Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 8

Republic of the Philippines

BATANGAS STATE UNIVERSITY


JPLPC Campus, Malvar, Batangas
COLLEGE OF TEACHER EDUCATION
SECONDARY EDUCATION PROGRAM
COURSE SPECIFICATION
First Semester, AY 2016-2017
VISION
A globally recognized institution of higher learning that develops competent and morally
upright citizens who are active participants in nation building and responsive to the challenges
of 21st century

MISSION
Batangas State University is committed to the holistic development of productive citizens
by providing a conducive learning environment for the generation, dissemination and utilization
of knowledge through innovative education, multidisciplinary research collaborations, and
community partnership that would nurture the spirit of nationhood and help fuel national
economy for sustainable development.

CORE VALUES
Faith
Patriotism
Human dignity

Course Title: English for Specific Purposes


Course Code: ENG 307
Pre-Requisite: ENG 3
Credit Unit: 3
Revision Number: 1
Date: August 31,2016

Integrity
Mutual respect
Excellence

Instructor: Ms. Lucille A. Matibag


Contact No.: 09778445526
E-Mail Address: matibaglucille@gmail.com
Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, Friday
(4:00-5:00PM)
Room: CTE 203

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES


The graduates have the ability to:
1. Demonstrate in-depth understanding of the development of adolescent learners.
2. Exhibit comprehensive knowledge of various learning areas in the secondary curriculum.
3. Create and utilize teaching methodologies and materials appropriate to the secondary
level to enhance teaching and learning.
4. Design and implement assessment tools and procedures to measure learning outcomes
in the secondary level.
5. Communicate effectively in oral and in writing using both English and Filipino.
6. Act in recognition of professional, social and ethical responsibility.
7. Pursue lifelong learning for personal and professional growth.

1. PHILOSOPHY
English for Specific Purposes (ESP) is known as a learner centered approach to
teaching English as a foreign or second language. It meets the needs of adult learners from
specific fields such as Science, Technology, Medicine, Leisure, and Academic Learning. This
course is recommended for English major students in order for them to be knowledgeable on
the different ESP instructional strategies, materials adaptation and development, and
evaluation.

Page 1 of 8

2. AUDIENCE
This course is intended for third year English major students who wish to learn how to
design ESP courses and programs in different areas of specialization such as Business,
Engineering, Academic, and Health.

3. STUDENT OUTCOMES
a. Identify and design lessons according to the stages of learners growth and
development.
b. Utilize the potentials and uniqueness of individual learners in teaching.
c. Discuss and share insights on the subject areas learning goals, instructional
procedures and content in the elementary/secondary curriculum.
d. Use appropriate teaching-learning strategies to sustain interest in learning.
e. Select, develop or adapt updated technology in support of instruction.
f. Use traditional and non-traditional assessment techniques and use assessment data
to improve teaching and learning.
g. Behave in accordance with the Code of Ethics for Professional Teachers.
h. Plan and carry out personal and professional advancement.

4. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


By the end of the course, the students must be able to:
ILO 1.
Infer understanding on the origin and the factors of the emergence of
ESP, both theoretical and applied.
ILO 2.
Create a rubric in developing needs assessments and genre analysis for
specific groups of learners.
ILO 3.
Provide guidelines in creating ESP materials in a chosen area and
evaluating available materials including technology based materials.
ILO 4.
Apply the assessment procedures appropriate for ESP
ILO 5.
Make a lesson plan based upon their needs assessment and genre
analysis.
The following table maps the intended learning outcomes with the student outcomes.
This also illustrates the relationship of the intended learning outcomes (ILOs) with the student
outcomes (SOs).
Intended Learning Outcome
ILO 1
ILO 2
ILO 3
ILO 4
ILO 5

a
a
a
a
a

Applicable Student Outcomes


d
b
b
b
c

g
f
h
f
e

5. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES
Upon completing the course, students should be able to exhibit the following
objectives congruent with each topic outlined in the course.
Topics and Objectives
I.

What is ESP?
a. Origin of ESP
Trace the origin of ESP
b. Development of ESP
Identify and enumerate the
development made in ESP
c. ESP: Approach not product
Differentiate the ESP as an
approach from ESP as a product

Intended Learning Outcomes


ILO
ILO
ILO
ILO ILO
1
2
3
4
5

+
+

+
Page 2 of 8

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION
II.
Course Design
a. Language Description
Describe and elaborate the use of
language in ESP
b. Theories of Learning
Identify and enumerate the different
theories of learning and their
functions
c. Needs Analysis
Identify and analyze the appropriate
assessment/ plan for the target
population
MIDTERM EXAMINATION
d. Approaches to Course Design
Discuss the different approaches to
use in designing a plan
III.
Application
a. The Syllabus
Identify the process on how to
create a course syllabus
b. Lesson plan
Identify and discuss the process on
how to create a plan
c. Materials Evaluation
Evaluate the different kinds of
materials appropriate for each
plan/syllabus
SEMI-FINAL EXAMINATION
d. Materials Design
Identify the materials to be used in
creating a plan or syllabus
e. Methodology
Discuss the steps on how to create a
lesson plan/syllabus
Create lesson plan/ syllabus
f. Evaluation
Evaluate the plan/ syllabus made
IV.
The Role of ESP Teacher
a. Orientation
Identify the roles of an ESP Teacher
Discuss the dos and donts of an
ESP Teacher
b. Resources
Enumerate the resources applicable
for ESP teacher or teaching of ESP
V.
Demo Teaching
Present/ Demonstrate the plan made
in class
FINAL EXAMINATION
Submission of all requirements

+
+
+
+

+
+

+
+
+

6. TEACHING-LEARNING STRATEGIES AND ASSESSMENT METHODS


Page 3 of 8

Teaching and Learning Strategies

Active Learning - Active Learning is anything that students do in a classroom


other than merely passively listening to an instructor's lecture. Research shows
that active learning improves students' understanding and retention of
information and can be very effective in developing higher order cognitive skills
such as problem solving and critical thinking.

Discussion Strategies - Engaging students in discussion deepens their learning


and motivation by propelling them to develop their own views and hear their own
voices. A good environment for interaction is the first step in encouraging
students to talk.

Humor in the Classroom - Using humor in the classroom can enhance student
learning by improving understanding and retention.

Experiential Learning - Experiential learning is an approach to education that


focuses on "learning by doing," on the participant's subjective experience. The
role of the educator is to design "direct experiences" that include preparatory and
reflective exercises.

Inquiry-Guided Learning - With the inquiry method of instruction, students


arrive at an understanding of concepts by themselves and the responsibility for
learning rests with them. This method encourages students to build research
skills that can be used throughout their educational experiences.

Team-Based Learning - Team-based learning (TBL) is a fairly new approach to


teaching in which students rely on each other for their own learning and are held
accountable for coming to class prepared. Research has found that students are
more responsible and more engaged when team-based learning is implemented.
The major difference in TBL and normal group activities is that the groups are
permanent and most of the class time is devoted to the group meeting.

Collaborative/Cooperative Learning/Workshops - Cooperative and


collaborative learning/workshops are instructional approaches in which students
work together in small groups to accomplish a common learning goal. They need
to be carefully planned and executed, but they don't require permanently formed
groups.

Brainstorming - The brainstorming technique is widely used in industry and


academia to encourage participants to generate ideas in an unhindered manner.
In an academic context, brainstorming encourages students to participate
actively in idea-generation exercises and experience the benefits of a multidimensional approach to analyzing problems or solutions. Asking interpretive
questions, rather than yes/no questions, leads to productive brainstorming.

Buzz Session - Buzz sessions are short participative sessions that are
deliberately built into a lecture or larger group exercise in order to stimulate
discussion and provide student feedback. In such sessions, small sub-groups of
two to four persons spend a short period (generally no more than five minutes)
intensively discussing a topic or topics suggested by the teacher. Each sub-group
then reports back on its deliberations to the group as a whole, or sometimes
combines with another sub-group in order to share their findings and discuss the
implications.

Interactive Learning/ Demonstration - Interactive demonstrations can be used


in lectures to demonstrate the application of a concept, a skill, or to act out a
process. The exercise should not be passive; you should plan and structure your
demonstration to incorporate opportunities for students to reflect and analyze the
process.

Page 4 of 8

Assessment and Evaluation Methods


A. Oral Strategy. The instructor will use this method to engage students in thinking
and analyzing or in defending one side of an issue/topic. This will also allow the
students to see the importance of paying attention and class participation.

B. Examination Strategy. The instructor will give the students an examination to


measure the students knowledge. Exams are tools of measurement, a
comparison of what a student has learned compared to what they should have
learned, and an indication that a student is progressing toward successful
outcomes.

C. Rubric. Scoring tool that will explicitly represent the set of criteria in grading the
Hans-On Activities

7. COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The following are the specific requirements of the course:
a. Activities/Exercises. These have to be given after every lecture or be given as
diagnostic tests.
b. Quizzes. This is another evaluation that measures the understanding of the
students after every lecture or discussion in the class.
c. Assignment. This is a follow-up activity that can be taken for home and can be
assessed in class.
d. Participation/ Attendance. Active participation or interaction is also important
factor that can be assessed among students in the class.
e. Exams. For content evaluation in the course, four major exams shall be given as
scheduled by the college/department. Latecomers shall not be given any
consideration, unless they have valid reasons. Make-up tests shall be given if
any student has been part of any authorized activities by the university with
pertinent documents (evidence). The instructor/university reserves the rights
(academic freedom) to disapprove any explanations for absences without prior
notice, and not to provide an opportunity for the student to have a make-up test.
Students that they will be absent from an announced test/exam because of
personal business reasons are required to inform the instructor before the
absence. A make-up test may be given early in some cases.
f. Lesson Plan/ Syllabus. This will determine the over-all progress of the student
by the end of the course. It will be graded using a rubric and will be included in
the 60% of their final grade.
g. Demo Teaching. This will serve as their oral presentation or demonstration of
their final written output.

8. COURSE POLICIES
A. Attendance
Students are expected to attend regularly every lecture to have meaningful
sharing of inputs to the discussions. Punctuality is also necessary to be able to
acquire a work habit of coming and attending to work and commitments on time.
Students are enjoined to familiarize themselves with the Student Norms of
Conduct Policies of our university, especially in cases of tardiness, giving of
considerations and in the exercise of fairness to all students.
Total absence should not exceed 20% of the maximum number of school days
for the semester. For this subject, students are allowed to be absent for six
meetings. Students exceeding these allowable maximum days of absence shall
be dropped from the class roll.
B. Missed Course Requirement

Page 5 of 8

In the event a student will miss any of the course requirements, he is solely
responsible for all the course materials/requirements taken in his absence. Grade
for the missed major examination due to valid justification(s) may be considered
for a make-up examination.
C. Academic Integrity
Students are to pursue academic integrity at all times in the course of the study.
Academic integrity focuses the level of professionalism attained by students. The
students will observe the following policies:
1. Cheating in any form to pass examination will earn a failing grade for the
course.
2. Plagiarism in compliance with course requirement will not be tolerated.
3. Acknowledgement will be made in reference to research works used.
4. Observance of the University Student Norms of Conduct by students is
enjoined at all times.
5. Proper decorum in the conduct of class will always be observed by all.

Grading System
Major Examinations
(Including Lesson Plan and Demo Teaching)
Class Standing
Quizzes
Homework/ Seatwork
Recitation
Attendance

60%
40%

9. ACADEMIC INFRASTRUCTURE
TEXTBOOKS
1. Hyland, K. (2014). Disciplinary specificity: Discourse, context, and ESP. In
D.D. Belcher, A.M. Johns, B. Patridge (eds). New Directions in English for
Specific Purposes Research (pp.6 24). Ann Arbor: University of
Michigan Press.
2. Johns, M.A. (2013). The history of English for specific purposes research. In
B. Patridge, S. Starfield The Handbook of English for Specific Purposes
(pp.22 49). Chichester: Wiley Blackwell.
3. Johns, M.A. (2015). English for Specific Purposes: The state of the art. (An
online interview with Ann M. Johns) International Journal of Language
Studies 9 pp. 113 120.
4. Patridge, B. (2013). Genre and English for Specific Purposes. In B. Patridge,
S. Starfield The Handbook of English for Specific Purposes (pp. 389
409). Chichester: Wiley Blackwell.
5. Phillipson, R. (2012). Linguistic Imperialism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
6. Van Naersen, M. (2007). Linking ESP needs assessment and research.
Seattle, WA: 2007 TESOL Convention.
OTHER REFERENCES
1. Candlin, C.N. (2008). Trading places, creating spaces: aligning research and
Page 6 of 8

practice in LSP and professional communication. Hong Kong: LSP &


Professional Communication Conference 2008. Retrieved August 29,
2016 from www.engl.polyu.edu.hk/lsp/apaclsp08/plenaryTalk_1.html
2. Knight, K. et.al. (2010). English for specific purposes: an overview for
practitioners an clients (academic and corporate). Retrieved August 29,
2016 from https://www.tesol.org
3. Lesiak-Bielawska, E. D. (2015). English for specific purposes in historical
perspective. Retrieved August 29, 2016 from http://www.esp_world.info
10. COURSE CALENDAR
Week
1-3

I.

Topics
What is ESP?
a. The Origins of ESP
b. The Development of
ESP
c. ESP: Approach not
product

Suggested Readings
www.engl.polyu.edu.hk/lsp/apaclsp08/
plenaryTalk_1.html
https://www.tesol.org
http://www.esp_world.info
Phillipson, R. (pp. 69 - 80)

4
5-7

PRELIMINARY
EXAMINATION
II.
Course Design
a. Language Description
b. Theories of Learning
c. Needs Analysis

Hyland, K. (pp. 6 - 24)


http://www.esp_world.info
Van Naersen, M. (pp. 90 - 105)

8
9
10-11

12
13-15

MIDTERM EXAMINATION
d. Approaches to Course
Design
Application
a. The Syllabus
b. Lesson Plan
c. Materials Evaluation
SEMI-FINAL EXAMINATION
d. Materials Design
e. Methodology
f. Evaluation

Patridge, B. (pp. 389 - 409)

III.

Van Naersen, M. (pp. 120 - 135)

www.engl.polyu.edu.hk/lsp/apaclsp08/
plenaryTalk_1.html
Van Naersen, M. (pp. 233 - 235)

16

17
18

IV.

The Role of ESP


Teacher
a. Orientation
b. Resources
V.
Demo Teaching/
Demonstration
FINAL EXAMINATION

Van Naersen, M. (pp. 235 - 238)

Page 7 of 8

Prepared by:
MS. LUCILLE A. MATIBAG
LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR
Checked and Verified by:
MS. RACHELLE M. QUINCO
Program Chairwoman, CTE
Recommending Approval:
DR. RUBILYN M. LATIDO
Associate Dean, CTE
Approved:
DR. AMADO C. GEQUINTO
Dean of Colleges

Page 8 of 8

Оценить