
valves, pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, vena cava, aorta, coronary artery, heart attack, stroke,
artery, vein, capillary, diffusion, osmosis, cellular respiration, red blood cells, white blood cells,
diaphragm, intercostal muscles, ribs, larynx, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli, lime water,
CO2, platelets, plasma, nutrients, hormones, urea
Content

Related
Concepts

Structure
and
Function

Processes

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Scientific and
Technical
innovation


Statement of Inquiry

Systems cells and systems
of the body interact to
maintain life.

Factual: How are blood
cells specialized to carry
out their job?

Conceptual: How is
structure related to
function in the lungs and in
the heart?

Debatable: Should Doctors
prescribe drugs to prevent
heart disease if patients do
not modify their diet or
exercise regime at the
same time? (ex. Statins)

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 8. Physics
Grade Level Theme for Year: Sustainable Survival
Time Frame: 12 weeks


MYP
Concept


Related
Concepts


Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Electricity and Heat


Electricity:

1. Distinguish between static and current electricity.
2. Use the principles of static electricity to explain common electrostatic phenomena.
3. Distinguish between conductors and insulators.
4. Discuss how various forms of energy can be transformed into electrical energy (e.g. wind turbines, hydroelectric
plants, solar panels, nuclear, etc.)
5. Illustrate how electrical energy is transformed into other forms (draw simple energy diagrams).
6. Describe the functions of the components of a simple circuit (light bulb, battery, wires, motor, etc.)
7. Build series and parallel circuits.
8. Distinguish the characteristics between series and parallel circuits.
9. Use voltmeters and ammeters in series and parallel circuits to measure current and voltage at different points in
the circuit.
10. Deduce the relationship between resistance, current and voltage.
11. Define electrical power (in kW) and electrical energy (in kWh).

Terminology: static, current, electricity, voltage, conductors, insulators, turbines, hydroelectric, solar panels, nuclear
energy, appliances, series circuit, parallel circuit, ammeters, voltmeters, resistance, power, Watts, etc.

Heat:


1. Use the particle theory to describe how energy affects the motion of particles in solids, liquids and gases.
2. Distinguish between heat and temperature.
3. Describe the effects of changes in temperature on volumes of solids (bridges), liquids (rising sea levels), and
gases (air in car tires).
4. Describe the direction of heat flow.
5. Explain how heat is transmitted through conduction, convection, and radiation.
6. Explain the meaning of heat capacity (no calculation just concept).
7. Compare the heat losses among the different types of windows.
8. Compare the efficiency of different light bulbs.
9. Discuss how certain architectural features in houses (walls, floors, color, windows, roofs, etc.) slow down heat
transfer during the winter and summer months.
10. Describe the role of radiation in heating and cooling the earth.
11. Discuss the role of greenhouse gases in the earths average temperature.
12. Explain the causes and effects of anthropogenic greenhouse effect on the earths climate.
13. Identify common sources of greenhouse gas and describe ways of reducing emissions of these gases.

Terminology: Temperature, heat, solids, liquids, gases, heat transfer, conduction, convection, radiation, evaporation,
heat capacity, heat loss, efficiency, greenhouse gases, greenhouse effect, anthropogenic.


Systems


Energy
Efficiency
Environment


Scientific and
Technical
Innovation





Humans must strive to
maximize the efficiency
of devices in order to
reduce their
environmental impact.

Factual: How is
efficiency determined?

Conceptual: How do you
design an energy
efficient building?

Debatable: Is our
observed climate
change a natural
process or is it human-
induced?

Content

Statement of Inquiry

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 8: Physics
Grade Level Theme for Year: Sustainable Survival
Timeframe: 6 Weeks

Fluids

Content
This unit should be connected to the Science Fair with an investigatory project linked to
Efficient Transportation.

1. Define density.
2. Calculate the density of an object.
3. Give the difference between mass and weight.
4. Distinguish between force and pressure.
5. Calculate pressure (P = F/A).
6. List factors affecting hydrostatic pressure.
7. State how pressure changes with altitude and depth.
8. Identify and explain examples of situations that involved balance pressure and unbalanced
pressure.
9. State Pascal's principle.
10. Give examples of applications of Pascals principle.
11. List factors affecting atmospheric pressure.
12. Identify forces acting on an object immersed, or submerged, in a fluid.
13. Define displacement (volume of fluid).
14. Define buoyant force and its effects.
15. State Archimedes' principle.
16. Explain how the density of an object determines whether it floats or sinks.
17. Calculate the buoyant force acing on an object (simple calculation on the weight of the
displaced fluid equals the buoyant force).
18. Solve qualitative or quantitative problems involving buoyancy, floating and/or sinking.
19. Define drag.
20. List factors affecting drag.
21. State Bernoullis Principle.
22. Outline the process of generation of lift in airfoils and hydrofoils.
23. Explain how the consideration of drag and lift relate to
the shapes of: birds' wings, aquatic animals, seed dispersion, aircraft wings, terrestrial and
marine vehicles, parachutes
damage caused by hurricanes

Terminology: Force, weight, pressure, area, altitude, fluids, atmospheric pressure, submerged,
flotation, buoyancy, density, displacement, drag, airfoil, lift, etc.


NOTE to teacher for biology link: Emphasize oxygen and carbon dioxide amounts at different
altitudes and atmospheric levels when talking about gases.

Related
Concepts




Relationships Movement
Development
Pattern

MYP Concept

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)


Scientific and
Technical
Innovation






Statement of Inquiry


Students will understand that
relationships between forces
and pressure are evident in
animals locomotion (and in
some plants) and that
humans use the same
principles to improve
methods of transportation.

Factual: What factors affect
pressure?

Conceptual: Why do objects
float or sink?

Debatable: What form of
public transportation would
be most efficient for the City
of Atlanta to invest in?

7/31/14 3:21 PM

Grade 9
MYP Units
Revised for teaching Fall 2014

Grade 9: Chemistry
Grade Level Theme for Year: Human Health
Timeframe: 12 Weeks
Chemical Bonding
Content

1. Apply theoretical models to illustrate atoms and ions of each of the first 20 elements of
the periodic table.
2. Show and explain how electrons are arranged in varying energy levels in an atom for
each of the first 20 elements of the periodic table and distinguish electrons occupying the
highest energy level (valence electrons).
3. Relate the number of valence electrons in an atom of an element to the position of the
element in the periodic table and to its chemical reactivity.
4. Describe the role of atoms, electrons, ions, and forces in metallic, ionic, and covalent
bonding.
5. Outline the electrical nature of the forces involved in each type of chemical bonding.
6. Explain how metallic, ionic, or covalent bonding occurs between certain elements and
not others.
7. Explain how metallic bonding determines the properties of metals and give examples.
8. Explain how ionic bonding determines the properties of ionic substances and give
examples.
9. Demonstrate the rules for writing chemical formulas and naming ionic compounds.
10. Balance chemical equations representing chemical reactions of ionic compounds.
11. Explain how covalent bonding determines the properties of covalent (molecular)
substances, including interactions between molecules, and give examples.
12. Apply covalent bonding rules to infer and model the structure of simple molecular
compounds of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen.
13. Give examples of how covalent bonding can produce giant/complex molecules such as
minerals, polymers/plastics, drugs, and biomolecules.
14. State the properties of hydrogen bonding with reference to water.
2-

15. Outline the properties of polyatomic ions (SO4 , CO3


2-,

NO3

1-

MYP
Concept

Systems

Related
Concepts

Models

Form and
Function

Interactions

Evidence

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Scientific and
Technical
Innovation



Statement of Inquiry

Investigating properties
of matter leads to an
understanding of
natural functions and
innovative application
of materials.


Factual: How can
know anything about
the atoms comprising
matter if we cannot see
them?

Conceptual: In what
ways do the building
blocks of materials
affect their properties?

Debatable: Are man-
made materials better
than natural materials?

, NH4+ )

Terminology: atom, ion, proton, neutron, electron, charge, electron arrangement, valence
electron, metallic bonding, ionic bonding, covalent bonding, molecule, matter, material,

polyatomic.

7/31/14 3:22 PM

Grade 9 Science Biology


Grade Level Theme for Year: Human Health
Time Frame: 12 Weeks

Health and Disease/Hormones and Homeostasis

Content (2 pages)

MYP Concept

Related
Concepts
Function
Evidence
Interaction

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)
Scientific and
Technical
Innovation

Hormones and Homeostasis


Systems

1. Define homeostasis as the maintenance of a constant internal environment
2. Identify, on a diagram of the skin and/or micrograph: hairs, sweat glands, temperature receptors and blood vessels
3. Describe thermoregulation humans in terms of insulation and the role of temperature receptors in the skin,
sweating, shivering, vasodilation and vasoconstriction of arterioles supplying skin surface capillaries and the
coordinating role of the brain
4. Conduct and evaluate a lab to model the effect of sweating on body temperature (wet and dry newspaper wrapping
on the rate of cooling of water in a test tube)
5. Explain that thermoregulation keeps enzymes at an optimum temperature and that enzymes are necessary to
catalyze chemical reactions
6. Conduct and evaluate an experiment to explore factors affecting the rate of an enzyme catalyzed reaction (catalase
and hydrogen peroxide.)
7. Explain that the thermoregulatory center is in the hypothalamus in the brain
8. Explain the concept of control by negative feedback in homeostasis
9. Define a hormone as a chemical substance, produced by a gland, carried by the blood, which alters the activity of one
or more specific target organs and is then destroyed by the liver
10. Describe the pioneering work of Banting and Best in relation to the treatment of diabetes
11. Discuss the two different types of diabetes
12. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using genetic engineered human insulin vs insulin derived from pigs
(details of the process of GM to be studied in grade 10.)
13. Describe the control of the glucose content of the blood by the liver, and by insulin and glucagon from the pancreas
14. State the role of the hormone adrenaline in chemical control of metabolic activity, including increasing the blood
glucose concentration and pulse rate
15. Give examples of situations in which adrenaline secretion increases

Terminology: homeostasis, hypothalamus, adrenaline, hormone, blood glucose, insulin, glucagon, pancreas, liver,
thermoregulation, vasodilation, vasoconstriction, temperature receptors, arterioles, capillary, negative feedback, type I
and type II diabetes

Health and Disease

1. Define the term pathogens and disease
2. State what types of pathogens are responsible for infectious diseases (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa)
3. Deduce how infectious diseases may be transmitted and how lifestyle and living conditions may affect the spread
4. Understand how the body prevents the entry of pathogens by using:
The skin which acts as a natural barrier
Mucus in the respiratory passages to trap some pathogens
Cilia on cells in the respiratory passages to move the mucus and trapped pathogens up to the throat
Acid conditions in the stomach, vagina and urethra which kills some pathogens
The ability to produce scabs which form following blood clotting at the site of wounds
White blood cells to combat pathogens
5. Understand that microorganisms
Reproduce rapidly in the body
Produce toxins (poisons)


Statement of Inquiry
Systems of the body are
interconnected and operate to
maintain optimal internal
conditions and to defend us from
the harmful effects of pathogens.

Are more likely to cause disease if large numbers of microorganisms enter the body as a result of unhygienic
conditions or contact with infected people
Explain how the treatment of disease has changed as a result of increased understanding of the action of antibiotics
and immunity (possible link to history)
State that antibiotics cannot be used to treat viral infections
Explain how white blood cells combat pathogens
Ingesting pathogens
Producing antibodies, which destroy particular bacteria and viruses
Producing antitoxins, which counteract the toxins released by pathogens
Explain how over use of antibiotics may lead to selection of resistant strains of bacteria
Evaluate the problems of antibiotic resistance in a modern hospital context.
Relate the contribution of Semmelweis in controlling infection to solving modern problems with the spread of
infection in hospitals
Evaluate the work of Pasteur with pathogens in milk
Investigate the effect of antibiotics or anti-bacterial products on bacteria
Explain the process of vaccination and immunity
Examine the controversy surrounding the published link between MMR vaccine and autism and the subsequent
retraction by Lancet.
Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of being vaccinated against a particular disease
Evaluate the consequences of mutations in bacteria and viruses in relation to epidemics and pandemics
Examine the case of Jenner, who, when investigating the smallpox vaccination, made an observation, formed a
hypothesis and then investigated it.
Discuss the ethical, moral and social issues of his work.

6.
7.
8.

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.


Terminology: pathogen, disease, bacteria, virus, fungi, protozoa, mucus, cilia, macrophage, antibiotics, toxins, antitoxins,
antibodies, antigens, memory cells, antibiotic resistance, vaccination, petri dish, inoculation loop, medium
7/31/14 3:22 PM

Grade 9: Physics
Grade Level Theme for Year: Human Health
Timeframe: 12 Weeks

Light and Sound

Content

MYP Concept

Related
Concepts

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Statement of Inquiry


Light:
1. Trace the path of light using a ray.
2. Describe how light behaves when it encounters a boundary (absorbed, reflected or refracted).
3. Apply the principle of similar triangles to solve problems regarding image, object size and distance (shadows and pinhole
cameras)
4. Explain how changes in the shape of the lens lead to accommodation.
5. Investigate Snells Law
6. Define the terms focal point and focal length.
7. State the relationship between focal length and lens curvature
8. Describe the action of convex and concave lenses, of different powers, on parallel, diverging, and converging rays of light.
9. Construct ray diagrams for convex and concave lenses, including camera - projector - photocopier, and magnifying glass (simple
microscope).
10. Label a diagram of a human eye, including the following parts: sclera, cornea, iris, pupil, ocular lens, ciliary muscle, retina, fovea,
optic nerve, blind spot. Outline the functions of the above parts.
11. Compare the action of the (a) pupil to a pinhole, (b) cornea & lens to a lens in a camera, (c) retina to a film or CCD.
12. Outline the causes and consequences of the following defect: myopia, hyperopia, presbiopia, and albinism
13. Explain how lenses can be used to correct [refractive] vision defects.
14. Describe the production of the visible spectrum using a prism.
15. Comment on the number of colors present in the visible spectrum (ROY G BIV).
16. Give the different components of the electromagnetic spectrum in order of increasing frequency (radio, microwaves, infrared,
visible light, UV, X-ray & Gamma ray)
17. State the primary colors relevant to trichromatic vision.
18. Describe the different types of color blindness.

Terminology: eye, sclera, cornea, iris, pupil, ocular lens, ciliary muscle, retina, fovea, optic nerve, blind spot, pinhole, shadows,
similar triangles, proportion, accommodation, reflection, absorption, refraction, focal point, focal length, convex, concave,
converging, diverging, rays, light, waves, myopia, hyperopia, presbiopia, albinism, color blindness, spectrum, etc.

Sound:
1. Define Oscillation, Vibration, Period, Frequency, Amplitude, Waveform.
2. Distinguish between Pitch, Volume, and Timbre of a sound.
3. State the relationships between Frequency, Amplitude, Waveform and Pitch, Volume, Timbre, respectively.
4. Sketch CRO traces corresponding to sounds of different pitches, volumes, and timbres .
5. Define the unit of frequency, hertz (Hz).
6. State the range of audible sounds (20 - 20,000 Hz).


Terminology: oscillation, vibration, period, frequency, waveform, amplitude, pitch, volume, timbre, fundamental, modes of
vibration, harmonics, resonance, etc.

Note: Significant opportunities for cross-curricular links with the Arts.



Relationships Interaction
Models


Scientific and
Technical
Innovation






Students will
understand how
scientific and
technological advances
involving wave
properties can be
utilized in different
medical and
technological
applications.

Factual: What are the
different wave
characteristics?

Conceptual: How do our
eyes (light) and ears
(sound) perceive the
different changes in
wave characteristics?

Debatable: Is lasik
surgery a more efficient
method to correct eye
defects than wearing
lenses?

7/31/14 3:22 PM

Grade 10
MYP Units
Revised for teaching Fall 2014

Grade 10: Chemistry


Grade Level Theme for Year: Sustainable Survival
Timeframe: 12 Weeks
Chemical Energy

Content

MYP
Concept

Related Concepts

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Statement of Inquiry



1. Define the mole and calculate the molar mass of a substance.
Change
2. Apply the molar mass to convert between units of mass and moles for any substance.
3. Express the ratio of the coefficients of any two substances in balanced chemical
equation as the ratio of reacting moles of those substances.
4. Predict the reacting quantity of one substance (reactant or product) in a chemical
reaction from the reacting quantity of another substance (reactant or product) as
represented in a balanced chemical equation.
5. Determine the actual yield, theoretical yield, and percent yield of chemical reactions
from measured and predicted quantities represented in balanced chemical equations.
6. Describe combustion as a type of chemical reaction and distinguish between
complete and incomplete combustion.
7. Describe the flow of energy associated with chemical reactions.
8. Explain the source of chemical energy on the molecular level.
9. Apply experimental methods to measure the heat of chemical reactions.
10. Apply quantitative methods to predict the heat of chemical reactions or changes in
state of matter.
11. Distinguish among the types and sources of carbon-based fossil fuels in terms of their
properties, abundance, methods of extraction and processing, and industrial
applications.
12. Discuss the carbon cycle and the scientific and societal implications of using
fossil/alternative fuels to produce energy.

Vocabulary:
mole, molar mass, yield, exothermic, endothermic, heat of reaction, enthalpy, fossil fuel,
alternative fuel, carbon cycle


Consequences
Energy
Environment


Globalization
and
Sustainability



Using chemicals as our main source of
energy has environmental consequences.

Factual: How can matter and energy in
chemical systems be measured,
manipulated, and expressed quantitatively?

Conceptual: In what ways does evaluation,
judgment, or prediction about the effects
of human activity on the environment
depend on quantitative measurements,
manipulations, and expressions?

Debatable: Will the continuing the use of
fossil fuels to generate power, cause
insurmountable environmental problems?

7/31/14 3:22 PM

Science 10. Physics


Grade Level Theme for Year: Sustainable Survival
Time Frame: 12 Weeks
Electrical Power Generation
Content
Magnetism and Electrical Power
1. Develop the basic concepts of the circuit theory (open vs. close circuit, voltage, current, resistance, power, electrical field).
2. Distinguish between magnetic and non-magnetic materials.
3. Identify poles of a magnet as the areas of (a) highest strength and (b) highest concentration of field lines.
4. Outline the structure of an electromagnet.
5. State factors affecting the strength of an electromagnet.
6. Compare the properties of permanent magnets to those of electromagnets.
7. Outline how electromagnets are used and how their properties are utilized in the following devices: lock, relay, buzzer, bell,
circuit breaker; loudspeaker, motor (DC and AC), (moving coil) galvanometer
8. State that a moving magnet can generate a current
9. Outline the structure and operation of an electric (AC) generator
10. Outline the operation of a turbine
11. Draw and label the structure of a transformer.
12. Outline how a transformer's AC output is generated.
13. Apply the equations N/N = V/V = I/I for an ideal transformer.
14. Distinguish between step-up and step-down transformers.
15. Outline elements of a power grid, including power stations, consumers, transformers, and transmission lines.
16. Explain why electrical power is transmitted at very high voltages.
17. Calculate power losses and transmission efficiency in power lines (resistive load only).
18. Discuss hazards associated with high voltage transmission lines.

Terminology: voltage, current, resistance, power, ferromagnetic, non magnetic, electromagnet, lock, relay, buzzer, bell, circuit breaker;
loudspeaker, motor (DC and AC), (moving coil) galvanometer, generator, turbine, step-up/step-down transformers, power stations,
power lines, power loss, etc.

Nuclear Physics
1. Describe the Bohr model of an atom.
2. State what an isotope means.
3. Determine the nucleon number A, proton number Z, and neutron number N of an atom.
4. Describe the interactions in a nucleus.
5. Describe the phenomenon of natural radioactive decay.
6. Describe different types of radiation (alpha, beta and gamma).
7. Outline the biological effects of ionizing radiation.
8. Explain why some nuclei are stable while others are unstable.
9. State the radioactive decay is a random and spontaneous process.
10. Define the term radioactive half-life.
11. Describe the process of nuclear fission and fusion.
12. Discuss how energy is produced during fission/fusion reactions.
13. State that nuclear fusion is the main source of the Suns energy.
14. Compare the principles behind the operation, efficiency, advantages, and disadvantages of the following power plants: solar
(thermal); geothermal; wind, hydroelectric, tide, ocean current, wave; gas, oil, coal, biomass/bio fuel; nuclear.

Terminology: model, isotopes, atomic mass, atomic number, nuclei, nucleon, nuclear force, alpha, beta, gamma, ionizing radiation,
radioactive decay, half life, artificial transmutation, atomic mass unit, random, spontaneous, fission, fusion, mass defect, binding
energy, solar (thermal), geothermal wind, hydroelectric, tide, ocean current, wave; gas, oil, coal, biomass/bio fuel, nuclear.

MYP
Concept

Change

Related
Concepts

Energy
Transformation
Environment

Global Context
(Formerly AOI)

Globalization
and
Sustainability





Statement of Inquiry

Expanding and diversifying
power production to meet
the needs of an expanding
global population has
environmental sustainability
consequences

Factual: How is electrical
power generated?

Conceptual: How are
electricity and magnetism
related?

Debatable: Are renewable
sources of energy better
than nonrenewable
sources?

Grade 10: Biology


Grade Level Theme for Year: Sustainable Survival
Time Frame: 12 Weeks
Genes and Variation
Evolution and Natural Selection
Content (2 pages)

Key
Concept

Related
Concepts

Global Context

Statement of Inquiry

Scientific and
technical innovation



The structure of DNA is related


to its function and there is a
connection between genetic
mutations and changes in
characteristics within
individuals and populations


Factual: How are genetic
abnormalities determined in
our society?

Conceptual: How have humans
,or other organisms, been
under pressure of
environmental forces that has
resulted in natural selection?

Debatable: How does
technology that allows humans
to manipulate the
development of species have
economic and environmental
implications?


Relationship
1. Describe the structure of DNA including complementary base pairing.
s
2. State that DNA codes for proteins which in turn control all other characteristics and biochemical

pathways
3. Define inheritance as the transmission of genetic information from generation to generation
4. Define the terms:
Chromosome as a thread of DNA, made up of a string of genes
Gene as a length of DNA that is the unit of heredity and codes for a specific protein. A gene may be
copied and passed on to the next generation
Allele as any of two or more alternative forms of a gene
Haploid nucleus as a nucleus containing a single set of unpaired chromosomes (e.g. sperm and egg)
Diploid nucleus as a nucleus containing two sets of chromosomes (e.g. in body cells)
5. Describe the inheritance of sex in humans (XX and XY chromosomes)
6. Define mitosis as nuclear division giving rise to genetically identical cells in which the chromosome
number is maintained by the exact duplication of chromosomes (details of stages are not required)
7. Discuss the role of mitosis in growth, repair of damaged tissues, replacement of worn out cells and
asexual reproduction
8. Define meiosis as reduction division in which the chromosome number is halved from diploid to haploid
(details of stages are not required)
9. Identify the karyotype of an individual
10.
Describe amniocentesis and its purpose
11.
Define the terms:
Genotype as genetic makeup of an organism in terms of the alleles present (e.g. Tt or GG)
Phenotype as the physical or other features of an organism due to both its genotype and its
environment (e.g. tall plant or green seed)
Homozygous as having two identical alleles of a particular gene (e.g. TT or gg). Two identical
homozygous individuals that breed together will be pure-breeding
Heterozygous as having two different alleles of a particular gene (e.g. Tt or Gg), not pure breeding
Dominant as an allele that is expressed if it is present (e.g. T or G)
Recessive as an allele that is only expressed when there is no dominant allele of the gene present
(e.g. t or g)
12. Calculate and predict the results of monohybrid crosses involving 1 : 1 and 3 : 1 ratios
13. State that continuous variation is influenced by genes and environment, resulting in a range of
phenotypes between two extremes, e.g. height in humans
14. State that discontinuous variation is caused by genes alone and results in a limited number of distinct
phenotypes with no intermediates e.g. A, B, AB and O blood groups in humans
15. Define mutation as a change in a gene or chromosome
16. Describe mutation as a source of variation, as shown by Downs syndrome (Trisomy 21)
17. Outline the effects of ionizing radiation and chemicals on the rate of mutation
18. Describe the role of artificial selection in the production of varieties of animals and plants with
increased economic importance
19. Define natural selection as the greater chance of passing on of genes by the best adapted organisms
20. Describe sickle cell anemia, and explain its incidence in relation to that of malaria

Models

Interaction

Evidence

21. Describe variation and state that competition leads to differential survival of, and reproduction by,
those organisms best fitted to the environment
22. Assess the importance of natural selection as a possible mechanism for evolution
23. Determine that evolution is the process of biological change within a population over time
24. Recognize that the theory of evolution is a scientific explanation based on a large accumulation of
evidence
25. Describe the development of strains of antibiotic resistant bacteria as an example of evolution by
natural selection
26. Define genetic engineering as taking a gene from one species and putting it into another species
27. Explain why, and outline how, human insulin genes were put into bacteria using genetic engineering

Terminology: DNA, complementary base pairing, adenine, thymine, guanine, cytosine, gene, inheritance,
chromosome, haploid, diploid, allele, nucleus, sperm cell, egg cell, sex chromosomes, mitosis, asexual
reproduction, meiosis, karyotype, amniocentesis, genotype, phenotype, homozygous, heterozygous,
dominant, recessive, monohybrid cross, discontinuous variation, mutation, Downs Syndrome, artificial
selection, natural selection, sickle cell anemia, malaria, evolution, antibiotic resistant bacteria, genetic
engineering, insulin

7/31/14 3:22 PM

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