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CITY LIMITS

40TH ANNIVERSARY
CELEBRATION GALA
HONORING WAYNE BARRETT AND HENRY GARRIDO

SEPTEMBER 26, 2016

City Limits uses


investigative journalism
through the prism
of New York City to
identify urban problems,
examine their causes,
explore solutions, and
equip communities to
take action.
OUR MISSION STATEMENT

www.citylimits.org1

Forty.
Forward.

A message from
the editor
My fellow New Yorker:
Since its founding in 1976, City Limits
has published thousands of articles on
matters big and small, tragic and joyful,
from every corner of the city, chronicling
the famous and obscure, casting heroes and
villains and passersby.
Together, these stories tell the tale of four
remarkable decades in the life of the greatest
city in the world.
Its not the standard history of New
York that filled our magazines, faxes, email
bulletins and web stories. But it is the one
we know to be true: a tale of struggle by
people who wanted a better city. Some
sought momentous change. Others aimed
for more modest goals. Each in their way
fought for justice and dignity. The city we
love today was shaped by their failures,
successes, frustration and hope.
Our anniversary, first and foremost,
celebrates these neighbors of ours.
We single out for honor two among
them: DC37 leader Henry Garrido, who has
spent a career fighting for the people who
make New York work, and Wayne Barrett,
whose tireless pursuit of the truth and
devotion to the city has set the standard for
all journalists.
Hundreds of writers, photographers,
editors, designers, donors, advertisers,
funders, sources and readers made City

Limits what it is; we gratefully lift a glass


to them.
And we ask all of them, and all of you, to
roll up their sleeves for the work ahead
because New York needs City Limits more
than ever.
Racism and climate change threaten.
Talent and diversity inspire. Inequality
persists and imagination blooms all
around us. The optimism and anxiety of
todays city demand the comprehensive,
conscientious reporting City Limits exists
to deliver. Having grown stronger during
the most difficult period the news industry
ever faced, City Limits is now ready to be
a larger and more forceful presence in the
New York of 2016 and beyond. With your
help, journalism distinguished by depth
and conscience can have an even bigger
impact on New York City during City
Limits next 40 years.
Our past is proud. Our time is now.
Thats true for City Limits and for the
city itself. In recent months, as Ive looked
though old issues and photo archives to
better understand the past were celebrating,
I realized that the story City Limits told is
not about New York. The story, instead,
is New York. Our city is not a finished
topography of streets and buildings but a
work in progress shaped by a multitude.
I cannot wait to see the next chapter,
and to help write it with you.
Yours,

Jarrett Murphy
Executive editor and publisher

2 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

City Limits 40th


Anniversary Gala
Benefit Committee
Gala Co-Chairs
Andy Breslau &
Michele DeMilly

Elizabeth Cooke Levy &


Reynold Levy

Robert Alexander

Esther Kaplan

Mark Anthony Thomas

Alyssa Katz

George Arzt

Jonathan Larsen

Jordan Barowitz

David Lebenstein

Neil Barsky

Jim Ledbetter

Bill Bastone

Nicholas Lembo

Jonathan Bowles

David Lewis

Joseph Calderone

Stuart Loeser

Jim Capalino

Shelly J.London

Mario Cilento

Richard Martin

Michele de la Uz

Kevin McCabe

David Dinkins
Janie Eisenberg
Mark Edmiston
Cheryl & Blair Effron
Richard Emery
Rachel Fee
Fernando Ferrer
Bart Friedman
Marilyn Gelber
Jerry Goldfeder
Mark Winston Griffith
LynNell Hancock
Alex Herzan
Anne Hess
David Cay Johnston
David Jones

Mary McCormick
Vinny McGee
Kim Nauer-Birbiglia
Nick Pileggi
Andy Reicher
Brooke Ritchie-Babbage
Tom Robbins

City Limits
Board of Trustees
Mark Edmiston, chairman
Dan Rubin, treasurer
Brent Phelps, secretary
Andrew Breslau
Bob Herbert
David Jones
Elizabeth Cooke Levy
Mark Lieberman
Jeff Maclin
Brent Phelps
Staff
Jarrett Murphy
Executive Editor & Publisher
Fran Reilly
Executive Director
Adina Berliant
Development Coordinator
Frederick Joseph
Marketing Director
Abigail Savitch-Lew
Staff Writer

Ben Reiter
Dan Rubin

William Traylor

Gene Russianoff

Doug Turetsky

Lee Saunders

Katrina vanden Heuvel

Ronald Shiffman

Andrew White

Hildy Simmons

Janice Savin Williams &


Christopher J. Williams

Ismene Speliotis
Ken Sunshine
Glenn Thrush
Michael Tomasky

Mark Willis
Kathryn Wylde
Sondra Youdelman

www.citylimits.org3

Thank You
CO-CHAIRS
Elizabeth Cooke Levy and Reynold Levy
Andy Breslau and Michele deMilly
JACOB RIIS LEVEL
Neil Barsky Bill Bastone Mark Edmiston Bart
Friedman Alex Herzan Vinny McGee Nick Pileggi
Andy Reicher Katrina vanden Heuvel Janice Savin
Williams & Christopher J Williams Community
Service Society Harper Collins Neighborhoods
First Fund
JOSEPH MITCHELL LEVEL
Robert Alexander Jordan Barowitz/Durst Organization Cheryl and Blair Effron Jon Larsen Mary
McCormick/Fund for the City of New York Ben
Reiter Dan Rubin William Traylor M&T Bank
Partnership for New York City
IDA WELLS LEVEL
Adam Blumenthal Assemblyman Jim Brennan
Joseph Calderone Jim Capalino Mario Cliento/
New York State AFL-CIO Michele de la Uz
Fernando Ferrer Jerry Goldfeder Anne Hess
Shelly J. London David Cay Johnston Alyssa Katz
David Lebenstein Jim Ledbetter Nick Lembo
David Lewis Richard Martin Kevin McCabe
Victor Navasky Kim Nauer-Birbiglia Lee Saunders Ismene Speliotis Ken Sunshine Mark
Anthony Thomas Michael Tomasky Mark Willis
The Downtown Lower Manhattan Association
Hotel, Restaurant & Club Employees and Bartenders
Union Local 6 New York Housing Conference
LINCOLN STEFFENS LEVEL
George Arzt Jim Buckley/UNHP Gail & Dan
Collins Maureen Connelly Harry DeRienzo/
Banana Kelly Community Improvement Association
Janie Eisenburg Audrey & Harvey Feuerstein Ruth
Ford Marilyn Gelber Jennifer Gootman Nicole
Gordon LynNell Hancock Ray Horton Marc Jahr
Sr. Paulette LoMonaco/Good Shepherd Services
Alice Martell Jim Mintz Martin Needelman
John Reilly Tom Robbins Ron Shiffman Claire
Silberman Hildy Simmons Brian Sullivan Glenn

Thrush Barbara Turk Andrew White Mary Zulack


Asian Americans for Equality Bedford Stuyvesant
Restoration Corporation Rev. Terry Troia/Project
Hospitality
MEMBERS
Marcia & Franz Allina Scott Anderson Leah
Archibald Michael Arena Alexa Aviles Lilliam
Barrios-Paoli Johanna Barr Nancy Biberman
Jonathan Bowles Charles Brecher Carolyn Brink
Arthur Browne Michael Clancy Harriet Cohen
Julius Colon Joseph DAgnese Anna Chiara Danieli
Jesse Drucker Kate Eberle Richard Emery Roger
Evans Cassi Feldman Adam Fifield David Fischer
Gregg Fisher Stephen Foster William Frey Michael
Gecan Rosalie Genevro Anat Gerstein Delfia
Gibson Jennifer Gonnerman Alexis Grenell Mark
Winston Griffith Tim Harper Karen Hein Alan
Hevesi Jennifer Hughes William Hughes Dara
Hunt Esther Kaplan Lisa Kaplan Denise Kiernan
Andrew Kirtzman James A. Krauskopf Luke
Kummer Christine Lagorio-Chafkin Maria Laurino
Magdalena Lesniakiewicz Mark Lieberman Sandra
Lobo Stuart Loeser Elizabeth Lorde-Rollins
Ronnie Lowenstein Bryant Mason Ben Max
Ruth Messinger Cristi Miller John Mollenkopf
Jordan Moss Ana Oliveira Bich Ha Pham William
Rashbaum Gene Russianoff Alex Schwartz
Marla Simpson Fred Smith Carol Smolenski
Anthony Smyrski Eliot Spitzer Bernard Stein
Elizabeth Strojan Kim Sweet Doug Turetsky
Judith Whiting Sondra Youdelman Community
Voices Heard
City Limits would like to acknowledge the indispensable
support of Silverstein Properties, David Joseph Catering,
Harper Collins, DC37 Director of Strategic Initiatives
Chris Policano and the many volunteers and vendors who
made this celebration a success.
City Limits is especially appreciative to those ticket
buyers who could not attend but donated their
tickets so that journalism students and interns
could join us this evening.

4 

The Urban
Journalist
Award
Chester Higgins Jr./The New York Times/Redux

AYNE BARRETT HAS REPORTED ON

New York City, state government and


national figures for more than four
decades. During that time he has earned a place
among the greatest investigative reporters in city
history.
A product of Lynchberg, Va., Barrett attended
St. Josephs College in Philadelphia and then the
Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.
He worked as a teacher in the Ocean Hill-Brownsville school district during the 1968 strike. He began
writing for the Village Voice in 1973 and was given a
column there in 1978.
Over the next 33 years, equipped with an allergy
to all flavors of corruption and an inhuman commitment to the drudgery of muckraking, Barrett held
accountable mayors and borough presidents,
members of Congress and senators, presidents and
governors, candidates and consultants, the heads of
city agencies and state authorities, religious leaders,
social-service providers, lobbyists, businessmen,
unions, his fellow reporters and many more. He
trained a legion of interns, many of whom went on
to careers in reporting and public service.
With his mentor Jack Newfield, he wrote the indispensable City for Sale, a 1988 classic of urban history
and investigative reportage. His biographies of Donald
Trump (1992 and recently updated and republished)
and Rudy Giuliani (2001) are essential reading for
anyone seeking to understand those men and the
city that produced them. The 2007 book Grand Illusion, written with Dan Collins, obliterated persistent
myths about this citys worst day.
After leaving the Voice in 2011, Barrett was a
Nation Institute fellow and a contributor to Newsweek and the Daily Beast; neither Chris Christie nor

Andrew Cuomo nor Bill de Blasio has escaped his


scrutiny in long-form articles for the Daily News. The
change in byline hasnt altered Barretts approach to
work: As he has for decades, Barrett continues to
investigate the world from his home in Windsor
Terrace, which he shares with his wife of 47 years,
Fran Barrett, who serves as New York States InterAgency Coordinator for Not-for-Profit Services. His
son Mac is the Barretts upstairs tenant.
Though beloved even by some whom he has skewered, Barrett has not been universally appreciated.
Some attacked him: Barrett was arrested in 1990
for crashing a Donald Trump party in Atlantic City,
and was assaulted by broomstick-weilding Bronx
social-services emperor Ramon Velez in 1985. Others
simply ran from him, or tried to. One political operative eluded Barrett and intern Bill Bastone for weeks
in 1984, until he was traced to Beth Israel Hospital.
The man awoke from a post-operative nap to see the
reporters standing at his bedside. The groggy patient
could only croak: You must be Wayne Barrett.
My credo has always been that the only reason
readers come back to you again and again over
decades is because of what you unearth for them,
and that the joy of our profession is discovery, not
dissertation, Barrett wrote upon his departure from
the Voice. There is also no other job where you get
paid to tell the truth. Other professionals do sometimes tell the truth, but its ancillary to what they do,
not the purpose of their job. He added: It was always
the conduct that prodded me to write, not the person.
And that is what I lived for, a chance to say something that revealed and mattered. To me, the story will
always be the thing. It is all I can see.

www.citylimits.org

The Civic
Champion
Award

ENRY A. GARRIDO IS THE FIRST LATINO

to head District Council 37, the largest


municipal employees union in New York
City. A native of the Dominican Republic, Mr.
Garrido assumed the position on Dec. 31, 2014.As
executive director, Mr. Garrido leads a union of
121,000 municipal workers who come from around
the world and are employed in 1,000 job titles.
The unions members work in mayoral agencies,
the public schools, city libraries and cultural
institutions, the Health and Hospitals Corp., the
Metropolitan Transportation Authority, School
Construction Authority, Emergency Medical
Services, the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel
Authority, the Unified Court System and New York
Law School.
Before becoming executive director, Mr. Garrido
served for four years as associate director during
the administration of longtime DC 37 leader Lillian
Roberts, who retired in 2014. As associate director
from 2011 to 2014, Mr. Garrido was involved in DC
37 policy and administration. His responsibilities
included testifying at the City Council and State
Legislature on union issues, administering the DC
37 field staff and coordinating the unions white
paper project, which addressed city waste by investigating contracting out and identifying revenue
sources. He also was involved in an initiative on
sustainability and green jobs in New York State.
Mr. Garrido helped establish a housing program for
municipal employees, which he administered. The
Municipal Employees Housing Program handles
over $3 million in grants for first-time homebuyers,
foreclosure prevention services and an educational
and counseling program. The program also provides
a preference for municipal employees in all city- and

state-sponsored apartment lotteries.


In his final year as associate director, Mr. Garrido
helped settle a new 88-month economic agreement
that preserved the memberships premium-free
health-care coverage and includes a total wage
increase of 10.4 percent. He also implemented a
computerized grievance tracking system at the
union and led an internal organizing drive to sign
up 14,000 dues payers who had not enrolled as
members. Garrido attributes his progressive political outlook to his mother, a garment worker, who
used to tell him about the indignities and abuses on
the factory floor. The garment workers union gave
her protection and a voice, leading Mr. Garrido to
understand the importance of the labor movement
at a young age. In 2003, Mr. Garrido finished his
college studies at City College of New York, where
he earned a bachelors of science degree in architecture. But he decided not to pursue a career in architecture because he enjoyed the stability and mission
of his union job.
While at DC 37, Mr. Garrido also completed the
Harvard Law Schools Trade Union Program, which
helps union leaders develop strategies for organizing
and responding to employer attacks As the leader of
the flagship affiliate of the American Federation of
State, County and Municipal Employees, Mr. Garrido
has assumed the responsibility of heading DC 37 at
a time when the labor movement particularly
in the public sector is under attack around the
country. His goals include expanding the membership, strengthening DC 37s ties to the community,
improving services and encouraging members to get
more involved in union activities. His two children,
Christopher and Leslie, are his greatest joy.

6 

The first issue, February, 1976

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Forty. Forward.
A Developing Story
The conventional narrative of New York City after the
1970s fiscal crisis emphasizes what mayors, police
commissioners, developers and other powerful
people did. But thats not the story. Its just one story.
From its founding 40 years ago, City Limits has told
a different taleone that sometimes complemented
and other times contradicted the official version.
Thats because we talked about the New York seen by
tenants, single mothers, strikers, prisoners, advocates,
social workers, the homeless, the young and others
who, when they strolled the traditional corridors of
power, did so with a visitors pass.
As the excerpted stories that follow illustrate,
those New Yorkers had their own kind of power, and
the city has always been shaped by it.
And always will be. The storylines that dominate
our citys headlines todayincome inequality, racial
disparities, the housing crunchare the ones weve
been writing about since our founding. Thats why no
media outlet is better positioned than City Limits to
cover the next chapter in New Yorks story.

8 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Corlandress Pittman
at the Willard J. Price
Houses in 1992.
(FM Kearney)


1976
A MESSAGE FROM THE
EDITORS
February
With this introductory issue of
City Limits, the Association is
responding to a need, expressed
at our retreat last September, for
more communication within and
among people and organizations
in the movement to save and
improve housing for low- and
moderate income residents of
New York City. We hope that our
members and affiliate groups as
well as others concerned with
our citys housing problems will
find this publication to be useful.
To insure that it will serve the
community housing movement
and to make future issues better
and more effective, we urge our
readers to keep in touch with
us. Please let us know what you
think of this issue; how should
it be improved; what do you
want to see included in future
issues; what should be left out?

1977
ORGANIZED COMMUNITY
GROUPS HELP WIN RENT
CONTROL EXTENSION
May
In a surprise move, the
Republican party members who
control the New York State

Senate announced on April 25th


that they would introduce and
vote for legislation extending,
for four years, the present
Emergency Tenant Protection
Act. What is significant about the
Republicans action, in addition
to assuring thousands of New
York City rent-stabilized and
upstate rent-controlled tenants
of continued protection, is the
manner by which it was brought
about. Without a well-planned,
coordinated and executed action
program by the organized tenant
groups, the turn-about would not
have happened.


1978
UPHILL BATTLE TO BRAKE
THE SLIDE OF 590 PARKSIDE
By Bernard Cohen
June/July
Mabel Kelly, 59, covers her
white lamp shades with plastic
to protect them from the soot
that blows so thick into her
apartment that she sometimes
thinks her building is on fire.
Downstairs, the mustard-colored
wall of her son Jamess kitchen
looks two-toned from the neat
line marking the upper limits

www.citylimits.org9

Martha Jones and


Jeanette Zelhof of MFY
Legal Services, 1990

of where he has cleaned off


the grime. Approximately one
third of the 40 units in the cityowned building at 590 Parkside
Ave. in Brooklyn are occupied.
A fire last November left a
50-square-foothole in the roof
that gobbled snow all winter
and went unrepaired until May
when James Kelly and two other
tenants fixed it themselves. There
was no heat or hot water for
weeks during the cold season
. The intercom has not worked
in years. Its just patch-up 590,
says Mrs. Kelly, shaking her head
and laughing.


1979
COUNCIL EYES RENEWED
J-51 PLAN FOR EVEN
BIGGER TAX GIVEAWAY
By Susan Baldwin
October
A city program that in 1979 will
reward owners who rehabilitate
buildings for multi-unit housing
with $74.8 million worth of
tax exemptions and abatements
could be a still bigger giveaway in
years to come, if City Hall has its
way. But, City Council insurgents
have mounted a challenge to
the
citys
business-as-usual
proposal to extend from 12 to 32
years owners exemption from
increased tax assessments and to
swell tax abatements from 90 to
100 per cent of owners costs.


1980
A DAY IN HOUSING COURT
By Susan Baldwin
November
Stories abound from Housing
Court, and terms like, Its a riot,
... a zoo, Its total chaos are
frequently used to describe it.
On the surface, every faction
tenants,
landlords,
judges,
attorneys,
community
and
tenant associationscomplain
about the court, but few have
suggestions for correcting it and
many argue, It might as well
stay the same because we have
learned to live with it and what
will replace it? Do we want to
take a chance on something else?

10 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Lilliam Rodriguez and


19-month-old daughter Leena
in the entrance to their
apartment. (FM Kearney)


1981
THE DESCENDING
BUDGET AX
By Tom Robbins
April
Reagan and his staff have
zeroed in on the public-service
employment program because,
they say, CETA must be
returned to its original purposes
improving the employability
of low income people, something
they charge PSE largely fails
to do. Their stand is buttressed
by a widely held belief among
Congressional legislators that
the program remains wracked by
the abuses that plagued its earlier
years when municipalities used
the federal job lines as patronage
plums and supplemented the
federal salaries with large
chunks of local money for middle
income people. CETA advocates,
on the other hand, counter that
many of those early problems
in the program have been
eliminated both through national
legislation and local initiative.
The program, they say, is today
a well-functioning, meaningful
and socially useful experience for
participants and neighborhoods.


1982
NEW YORKS
ENERGY FUTURE
By Barry Commoner
April


1983
ORGANIZING THE
NORTHWEST BRONX
By Tim Ledwith
March

The burden of energy costs on


the citys economy is not evenly
borne by its population. The poor
and the elderlypeople with
fixed or falling incomessuffer
most from the escalating cost
of energy. Thus, especially for
New York, the escalating cost of
energy is a viciously destructive
force. ... It is this dismal outlook
that has convinced some that
New York, along with other
northeastern cities, has outlived
its economically useful life and
should be allowed to decline.

The new approach took shape


with the birth of a reinvestment
committee,
composed
of
[Northwest Bronx Community
Clergy] Coalition members from
11 neighborhoods, in 1976. That
group started a series of meetings
with local lending institutions,
armed with the knowledge from
Federal mortgage disclosure
records that both the number and
amounts of loans in the northwest
Bronx were declining. At the
meetings, community members
asked flustered bank and insurance
company representatives about
their institutions reinvestment

www.citylimits.org11

performance. Unused to the


Alinsky-style organizing tactics
employed by the Coalition, the
lenders first balked at community
demands. But by January, 1980,
six major financial institutions
had been pressed into making
concrete commitments.

1984
BLACKS NEED NOT APPLY
By Nancy Stiefel
October
Starrett City advertised the good
life in the late seventies, but
blacks and other minorities were
offered just a 30 percent share
of that dream. Management said
higher numbers would cause the
6,000-unit project to tip. Some
rejected black applicants sued,
but no trial was held because this
spring a tentative settlement was
reached. Minorities, however,
would still be restricted and the
Reagan administrationfor its
own reasonshas challenged
it. Here a former Starrett rental
assistant gives the untold story of
how Starrett kept minorities out.

1985
THE HOLLIS RAPPERS
By Annette Fuentes
December
The Brothers Reeves are part
of an illustrious crew of Hillis
hometown boys making it in a big
way in New Yorks rambunctious
rap music scene. Over of 205th
lives Todd Smith a.k.a. LL Cool
J, and Joseph Simmons and Daryl
McDaniels live of 209th and
187th respectively. Those two

have become more well known


as the dapper rapper duo Run
DMC. Spyder D, formerly Duane
Hughes, grew up in Hollis too,
and went to school with Davy
DMC. So much energy, so
much talent, so much rapping to
come out of one small section of
the city.

1986
A SECOND CHANCE
By Doug Turetsky
August/September
The devastation was palpable,
physically and mentally. An entire
community seemed to be in its
death throes, with abandoned
buildings and littered, vacant
lots like scars on a community
that was one of the poorest in
the city, if not the entire state.
Kathleen Casuso remembers that
it was impossible to even walk
along the sidewalk for fear that
a chunk of debris would fall off
one of the innumerable deserted,
rotting buildings. The Brooklyn
community of Bushwick was
nearly laid to ruins by years of
governmental neglect and bank
disinvestment. But two public
housing developments have
shown there can be a road back
from urban decay.

1987
QUESTIONS GO BEGGING
IN KOCHS HOMELESS
SHELTER PLAN
By Beverly Cheuvront
May
Last October, Mayor Koch
announced a $100 million

plan to construct 20 homeless


shelters citywide, four per
borough. Although his plan
met with a barrage of criticism
from borough officials, housing
advocates, communities and the
homeless, he steamrolled his
project through the City Planning
Commission and is heading fullthrottle toward the Board of
Estimate. I dont suggest any evil
intent, but they sure are as inept
as hell, Manhattan Borough
President David Dinkins has
disparaged the administrations
solutions for homelessness.
Robert Hayes, counsel for the
Coalition for the Homeless,
summed up the mayoral proposal
for building large shelters as
stupid. Curiously, even as the
plan speeds ahead, Kochs aides
are tight-lipped about the fiscal
and design details of this project.
They argue that the mayors
proposal for large shelters will
be cheaper and faster than his
opponents counterproposals to
rehabilitate in rem apartments or
construct mini satellite shelters.
But they refuse to reveal the basis
for their comparison.

1988
BATTLE FOR THE BEACH
By Doug Turetsky
December
For more than two decades a
windswept piece of beachfront
known as the Arverne Urban
Renewal Area has sat vacant.
Last month, Mayor Edward
Koch announced plans to
sell the sitethe largest the
city ownsfor market-rate
development. The citys decision

12 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Children at Camp Homeward


Bound, an upstate summer
campfor homeless kids.

to opt for market-rate housing


on the Arverne site dovetailed
with the desires of many in the
Rockaway area. All the local
elected officials, the major civic
groups and the community
board endorse the decision. But
not all local residents believe
benefits from the arrival of
affluent neighbors city officials
estimate the new residents
will need annual incomes of at
least $65,000 to afford the new
housing will trickle down
to them . The city is trying to
sell us on a plan by saying the
market-rate housing will make
the area better, says Maureen
Meany. But we know the trickledown theory hasnt worked in
the federal government and it
hasnt worked in Atlantic City.

1989
STILL LOCKED OUT
By Errol Louis
February
In this election year, there are
signs that the issue of community
reinvestment may add some
extra spark to the usual heat of
city politics . For the first time
since the fiscal crisis of the mid1970s, community activists are
beginning to put bank policies
the foundation of the financial
systemsquarely on the public
agenda. Theyre doing it so

forcefully that elected leaders are


beginning to notice.

1990
LIFE IN A CITY-OWNED
CRACK HOUSE
By Lisa Glazer
November
Franklin Avenue is a narrow
strip of tar in Crown Heights,
Brooklyn, and on a blazing
summer afternoon it serves as
a kind of demarcation zone.
On one side of the street are
Gwendolyn Smith and her five
children, sitting on kitchen chairs
theyve brought down from their
apartment. On the other side of
the street, leaning against a black
metal dumpster, are a handful
of drug dealers. Yo, big-bottie
girl, yells one of the drug dealers
from across the street. He picks
up an empty glass bottle, throws
it in the air, and it smashes on
the street. The young men beside

him chortle, elbow each other


and swagger. Smith tenses her
mouth but quickly swallows the
insult. She turns her attention
toward her four-month old
baby, Mydisa, and wipes her face
clean. The drug dealers are bored,
business is slow and Smith isnt
taking any chances: She lives in
the same building the dealers
operate from.

1991
DISPOSABLE DREAMS
By Andrew White
October
All Boro, R2B2 and more than a
dozen voluntary dropoff centers
across the city are part of a
fledgling community recycling
network that provides a panoply
of economic and environmental
benefits. The organizations save
the city money by reducing the
flow of garbage to the nearlyfull Fresh Kills landfill. They

www.citylimits.org13

Brownsville, 1993.
(Suzanne Tobias)

offer jobs for unskilled workers


in need of steady income. And
they give practical recycling
experience to residents of
neighborhoods across the city.
In the wake of draconian budget
cuts, this network is now facing
extinction. The Department of
Sanitations recycling funds for
the current fiscal year have been
slashed from $65.5 million to
$11.4 million and all outside
contracts with community-based
groups have been eliminated.


1992
THE WELFARE REFORM
RUNAROUND
By Mary Keefe
June/July
On the wall outside Room 401 in
the South Bronx welfare office on
Rider Avenue is a large, framed
illustration of a Monopoly board
with a difference. The squares
on the board have names like
Education Avenue, Independence
Place and Employment Avenue.
And one corner of the board is
home to a large pair of smiling
red lips accompanied by a single,
tantalizing word: Paycheck. But
its very doubtful that the women
waiting on hard blue plastic
chairs inside the welfare office
will end up as smiling recipients
of a paycheck. Theyre part of a

historic social experiment called


welfare reform-and it already
appears to be failing in New York.

1993
CHINATOWN PORTRAITS
By Peter Kwong
May
Gwen Kinkead devotes one-third
of the book to criminal activities,
spinning gruesome tales of
Chinatown tongs and gangs.
Chinese underworld culture
and its murderous villains have
long kept American readers
entertained. Kinkeads construct
of a global Chinese criminal
network does not disappoint.
She paints the network as a
shadow army saturating the
U.S. with heroin and smuggled
illegal aliens. The sophistication

14 

of these criminal elements


has supposedly overwhelmed
our law enforcement. Kinkead
puts the blame on Chinatown
residents and their unwillingness
to cooperate with police. The
problems of Chinatown are
American problems. As the
U.S. continues its development
into a multi-racial society, the
false dichotomy-us vs. themmust cease. Kinkeads time-warp
treatment of cultural differences
created by circumstance precludes
a new societal order of mutual
respect and understanding.

1994
GUILTY UNTIL PROVEN
INNOCENT
By Kim Nauer
November
Some called it a case of mistaken
identity. Others said it was
perjury. But lying is exactly what
the Child Welfare Administration
did last July when the agency
went to Brooklyn Family Court
with a petition to remove
Caroline Cappas day-old baby
from her custody. The baby didnt
exist. The agency knew Cappas
had been pregnant four months
earlier. By their watch, she should
have had a child by now. So CWA,
which had already taken Cappas
five older children and placed
them in foster care, went forward
with the removal petition. For
good measure, the lawyers
invented a sex and birthdate for
the nonexistent child.

City Limits: Forty. Forward.


1995
THE BIG SQUEEZE
By Andrew White
May
It all began in the early part of the
last decade when, after 20 years of
devastating owner-abandonment
and arson-for-profit, government
returned to neglected areas
with low-interest financing,
replacing windows and boilers,
eventually even financing the
rehabilitation of entire buildings.
Within five years, this public
investment helped put a stop to
the long decline, recalls former
city housing commissioner Felice
Michetti. But it also sparked
private investment, much of it
extremely reckless, as speculators
got caught up in the highs of a
co-op conversion frenzy they
thought would spread from
gentrifying middle class areas.

1996
FORTY DEUCE
By Kierna Mayor Dawsey
August/September
It will all be, at long last, sane
remarkably so. But using my
own Brooklyn sensibilities as the
barometer, I would venture to
say that the new 42nd Street will
also prove intimidating, albeit
intriguing, to thousands of young
people who will grow up here
in the Big Apple and perhaps
never leavethose city kids
who unabashedly wear the oftmisunderstood banner of Black
and Latino urban youth culture
everywhere they go. Im afraid
theyll be shut out. Hell, they

like Mickey Mouse, too. But Im


very fearful its somebody elses
Disneyland

1997
PROMISES, PROMISES
By Glenn Thrush
June/July
The anger rising on Southern
Boulevard is directed at the
New
York
City
Housing
Authority, their landlord and,
to hear the tenants tell it, their
tormentor. Four years ago, most
of the residents gave up crowded
apartments in housing projects
or rundown private housing
to take units renovated under
the
authoritys
Multifamily
Homeownership Program.
If the promise had been kept,
thousands of tenants would
own their own placesand
the city would have developed
an important new program
to dispose of its huge backlog
of tax-foreclosed apartment
houses. It was supposed to
be a model of ingenuity and
innovation. Promises, promises.
[The program] has been almost a
complete failure and a study in
how a bigfoot bureaucracy can
trample a good ideaeven given
ample money, cream-of-thecrop tenants and the full force
of the 1990s national bootstrap
movement behind it.

www.citylimits.org15

Nicole Tai, a green-building


materials pioneer, in 2003.
(Margaret Keady)


1998
7-AND-A-HALF DAYS
By Kevin Heldman
June/July
A nurse comes out into the foyer.
She asks me what the problem is. I
tell her Im depressed, I need some
help, I don t want to go on living
like this, Im thinking about killing
myself. You use cocaine, huh?
Smoke some crack tonight, huh?
She frames it as a statement, not
a question. I say no, I dont use
drugs, Im just worn out by life,
overwhelmed by poverty and
stress, sick of going on. Several
more times she conspiratorially
asks me about the heroin or crack
Ive used. I say no repeatedly. She
tells me to pull up my sleeves and
looks for track marks.

1999
THE HARLEM SHUFFLE
By Kemba Johnson
November
Three years ago, HUD banned forprofit investors from the program,
citing problems with profiteering
and corruption. Now, City Limits
has learned, for-profit interests
are once again profiting mightily
from the 203(k) program. The
result: overpriced properties in
poor neighborhoods, quick-flip
speculation, and, in Brooklyn, a
chain of expensive defaults. This
is so big and such a mess, itll
take [HUD] years to figure this

out, says a HUD official close


to the Brooklyn investigation.
By that time there will be so
many [nonprofits] in default.
The program is supposed to
bolster home ownership. Instead,
the invasion of the Long Island
realties, backed with government
money, is pushing housing out of
reachand turning Harlem into
a cash machine.

2000
MAKING UP KIDS MINDS
By Liza Featherstone
July/August
Advocacy groups like the
Washington-based Center for
Education Reform tout charter
schools as a chance for poor
families to have control over
their childrens education-just as
wealthy people already do. The
rhetoric of choice goes all the way
up the political line. As Governor
George Pataki announced when

he signed New Yorks new law last


spring, Our new charter schools
will give parents real choices
in education and will provide
teachers unprecedented freedom
to innovate. But the law actually
works
against
innovation.
Charter schools cant get public
funding for startup costswhich
means, most seriously, no money
for constructing, renovating or
leasing a building .

2001
THE NEW WAGE MOVEMENT
By Annia Ciezadlo
March 2001
In this city, there are home
healthcare aides bathing sick
people for $6.55 an hour. There are
people making $7.82 an hour to
feed and play with children. And
then theres Bertie Caraway, still
living from paycheck to paycheck
on $7.49 an hour after 26 years of
cleaning house, running errands,

16 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Dancer at Club Tobago during


Carnival, February 2002.
(Regina Monfort)


2003
MARKET BABIES
By Tracie McMillan
January

doing laundry and preparing


meals for people too sick to take
care of themselves. Sometimes
I get very angry. I think Oh
my God, Ive been doing this
all these years, and look at my
wages, she admits. But I keep
working, because I care about
my clients. Helpless victims of
hardhearted bosses? Just more
casualties of corporate greed?
Hardly. These workers and more
than 100,000 others all work for
human-service nonprofits, and
the money in their paychecks
comes from the city of New York.

2002
WILLIAMSBURG BREWHAHA
By Matt Pacenza
May
Spectacular East River views, 1 to
7BR,roof gardens, parking, some

apts. affordable. Available 2003.


This ad may soon appear in papers
across the city as a developer
prepares to break ground this
spring on Williamsburgs first
waterfront housing development.
Slated for the former home of
the Schaefer Brewerywhich
operated along the riverfrom1918
to 1976the development is a
welcome answer to the areas
growing housing crunch. For
years, as East Village hipsters
priced out of Manhattan have
streamed into Brooklyn to find
more affordable places to live,
Williamsburgs longtime, lowerincome residents have clamored
for cheaper apartments. But the
citys choice of one local developer
over others has revived some old
tensions between the Hasidic and
Hispanic communities which
observers fear could reverse
years of mending.

Kwame Boame is only 6 years


old, but hes already got a helluva
commute.
Every
Monday
morning,
Kwames
mother,
Kimberly Paul, rustles him out
the door at 6:30 to take the A
train from their apartment in
the Dyckman Houses, at the
northern tip of Manhattan, to
the islands southern border. In
the Broadway-Nassau station,
next to the magazine stand
on the A platform, they meet
Kwames
great-grandmother,
who shepherds Kwame onto the
train to Bedford-Stuyvesant,
where he goes to school. For the
next five days, hell stay with
his grandmother and greatgrandmother. Kwame wont see
his mother again until Friday.
Kwames
weekly
commute
and bi-borough living are
Pauls response to a common
conundrum:
a
low-income
parents need to find affordable,
quality child care. Almost
since the city began building
its publicly funded day care for
low-income families through its
Agency for Child Development
in the 1970s,waiting lists have
numbered from thousands to
tens of thousands. Then came
welfare reform.

www.citylimits.org17

Bushwick, 2009 (Jacob


Silberberg)


2004
WILL YOU ADOPT ME?
By Kendra Hurley
June
Twelve-year-old Marisol Torres,
a round-faced girl with a pink
headband, long black hair and
thick bangs, sits primly before a
room of nearly 50 people at an
orientation in Harlem for adults
who are thinking of becoming
adoptive parents. In a few minutes,
Marisol will be videotaped as she
tries to persuade this audience
that someone out there should
become her new mother or
father. At first Marisol deftly
whittles the complications of her
life to a few charming facts
Then everything goes wrong.

2005
THE PEOPLES MAYOR?
By Alyssa Katz
July/August
The new Battery Park City
deal is a side effect of the
administrations
West
Side
redevelopment mania. In March
2004, the mayor and governor
announced an agreement to
finance the expansion of the
Javits Center, a plan that counted
on using $350 million in Battery
Park City revenues. That use
of the funds was shot down by
State Assembly Speaker Sheldon
Silver, and the city never pursued

it further. But the Javits flap was


a wake-up call to affordable
housing advocates: The Battery
Park City money was once
again in play. The Battery Park
City Authority had restructured
its debt, freeing $1.1billion in
proceeds and generating its final
payment to the city under the
1989 agreement.Theslate was
clean. And a new alignment of
advocacy organizations stepped
up to bring the pledge back from
the dead.

2006
DISSECTING WELFARE
STATS
By Cassi Feldman
April
The mayor grabbed headlines
earlier this month when he
announced that welfare rolls

had dipped to their lowest level


in more than 40 years. But new
data obtained by City Limits
from the Human Resources
Administration (HRA) reveals
a less impressive trend: Of the
recipients who leave welfare each
month, only around 23 percent are
known to have found work. The
rest, according to HRA, just stop
showing up for appointments.
Meanwhile, a dramatic 67 percent
of cases added to the rolls each
month are returnees, proof of
what advocates call churning,
the tendency of low-wage workers
to cycle between government
assistance and dead-end jobs. Oh
God, said Mark Levitan, senior
policy analyst at the Community
Service Society (CSS), a research
and advocacy group, when he
heard the new numbers. Talk
about a revolving door.

18 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Tanya Fields in 2011, when she


was operating a fledgling nonprofit shed founded and surviving
on Food Stamps. (Marc Fader)


2007
PRISONERS DILEMMA
By Jarrett Murphy
Fall
In an era of falling felony crime
rates but rising arrest numbers,
New York Citys courts are
increasingly dealing with lowlevel misdemeanor offenses that
years ago might never have led
to arrest, arraignment and bail.
And at the same time, a growing
litany of life consequences
the loss of housing, ineligibility
for some jobs, disqualification
for government assistance
have been arrayed to target
people found guilty even of
petty crimes and non-criminal
violations
like
disorderly
conduct. People who get arrested
today are likely to be accused
of more minor crimes but face
penalties for a conviction that go
well beyond prison or probation.
Bail can hasten those convictions
regardless of guilt or innocence

2008
A SHOW OF HANDS
By Ali Winston
March
The concerns, however, arent
confined to privacy issues.
CityTime critics like State
Assemblyman
Alan
Maisel

(D-59th District, Brooklyn) are


worried about the cost of the
entire program, which also
includes developing a computer
network for data transfers. I
have a hard time understanding
it, Maisel says. There is so much
money available for the Mayors
gadgets. The CityTime budget
from 1999 to date outstrips this
years proposed budget cuts of
$324 million and $95 million
for the Department of Education
and the NYPD, respectively.
Besides the size of the CityTime
budget, there are questions about
the companies whove been
contracted under it. A smaller
quality assurance contract with
Spherion, a Florida consulting
firm, has also raised red flags.
OPA chief Bondy launched his
own consultancy and worked
as a subcontractor for Spherion
on CityTime from 2002 to 2004
immediately prior to being hired
by the city. Bondys biography

on the OPA website does not


mention this work. Bondy and
City Hall maintain that his past
employment was brought to
the attention of the Conflicts of
Interest Board (COIB), and settled
appropriately.

2009
A WINTERS TALE
By Karen Loew
March
With local unemployment up,
home foreclosures continuing,
and dire economic indicators as
far as the eye can see, the citys
announcement last week that
street homelessness is down
30 percent from last year was
promptly met with disbelief
from some quarters. Merely
an hour after the Department
of Homeless Services issued
its press release Wednesday,
the Coalition for the Homeless

www.citylimits.org19

A crowd in Brownsville
during campaign 2013
(Adi Talwar)

issued one, too. The numbers


released by the city today defy
credibility and run counter to
what New Yorkers observe every
day on New York&s streets, said
Coalition Executive Director
Mary Brosnahan. Looked at
over a four-year period the
city is arguing it has cut street
homelessness in half. Do New
Yorkers really think there are
half as many homeless people on
our streets as four years ago?

2010
IS THE PROMISE REAL?
By Helen Zelon
March
There has been some success,
no doubt. Canada possesses
enormous integrity; his lifelong
dedication is unquestioned.
But its unclear whether the
Harlem Childrens Zone is an
exportable, adaptable commodity
that can work from Cleveland
to Compton or a sui generis,
only-inNew York idea. Not
every neighborhood could claim
the deep, dense financial and
political resources that have
nurtured the Harlem Childrens
Zone. Not everyone has a
homegrown Geoffrey Canada to
lead the way. How much does a
dynamic, charismatic, visionary
leader matter? Short answer: a
great deal.


2011
EVEN ENTREPRENEURS
NEED FOOD STAMPS
By Neil deMause
July


2012
YEARS OF WARNINGS, THEN
A BOYS DEATH
By Jordan Moss
March

Its Monday, Jan. 31, and as


usual, Tanya Fields is having
a hectic morning. The Bronx
mother of four has already had
to juggle her schedule after her
babysitter called in sick, forcing
her to be late for an important
appointment
in
downtown
Brooklyn. But on this occasion
unlike her daily work running
a nonprofit start-up or her
prior years as an environmental
advocatetheres no calling in
sick or asking to reschedule: This
appointment is for trying to keep
her welfare benefits.

Building blazes that kill kids


usually burn as brightly the next
morning in the tabloids. But the
fire that took 8-year-old Jashawn
Parker in the late evening of
Aug. 6, 2002, on a typically dense
northwest-Bronx block somehow
never got much inkjust a couple
brief stories in the Daily News
and a small item in the Post. Its
unclear why. The fire stemmed
from
a
hyperdocumented
virtual time bomb that tenants
and advocates had worked to
defuse for two years. The sixstory building at 3569 DeKalb
Avenue, just off Jerome Avenue
and next to Woodlawn Cemetery,
was a stunning case study of
the citys flawed housing-code

20 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

enforcement system, with the


scope of dangerous neglect
apparent to anyone with an
Internet connection. At the
time of the fire it had 387 code
violations, with leaks, water
damage, electrical problems,
roaches and mice among them. At
least two Housing Court judges
cut the buildings landlords slack
rather than appoint an outside
administrator, despite minimal
signs of repair progress.

sustained applause. For them


not to be here, Im pissed off so
bad, Monday morning Im going
to pick up the phone and Im
going to make some phone calls.


2013
CAMPAIGNS SKIP MOTT
HAVEN, DRUG CENTERS
AND SHELTERS DONT
By Joe Hirsch
March

People
come
to
hospital
emergency rooms to sleep, to
sober up, to get warm, to stay in
between other shelters. They come
if someone is violent at home, or
back on drugs, or if theyve lost
their job. As long as theyre not
disruptive, theres no reason to
think something else is going on,
says one hospital administrator,
who requested anonymity. There
are certain circumstances where
you do pay attention: Someone
comes in with a family, sits down
there for three or four hours.
Then, something needs to be done.
But for the most part, people use it
as a quick stay, to sober up, sleep
and then move on.

It was standing room only on a


Saturday afternoon in March at a
South Bronx church known for
its social activism streak, where
residents came, hoping to hear the
citys mayoral candidates explain
their positions on the issues.
There was only one problem:
The three candidates considered
frontrunners in next Novembers
electionCity Council Speaker
Christine Quinn, Public Advocate
Bill de Blasio and former
Comptroller Bill Thompson
were nowhere to be found. Many
expressed anger that Quinn,
de Blasio and Thompson had
ignored invitations to attend,
saying it was an indication of the
low regard in which the citys
power structure holds the South
Bronx. I dont know about you,
but right now, Im pissed off,
Pastor Kahli Mootoo of Bright
Temple AME Church in Hunts
Point bellowed into the mic, to


2014
FOR CLIENTS SICK OR NOT,
HOSPITALS SERVE AS SAFE
HAVENS
By Ruth Ford
March


2015
CLOSING RIKERS
By Ed Morales
November
Certainly there is plenty in the
air about criminal justice reform
not just in New York but all
around the country particularly
since the anguished summer of
civilian deaths at the hands of
police in Ferguson and Staten
Island last year, the emergence of

the Black Lives Matter movement


Whether that heightened
awareness translates into a death
sentence for Rikers depends not
just on the politics of closing down
one of the largest correctional
facilities in country, but on elected
officials ability to come up with
something to replace it.

2016
WATCHING THE WATCHMEN
By Adam Wisnieski and
Jonathan Gomez
May
In 1992, New York became a
nationwide leader in efforts to
clean up and professionalize the
private security industry when
Gov. Mario Cuomo signed the
Security Guard Act. But more
than two decades later, as their
resources dwindle, the state
agencies in charge of overseeing
the private security industry
struggle to make sure companies
and the guards they employ are
following the rules. A City Limits
investigation reveals a messy
training school system in New
York, full of discrepancies and
misinformation, where its even
possible to buy a certificate
without going through any of the
mandatory training. Over the last
couple decades, there have been
calls to update the Security Guard
Act, but aside from a few tweaks
here and there, the requirements
havent changed much since 1992.
In interviews with City Limits,
not only did industry leaders and
researchers say they wanted to see
changes, but guards themselves
said more oversight and better
training is needed.

City Limits gratefully acknowledges HarperCollins'


generous donation of Kevin Walsh's book,
Forgotten New York.

22 

Weve
Accomplished
Absolutely
Nothing
Wayne Barretts tremendous
legacy includes dozens of interns
whove gone on to great careers
in journalism, public service and
other fields. We carry forever
the skills we learned during our
months as Waynes assistant,
memories of the calls to his home
so he might dictate endless to-do
lists of tedious if not impossible
reporting tasks, and scars from
the occasionalor not so occasionaleruption of the infamous
Barret temper. So basically,
he told one terrified aide upon
hearing a particular days report,
youve accomplished absolutely
nothing. Rarely has so fearsome
a boss been so beloved.
In honor of Waynes unique
and steadfast insistence that all
of ones work be done on pads
of yellow legal paperearlier
ones littered his office like
sun-bleached bonesa few of
Waynes protgs jotted down
some of the lessons, about life and
reporting, they learned from him.
Many thanks to Sara Dover,
Bryan Farrell, Adam Fifield,
Adam Fleming, Alex Gecan,
Douglas Gillison, Keach Hagey,
Jeff Herman, Luke Kummer,
Anna Lenzer, Tracie McMillan,
Matteen Mokalla , Puneet Parhar,
Solana Pyne, Robin Shulman, and
Jane Timmand to Vinny McGee
for generously sponsoring these
pages.
-Murphy

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

www.citylimits.org23

Reynold Levy and Elizabeth Cooke Levy


salute City Limits for its four decades
of journalism with purpose.

The Community Service


Society of New York
and

President and CEO David R. Jones, Esq.


salute

City Limits
Henry Garrido and Wayne Barrett
our allies in working toward
a more just New York.

Kudos to the new kid on


the block, City Limits, on
its 40th Anniversary!
Your work makes us all
stronger!

The Neighborhoods First Fund is proud to


support City Limits' 2016 40th anniversary
gala and congratulates honorees
Wayne Barrett and Henry Garrido

NEIGHBORHOODSFIRSTFUND.NYC

City Limits Board Chairman

Mark
Edmiston
welcomes you to
tonight's event
congratulates
the honorees
and invites you
to be part of
City Limits' future.

Acknowledges
City Limits'
contributions to New York City
and coverage of housing
policy

The Village Voices Best Book Club (2008)


congratulates

WAYNE BARRETT.
In any deck of journalists,
he will always be the Trump card.

Love,
Alex, Alvin, Caroline,
Christina, Debby, Doug,
Jamie, Janet, Jonathan,
Lynne, & Steve

New York is a
more honest city
thanks to Wayne
Barrett. Thank
you for your
contributions to
civic sanity, to
journalism and to
friendship, Wayne.
-Neil Barsky

When our community


succeeds, we all succeed.
Congratulations to City Limits on 40 Years

At M&T Bank, we know how important it is to support those organizations


that make our communities better places to live and work. Thats why we
offer both our time and resources and encourage others to do the same.

mtb.com 2015 M&T Bank. Member FDIC.

UHAB applauds City Limits


contributions to New York City
and its coverage of
housing policy since 1976.

By guiding and creating strong tenant associations


and affordable co-ops, UHAB empowers low- to
moderate-income city residents to take control of
their housing and enhance communities.
UHAB was a founder of City Limits and
its steward for nearly 40 years.
www.uhab.coop
120 Wall St. 20th Floor
New York, NY 10005

Daniel and Jo-Anne


Rubin
congratulate
City Limits,
Henry Garrido
and
Wayne Barrett.
The panorama of the City of New York, Queens Museum of Art. Photo: OptimumPx

CONGRATULATIONS & BEST WISHES!


We are proud to support City Limits
We salute the important contributions made by the following
distinguished honorees:

Wayne Barrett
and

Henry Garrido
from

THE NEW YORK HOTEL TRADES COUNCIL


AFL-CIO
PETER WARD, PRESIDENT
CHRIS CUSACK, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT
RICHARD MAROKO. VICE PRESIDENT
KUBA BROWN, RECORDING SECRETARY
MICHAEL GOODWIN, SECRETARY TREASURER
&

HOTEL, RESTAURANT, & CLUB EMPLOYEES &


BARTENDERS UNION
LOCAL 6, UNITE HERE
PETER WARD, BUSINESS MANAGER
JIM DONOVAN, PRESIDENT
VANESSA MEADE, SECRETARY TREASURER
RICHARD MAROKO, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

The Durst Organization is


pleased to join City Limits
in honoring

Wayne Barrett
and Henry Garrido

1976 1977 1978


1979 1980 1981
1982 1983 1984
The Fund for the City of New York
is proud
to have been with
1985
1986
1987
City Limits
1988from1989
1990
the very beginning.
1991 Congratulations
1992 1993
on 40 years of independent journalism
1994 that
1995
helped move 1996
New York City forward
1997
1998
1999
and is needed
now more than
ever.
2000 2001 2002
2003 2004 2005
2006 2007 2008
2009 2010 2011
2012 2013 2014
2015 2016 2017
2018 2019 2020

CWA LOCAL 1180, AFL-CIO


Making Government Work For You

Salutes

CITY LIMITS

ON ITS 40th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION GALA

honoring
HENRY GARRIDOWAYNE BARRETT
OFFICERS

Arthur Cheliotes
PRESIDENT

Gina Strickland
FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

Gerald Brown

SECOND VICE PRESIDENT

Gloria Middleton
SECRETARY-TREASURER

Lourdes Acevedo
RECORDING SECRETARY

MEMBERS-AT-LARGE
Robin Blair-Batte
Hilary Bloomfield
Charles Garcia
Denise Gilliam
Lisa Lloyd
Debra Paylor
Lenora Smith
Venus Williams
Hazel O. Worley

LOCAL 1180 COMMUNICATIONS WORKERS OF AMERICA, AFL-CIO


6 Harrison Street ~ New York, NY 10013-2898
PH. (212)226-6565 FAX (212)966-6831
www.cwa1180.org

Lets all praise

WAYNE BARRETT

New York Citys finest reporter


DaviD Cay Johnston & Jennifer LeonarD

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER


A searing indictment.
Michiko Kakutani,
The NewYork Times

This years must-read


Trump book.
Lawrence ODonnell,
MSNBCs The LastWord

The best of investigative


reporting.
USA Today

AVAILABLE NOW

www.citylimits.org43

44 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

supports
City Limits
on the occasion its
40th Anniversary Celebration Gala
and congratulates 2016 Honorees:
Wayne Barrett
Journalism Award
Henry Garrido
Civic Champion Award
On Behalf of the Board of Directors,
Administration and Medical Staff

www.citylimits.org45

Congratulations
to City Limits
and your honorees
Wayne Barrett
and Henry Garrido.

pfnyc.org

is delighted to honor
Wayne Barrett
and
City Limits
for their valuable
contributions to
journalism.

www.citylimits.org47

48 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

David Lebenstein and Cushman


and Wakefield salute City Limits for
its 40 year commitment to creative
and powerful journalism, at the
community and neighborhood level.

Congratulations to City Limitsmay


you have another 40 glorious years.
And congratulations to
Henry Garrido and Wayne Barrett
for your commitment to
a better city and world
James Ledbetter

Editor, Inc. magazine and Inc.com

www.citylimits.org49

50 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Thanks to
City Limits
for 40 years
of shining light
on issues critical
to the well-being
of all New Yorkers.
-Mark A. Willis

Congratulations to Wayne Barrett


- A Friend of Tom Robbins

www.citylimits.org51

CONGRATULATIONS TO

CITY LIMITS

ON 40 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE!
New Yorks Affordable Housing Advocate

www.thenyhc.org

52 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Janie Eisenberg and Tom Robbins salute Wayne Barrett and City Limits
in the best tradition of muckraking.
"He not only got the news;
he cared about the news.
He hated passionately all
tyrannies, abuses, miseries,
and he fought them. He
was a 'terror' to the officials
and landlords responsible,
as he saw it, for the
desperate condition of the
tenements, where the poor
lived. He has 'exposed'
them in articles, books, and
public speeches, and with
results."

Wayne Barrett and Jack Newfield, Brownsville, Brooklyn, 1976.

-from The Autobiography of


Lincoln Steffens, writing
about Jacob Riis

CONGRATULATIONS TO
A MENTOR,
ROLE MODEL,
AND FRIEND.
-from Michael Tomasky

www.citylimits.org53

Capalino+Company is proud to support


City Limits on your 40th Anniversary.
Congratulations to the honorees
Wayne Barrett and Henry Garrido.
www.capalino.com 212.616.5810
contact@capalino.com
@capalino
The Woolworth Building
233 Broadway, Suite 710 New York, NY 10279

Jerry H. Goldfeder
Special Counsel, Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP

congratulates

Wayne Barrett
winner of the Urban Journalism Award

Henry Garrido
Winner of the Civic Champion Award

&

City Limits
on 40 years of journalistic excellence.

54 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Congratulations to the
honorees and best wishes
to City Limits.
-Fernando Ferrer

www.citylimits.org55

Thank you,
Wayne
Barrett!

Congratulations on 40 years of speaking up for


the Other New York!
From the inimitable Bob Schur & Kathy Sanders,
through Bernard Cohen, Susan Baldwin, Tom
Robbins, Annette Fuentes, Doug Turetsky, Errol
Louis, Andy White, Kim Nauer & Kemba Johnson
to Alyssa Katz & Ed Morales (and many others
too numerous to cite in this cheap 1/4 page ad)
the bylines in City Limits represent a veritable
"Who's Who" in progressive investigative
journalism in New York City. Thanks to all for
your invaluable contributions to the struggle.
May the spirit and impact of City Limits live on
for another 40 years!
Brian Sullivan & Cathy Herman

- Barbara Turk

BEDFORD STUYVESANT RESTORATION CORPORATION

Thank you to City Limits for 40


years of bold, award-winning
journalism that continues to
push the minds of New
Yorkers and the policies of
our government.
Congratulations to tonights
honorees Wayne Barrett and
Henry Garrido.

CONGRATULATES

CITY LIMITS
ON ITS

4OTH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION GALA


AND THIS YEARS HONOREES

WAYNE BARRET
HENRY GARRIDO
RESTORATION ROCKS! MUSIC FESTIVAL OCTOBER 8, 2016
bedford stuyvesant 10k run & fun walk OCTOBER 9, 2016

OFFERINGS
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CENTER FOR Healthy Neighborhoods | MIXED-INCOME HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

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56 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

In
tribute
to
Wayne

Congratulations
to my old friend
and frequent
thorn in my side
on a lifetime well
spent.

Dan and
Gail Collins

In honor of Richard Thrush,


an underdog with bite,
New York is a better, bigger town
with City Limits in the fight.

--Glenn Thrush
former co-editor

Banana Kelly Community


Improvement Association,
Inc., congratulates
City Limits
on 40 years of relevance to
the people and communities
that matter most to us.

www.citylimits.org57

Congratulations
on 40 years of
steadfast
commitment to
social justice.

Co
ongratulations to
Citty Limits on
o their
40
0th Anniveersary!

- Jennifer Gootman

UniversityNeighb
borhood
HousingProgram
m,Inc.
www.unhp.org @UNHP
2751GrandConccourse
Bronx,NY104
468

ForServicesandInfo
Call:(718)9332539

Best Wishes
City Limits!

Congratulations,
Wayne!

Lois Harr &


John Reilly
Since 1976!

58 

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Keep
doing
good
right
here!
-Marilyn Gelber

Heartiest
congratulations
to the one and
only Wayne
Barrett, whose
deep research
has so greatly
informed New
York and beyond!
-from Nicole Gordon and
Roger Bernstein

Wayne, you've always been


and still are
the greatest
sticking it to the bad guys,
emboldening real people to
stick together.
Much love,
Mary Zulack

www.citylimits.org59

City Limits 40th Anniversary

Congratulations
to the Honorees
Wayne Barrett
and

Henry Garrido

Rabbi Gerald Sussman, President


Reverend Terry Troia, Executive Director
100 Park Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10302
718-448-1544 x103
www.projecthospitality.org

Here's to the editors,


designers, publishers,
trustees, printers,
proofreaders, accountants,
lawyers, advertisers,
foundations, donors,
fundraisers, tipsters,
sources, subjects,
spokespersons, critics,
friends, enemies and
readers who've made City
Limits special
and to the writers and
photographers who have
allowed it to exist.

Joe Conason, Elizabeth


Wagley, and the staff of
The National Memo send
our deep affection and
admiration to the mighty
Wayne Barrettfriend,
colleague, and mentor
whose devotion to human
progress has never faltered.

60 

Congratulations to
Henry Garrido
as 2016 City Limits
Civic Champion
Award Winner
From your friends at
Segal Rogerscasey

City Limits: Forty. Forward.

Everyone has the right to freedom


of opinion and expression; this right
includes freedom to hold opinions
without interference and to seek,
receive and impart information and
ideas through any media and
regardless of frontiers.

Everyone has the right to form and


to join trade unions for the
protection of his interests.

Global Investment Solutions

-Universal Declaration of Human Rights

www.segalrc.com
Offices throughout the United States and Canada

Grand Army Plaza (Marc Fader)

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