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Copyright © 2014 Creative Publishing international, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this work

Copyright © 2014 Creative Publishing international, Inc.

All rights reserved. No part of this work covered by the copy- rights hereon may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means—graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or taping of information on storage and retrieval systems—without the written permission of the publisher. However, the publisher grants to the purchaser of this book permission to reproduce the templates in the book for personal use.

Due to differing conditions, materials, and skill levels, the pub- lisher and various manufacturers disclaim any liability for unsat- isfactory results or injury due to improper use of tools, materials, or information in this publication.

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The Complete Photo Guide to

CANDY MAKING

The Complete Photo Guide to CANDY MAKING

Contents

Contents IntroductIon 7 Basics 8 Candy Packaging and Storage 18 All about Chocolate 20 Melting

IntroductIon

7

Basics

8

Candy Packaging and Storage

18

All about Chocolate

20

Melting Chocolate and Candy Coating

26

Tempering Chocolate

32

Molding Chocolate

34

Working with Cooked Candies and Sugar Stages

48

dIpped treats, Barks, and clusters

54

General Dipping Instructions

56

Chocolate-Covered Strawberries

58

Crackers and Sandwich Cookies

60

Dipped Pretzels

64

Adding Decorations to Dipped Treats

66

Crunchy Barks

70

Layered Barks

74

Tiger Barks

76

Clusters

78

Fudge

82

Easy Fudge

84

Fudge with Marshmallows or Marshmallow Cream

90

Traditional Cooked Fudge

94

Fudge Bites

98

caramels

100

Basic Caramel Instructions

102

Buttery Caramels

103

Soft Caramels

104

Caramel with Nuts

106

Chocolate Caramels Caramel Pecan Patties Crispy Caramel Bars Caramel Chocolate Pretzels Caramel-Chocolate Apples toFFees,

Chocolate Caramels Caramel Pecan Patties Crispy Caramel Bars Caramel Chocolate Pretzels Caramel-Chocolate Apples

toFFees, BrIttles, and Hard candy Toffee Brittle Hard Candy

candy centers All about Fondant Candy Centers Using Fondant Other Candy Centers

truFFles and ganacHe centers Whipped Truffles Modified Whipped Truffle Recipes Alternative Finishing Methods for Whipped Truffles Ganache Centers Modified Ganache Center Recipes Alternative Finishing Methods for Ganache Centers

marsHmallow, dIvInIty, and mInts Marshmallow Cream Marshmallow Candies with Marshmallow Centers Divinity Mints

107

mIscellaneous candIes

200

110

Southern Pralines

202

112

Marzipan

204

113

Gummy Candy

208

114

Mendiants

210

Sugared and Spicy Nuts

211

Invert Sugar

212

116

Gianduja

213

118

Saltwater Taffy

214

120

Maple Candy

216

122

Sugared Citrus Peels

217

130

glossary

218

132

resources

220

136

acknowledgments

220

142

about the author

221

Index

222

146

148

152

156

160

164

172 176 178 179 186 188 190
172
176
178
179
186
188
190
about the author 221 Index 222 146 148 152 156 160 164 172 176 178 179
about the author 221 Index 222 146 148 152 156 160 164 172 176 178 179

Introduction

Whether you are making candy for your family, for a party, or for gift giving, there are sure to be recipes to please. Candy making is an art and a science project. It can be easy, but there are steps and tech- niques that must be followed for success. If you are a beginning candy maker, this book will serve as a step-by-step course in candy making. If you are an experienced or advanced candy maker, use this book to try new recipes and pick up some new tips.

This book is divided into several sections. This first sec- tion covers the tools, ingredients, and basic information you will need to know before you begin. The sections that follow each focus on a type of candy and contain various recipes, step-by-step technique instruction, and full-color photographs. Tips and troubleshooting are pro- vided throughout to ensure picture-perfect and delicious candy. Refer to the handy glossary on page 218 when you encounter an unfamiliar word or phrase. Some candies are quick and simple, while other can- dies, especially those that require a thermometer, are a little trickier. If the candy doesn’t turn out the first time, do not be discouraged or disappointed, as it takes time to mas- ter some of the recipes. I remember the first time I made caramel. It had dark chunks and did not set up properly.

I knew the caramel could be made to perfection because my grandma and mother had been using the same recipe for years! I did not become discouraged and I tried again. My caramel came out perfectly on my next attempt. Candy making is in my blood. I have been around candy makers since the day I was born. Many of the recipes in this book are the originals that have been handed down from my grandmother and mother. Other recipes have been modified and modernized. While it would not be possible to write a book that has every candy recipe in the world, this book covers the most common and my favorites that are tested, tried, and true. I hope you enjoy the book and this collection of recipes; most of all, I hope you find new favorites to pass down to your family for generations to come.

recipes; most of all, I hope you find new favorites to pass down to your family

introduction

recipes; most of all, I hope you find new favorites to pass down to your family

7 7

Basics

This section covers all the basic information that you’ll need to know before you begin candy making, including necessary ingredients, tools, how to work with chocolate (including melting and molding), cooked candy basics, and much more.

Before starting any recipe, it is important to prepare your kitchen and gather the ingredients. Read through each recipe thoroughly before you begin to make sure you understand the process. Measure all the ingredients and have them ready before you begin. Any tools and equip- ment, such as a lined pan or sprayed candy mold, should

Ingred I ents

The quality of your candy depends on quality of the ingre- dients you use. For example, if the nuts are not roasted and fresh, your finished candy will be unpleasant. High- quality ingredients produce high-quality finished candies. Always check the shelf best-by date. This book contains recipes with dozens of ingredients. This section provides tips for shopping for common ingredients and describes less common ingredients that may not be found in your local grocery store. Most of these ingredients can be pur- chased at candy supply shops.

sugar

Sugar is the basis of nearly every recipe in this book. Do not change the type of sugar called for in a recipe. For example, if the recipe calls for granulated sugar, do not substitute with powdered (confectioners’) sugar. The texture and mouthfeel of the candy will be very differ- ent. If brown sugar is used in the recipe, choose light brown sugar. Dark brown sugar may be substituted, but the candy will have a more intense molasses flavor.

dairy Products

also be prepped and ready before you start. When you are making candy, it is important to stay focused and avoid doing too many things at once. In many recipes, timing is crucial. Walking away for even a minute or two, for example, can cause caramel to turn from a beautiful golden caramel to a burnt blackened mess.

give the rich texture and flavor of heavy whipping cream. Always use unsalted butter and never substitute marga- rine for butter.

nuts

The quality of nuts will vary. Always use nuts that are

fresh. Store unused nuts in the freezer in an airtight con- tainer. Taste the nut before adding the nut to the recipe.

If the recipe calls for adding the nuts while the candy

is cooking on the stove, the nuts will cook as well. Otherwise, toasting nuts before adding them to the recipe will improve the flavor of finished candies. To toast nuts, place the nuts in a single layer on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Place them in a 300ºF (150ºC) oven for approximately 15 minutes, stirring every 3 min- utes. When finished, the nuts should have darkened in color. When cool, they should have a roasted flavor and be slightly crisper than before they were toasted.

Cocoa Powder

Cocoa powder is an unsweetened powder used in many candy recipes. Dutch-processed cocoa is cocoa powder

There are a wide variety of dairy products. When using dairy in candy making, do not substitute any ingredients.

that has been treated with an alkali to prevent the cocoa from having sour flavor notes. Dutch-processed cocoa has

For example, if the recipe calls for heavy whipping

a

different flavor than regular cocoa powder. My favorite

cream, do not substitute half-and-half. Nothing else can

is

E. Guittard Cocoa Rouge Dutch-processed cocoa.

8

else can is E. Guittard Cocoa Rouge Dutch-processed cocoa. 8 The Comple T e p h

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy

makin G

Chocolate and Candy Coating

See page 20.

Cocoa nibs

Nibs are small bitter pieces found inside the cocoa bean. They can be purchased at candy supply stores. Nibs can be added as a nice bitter garnish or to recipes for extra crunch with a bitter flavor.

nut Pastes

Nut pastes are added to candy recipes to impart a nutty flavor with a creamy texture. Peanut butter is a nut paste that is loved by many. Almond paste and hazelnut paste are other common pastes. Almond paste is used to make marzipan candies. Hazelnut paste is used to make gianduja.

Invertase

Invertase is a liquid added to candy centers to soften their texture. This is especially crucial for chocolate creams. Invertase is also added to cherry cordials to encourage the fondant to liquefy. Invertase can be purchased at candy supply stores.

Icing Fruit

Icing fruit is a fruit puree. It is more concentrated than jellies and jams. It can be found in candy supply stores.

Flavoring

There are several types of flavorings. Extracts are alco- hol based and should not be added to chocolate or the chocolate may seize. Concentrated flavors and oils are approximately three times stronger than extracts. These flavors can be added to chocolates or to hard candies. When adding flavors to cooked candies, keep in mind that flavorings, extracts, and oils vary in strength. It’s best to add a little flavoring and test before adding the amount recommended in the recipe.

Food Color

Food color is added to a couple of recipes in this book, including hard candy. A concentrated gel color is ideal for hard candies to obtain a vivid shade without excess color. Add a little at a time. If coloring chocolate, use an oil-based color.

dusting Powders

Dusting powders can be brushed onto chocolates to obtain

a chocolate with a color or sheen. Some are nontoxic, but not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

Chocolate transfer sheets

Chocolate transfer sheets are sheets of acetate plastic with

a printed design. The design is most commonly made from

cocoa butter. When the cocoa butter touches the warm chocolate, the cocoa butter design melts and sets when the

chocolate sets. The sheets are available in several sizes or in precut squares and come with a full print pattern or with

a single design repeated for individual pieces.

precut squares and come with a full print pattern or with a single design repeated for

introduction

precut squares and come with a full print pattern or with a single design repeated for

9

Candy-Mak I ng

t ools

and

Before starting on candies, there are a few essential tools that will help make candy making successful. Some of the

that will help make candy making successful. Some of the Mixing Bowls Mixing bowls are a

Mixing Bowls

Mixing bowls are a must-have for candy makers. Many

of the recipes require vigorous stirring, so a mixing

bowl that is easy to grip tightly with your nondominant hand is best.

is easy to grip tightly with your nondominant hand is best. double Boiler A double boiler

double Boiler

A double boiler consists of two pans that fit together.

Using a double boiler is a classic method for melting

chocolate. The bottom half is filled with hot water, while the top half contains chopped chocolate. The hot water slowly melts the chocolate chunks. A double boiler is

a practical way to keep bowls of chocolate warm for

several minutes while dipping or molding. Use a double boiler to fix a broken ganache.

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or molding. Use a double boiler to fix a broken ganache. 1 0 The Comple T

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

s u P P l I e s

tools listed are a necessity, while others, such as cookie scoops, are a practical addition to the basic tools.

cookie scoops, are a practical addition to the basic tools. saucepans It is important to choose

saucepans

It is important to choose a heavy, high-quality saucepan for candy making. Choose a nonreactive saucepan that has a thick bottom so the heat is evenly distributed. In candy making, having 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-quart (1.8, 2.7, 3.6, and 4.5L) pans is useful. If the recipe calls for a 5-quart (4.5 L) pan, don’t substitute a smaller pan, or the candy mixture may bubble over and make a mess.

pan, or the candy mixture may bubble over and make a mess. Baking Pans Baking pans

Baking Pans

Baking pans and sheet pans are used in many of the recipes. Most often, candy is poured into the pans, and then cut into pieces. Sheet pans with square edges are ideal to ensure each piece will have a perfectly square edge. It is helpful to have a standard quarter sheet pan (9" x 13" [23 x 33 cm]) as well as square 8" (20 cm) and 9" (23 cm) pans.

Pan dividers Pan dividers can be very handy when you only have one large sheet

Pan dividers

Pan dividers can be very handy when you only have one large sheet pan and the candy only fills a portion of the pan. The divider can be added to prevent the candy from filling the pan.

Parchment Paper or silicone Mats

Parchment paper or a silicone mat is used for nearly every recipe in this book. Parchment paper is wonderful for lin- ing pans. Cut a sheet to fit a pan, then pour in the candy. Once the candy is set, simply lift up the parchment lin- ing to easily remove the candy from the pan. Parchment paper is also used to set chocolate-dipped treats. Waxed paper should not be substituted for parchment paper as it may leave a waxy coating on the bottom of candies. Parchment paper is also used to collect any excess choco- late. The chocolate peels right off the parchment paper and the chocolate can be reused. Parchment paper can

be reused for as long as it remains fairly clean. I typically use the same sheet a few times in one cooking day, but toss the sheet when I am done for the day. A silicone mat is used for hard candies and brittles. Hard candies stick to nearly all surfaces except silicone. If silicone is not used, the surface must be thoroughly buttered or sprayed with a cooking spray. Many silicone mats have a small grid pattern. When the hard candies and brittles set, the grid pattern will remain on the bottom of the candy. If this is undesirable, silicone mats with a smooth texture are also available.

introduction

the bottom of the candy. If this is undesirable, silicone mats with a smooth texture are

1

1

Chocolate Chopper

This tool with thick, sharp needles is used to quickly chop chocolate.

thermometers (tempering and Candy)

A candy thermometer has readings typically up to 400°F

(200°C). A tempering thermometer has readings that are 130°F (55°C) and lower. Most digital thermometers can be used for both candy and chocolate tempering. When

a candy thermometer’s reading is off, it doesn’t mean the

thermometer is “bad.” Readings vary from one day to the next. If the thermometer is off by several degrees, it may be time to invest in a new thermometer. It is important to test your thermometer on the day the candy will be made. See page 49 for instructions on how to test your thermom- eter. When choosing a candy thermometer, choose one that has a clip that allows you to attach it to the side of the pan. This prevents the bulb from touching the bottom. Even better is a thermometer (shown) with a protective housing case around the bulb. This allows you to stir and test the temperature throughout the candy. A good alter- native to liquid thermometers are digital thermometers, which can be used for tempering chocolate or for making cooked candies. Digital thermometers read results quickly and have an alarm that can be set to go off once the tem- perature is reached. Be careful when using digital probe thermometers. The probe should not hit the bottom of the pan or you may have inaccurate readings.

Marble slab

Some candies, such as taffy and homemade fondant, require a cold surface like a marble slab for cooling. While a slab can be a costly investment, it helps in mak- ing candies that require the heat to be drawn out quickly and continually as the candy is worked. Without a cold surface, the candy may not set properly. If your counter- top is granite or another type of nonporous stone, it may serve the same purpose as a marble slab.

1 2

of nonporous stone, it may serve the same purpose as a marble slab. 1 2 The

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

of nonporous stone, it may serve the same purpose as a marble slab. 1 2 The
of nonporous stone, it may serve the same purpose as a marble slab. 1 2 The
Cookie scoops A variety of sizes of scoops are useful for making uni- form candies

Cookie scoops

A variety of sizes of scoops are useful for making uni-

form candies efficiently. A small scoop is useful for evenly spooning out truffle balls and candy centers. A larger scoop can be used to evenly portion mounds of clusters

or pralines.

be used to evenly portion mounds of clusters or pralines. spatulas Silicone spatulas are ideal for

spatulas

Silicone spatulas are ideal for cooked candies. The sili- cone withstands high temperatures. Hardened cooked candies and brittles are easily removed from the slick silicone. A spoon-style spatula with rounded edges scrapes the bowl nearly clean. The handle should be strong and the blade should be firm. A one-piece con- struction spatula that is completely coated in silicone allows for easy cleanup, as it has no crevices in which the candy can hide.

cleanup, as it has no crevices in which the candy can hide. Wooden spoons In candy

Wooden spoons

In candy making, it is helpful to have at least two wooden

spoons. A wooden spoon with a long handle can be used to keep your hand safe and high above the hot syrup when stirring hot, cooked candies. A wooden spoon with

a shorter handle is best to vigorously stir candies that have cooled, such as fudge.

to vigorously stir candies that have cooled, such as fudge. Icing spatulas Large offset icing spatulas

Icing spatulas

Large offset icing spatulas are used to evenly spread candy

in a pan. The larger size is also used to scrape chocolate

off the top of candy molds. Small offset spatulas can be used to slide dipped treats off of a dipping tool.

introduction

the top of candy molds. Small offset spatulas can be used to slide dipped treats off

1 3

Mixer

A

high-powered, stand-alone mixer is crucial for success

in

many candy recipes. Some mixtures will become stiff

and may burn the motor of a standard hand-held mixer.

stiff and may burn the motor of a standard hand-held mixer. scissors Scissors are used in

scissors

Scissors are used in a variety of applications, such as cut- ting off the extra rim from dipped treats, cutting chocolate transfer sheets, trimming parchment cones and squeeze bottles, cutting parchment paper to fit a pan, and much more. Reserve a pair of scissors for exclusive kitchen use.

more. Reserve a pair of scissors for exclusive kitchen use. 1 4 The Comple T e

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Reserve a pair of scissors for exclusive kitchen use. 1 4 The Comple T e p

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

dough scraper

A dough scraper, often called a bench scraper or dough cutter, is quite possibly my favorite tool in the kitchen. It can be used to paddle fondant, scrape the top of candy molds, smooth candy in a pan, and scrape hardened chocolate or candy from countertops. It is a practical way to cut through slabs of fudge, caramel, and ganache. Choose a scraper that feels comfortable in your hands.

Choose a scraper that feels comfortable in your hands. dipping tools Tools designed to easily remove

dipping tools

Tools designed to easily remove candies from melted chocolate are available in metal or plastic. Dipping tools will give candies a cleaner finish than using a fork or toothpick. A tool with prongs is used for lifting crackers and flat treats. A tool with a swirl is used for round bon- bons and truffles.

with prongs is used for lifting crackers and flat treats. A tool with a swirl is
Brushes Invest in a set of brushes to be used exclusively for candy making. Small

Brushes

Invest in a set of brushes to be used exclusively for candy making. Small brushes are used for painting details in candy molds. Brushes with soft bristles are used to add dusting powders to finished candies. A pastry brush is used for brushing sugar crystals that have formed on the sides of a saucepan. Do not use a pastry brush that has been used with savory cooking, or the flavors may be incorporated into the candy.

Heat-resistant Funnels

Funnels with a stopper are used to control the flow of hard candies. The funnel and stopper should be sprayed with canola oil cooking spray to prevent the candy from hardening on the sides. Placing the funnel in a large glass measuring cup allows the funnel to be filled with ease.

measuring cup allows the funnel to be filled with ease. squeeze Bottles A squeeze bottle filled

squeeze Bottles

A squeeze bottle filled with candy coating is useful to keep the work area clean. Wrap a heating pad around the bottle to keep the candy coating from solidifying when the bottle is not in use. A 12-ounce (355 ml) bottle will hold nearly 1 pound (455 g) of melted candy coating.

is not in use. A 12-ounce (355 ml) bottle will hold nearly 1 pound (455 g)

introduction

is not in use. A 12-ounce (355 ml) bottle will hold nearly 1 pound (455 g)

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1 6 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy
1 6 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy
1 6 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy

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1 6 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin

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Candy Molds

Candy molds come in lightweight plastic, rubber, silicone, and polycarbonate. The lightweight plastic molds are inexpensive and come in dozens of designs. The plastic is available in clear or white. The clear lightweight plastic is used for chocolates. The white lightweight plastic with- stands higher temperatures, so this is ideal for hard candy. Cooked candies will likely melt and distort clear plastic. Polycarbonate molds (not shown) are heavy-duty plastic molds commonly used by professionals. Some polycarbonate molds are magnetic. Magnetic molds are used in conjunction with chocolate transfer sheets. Silicone molds provide candy pieces with the best detail. However, because the details may be deeper than plastic candy molds, the candy may be more difficult to release.

sucker sticks and skewers

Sucker sticks come in plastic, coated paper, or wood. Plastic, coated paper, or wooden sticks should be used for chocolate suckers. Use coated paper or wooden sticks for hard candies. Sucker candy molds have cavities for the sticks to extend. Be sure the stick fits the molds. If the stick is coated paper and is too long to fit in the mold cavity, the stick can be easily broken to fit.

Parchment Cones and Pastry Bags

Parchment can be formed into the shape of a triangle to create a cone for piping. Parchment cones are best used to pipe chocolate details or to add chocolate stripes. A clear, disposable pastry bag is a convenient method to pipe tempered chocolate into a candy mold. Fill the bag, then cut a small hole at the end.

Cookie Cutters Mini–Pizza Cutter Cookie cutters are used in candy making to cut shaped pieces

Cookie Cutters

Cookie Cutters Mini–Pizza Cutter Cookie cutters are used in candy making to cut shaped pieces of

Mini–Pizza Cutter

Cookie cutters are used in candy making to cut shaped pieces of ganache, fudge, or marshmallow. They are also used when making decorative pieces to garnish desserts.

A mini–pizza cutter is used to quickly glide through barks and slabs of candy such as ganache or fudge.

through barks and slabs of candy such as ganache or fudge. Chablon sheets Chablon are silicone

Chablon sheets

Chablon are silicone stencil sheets. They are used to make truffle sandwiches. They can also be used with chocolate transfer sheets for a perfect disk with a design.

chocolate transfer sheets for a perfect disk with a design. Food-Handling gloves Wearing gloves prevents fingerprints

Food-Handling gloves

Wearing gloves prevents fingerprints from marring finished chocolates. Be sure to use gloves intended for food use.

introduction

prevents fingerprints from marring finished chocolates. Be sure to use gloves intended for food use. introduction

1 7

Candy Packaging and Storage

Candy packaging should be approved for food use. Bags and boxes that are approved for food use are grease resistant so that the container will not absorb grease and be speckled with grease spots.

Boxes, bags, foils, and containers not approved for food use may contain dyes that can contaminate the candies and compromise the flavor. If the box is not approved for food use, the box or container should be lined with food- approved tissue paper or parchment paper. The candy may also be placed in a cellophane bag before setting it in the non-food-approved container. Do not allow can- dies to move about freely in the box or bag, or they may become scuffed and unattractive.

P a C kag I n g

When packaging a box of assorted candies, it’s best to arrange the candies just before giving. Most candies are at their best when packaged in airtight containers. Candy boxes do not typically give an airtight seal. Chocolates are also especially quick to pick up flavors. For example, if a dipped chocolate sprinkled with peppermint candy pieces and a peppermint candy center is placed in a box with other flavors of candies, it is likely the entire pack- age will absorb the peppermint flavor. If the center is pep- permint and dipped with chocolate without peppermint garnishes, it is less likely for flavors to merge.

Candy Boxes

Candy boxes are available in nearly every size. Whether you need a simple tiny box to hold one truffle, or a box to hold 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of chocolate, there are hundreds of options available.

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of chocolate, there are hundreds of options available. 1 8 The Comple T e p h

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1 8 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin

liners

Liners are made to fit snuggly inside candy boxes. The liners may have several cavities or one cavity. Individual candies fit into each cavity or one large slab of fudge will fit into a single cavity.

Candy Cups

Candy cups serve as an individual container for each piece of candy and protect each piece from bumping up against other pieces. A box of candy set in candy cups adds professionalism to the finished candies.

Fda-approved tissue Paper

Food-grade tissue paper is available in white and many colors; use it to line non-food-grade boxes and tins.

Parchment Paper

Parchment paper is food-approved and is available in nat- ural bright white, bleached sheets, and printed designs.

Candy Pads

Quilted cushioned sheets of food-grade paper protects chocolates and candies. Place a sheet on top of a box of chocolates, or in between layers of candy.

Cellophane Bags

Cellophane bags are an affordable packaging alternative to candy boxes. Be sure the bags are made of a food- grade cellophane. The bags can be tied with ribbon or twist ties, or sealed with a decorative sticker.

Candy Foils Add color to your presentation and prevent candies from drying out by using
Candy Foils Add color to your presentation and prevent candies from drying out by using

Candy Foils

Add color to your presentation and prevent candies from drying out by using colored candy foils. Candy foils are thinner than aluminum foil, making them easy to wrap around chocolates. To wrap candies, place the colored side of the foil face down on top of a soft piece of foam. Put the candy face down on top of the foil. Gently press the candy to allow the foil to naturally form around the candy. Finish by folding over the sides and smooth.

Precut Waxed Paper squares

Precut squares of waxed paper for candy makers are used for caramels and saltwater taffy. Waxed paper and plastic wrap are the only wrapping that should be used with sticky candies.

Freez I ng

Cand I es

and

C H o C olates

Some candies freeze better than others. Fudges, chocolates, and truffles freeze well, while pralines, hard candies, and other candies do not freeze well. Refer to each recipe to determine whether the candy holds up well in the freezer. If the candy freezes well, follow these instructions for the freshest tasting candies. Try to find a box that will fit the amount of candy perfectly without extra space. For best results, freeze candies for no longer than three months.

1 Line a candy box with a sheet of plastic wrap, covering the box on all four sides. Place a layer of candy on the bottom of the box.

2 Add more layers, placing a piece of parchment paper between each layer. Tightly seal up the candy using the plastic wrap that lined the box.

1
1
2
2

3 Close the lid and tape down the sides (do not fit the sides into the box or it may destroy the chocolates).

4 Wrap the candy box with two layers of plastic wrap. Wrap the candy box with a layer of aluminum foil. Place the box in the freezer. When ready to serve the candy, remove the box of frozen candy from the freezer. Place the box on the counter at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours. Do not unwrap the plastic or foil. Allow the candy to return to room temperature before unwrapping the foil or plastic wrap.

4
4

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or foil. Allow the candy to return to room temperature before unwrapping the foil or plastic

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All about Chocolate

Chocolate is available from many manufacturers. This section explains the differences between the most common chocolates, including milk, dark, bittersweet, and unsweetened. It also covers the difference between chocolate and chocolate- like products called candy coating (almond bark, candy wafers, compound coating, Candy Melts). Chocolate (baking) chips are not included in the descriptions as they are used in baking and not intended for candy making.

they are used in baking and not intended for candy making. H o W C H
they are used in baking and not intended for candy making. H o W C H

H o W

C H o C olate

I s

Made

Understanding how chocolate is made can be help- ful when shopping for chocolates, and is important in knowing the differences between chocolate and candy coating. Although the process of chocolate is very labor intensive and highly technical, the following is a quick and simple generalization of how most manufacturers make their chocolate. There are farms in several countries around the world where cacao trees are grown. The tree produces a cocoa pod and inside the pod are cocoa beans. The cocoa beans require fermentation and drying before they are distributed to chocolate manufacturers. Once the choc- olate manufacturers receive the beans, the beans are roasted. The bean is composed of two parts: shell and nibs. The shell is removed from the nibs. The nibs are then finely crushed and pulverized. The result is a paste called chocolate liquor. The chocolate liquor is combined with any or all of the following: milk solids, sugar, lecithin, and vanilla to produce milk chocolate, dark chocolate, or

and vanilla to produce milk chocolate, dark chocolate, or The Comple T e p h o

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

bittersweet chocolate. The chocolate liquor, milk, sugar, and other additives are then put on a conch machine that will heat and blend the mixture for a few hours or even a few days. Finally, the chocolate is tempered, then made into block or disk form. The chocolate liquor (without any additives) may instead be pressed to separate the liquor into cocoa powder and cocoa butter. The cocoa butter may be added to chocolate formulations to lower the vis- cosity of chocolates. Cocoa butter is also used in white chocolate, but cocoa powder is not.

to lower the vis- cosity of chocolates. Cocoa butter is also used in white chocolate, but
Candy Coat I n g Candy coating, often called almond bark, candy wafers, compound coating,

Candy

Coat I n g

Candy coating, often called almond bark, candy wafers, compound coating, or Candy Melts, is a chocolate-like product. The coating is available in milk, dark, or white chocolate. It is also available in a rainbow of colors. Coatings may have flavorings added, such as peanut butter, butterscotch, or mint. Some coatings, such as milk chocolate coating or semisweet coating, contain cocoa powder, but lack chocolate liquor. Because coat- ing does not contain chocolate liquor, it is not technically chocolate. It is produced to make an easy-to-use candy- making product. When dipping or molding, chocolate needs to be tempered, a tedious candy-making method that requires practice to master. When dipping or mold- ing with candy coating, the coating is simply melted and ready to use. Beginners may choose to start with candy coating, then advance to tempering. There is a big taste difference if you compare the taste and texture of a solid piece of chocolate verses a solid piece of candy coat- ing. However, when dipping treats, the center may be strong enough that the contrast is less noticeable. Just as in chocolate, candy coating should be creamy and melt

as in chocolate, candy coating should be creamy and melt easily in your mouth. It should

easily in your mouth. It should not have a waxy or crum- bly texture. Several companies manufacturer candy coat- ing. Merckens is a favorite. Candy coating should not be used as an ingredient, such as in fudge, ganache centers, or truffle centers.

introduction

Candy coating should not be used as an ingredient, such as in fudge, ganache centers, or

2 1

C H o C olate

ty P e s

Use this chart to easily identify properties of chocolates and coatings. The chocolate chart is given for typical chocolate labels, but actual ingredients and descriptions may vary depending on manufacturers. The column on the left lists the common types of chocolates and coatings

available. Common ingredients are included in a row across the top of the chart. Following the chart, gen- eral descriptions of the chocolate types and ingredients explain how, why, or when they are used.

CoCoa CoCoa ChoColate CHoColate CoCoa CoCoa CoCoa CoCoa daIry dairy VegetaBle VegetaBle sugar sugar leCItHIn
CoCoa
CoCoa
ChoColate
CHoColate
CoCoa
CoCoa
CoCoa
CoCoa
daIry
dairy
VegetaBle
VegetaBle
sugar
sugar
leCItHIn
leCithin
Content
Content
liquor
lIquor
PoWder
Powder
Butter
Butter
ProduCts
ProduCts
Fats
Fats

White Chocolate

25–35%

yes

no

yes

yes

yes

no

yes

Milk Chocolate

30–45%

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

no

yes

Dark Chocolate

40–65%

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

no

yes

Bittersweet Chocolate

62–98%

yes

yes

yes

yes

yes

no

yes

Unsweetened Chocolate

100%

yes

yes

yes

no

no

no

no

Milk Milk or or Dark Dark Chocolate Chocolate

n/a

no

yes

no

yes

yes

yes

yes

Candy Coating

Candy Coating

White White and and Colored Colored

n/a

no

no

no

yes

yes

yes

yes

Candy Coating

Candy Coating

Milk Milk or or Dark Dark Sugar-free Sugar-free

n/a

no

yes

no

yes

no

yes

yes

Candy Coating

Candy Coating

types of Chocolate and Candy Coating

White Chocolate White chocolate contains cocoa butter, dairy products, sugar, and flavorings. White chocolate is lacking cocoa powder. However, white chocolate does contain cocoa butter, which is a component of chocolate liquor. White chocolate must be tempered when dipping or molding.

Milk Chocolate Milk chocolate has a mild, sweet, and milky flavor. Milk chocolate contains chocolate liquor, dairy products, sugar, and flavorings. Choose a milk chocolate with a 30 percent or higher cocoa content.

Semisweet Chocolate Semisweet is a type of dark chocolate that is less sweet than milk chocolate. It contains chocolate liquor, a small amount of sugar, and a small amount or no dairy. Semisweet chocolate often contains a cocoa content of 50 percent or higher. Most recipes in this book call for dark chocolate; use semisweet chocolate unless otherwise specified.

2 2

use semisweet chocolate unless otherwise specified. 2 2 The Comple T e p h o T

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

Bittersweet Chocolate Bittersweet is a type of dark chocolate with a deeper, more intense flavor than semisweet chocolate. Often there is a fine line between bittersweet and semisweet choco- lates. Typically, bittersweet will have little sugar and no dairy product added. Chocolates with a cocoa content higher than 65 percent are typically labeled bittersweet.

Unsweetened Chocolate Unsweetened chocolate is chocolate without any addi- tives. If a recipe calls for baking chocolate, use unsweet- ened chocolate.

Milk or Dark Chocolate Candy Coating Milk and dark chocolate candy coatings contain cocoa powder but lack cocoa butter; therefore, they are not a real chocolate. The cocoa powder is blended with veg- etable fats, dairy products, sugars, and flavors to pro- duce a chocolate-like product that is easy to work with. See page 21 for more information on candy coating. Mint-flavored milk and dark chocolate candy coatings are also available.

White and Colored Candy Coating White candy coating has no cocoa powder or cocoa butter. It is simply a combination of milk products, sugar, vegetable fats, and other ingredients. It has a vanilla fla- vor. Colored candy coatings are basically white candy coating with food color added. Some are available fla- vored, such as butterscotch and peanut butter.

Sugar-free Candy Coating Milk, dark, and white chocolate coating are available sugar-free for those who must restrict their sugar consump- tion. People with heath issues should consult with a doc- tor before consuming sugar-free coating, however. It is melted and used as regular candy coating.

Ingredients

Cocoa Content

The term “cocoa content”—listed as a percentage on the packaging—refers to the amount of cocoa liquor that is

in

the chocolate. The remaining percentage is the amount

of

sugar and/or dairy added. Cocoa liquor is composed

of cocoa powder and cocoa butter. Most companies do not break up the amount of cocoa butter and cocoa pow-

der, so the flavor can vary tremendously. For example, a 72 percent bittersweet chocolate may taste sweeter than

a 65 percent dark chocolate. Often the labels will state

“bittersweet” or “dark chocolate” to help the consumer determine the flavor. Because of this, the percentages on the package and in the chart at left should be used as a general guideline.

Cocoa Liquor Cocoa liquor is made by taking the nibs of the cocoa bean and grinding them into a paste. Cocoa liquor is

mixed with sugar and other ingredients to make a variety

of chocolates such as milk, dark, or bittersweet. Or cocoa

liquor can be pressed and separated into cocoa powder

and cocoa butter.

Cocoa Powder Cocoa powder, made by pressing cocoa liquor, is not typically listed on a chocolate label. The label usually lists cacao beans or chocolate liquor. Cocoa powder is often used in milk and dark chocolate coatings.

Cocoa Butter Cocoa butter is the fat of the cocoa bean. More cocoa but- ter may be added by manufacturers during the chocolate- making process to change the viscosity (or thickness) of the chocolate. White chocolate does not contain cocoa powder, but it does have cocoa butter, a component of chocolate liquor.

Dairy Products Milk and white chocolate have a high amount of dairy product, while dark and bittersweet chocolates have very little, if any. Candy coatings have dairy products added.

Sugar

Sugar is added to chocolates to sweeten the bitter flavor

of the cocoa. There is more sugar in milk and white choc-

olates, and less sugar in dark and bittersweet chocolates.

Vegetable Fats Candy coating contains vegetable fats. The most com- mon fat used in candy coating is palm kernel oil.

Lecithin Lecithin is included in most chocolate and candy-coating

formulations. Lecithin is an emulsifier, but it also changes the viscosity of chocolate. Manufacturers may add a small amount of lecithin to thin the chocolate and create

a chocolate with the optimal viscosity. It is not recom- mended to add lecithin to chocolate when dipping or molding, as it may make the chocolate thicker.

introduction

recom- mended to add lecithin to chocolate when dipping or molding, as it may make the

2 3

2 4

s H o PPIng

F or

C H o C olate

It can be confusing and overwhelming to choose choc- olate with the dozens of companies that manufacture chocolate and the several types of chocolate from each manufacturer. First determine what is used in the recipe. Will this recipe be used as an ingredient, such as in fudge, chocolate caramels, or truffles? If it is an ingredient, then chocolate, not candy coating, should be used. Are you molding or dipping with chocolate? If you are, choc- olate must be tempered (see page 32) when dipping or molding or you will likely have undesirable results. Candy coating can be used instead. If you are molding or dipping, simply melt and use the coating. Check the label. The ingredient list in milk or dark chocolate candy coating may contain cocoa powder, but you will not see chocolate liquor or cocoa butter listed. Candy coating will likely list vegetable fats, such as palm kernel oil, as an ingredient. If chocolate liquor or cocoa butter is listed, it is chocolate, not candy coating. Once you determine whether you need chocolate or candy coating, next choose the brand. Chocolate brands will vary in flavor, viscosity, and texture. Unfortunately, this is unknown without trial and error. E. Guittard white choc- olate is my favorite, while my preferred dark chocolate is Gibraltar by Peter’s. Callebaut milk chocolate Callets are heavenly, while Peter’s Superfine chocolate has been a favorite since I was a little girl. Taste is subjective, so find

your favorite chocolate by experimenting with different brands. Often the candy center determines which choco- late is preferred. Whichever chocolate is purchased, the chocolate should taste delicious on its own. When biting into the chocolate, it should be creamy and melt in your mouth. If the chocolate is “just okay” your finished can- dies will be subpar as well. You should hear a definitive snap when a piece of good-quality chocolate is broken. Candy coating will vary in quality and workability as well. When purchasing chocolates and coatings, they should be free of bloom. The chocolate may have white scuffs from pieces bumping up against one another, but should not have a nearly white coating. A white chalky coating on the surface indicates the chocolate has a fat bloom and may not be fresh. If the chocolate or coat- ing has bloomed, it may still be okay to melt and use. However, it may be more difficult to work with and it may not be as creamy.

be more difficult to work with and it may not be as creamy. The picture shows
The picture shows the same brand of chocolate, but the chocolate wafers on the right
The picture shows the same brand of chocolate, but the
chocolate wafers on the right are several months old.

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

FlaV o r I ng Color I ng Flavoring

When flavoring chocolates and candy coatings with no other ingredients added, an oil-based or concentrated flavor should be used. Water-based flavorings may cause the chocolate to seize and become difficult to use. If flavor-

ing truffles, fudge, or recipes with additional ingredients, it

is okay to use extracts.

and C H o C olate

Coloring Chocolates and Candy Coatings
Coloring Chocolates and Candy Coatings

White chocolate or white candy coating can be colored

to create a spectrum of chocolate shades. Oil-based candy coloring is the best choice for coloring. The col- ored oils blend smoothly into the melted chocolate and candy coating. Powdered colors may also be used. Mix

a

small amount of vegetable oil with the powdered color

to

create a colored paste before blending with the choco-

late. Powdered colors will typically leave subtle specks of color on the finished piece. Common food colors are usu- ally water based and should not be used with chocolate or candy coatings. Excessive color may cause the candy coating to thicken. One to 3 tablespoons (15 to 45 ml) of Paramount Crystals or vegetable oil can be added to a pound (455 g) of candy coating if the coating thickens. Start with 1 tablespoon (15 ml), and add more oil or

Start with 1 tablespoon (15 ml), and add more oil or crystals if necessary. When possible,

crystals if necessary. When possible, start with a shade closest to the desired color. For example, if black choco- late is needed, do not start with white chocolate. Start with dark chocolate, then add black candy color. Or, if hot pink candy coating is desired, start with pink candy coating and add pink candy color. Be aware that if color is added to chocolates, the color may rub off onto hands or stain tongues.

s tor I ng

C H o C olates

Solid chocolates and candy coatings should be left at room temperature in an airtight container away from heat, light, and moisture. Placing chocolate and coatings in the freezer may add excess moisture to the chocolate, causing the chocolate or coatings to be difficult to melt. Chocolate tends to lose its quality and creaminess after time. Chocolate and coatings that are older than a couple of months may bloom and are also more difficult to melt. For best results, use chocolate and coatings within six months. For the freshest and best flavor, use the chocolate and coating within a month or two. These suggested guide- lines for storing chocolates are for solid chocolates and coatings. The shelf life and storing suggestions will vary if the chocolate is enrobing a candy center or other treat, or if the chocolate is used as an ingredient. Refer to each recipe to determine the shelf life of individual candies.

introduction

is used as an ingredient. Refer to each recipe to determine the shelf life of individual

2 5

Melting Chocolate and Candy Coating

All of the recipes in this book that contain chocolate require melting. These instructions can be used for

chocolates or candy coatings. If using chocolate for dipping or molding, the chocolate must be tempered

(see page 32). If using chocolate as an ingredient, such as fudge or for a center, such as a truffle, the choco-

late does not need to be tempered and these melting instructions can be used. If using candy coating for

dipping or molding, the chocolate does not need to be tempered and these melting instructions are used.

The melting point of chocolates and candy coatings will vary depending on the manufacturer, but most have a low melting point, so it doesn’t take long for the chocolate to melt. If the chocolate is in a block form, the choco- late should be chopped into small pieces that are similar in size. Chocolate that comes in wafer or disk form will not require chopping before melting. Melting chocolate is easy and quick when done in the microwave. It is typically fine to set the microwave on a high setting as long as you

stir it every 20 seconds. Melting usually occurs within a minute or two. I rarely use any other method of melting; however, instructions are included for melting chocolate using a double boiler as well. A double boiler is a two- part pan. The bottom part holds hot water, while the top part holds the chopped wafers. In a double boiler, it takes several minutes for the chocolate to completely melt, but because there is a hot source underneath, the chocolate may remain fluid longer.

C

H o PPI n g

C

H o C olate

The trick to chopping is to start at one end of the bar and work your way to the other end. Chop the chocolate into uniform pieces to ensure even melting. Chocolate in disk or wafer form does not need to be chopped.

Chocolate in disk or wafer form does not need to be chopped. A chocolate chopper has
Chocolate in disk or wafer form does not need to be chopped. A chocolate chopper has

A

chocolate chopper has thick, sharp

A

large chef’s knife also can be used

needles and is designed to pierce

to

chop chocolate. Start at one cor-

through chunks of chocolate. Start

at one end of the chocolate. Cut

through the chocolate, holding the

tool at a 90-degree angle.

2 6

the chocolate, holding the tool at a 90-degree angle. 2 6 The Comple T e p

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

ner of the chocolate block and work across, slicing the chocolate into small chunks.

g eneral

Instru C t I ons

I n

Melt I n g

t H e

M ICro W aV e

Using Plastic in the Microwave

I n g t H e M ICro W aV e Using Plastic in the Microwave

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Look for labels on plastic containers stating that they are microwave-safe. Emails circulating several years ago warned of cancer-causing dioxins leaching into food from plastics heated in the microwave, and these warnings were credited to major hospitals and universities. These claims were later deemed unfounded. The American Cancer Society provides this information on their website: “The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on its Website does say substances used to make plastics can leach into foods. But the agency has found the levels expected to migrate into foods to be well within the margin of safety based on information available to the agency. As for dioxin, the FDA says it has seen no evidence that plastic containers or films contain dioxins and knows of no reason why they would.” www.cancer.org/aboutus/ howwehelpyou/microwaving-plastic.

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

1 Place chocolate wafers or chopped chocolate in a

1 Place chocolate wafers or chopped chocolate in a microwave-safe plastic container. Glass containers become hotter than plastic, so a microwave-safe plastic container is ideal.

2 Heat the chocolate for 20 seconds. Stir. Heat the choco- late for 20 more seconds. Stir.

3 Continue microwaving only a few seconds at a time, stirring between each time, until the chocolate is nearly melted. Remove from the microwave and stir until the chocolate is fluid.

1
1
2
2
3
3

introduction

the chocolate is nearly melted. Remove from the microwave and stir until the chocolate is fluid.

2 7

general MeltIng InstruCtIons usIng a douBle BoIler 1 Place chocolate wafers or chopped chocolate in

general MeltIng InstruCtIons usIng a douBle BoIler

1 Place chocolate wafers or chopped chocolate in the top pan of the double boiler. Set the top pan aside. Fill the bottom of the pan with an inch or two (2.5 to 5 cm) of water. Heat the water on the stove until it is nearly simmering. Remove the hot water from the stove. Place the top pan containing the chopped chocolate on the bottom pan with the hot water. Always remove the bottom pan from the stove before replacing the top pan. If the water needs to be heated again, remove the top pan and place the water back on the stove.

2 Stir until the chocolate is fluid. Be sure water or steam does not get into the chocolate, or the chocolate will seize and thicken. Always wipe the bottom free of water when lifting the pot.

No Double Boiler?

bottom free of water when lifting the pot. No Double Boiler?

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

A metal bowl containing chopped chocolate over a pan of hot water can be used instead of a double boiler. It is a little more awkward to use, because you must use one hand to steady the bowl while you stir with the other.

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

2 8 Melt I n g I n Candy C a n d y Wr

2 8

Melt I n g

I n

Candy

C a n d y Wr I ters

Candy writers are small tubes filled with candy coating. They are handy to use for piping details into molds or to pipe accents onto finished can- dies. The best method for melting the candy in the writers is to use a slow cooker, electric skillet, or heating pad (see page 30). These three methods avoid the risk of water getting into the tube or melting the plastic tube. It takes about an hour for the candy to melt in the candy writers. If time is a factor, run hot water over the candy writer and knead until the candy is melted. Take care that water does not

writer and knead until the candy is melted. Take care that water does not The Comple
writer and knead until the candy is melted. Take care that water does not The Comple

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

get into the tip of the writer, or it will cause the candy to seize and the writer may become unusable. The candy writer may also be placed in the microwave. Place the writer in the microwave and heat for 10 seconds. Remove the candy writer and knead. Heat for 10 more seconds. Remove and knead. Continue microwaving only a few

seconds at a time, kneading between each time, until the candy is fluid. Whichever method is used, be sure not to scorch the candy. If the candy seems like it is fluid, but it is not coming out of the writer, make sure the tip is not clogged. Check the tip and use a straight pin to unclog.

Candy

s queeze

Coat I ng Bottle

I n

a

Melted candy coating can be poured into a squeeze bottle for ease in filling candy molds. The tip of the squeeze bottle may need to be cut for the chocolate to flow. Melt candy coating in the microwave using a square microwave-safe bowl following the directions on page 27. Pour the melted coating into the squeeze bottle, using the corner of the bowl as a spout. Keep the candy coating fluid when the squeeze bottle is not being used with a heating pad, lined slow cooker, or lined electric skillet (see page 30). It is not sensible to pour tempered chocolate into a squeeze bottle. Chocolate will not keep the proper temper long enough for use in the squeeze bottle.

the proper temper long enough for use in the squeeze bottle. k eePI ng C H

k eePI ng

C H o C olate

Flu I d

Keep chocolate fluid for hours using a slow cooker, elec- tric skillet, or heating pad. The instructions can be used for bowls of melted candy coating or candy writers. It will not work when using tempered chocolate for dipping and molding. The key factor is the heat. The range of heat will vary by appliance, so testing must be done to ensure the chocolate will not burn. The bottom of the skil- let or slow cooker should be warm when you touch it, but not burn your hand. A slow cooker may work if it has a warm setting. Setting a slow cooker on low is too hot and will scorch the chocolate. An electric skillet may work if it has a warm setting. Both the electric skillet and the slow cooker should be lined with two or three dry towels to keep the bowl of chocolate from directly touch- ing the heat source. If the towels discolor from the heat, the skillet or slow cooker is too hot. You can also melt chocolate using the skillet or slow cooker. However, do not put chocolate directly in the skillet or slow cooker or the chocolate may scorch. Place the chocolate in bowls with towels serving as a barrier between the bowl of chocolate and the heat source.

introduction

chocolate in bowls with towels serving as a barrier between the bowl of chocolate and the

2 9

slow Cooker or electric skillet Turn the slow cooker or electric skillet to warm. Line

slow Cooker or electric skillet

Turn the slow cooker or electric skillet to warm. Line the pot or skillet with two or three towels. Place bowls of melted chocolate in the pot or skillet. The chocolate should remain fluid for several hours. To melt chocolate, place bowls of chopped chocolate in either the lined skil- let or the lined pot. Be aware it takes nearly 2 hours to melt a pound (450 g) of chocolate this way. I typically melt chocolate in the microwave, then place the bowls of melted chocolate in the lined slow cooker or lined electric skillet. A slow cooker or electric skillet set on warm is also a nice alternative to melt the candy in candy writers. Place the writers in a lined slow cooker or electric skillet an hour before they will be used.

cooker or electric skillet an hour before they will be used. Heating Pad Keep melted candy

Heating Pad

Keep melted candy coating in candy writers and squeeze bottles fluid by placing them in a heating pad. The instruc- tions can be used for squeeze bottles filled with melted candy coating or candy writers. If using tempered choco- late, the chocolate will become too warm and lose the proper temperature. A heating pad is my favorite way to heat candy writers. Simply place the candy writers in the heating pad set on low, and they will be ready to use in approximately an hour.

sCorCH ed

C H o C olate

When chocolate is scorched it turns into a thick, clumpy mass. It looks as though it may need to be heated more, but in fact it was likely overheated. When heating choc- olate in the microwave, never let it go for longer than 30 seconds without stirring. If using a double boiler, the water should be hot, but not boiling. The top pan of choc- olate should never be directly on the heat source, even if the bottom pan of the double boiler is under the top

3 0

if the bottom pan of the double boiler is under the top 3 0 The Comple

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o

Candy makin G

pan containing the chocolate. If bowls of melted choco- late are in a lined electric skillet or slow cooker, and the chocolate has gotten thick, the chocolate has likely gotten too hot. If it has gotten too hot, it should not be used for dipping or molding. If it is thick, but not burnt, it can be used for fudge or you can add approximately 1 cup (235 ml) heavy cream to 1 pound (455 g) of chocolate and make a delightful ice cream topping.

Water I s C H o C olate’s e n e M y

A drop or two of water can cause dreadful results. It can

thicken the chocolate and make it unusable. Or, if the chocolate is usable, once the chocolate contaminated with water sets, the piece may have white streaks. All utensils and bowls should be thoroughly dried before adding and melting the chocolate. If using a double boiler, make sure that hot water, or even steam, does not get into the chocolate. Always wipe the bottom of the double boiler pan containing the chocolate before pouring to keep drops of water from dripping onto the chocolate. If the chocolate has gotten water in it, it should not be used for dipping or molding. It can be used as an ingredient in truffles, fudge, ganache, etc.

u nused

Melted

C H o C olate

If, after dipping, molding, or making candy there is left-

over chocolate, it can be reused in most cases. If the chocolate was used to dip strawberries, truffles, or candy centers, the chocolate may have become contaminated. When the chocolate is contaminated, it will not be nice to

work with again. In this case, it is best to mix in a crunchy product such as pretzels, cereal, or commercial crunches and make a bark. If the chocolate was used for molding, the chocolate should be fine. Pour unused chocolate onto

a sheet of parchment paper. Allow the chocolate to set

completely. Break the set chocolate into pieces and put in

a tightly sealed bag. Keep the bag at room temperature.

in a tightly sealed bag. Keep the bag at room temperature. Clean I ng Plast I
in a tightly sealed bag. Keep the bag at room temperature. Clean I ng Plast I
in a tightly sealed bag. Keep the bag at room temperature. Clean I ng Plast I

Clean I ng Plast I C Bo W l s and s queeze Bottles

Melting chocolate in the microwave in a microwave-safe plastic bowl is quick and easy. Another advantage is the cleanup. When you are finished working with chocolate, dump the excess chocolate or candy coating onto a sheet of parchment paper. Place the bowl in the freezer for a few minutes. After a few minutes, flex the plastic bowl to release the chocolate. There will be little chocolate left on the bowl to clean. The same technique can be used to clean squeeze bottles. Remove the cap from the squeeze bottle. Wash separately. Dump the excess chocolate or candy coating out onto a sheet of parchment paper. Place the squeeze bottle on its side in the freezer for a few minutes. After a few minutes, squeeze the bottle to release the chocolate. Wash the bottle in hot soapy water using a bottle cleaner.

introduction

squeeze the bottle to release the chocolate. Wash the bottle in hot soapy water using a

3 1

Tempering Chocolate

The structure of chocolate is quite scientific and complex. Several pages can be written on the crystalline structure of chocolate. While this book does not delve into the complexities of chocolate, this section will give a brief description of why and how to temper chocolate.

Tempering is a process of melting and cooling choco- late so that the finished chocolates have a wonderful mouth-feel and creamy texture. If the chocolate is sim- ply melted, then molding or dipping is immediate, the finished candies may be dull, have streaks or speckles, or remain tacky. Chocolate not properly tempered will likely have a grainy or chalky texture. While the temper- ing process may seem somewhat simple, it will take prac- tice to achieve a perfectly tempered piece of chocolate. If it is your first attempt at tempering, start with clusters, barks, or dipped treats. Molding chocolate is more dif- ficult and should be undertaken after the tempering has been perfected. There are several ways to temper chocolate. The method of tempering will vary from one candy maker to the next. Some temper the chocolate on a marble slab, while others use a double boiler. Professionals often have tempering machines. The instructions included in this book are an easy method for beginners. This tempering method is achieved by “seeding” melted chocolate with a couple of blocks of unmelted chocolate. The unmelted chocolate introduces perfectly tempered chocolate that has stable crystals. The crystals help control the crystal structure in the melted chocolate. The seed chocolate must be in per- fect temper or the chocolate will not temper properly. This means the added chunks should be free of bloom. Chunks of bloomed unmelted chocolate will add unstable crystals to the melted chocolate. Start with at least 1 to 2 pounds (455 to 905 g) of chocolate. Add 25 percent of unmelted chocolate (seed chocolate) to the melted chocolate. It is helpful to have additional seed chocolate on hand.

3 2

It is helpful to have additional seed chocolate on hand. 3 2 The Comple T e

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

Dark chocolate is ready for candy making when the chocolate’s temperature is 86°F–90°F (30°C–32°C). Milk and white chocolate are ready for candy making when the chocolate’s temperature is 84°F–87°F (29°C–31°C). If chocolate is used as an ingredient, such as in fudge, chocolate caramels, or truffle centers, it is not nec- essary to temper the chocolate.

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1 Chop the chocolate into chunks. Add three-fourths of the chunks to a microwave-safe container. Set aside the remaining one-fourths chunks.

2 Heat the chocolate for 20 seconds. Stir. Heat the chocolate for 20 more seconds. Stir. Continue microwaving only a few seconds at a time, stirring between each time, until the chocolate is nearly melted. Remove from the microwave when the chocolate is nearly melted. Stir until the chocolate is fluid. If the chocolate is lukewarm, the chocolate may not temper properly. It should be warm to the touch, not just lukewarm. However, take care not to scorch the chocolate! When the chocolate is melted, add the remaining unmelted chunks of chocolate. Stir to seed the chocolate. Insert a chocolate tempering thermometer.

3 Continue stirring the chocolate, including scraping the sides. Dark chocolate is at the proper temperature when the chocolate reaches 90°F (32°C). Milk or white choco- late is at the proper temperature when the chocolate reaches 87°F (31°C). Remove the chunks when it reaches the proper temperature and dip, mold, or use as desired. If the dark chocolate drops to lower than 86°F (30°C), stop, and temper the chocolate again. If the milk or white chocolate drops to lower than 84°F (29°C), stop, and temper the chocolate again. Once the chocolate reaches a temperature below the optimum working temperature, warm the chocolate again. This can be quickly achieved by placing the bowl in the microwave for a few seconds to warm. If the chocolate reaches above the peak temperature for working (90°F [32°C] for dark chocolate and 87°F [31°C] for milk or white), the chocolate tempering process must be repeated.

or white), the chocolate tempering process must be repeated. t t rou B les H oot

t

t rou B les H oot I n g

From left to right:

White streaks caused by improper tempering Chocolate is dull Chocolate in perfect temper Chocolate too cool

e MPer I n g

White streaks or speckles

White or grayish streaks and/or spots are caused by improper tempering. Most often these streaks and spots occur when not enough chocolate was used for seeding. Improper storage of the finished candies may also cause streaks. Chocolate should be stored at room temperature with low humidity.

Chocolate Is tacky or takes a long time to set

Chocolate will not set up properly if the chocolate wasn’t tempered properly. This occurs when there was not enough seed chocolate, or if the chocolate’s tempera- ture was higher than the optimal working temperature. Placing chocolate-dipped treats in the refrigerator to set may also cause the chocolate to remain tacky.

Tempering Tips

may also cause the chocolate to remain tacky. Tempering Tips

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•   Chocolate comes in block or disk form.  •   Chocolate  in  block  form,  chopped  into  chunks,  is  easiest  to  use when tempering. •   Small chocolate wafers can be used as well, but they get in  the way more often than the larger chunks when the chocolate is at its proper temper. •   If tempering seems intimidating, start with candy coating (see  page 21) to become familiar with how chocolate sets and should feel. While the taste of candy coating does not com- pare with chocolate, the workability and the finished look are similar. Candy coating is great for beginners!

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

introduction 3 3

introduction

introduction 3 3

3 3

Molding Chocolate

Molded chocolates look professional. They should

have a high gloss and uniform shape. Choose a

candy mold with a shiny cavity. The mold acts as

a mirror to the chocolate. If the mold is dull, or has

scratches or scuffs, the finished chocolate piece

will be dull or have scratches or scuffs.

Hundreds of shapes and sizes of chocolates can be made for a number of occasions. Filled candies can be made with nearly any type of candy mold. Chocolate bunnies are made from three-dimensional candy molds. Suckers in bright colors are made using sucker candy molds and candy coating. This section covers these techniques and more, using inexpensive plastic candy molds. Other molds, such as polycarbonate or silicone, can be used for these methods as well, but the technique may vary slightly. When filling candy molds, a spoon can be time- consuming. Traditional candy makers may use their hands to fill the cavities. While this can be a practical and effective method of filling molds, it can be messy. The instructions included in this book show filling molds using squeeze bottles for candy coating or parchment cones and disposable pastry bags for chocolate. Additional molding instructions are given for paint- ing details, lining a candy mold, creating suckers, and making three-dimensional candies. Candy coating or melted and tempered chocolate can be used in candy molds. Chocolate must be properly tempered when filling molds, or the chocolate will not come out of the molds, it will have white streaks, or it will remain tacky. Make sure each cavity is thoroughly dried before using. A tiny drop of water may cause the chocolate to seize or discolor, or make it difficult to remove the choco- late piece from the mold. The candy mold should be at room temperature when molding. If it is cold, the chocolate will set too quickly.

3 4

If it is cold, the chocolate will set too quickly. 3 4 The Comple T e

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

3 4 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin

t y P es

C H o C olate lightweight Plastic (below left)

Candy molds made of a clear, lightweight plastic are the easiest molds to use, making them the best for begin- ners. They are inexpensive, and the mold can be gently flexed to release the chocolate. The clear plastic allows the candy maker to lift the filled mold and see whether there are any air bubbles. A clear mold also allows the candy maker to easily see the details for painting con- trasting colors. Flexible, inexpensive candy molds are also available in white plastic. These molds withstand higher temperatures and can be used for hard candy as well as chocolates.

o F

Molds

F o r

plastic. These molds withstand higher temperatures and can be used for hard candy as well as

Polycarbonate (page 34, right)

Polycarbonate molds are heavy-duty plastic molds com- monly used by professionals. They are sturdy and will last for hundreds of usages. If the chocolate is not properly tempered, it will be very difficult to remove the candy piece from polycarbonate molds. Some polycarbonate molds are magnetic. Magnetic molds are used in con-

junction with chocolate transfer sheets. They will produce

a professionally molded piece of candy with a lovely printed design on the top.

silicone (page 34, center)

Silicone molds provide candy pieces with the best detail. However, because the details may be deeper than plastic candy molds, the candy may be more difficult to release. Chocolate falls from a plastic or polycarbonate mold. To release the chocolate from a silicone mold, the mold is flipped over and the silicone cavity is pressed to invert the cavity and release the piece. Filled candies with a delicate chocolate shell may break. Silicone molds tend

to be more flimsy than plastic molds. They may need to

be placed on a flat plate or cookie sheet to prevent the chocolate from spilling.

Clean I ng

Molds

When using a candy mold over and over throughout the day, be sure to wipe it down with a soft, dry cloth to polish the mold and remove any excess chocolate scraps. It is not necessary to wash the candy mold in between uses. Mold cavities can be difficult to thoroughly dry, so it can be det- rimental to wash the mold if it will be used again the same day. When done molding for the day, wash candy molds in hot water with a gentle soap. Thoroughly rinse with hot water. Dry the cavities, and the front and back of the mold. Then, lay flat to dry with the open cavities facing up. Do not wash candy molds in a dishwasher, as the mold may become distorted from the hot temperature.

u s I ng

a

s queeze

Bottle

When molding with candy coating, a squeeze bottle is a wonderful tool. The squeeze bottle allows control over the flow of the candy coating. If molding chocolate instead of candy coating, fill a parchment cone or disposable pastry bag with the tempered chocolate instead of using a squeeze bottle. Keep candy coating in a squeeze bottle fluid by following instructions on page 29. Clean squeeze bottles by following instructions on page 31.

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1

1 Melt candy coating in a square or rectangular microwave-safe plastic bowl. Pour the melted candy coat- ing into the squeeze bottle.

2
2

2 It may be helpful to cut the tip of the squeeze bottle for a larger opening.

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3 Fill the candy molds with the squeeze bottle.

introduction

the tip of the squeeze bottle for a larger opening. 3 3 Fill the candy molds

3 5

3 6

1
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u s I ng a Pastry Bag or Par CHM ent Cone

Melted candy coating can be poured into a squeeze bottle, pastry bag, or parchment cone for molding. Simply pour the melted candy coating into one of the con- tainers. Chocolate that has been melted and tempered can be poured into a pastry bag or parchment cone. When the chocolate is at its proper temper, pour the tempered chocolate into the pastry bag and use imme- diately. Once the chocolate loses the proper temper, the chocolate should be removed from the bag or cone and will need to be tempered again. Chocolate flows quickly from a pastry bag or parchment cone. Place a sheet of parchment under the bag to collect dripping chocolate and keep cleanup minimal.

using a disposable Pastry Bag

Disposable pastry bags are inexpensive, convenient, and practical for chocolate.

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1 Melt candy coating or melt and temper chocolate. Form a cuff over your hand with the pastry bag. Pour melted chocolate into the cone.

2 Pinch all the sides together and twist the top of bag.

3 Secure the twist with a rubber band or icing bag tie.

4 Cut the tip to create a small hole.

5 Fill the candy mold using the pastry bag.

tip to create a small hole. 5 Fill the candy mold using the pastry bag. The

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

1 B a C
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a
C
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Making a Parchment Cone

Parchment paper is available in precut triangles. These triangles are formed into a cone. Parchment cones are ideal for chocolate-piped designs or piping chocolate details into candy molds. They can be thrown away when the project is completed, making cleanup easy. Because chocolate will be poured into the cone, it is important to try and make as small of a point as pos- sible to avoid leaking.

1 The triangle is labeled A, B, and C.

2 Fold corner A to meet corner B, twisting to form a cone.

3 Fold corner C to meet corner B, keeping the cone shape with a tight point. Align all three points.

4 Cross over corners A and C, making a “W” to ensure the seams of the cone overlap. Always keep the bottom point tight. Shift A and C up and down to ensure a tight point. When a tight point is made, tape the seam.

5 Melt candy coating or melt and temper chocolate. Pour melted chocolate into the cone.

6 Fold in the left side, then the right side. Fold down the middle, and continue to fold until you reach the top of the chocolate.

introduction

then the right side. Fold down the middle, and continue to fold until you reach the

3 7

3 8

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Chilling

3 8 1 2 3 4 5 Chilling

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If the chocolate piece is delicate, it may set too quickly in the freezer and crack when the chocolate is being removed. If the chocolate is breaking when it is removed, place the filled mold in the refrigerator instead of the freezer.

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B asIC Mold I ng I nstru C t I ons 1 Make sure the

B asIC

Mold I ng

I nstru C t I ons

1 Make sure the candy mold is thoroughly dry. Melt candy coating or melt and temper chocolate. Pour melted candy coating into a squeeze bottle or pour melted and tempered chocolate into a parchment cone or disposable pastry bag. Fill the candy mold, just to the top of the cavity.

2 Lift and tap the mold against the counter several times to smooth the top and remove any air bubbles.

3 If the mold is clear, lift the mold to see whether there are air bubbles. Take care to lift the mold straight up without rotating the mold so the chocolate does not seep. If there are air bubbles, use a brush to press the tiny holes.

4 Use a spatula with a thin blade to scrape excess chocolate from the mold.

5 Place the filled mold in the freezer for a few minutes. The amount of time required depends on the mold thickness. A mold with a thin cavity will only take a few minutes, while a mold with a deep cavity may take 30 to 45 minutes. Place a couple layers of towels on the countertop. Invert the mold over the towels, holding the mold approximately 4" (10 cm) above the towels. If the mold is flexible, gently flex it to allow the chocolates to fall from the mold. If the mold is not flex- ible, gently tap the mold against the countertop to release the chocolate. If the chocolate doesn’t easily fall from the mold, place the mold in the freezer for a few more minutes.

fall from the mold, place the mold in the freezer for a few more minutes. The

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

1
1

P a I n t I ng

d eta I l s

Create a molded piece of candy

with details that stand out using con- trasting colors of chocolate. In this technique, the cavities of the mold are painted with chocolate, then set to dry at room temperature before

a contrasting color of chocolate is

used to fill the mold. It is important that the color sets before adding the contrasting colors, or the chocolate will bleed. Candy coating, available

in a variety of colors, can be used,

or white chocolate can be colored using oil-based food color.

1 Make sure the candy mold is thor- oughly dry. Melt candy coating or melt and temper chocolate. Using a fine brush, paint the details of the cavity in the mold. Allow each color to set before adding an adjoin- ing color. Allow the details to set completely. Hold the mold up to the light. If light can be seen through the painted chocolate, add a touch more chocolate.

2
2

2

Melt a contrasting color of candy coating or melt and temper a contrasting color of chocolate. Fill the candy mold, filling just to the top of the cavity. If there are several cavities, it may be easiest to pour the melted candy coating into a squeeze bottle or pour melted and tempered chocolate into a parch- ment cone or disposable pastry bag. Lift and tap the mold against the counter several times to smooth the top and remove any air bubbles.

3

If

the mold is clear, lift the mold to

see whether there are air bubbles. Take care to lift the mold straight up without rotating the mold so the

chocolate does not seep. If there are air bubbles, use a brush to press the tiny holes. Use a spatula with a thin blade to scrape excess chocolate. Place the filled mold in the freezer for a few minutes. The amount of time needed in the freezer depends on the mold thickness. A mold with a thin cavity will only take a few minutes, while a mold with a deep cavity may take longer. Place

a couple layers of towels on the

countertop. Invert the mold over the towels, holding the mold approxi- mately 4" (10 cm) above the towels.

If the mold is flexible, gently flex it

to allow the chocolates to fall from the mold. If the mold is not flexible, gently tap the mold against the countertop to release the chocolate.

the mold against the countertop to release the chocolate. Candy writers are an alternative to brushes

Candy writers are an alternative

to brushes when painting details.

Simple squirt the melted candy from

the candy writer tube into the cavity. Fine details should be painted with

a brush, but larger areas can be

painted using candy writers. Candy writers are ideal for children to use. Just remind them to only color details, and not fill the entire cavity with the candy from the tube. See page 28 for more information on using candy writers.

the entire cavity with the candy from the tube. See page 28 for more information on

introduction

the entire cavity with the candy from the tube. See page 28 for more information on

3 9

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4 0

1 2 3 4 0 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

s u C ker

Candy

Molds

A chocolate sucker in a shape can make a fun treat for parties. Sucker molds have a cavity for the design as well as a long cavity for the stick. Be sure the sucker stick is placed deep into the design cavity to prevent the sucker stick from falling off the chocolate piece. Sucker sticks come in a variety of lengths and are available in paper, plastic, or wood.

1 Make sure the candy mold is thoroughly dry. Paint details if desired following instructions on page 39. Melt candy coating or melt and temper chocolate. Pour melted candy coating into a squeeze bottle or pour melted and tem- pered chocolate into a parchment cone or disposable pastry bag. Fill the candy mold, filling just to the top of the cavity. Lift and tap the mold against the counter several times to smooth the top and remove any air bubbles.

2 Insert a sucker stick so that it is at least three-fourths into the design cavity. Use your index finger to roll the stick so the stick that is in the design cavity is completely coated with chocolate.

3 If the mold is clear, lift the mold to see whether there are air bubbles. Take care to lift the mold straight up without rotating the mold so the chocolate does not seep. If there are air bubbles, use a brush to press the tiny holes. Place the filled mold in the freezer for a few minutes. The amount of time needed in the freezer depends on the mold thickness. A mold with a thin cavity will only take a few minutes, while a mold with a deep cavity may take longer. Place a couple layers of towels on the counter- top. Invert the mold over the towels, holding the mold approximately 4" (10 cm) above the towels. If the mold is flexible, gently flex it to allow the chocolates to fall from the mold. If the mold is not flexible, gently tap the mold against the countertop to release the chocolate.

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F I lled

Cand I e s

Filled molded candies are always a nice surprise, and they make great gifts. Select the candy center of your choice (pages 130 to 145) and follow these directions.

1 Set aside two sheets of parchment paper. Make sure the candy mold is thoroughly dry. Melt candy coat- ing or melt and temper chocolate. Pour melted candy coating into a squeeze bottle or pour melted and tempered chocolate into a parch- ment cone or disposable pastry bag. Fill the candy mold, filling just to the top of the cavity.

2 Lift and tap the mold against the counter several times to smooth the top and remove any air bubbles. If the mold is clear, lift the mold to see whether there are air bubbles. Take care to lift the mold straight up without rotating the mold so the chocolate does not seep. If there are air bubbles, use a brush to press the tiny holes. Invert the mold and allow excess chocolate to drip onto the sheet of parchment paper.

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5

3 Turn the mold back over. Use a spatula with a thin blade to scrape excess chocolate from the mold.

4 Place the mold face down on a

clean sheet of parchment paper for

a few minutes.

5 After a few minutes, turn the mold over and scrape again. Fill the mold with the desired candy center, filling nearly to the top, but leaving enough space for a thin chocolate layer on top of the center. The candy center should be at room temperature.

A hot candy center may melt the

chocolate, whereas a cold candy center may cause the shell to crack.

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6 Start at the outer edge of the cavity and seal the candy center with melted candy coating or melted and tempered chocolate.

7 Scrape excess chocolate from the mold. If the candy center is visible after scraping, the cavity was filled with too much candy center. A bit more chocolate can be added to cover the candy center. Place the mold in the freezer for a few minutes until the candy feels cool.

8 Place a couple layers of towels on the countertop. Invert the mold over the towels, holding the mold approximately 4" (10 cm) above the towels. If the mold is flexible, gently flex it to allow the chocolates to fall from the mold. If the mold is not flex- ible, gently tap the mold against the countertop to release the chocolate.

introduction

mold. If the mold is not flex- ible, gently tap the mold against the countertop to

4 1

4 2

tHree-dIMens I onal Candy Molds

Make three-dimensional candy pieces with special molds. Molds are clamped together and have a small opening where the chocolate can be added. The opening is filled with chocolate, then the mold is placed in the freezer for the chocolate to set. When set, the mold is removed from around the chocolate piece. Lightweight plastic molds for three-dimensional candies are commonly sold in a sheet that needs to be cut apart. After the mold is cut, there are typically notches on the mold that allow you to line up the cavities. Polycarbonate molds are made so the mold stays together with magnets.

1 Make sure the candy mold is thoroughly dry. If the mold is lightweight plastic and is one sheet, cut the mold apart to create two halves. Also cut the bottom to provide an opening.

2 Paint details, if desired, following instructions on page 39. To prevent air bubbles, brush the mold cavities with chocolate. If the mold is lightweight plastic, clamp the two halves of the mold tightly together using binder clips. If the mold is polycarbonate, put the two mold halves together. The magnets will secure the halves together.

3 Melt candy coating or melt and temper chocolate. Pour melted candy coating into a squeeze bottle or pour melted and tempered chocolate into a parchment cone or

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and tempered chocolate into a parchment cone or 1 2 3 4 5 The Comple T

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

                               
  
  
6
6

disposable pastry bag. Insert the bottle, cone, or pastry bag into the open- ing of the three-dimensional mold. Fill the candy mold, filling just to the top of the cavity.

4 If the mold is lightweight plastic, insert the mold into a block of Styrofoam to keep the mold upright. Polycarbonate three-dimensional molds stand upright on their own. Place the filled mold in the freezer. The freeze time will vary accord- ing to the thickness of the mold. A mold for a 2" or 3" (5 or 7.5 cm) three- dimensional piece may only take 10 minutes in the freezer, while a large, 12" (30 cm) solid piece may take 40 to 60 minutes in the freezer. When the mold is cloudy, remove it from the freezer. Remove the binder clips and take the mold apart, carefully releasing the candy.

Hollow Candy

the mold apart, carefully releasing the candy. Hollow Candy

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•   Before freezing,  allow the  filled mold  to set for 10 minutes. Flip the mold and allow excess chocolate to drip onto parchment paper. Then continue with step 4. •   Hollow candy will take 10 to 20 min- utes to set in the freezer.

- utes to set in the freezer.

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5 If the molds are not tightly clamped, there may be a

5 If the molds are not tightly clamped, there may be a seam. Trim the seam using a paring knife.

6 If the base is not level, line a cookie sheet with a sheet of parchment paper. Heat the cookie sheet on a stove top, over the lowest heat. Rub the base of the candy piece on the parchment paper to level.

introduction

on a stove top, over the lowest heat. Rub the base of the candy piece on

4 3

MagnetIC C H o C olate sHeets

Special molds allow a chocolate design to be transferred onto a professional-looking molded piece of chocolate. The mold comes with two parts. The first part is a metal sheet. The second part is the mold with open cavities. The mold has magnets embedded within it. When the two parts are put together, the mold is tightly secure.

M o l d s

a n d

t rans F e r

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2

4 4

mold is tightly secure. M o l d s a n d t rans F e

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

e r 1 2 4 4 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide
3
3

1 Cut a transfer sheet to fit the mold.

2 Place the transfer sheet, textured side facing down, on top of the mold. Place the metal sheet over the transfer sheet, securing it in place.

3 Melt chocolate candy coating or melt and temper choco- late. Flip the mold so the metal sheet is on the bottom. Fill the mold with the chocolate. If a filling is desired, follow steps for lining and filling molds on page 41.

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5

4 Scrape the top of the mold using a spatula with a long, thin blade.

5 Place the filled mold in the freezer for several minutes. Flip the mold so the metal sheet is on top. Remove the metal sheet. Peel back the transfer sheet.

6 Gently press the top of the chocolate to release the choco- late from the mold.

6
6
the transfer sheet. 6 Gently press the top of the chocolate to release the choco- late

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the transfer sheet. 6 Gently press the top of the chocolate to release the choco- late

4 5

4 6 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy
4 6 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy
4 6 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy

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4 6 The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

C H o C o l a t e t rou B les H oot
C
H o C o l a t e
t
rou B les H oot I n g
   
Chocolate Clumps or “seizes”
   
   
  •  Water or steam got into the chocolate
  •  Chocolate became too warm when melting. It cooked 
instead of melting and turned into a clump.
   
  
Solution: If chocolate has clumped, it may not be salvage-
able. You may try adding vegetable oil to thin. If chocolate
does not taste scorched, mix nuts into the seized chocolate
and spoon mounds onto parchment paper.
dull Patches
  •  Chocolate was removed from the mold prematurely
   
  •  Real Chocolate was not tempered properly
   
  •  Candy mold was cool when melted chocolate was added 
to cavities
   
  •  Chocolate mold was not clean and dry
   
  •  The chocolate solidified too slowly
  •  Fingerprints got on the chocolate
Solution: Solid chocolate pieces with dull patches can
be remelted.
air Bubbles
  •  Mold was not tapped thoroughly
   
  •  Chocolate was too thick or too cool
   
  •  The edges or details of the mold are too sharp
   
   
Solution: Avoid bubbles by sufficiently tapping the mold on
the countertop. You may use a brush to get into the details
and grooves.
   
  

Condensation on the Finished Piece

  •  Sugar bloom

  •  Mold was left in the freezer too long

                  • 
   
  •  Candy left in the refrigerator or freezer before serving will 
pick up condensation
   
  
  •  Candy removed from the freezer was unwrapped before it 
was completely thawed
Solution: If chocolate has been stored in a cool place,
let it come to room temperature before opening to mini-
mize condensation.
Cracks on the Finished Pieces
   
  •  Candy center was too cool when piped into lined mold
   
  •  Chocolate shell was too thin
   
  •  Some centers, such as marshmallow, can expand and may 
cause the shell to crack
   
  •  Candy was left in the freezer too long
   
   
Solution: Solid chocolate pieces with cracks can
be remelted.
White streaks on the Chocolate
   
  •  Chocolate solidified too slowly
   
  •  Chocolate was not tempered properly
   
  •  Water or steam affected the chocolate

  •  Chocolate mold was not clean and dry

  •  Chocolate has a sugar bloom (moisture has settled on the  chocolate)

Solution: Solid chocolate pieces with white streaks can be remelted.

chocolate) Solution: Solid chocolate pieces with white streaks can be remelted. introduction 4 7
chocolate) Solution: Solid chocolate pieces with white streaks can be remelted. introduction 4 7
chocolate) Solution: Solid chocolate pieces with white streaks can be remelted. introduction 4 7

introduction

chocolate) Solution: Solid chocolate pieces with white streaks can be remelted. introduction 4 7

4 7

Working with Cooked Candies and Sugar Stages

This section covers the basic information you’ll need to know when cooking candies on the stove. It is

important to use extreme caution. These temperatures get very hot and can cause major burns. I remember

as a child, an associate of my mother’s was using a wooden spoon to stir her hot caramel. The wooden

spoon broke in half and the side of her hand went into the hot caramel. I am still haunted by the huge

blister and burn she had! Use sturdy utensils. Keeping a bowl of cold water nearby ensures you will be

ready should any of the hot syrup touch you. Always hold on to pans with oven mitts. Keep countertops

protected using hot pads and pour hot candies onto cookie sheets that are lined with a silicone mat.

Recipes for cooked candies require your complete attention and are not suitable for making with children.

Be

Pre P ared

Read through the recipe completely before beginning. Understand each of the steps before starting the candy. Often, ingredients are added at different temperature stages. All of the ingredients should be measured out and ready to go before you begin. Tools and equipment, such as a lined pan, sprayed candy molds, or other candy- making tools, should be ready to go before starting the recipe. It can take several minutes to reach the desired temperature, but those last few degrees can come quickly. Watch the thermometer temperature frequently. It’s not a good idea to start any other involved project, candy related or not, when cooking candy on the stove.

Work I n Ideal t e MPeratures

Ideally, it is best to work in low humidity. If you live in an area with high humidity, a dehumidifier can be ben- eficial. The optimal temperature should be 68°F–70°F

(20°C–21°C).

4 8

temperature should be 68°F–70°F (20°C–21°C). 4 8 The Comple T e p h o T o

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

s t I r r I ng

t H e

Candy

Follow the directions very carefully. Stir when the recipe

calls for stirring, but do not stir if the recipe doesn’t state to stir. Stirring can lead to a sugary-grainy texture in some candies, while other candies need to be stirred con- stantly. A sturdy, silicone spatula or wooden spoon works well for stirring hot candies. A high-quality thermometer with a stainless steel protective housing case can serve as

a stirring device as well.

Was HIng

s ugar

d o W n

Crystals

As candy is cooked on the stove, sugar crystals may form on the sides of the pan and can become mixed into the hot syrup. To remove the crystals, use a damp brush and start just above the syrup. Brush upward toward the lip of the pan. Rinse the brush in a bowl of water. Remove excess water from the brush with a clean towel, and repeat. Some candies are constantly bubbling and rising.

In this case, it is difficult and dangerous to try and remove

sugar crystals. Do not scrape the pan when pouring these

candies onto a marble slab or into a pan, or the formed crystals may become mixed with the cooked candy.

u se s a u C e P a n Many of the candy recipes

u se

s a u C e P a n

Many of the candy recipes require large saucepans because the mixture doubles in size when boiling or additives may affect the bubbling. The saucepan should be a heavy-duty, thick saucepan so the candy is evenly cooked. However, using a saucepan that is too large with only a small amount of candy may cause inaccurate ther- mometer readings.

t H e

Pro P er

sI z e

t est I ng

tHer M o M eter

Throughout the book I suggest that you test the thermom- eter for accuracy before cooking the candy. This is one of the most important steps to ensure success in the recipe. The readings on a thermometer vary from one day to the next; therefore, the thermometer should be tested on the day the candy will be made. Overcooking the candy will result in candy that is harder than intended. Undercooking the candy will result in candy that is too soft, never sets

t H e

C a n d y

properly, or will not hold its shape. Another key factor when using a candy thermometer is to ensure the bulb or probe does not touch the bottom of the pan. The reading should come from the center of the candy.

1 Fill a 2-quart (1.9 L) saucepan half full with water. Place a lid on the pan. Heat on high until the water boils.

2 Remove the lid. Insert the thermometer. Leave the ther- mometer in the pan for several minutes.

Water boils at 212°F (100°C). If the thermometer reads 212°F (100°C), cook the candy exactly as the recipe says. If the thermometer is reading 214°F (102°C), add 2 degrees to the recipes instructions. Therefore, if the recipe says to cook to 238°F (114°C), cook to 240°F (116°C) instead. If the thermometer is reading 209°F (98°C), sub- tract 3 degrees from the recipe instructions. Therefore, if the recipe says to cook to 238°F (114°C), cook to 235°F (111°C) instead.

introduction

instructions. Therefore, if the recipe says to cook to 238°F (114°C), cook to 235°F (111°C) instead.

4 9

t est I ng

t H e

s ugar

s tate

The sugar state describes the consistency of the sugar when cooking candies. Testing the sugar state isn’t nec- essary when a thermometer is used, but it is helpful and ensures your candy will set appropriately if the thermom- eter used isn’t accurate. Dropping the hot candy into ice water also allows you to test the flavor. Flavors and extracts vary tremendously in potency. After flavorings, extracts, or oils are added to the candy, drop a bit of the hot candy into ice water. Remove the candy from the ice water and taste to see whether additional flavoring is needed. To test the sugar state, drop 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of the hot candy into a bowl of ice water to quickly cool the candy and test the consistency. Allow the candy to cool in the ice water a few seconds. Remove the sample using your fingers. Test the consistency by comparing it with one of the sugar state definitions below.

comparing it with one of the sugar state definitions below.            
                        thread 225°F–234°F (108°C–112°C)
   
thread 225°F–234°F (108°C–112°C)
soft Ball 234°F–240°F (112°C–116°C)
Candies that have been cooked to thread stage will pro-
duce a thread between your fingers.
Soft-ball candies will be soft when rolled into a ball. Some
candies, such as soft caramel, will not keep the shape,
while others, such as fudge, will be soft and will hold the
shape. Cook the following candies to the soft-ball stage:
• Soft caramels 
• Soft fondant
• Fudge 
• Maple candy
• Southern pralines
   

5 0

• Maple candy • Southern pralines         5 0 The Comple T e p h o T

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

Firm Ball 240°F–248°F (116°C–120°C) Firm-ball candies will hold their shape, but still remain soft when

Firm Ball 240°F–248°F (116°C–120°C)

Firm-ball candies will hold their shape, but still remain soft when squeezed. Cook the following candies to the firm-ball stage:

• Caramel 

• Taffy 

• Firm Fondant 

• Divinity

• Taffy  • Firm Fondant  • Divinity soft Crack 270°F–295°F (132°C–146°C) Soft-crack

soft Crack 270°F–295°F (132°C–146°C)

Soft-crack candies will bend slightly, then break. Cook the following candies to the soft-crack stage:

• Hard candy 

• Toffee

Hard Ball 250°F–268°F (121°C–131°C) Hard Crack 295°F–310°F (146°C–154°C)            
Hard Ball 250°F–268°F (121°C–131°C)
Hard Crack 295°F–310°F (146°C–154°C)
Candies that have been cooked to the hard-ball stage will
be very firm and slightly pliable.
Candies that have a hard-crack will be very hard, then
snap when broken. Cook the following candies to the
hard-crack stage:

• Hard candy 

• Brittles

introduction

when broken. Cook the following candies to the hard-crack stage: • Hard candy  • Brittles introduction 5 1

5 1

Clean I ng

Pans

Coated

W I t H

Place saucepans in a sink and fill with very hot water to dissolve the sugar crystals. Sugar dissolves very easy, making the pans quick to clean. For stubborn stuck-on candy, fill the pan two-thirds full of water. Place the filled

Hardened

Candy

pan on the stove and boil the water for a few minutes. The boiling water should dissolve the crystals and soften candy around the rim.

l I n I ng

a

Pan

W I t H

Par CHM ent

Pa P e r

Many of the candy recipes require mixing, cooking, then pouring the mixture into a pan. Lining a pan with parch- ment paper allows the candy to be easily removed from the pan. It also makes for easy cleanup. The parchment

should extend above the height of the pan so the parch- ment containing the candy slab can be easily lifted and removed from the pan.

1
1

1 Cut a sheet of parchment to fit the pan. The width of the paper should be the exact width of the pan. The length of the parchment paper should be the length of the pan, the height of the pan x 2, plus an additional 6" (15 cm).

5 2

of the pan x 2, plus an additional 6" (15 cm). 5 2 The Comple T

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

Therefore, a 7" x 7" x 2" (18 x 18 x 5 cm) pan should be lined with a parchment sheet that is 7" x 17" (18 x 43 cm). Basically, the parchment sheet should fit snuggly in the pan with the bottom and two sides covered with parchment.

2 Use a tool with a flat edge, such as a cookie spatula, to tightly form the parchment on the sides.

3 Pour the candy into the lined pan. Allow the candy to set completely. When the candy is set, use a table knife or a tool with a flat edge to loosen the two sides of the candy not lined with parchment.

2
2
3
3

4 Hold onto the parchment and lift the candy from the pan.

5 Flip the candy onto the work surface with the parchment facing up. Peel back the parchment paper. Cut the candy slab as directed in the recipe.

4
4
5
5

introduction

the parchment facing up. Peel back the parchment paper. Cut the candy slab as directed in

5 3

Dippe D a n D Trea T s , B a r k s ,

Dippe D a n D

Trea T s ,

B a r k s ,

Clus T ers

p ractically anything tastes great dipped in chocolate. This section begins with general dipping instructions
p ractically anything tastes great dipped in chocolate. This section begins with general dipping instructions

practically anything tastes great dipped in chocolate. This section begins with general dipping instructions and tips and includes instructions and recipes to dip some of the most common chocolate-covered treats, such as strawberries, pretzels, and sand- wich cookies. learn how to add decorations by using chocolate transfer sheets, drizzling contrasting stripes, and adding sprinkles and sugars.

This section also includes instructions for making barks and clusters, quite possibly the simplest candies to make. Barks and clusters are made by spreading chocolate thin or spooning choc- olate into mounds. Often ingredients such as nuts, pretzels, or hard candies are added for crunch. The mixture can be spread onto parch- ment paper, then broken into pieces for a bark candy. For clusters, simply spoon the mixture into candy cups, or onto parchment paper. The candy can also be spooned into candy molds for shaped pieces. recipes for some delicious combinations are included in this section. all of the bark recipes can be made into clusters. The cluster recipes have larger pieces of a crunchy item and may not be suited for barks.

General Dipping instructions

Dozens of snacks and treats are available at the grocery store, just waiting to be coated in chocolate.

use the following instructions to dip any treats not covered in this book. For truly unforgettable treats,

try dipping unique items such as cooked bacon, potato chips, popcorn, or gummy candies. Treats can

be dipped in milk chocolate, semisweet chocolate, dark chocolate, white chocolate, or colored white

chocolate. Candy coating can be used for a quick, easy treat. if real chocolate is used, the chocolate

must be tempered when the treats are dipped.

5 6

The shelf life will vary depending on the treat that is

dipped. always look at the best-by date on the package.

if the dipped treat is completely coated in chocolate, the

treat should be fine for up to four weeks. if the dipped treat is not completely coated in chocolate, the treat may

have a shorter shelf life. Fresh fruits have a significantly shorter shelf life. For example, chocolate-covered straw- berries are best eaten the day they are dipped, while chocolate-covered pretzels are good for up to four weeks.

S w i r l Tool

a round swirl tool is used for dipping

smaller items, such as nuts, raisins, bonbons, or truffles. Melt candy coat- ing or melt and temper real chocolate. Drop the treat into the melted choco- late. using a swirl dipping tool, com- pletely coat the treat with chocolate.

lift the treat from the chocolate using the same tool. Tap the tool against the bowl to allow excess chocolate to fall back into the bowl. scrape the dipping tool along the rim of the bowl to remove excess chocolate from the tool. slide the dipped treat onto a sheet of parchment paper to set. a spatula with a thin blade can be slid under the treat to remove it from the dipping tool. allow the treat

to set at room temperature.

D i p p i n g

dipping tool. allow the treat to set at room temperature. D i p p i n
dipping tool. allow the treat to set at room temperature. D i p p i n

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

Fla T Spa T ula Dipping Tool a tool with a flat edge is used
Fla T Spa T ula Dipping Tool a tool with a flat edge is used

Fla T

Spa T ula

Dipping

Tool

a tool with a flat edge is used for dipping larger pieces

such as marshmallows, potato chips, crackers, or cook- ies. Melt candy coating or melt and temper real choco- late. Drop the treat into the melted chocolate. using a flat spatula dipping tool, push the treat down into the chocolate so that it is completely immersed. lift the treat from the chocolate using the dipping tool. Tap the tool against the bowl to allow excess chocolate to fall back into the bowl. Drag the bottom of the tool against the rim of the bowl to remove excess chocolate from the tool.

place the dipped treat on a sheet of parchment paper to set. a spatula with a thin blade can be slid under the treat

to slide it off of the dipping tool. allow the treat to set at

room temperature.

Hal F -Dippe D

Trea T S

When only half of the treat will be dipped in chocolate, such as dried fruits, pretzel rods, candy canes, or fortune cookies, a special tool is not needed. simply hold onto

the end of the treat that will not be chocolate covered and dip the other end into melted candy coating or melted and tempered chocolate. Hold the treat over the bowl of melted chocolate and allow the excess chocolate to drip into the bowl. scrape the bottom of the treat against the rim of the bowl to remove excess chocolate from forming

a puddle around the bottom. set the dipped treat on a

sheet of parchment paper. allow the treat to set at room temperature.

dipped treats, barks, and clusters

treat on a sheet of parchment paper. allow the treat to set at room temperature. dipped

5 7

Chocolate-Covered strawberries

Dipped strawberries have been an indulgent treat for several decades. strawberries taste great dipped in milk, semisweet, or white chocolate. When shopping, choose plump, fragrant strawberries with a bright green, fresh-looking stem. keep the strawberries refrigerated until you are ready to dip. next, wash and thoroughly dry the strawberries before dipping them in the chocolate. strawberries dipped in chocolate should be kept in the refrigerator until they are ready to be served.

be kept in the refrigerator until they are ready to be served. 5 8 The Comple

5 8

be kept in the refrigerator until they are ready to be served. 5 8 The Comple

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

1
1
2
2

You

w ill

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• 1 pound (455 g) milk, semisweet, or white

• approximately 50 strawberries

1

Wash strawberries in cold water. place the strawberries on paper towels and pat dry with paper towels. allow the strawberries to thoroughly dry before dipping.

note: it is very important to wash and thoroughly dry the strawberries before they are dipped. a drop of water may cause the chocolate to thicken or cause streaking.

2

Melt candy coating or melt and

temper real chocolate. Hold on

to

the top of the strawberry and

immerse into the melted chocolate. Gently shake your hand over the bowl of melted chocolate to allow excess chocolate to fall back into the bowl. place the dipped strawberry on parchment paper to set. When set, place the strawberries uncov- ered on a tray in the refrigerator.

3

if

desired, add sprinkles or nuts to

the chocolate-coated strawberries immediately after they are placed on the parchment before the choco-

late sets. after the chocolate sets, stripe the dipped strawberries with

a contrasting color of melted candy

coating or melted and tempered chocolate. see page 66 in this sec- tion for more instructions on adding decorations to dipped treats.

S H e l F

l i F e,

S T orage, an D

g i F T

g i v i n g

Chocolate-covered strawberries are best when eaten the day they are dipped and no more than 24 hours after they are dipped. Chocolate- covered strawberries do not freeze well. keep chocolate-covered strawberries in a single layer on a tray in the refrigerator. The chocolate-covered strawberries keep best when they are left uncovered in the refrigerator. Be sure the refrigerator does not have any strong odors, or the chocolate may pick up the smell. Take the strawberries out of the refrigerator about 30 minutes to an hour before serving to allow

them come to room temperature. Dipped strawberries should be left at room temperature no longer than a couple of hours. strawberries dipped in chocolate are a perfect accompaniment for nearly any type of gathering. serve them as a simple but elegant light des- sert, have them take center stage at a dessert table, present them alongside a decadent piece of chocolate cake, or simply serve them for a romantic treat for two. The strawberries can be made a few hours before the event. Chocolate-covered strawberries make a lovely gift. Be sure the recipient can enjoy them on the day they are delivered so they taste fresh, sweet, and delicious. The dipped strawberries can be set on a tray or placed in candy boxes. plastic inserts are available that fit in the candy boxes. The inserts are sized to fit dipped strawberries and prevent the juices from staining the box.

Tuxedo strawberry

prevent the juices from staining the box. Tuxedo strawberry

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

To make a tuxedo strawberry, dip the strawberry in white chocolate. allow the white to dry. Hold the dipped strawberry at an angle, and dip into melted milk chocolate on both sides to form a “v.” pipe bowtie and buttons using semisweet

chocolate.

“v.” pipe bowtie and buttons using semisweet chocolate.

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Makes 50 strawberries

Makes 50 strawberries dipped treats, barks, and clusters 5 9

dipped treats, barks, and clusters

Makes 50 strawberries dipped treats, barks, and clusters 5 9

5 9

Crackers and sandwich Cookies store-bought crackers or cookies dipped in chocolate make a fantastic, quick

Crackers and sandwich Cookies

store-bought crackers or cookies dipped in chocolate make a fantastic, quick treat. Depending on the size and shape, these treats could be considered cookies or candies. add color to the treat by dipping the cracker in colored chocolates, use chocolate transfer sheets, or decorate with contrasting colors of chocolate. lemon sandwich cookies are delicious dipped in white chocolate, while chocolate and peanut butter sandwich cookies are yummy in white, milk, or semisweet chocolate. Buttery crackers also taste great in chocolate. The salt, butter flavor, and chocolate are tasty together. Graham crackers are deli- cious in milk or semisweet chocolate. recipes are included for some of my favorite crackers and cookies dipped in chocolate. Make your own cookie/cracker/chocolate combination. Visit the grocery store cracker and cookie aisles for inspiration and discover a new treat combination.

60

1
1

B a S ic

i n STruc T ion S

1 Melt candy coating or melt and temper real chocolate. Drop the cookie or cracker into the melted chocolate. using a dipping tool, push the cookie or cracker down into the chocolate so that it is completely immersed.

or cracker down into the chocolate so that it is completely immersed. The Comple T e

The Comple T e p h o T o

Guide T o Candy makin G

You

w ill

n e e D

• 1 pound (455 g) milk chocolate • 18 graham crackers

• 1 pound (455 g) milk chocolate • 18 graham crackers 2 3 5 2 lift
2
2
3
3
5
5

2 lift the treat from the chocolate using the dipping tool. Tap the tool against the bowl to allow excess chocolate to fall back into the bowl. Drag the bottom of the tool against the rim of the bowl to remove excess chocolate from the tool.

3 place the dipped treat on a sheet of parchment paper to set.

4 if desired, add sprinkles, nuts, an edible lay-on, or place a transfer sheet on the chocolate-coated treat immediately after it is placed on the parchment before the chocolate sets. another easy decorating technique is to pipe decorations using a contrasting color of melted candy coating or melted and tempered chocolate. see page 66 in this sec- tion for more instructions on adding decorations to dipped treats.

5 When the treat is completely set, use kitchen scissors to trim the excess chocolate from the bottom of the chocolate treat. Take care not to touch the top of the choco- late or fingerprints will show. Wear food-handling gloves to prevent fingerprints.

Dippe D

c racker S

Graham crackers dipped in choco- late are classic treats. expand upon this traditional treat by using cinna- mon grahams or by sandwiching marshmallow cream (recipe page 178) between two graham crackers before dipping.

g r a H a m

1 Melt milk chocolate candy coating or melt and temper real milk chocolate.

2 Drop the graham cracker into the melted chocolate. using a dipping tool, push the cracker down into the chocolate so that it is completely immersed.

3 lift the cracker from the chocolate using the dipping tool. Tap the tool against the bowl to allow excess chocolate to fall back into the bowl. place the dipped cracker on parch- ment paper to set.

4 add decorations, if desired.

Makes approximately 18 crackers

dipped treats, barks, and clusters

ment paper to set. 4 add decorations, if desired. Makes approximately 18 crackers dipped treats, barks,

61

Dippe D p eppermin T p eanu T Bu T T er San D wic
Dippe D p eppermin T p eanu T Bu T T er San D wic

Dippe D

p eppermin T

p

eanu T

Bu T T er

San D wic H

c racker S

c

ookie S

The surprisingly delicious combination of round buttery crackers with mint-flavored semisweet chocolate makes these crackers a minty family favorite.

1. Melt semisweet chocolate candy coating or melt and temper real semisweet chocolate.

2 Add 15 drops of peppermint oil. Stir to blend.

3 Drop a cracker into the melted chocolate. using a dipping tool, push the cracker down into the chocolate so that it is completely immersed. lift the cracker from the chocolate using the dipping tool. Tap the tool against the bowl to allow excess chocolate to fall back into the bowl.

4 place the dipped cracker on parchment paper to set. add decorations, if desired.

Makes approximately 45 dipped crackers

You w ill

n e e D

• 1 pound (455 g) semi-sweet chocolate

• 45 round butter crackers

• 15 drops peppermint oil

6 2

45 round butter crackers • 15 drops peppermint oil 6 2 The Comple T e p

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

store-bought peanut butter sandwich cookies may be dipped in chocolate, or make your own peanut butter sandwich cookies by spreading peanut butter between two butter crackers. For an extra gourmet treat, replace peanut butter with hazelnut-chocolate spread.

1 spread peanut butter or hazelnut spread between two but- ter crackers. set aside.

2 Melt milk chocolate candy coating or melt and temper real milk chocolate.

3 Drop the filled cracker into the melted chocolate. using a dipping tool, cover the cracker with melted chocolate. lift the cracker from the chocolate using the dipping tool. Tap the tool against the bowl to allow excess chocolate to fall back into the bowl.

4 place the dipped sandwich cookie on parchment paper to set. add decorations, if desired.

Makes approximately 30 dipped sandwich cookies

You

w ill

n e e D

• 1 pound (455 g) milk chocolate

• 60 round butter crackers

• peanut butter or hazelnut-chocolate spread

c ookie S on or a S T ick c racker S use sandwich cookies

c ookie S

on

or

a

S T ick

c racker S

use sandwich cookies or the peanut butter sandwich cookie recipe to make a treat on a stick. simply press a sucker stick into the cookie and dip into melted chocolate. sandwich cookies stuffed with extra-thick filling work best for this recipe.

1 Gently insert a stick into the filling of the cookie. The stick should go three-fourths up into the cookie. if the cookies are breaking or if the stick does not fit in between the cookie, twist the cookie to separate the cookie into two pieces. Dip the end of the sucker stick in melted choco- late. Gently press the dipped end of the stick onto the top of the cookie that has the filling. add a bit more chocolate on top of the stick. Center the other side of the cookie on the dipped stick. allow the chocolate to completely set before dipping.

2 Melt milk chocolate candy coating or melt and temper real milk chocolate. Hold on to the stick and immerse the cookie in the melted chocolate. lift the cookie and tap the stick on the rim of the bowl to allow excess chocolate to fall back into the bowl. scrape the bottom of the cookie along the rim of the bowl. place the dipped cookie on parchment paper to set.

S H e l F

a n D

l i F e,

S T o r a g e ,

g i F T

g i v i n g

Chocolate-covered crackers are fresh-tasting for up to four weeks. However, check the best-by date. if the date is less than four weeks, the treat is fresh only up to the best-by date. keep chocolate-covered crackers and cookies in an airtight container. The treats can be placed in layers in the container with parchment paper between each layer. store the container at room temperature for up to four weeks. Crackers and cookies dipped in chocolate freeze well. Follow instructions for freezing chocolates on page 19. Chocolate-dipped cookies and crackers have become very trendy with the popularity of dessert and well-dressed party tables. These treats are simple to cre- ate and can add color to the table, especially when they are decorated with chocolate transfer sheets. placing each dipped cookie in a candy cup adds a bit of sophis- tication to these simple treats. Because the treats have a long shelf life, the treats can be made a couple weeks before the party, making them ideal if there is a lot of other things to do the day of the party. Dipped cookies on a stick placed in a cellophane bag make a wonderful little party favor. Finally, consider taking a tray of dipped cookies and crackers when traveling to a party. Candy boxes are available for nearly any size and amount of dipped cookies or crackers. a stack of dipped cookies in a cellophane bag looks lovely and is an economical gift. placing squares of food-grade tissue paper between each cookie keeps the tops from getting scuffed. Cookies on a stick wrapped individually in cellophane bags make a great treat for school.

dipped treats, barks, and clusters

on a stick wrapped individually in cellophane bags make a great treat for school. dipped treats,

6 3

64

Dipped pretzels

The salty-sweet combination of a pretzel coated in chocolate creates a timeless treat. instructions are included for hard pretzel rods and pretzel twists. Watch for fun pretzel shapes around holidays. see also caramel-coated pretzels on page 113.

holidays. see also caramel-coated pretzels on page 113. p r e T zel Twi STS Twisted

p r e T zel

Twi STS

Twisted pretzels are commonly avail- able in three sizes: bite size, stan- dard size, and large sourdough pretzels. When dipping pretzel twists, a special prong dipping tool is used to make the process clean and efficient. The two prongs fit through the holes in the pretzel, making it easy to remove the pretzel from the bowl of melted chocolate. The instructions show dipping the mini twist pretzels. Follow the same instructions when dipping standard- size or large sourdough pretzels.

1 Melt candy coating or melt and tem- per real chocolate. Drop a pretzel into the melted chocolate. using a prong dipping tool, push the pretzel down into the chocolate so that it is completely immersed.

2 lift the pretzel from the chocolate using the dipping tool. Tap the tool against the side of the bowl to allow excess chocolate to fall back into the bowl.

3 place the dipped pretzel on a sheet of parchment paper to set. if desired, add sprinkles or nuts to the chocolate-coated pretzels before the chocolate sets. Or wait until the first layer of chocolate is set and pipe decorations using a contrasting color of melted candy coating or melted and tempered chocolate. see page 66 for more instructions on adding decorations to dipped treats.

Makes approximately 125 bite-size pretzels, 45 standard-size pretzels, or 20 large sourdough pretzels

1
1
2
2

You

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• 1 pound (455 g) milk, semi- sweet, or white chocolate

• pretzel twists

• sprinkles or nuts, optional

or white chocolate • pretzel twists • sprinkles or nuts, optional The Comple T e p

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

p r e T zel

r o D S

rods dipped in chocolate are quicker to make than the pretzel twists. a long, rectangular bowl is ideal for dip- ping large, thick pretzel rods. The pretzel rods can also be dipped using a tumbler glass. The glass should be about the height of the pretzel. The chocolate can be melted in a microwave in the glass, but be sure to stir often when melting to avoid overheating.

but be sure to stir often when melting to avoid overheating. 1 2 You w ill
1
1
2
2

You

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n e e D

• 1 pound (455 g) milk, semi- sweet, or white chocolate

• pretzel rods or sticks

• sprinkles or nuts, optional

1 Melt candy coating or melt and temper real chocolate. Hold on to one end of the pretzel rod. spoon melted chocolate onto the pretzel rod, leaving the end uncoated.

2 Tap the pretzel against the rim of the bowl to allow excess chocolate to drip back into the bowl. When no longer dripping, scrape the bottom of the pretzel against the bowl to remove excess chocolate.

3 place the dipped pretzel on a sheet of parchment paper to set. if desired, add sprinkles or nuts before the chocolate sets. Or, wait until the first layer of chocolate is set and stripe the chocolate using a contrasting color of melted candy coating or melted and tempered chocolate. see page 66 for more instructions on adding decorations to dipped treats.

Makes approximately 50 large pretzel rods or 250 mini pretzel sticks

S

H e l F

l i F e ,

S

T orage,

an D

g i F T

g i v i n g

keep chocolate-covered pretzels in an airtight container with parch- ment paper between layers. store the container at room temperature. pretzels dipped in chocolate freeze well if proper freezing procedures are followed (see page 19). Dipped pretzels are ideal for par- ties. They can be made a couple of weeks ahead of time, can be dipped in any color of melted chocolate to add a punch of color, are quick and easy, and guests love them! setting a few bowls of dipped pretzels through- out the room provides a treat just wait- ing to be devoured. a jar of pretzel rods with vibrant sprinkles adds instant color to a dessert or party table. Cellophane bags are available in sizes to fit one, two, six, or a dozen dipped pretzel rods and allow affordable packaging for gift giving. Fill a glass jar for a perfect vessel to hold dipped mini pretzel twists. Dipped sourdough pretzels lined up in a box are sure to put a smile on the recipient’s face.

Chocolate-covered pretzels are fresh- tasting for up to four weeks, or up to

the best-by date on the package.

dipped treats, barks, and clusters

are fresh- tasting for up to four weeks, or up to the best-by date on the

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adding Decorations to Dipped Treats

cHocola T e

Tran S F er

S H eeTS

a chocolate transfer sheet can be placed atop any dipped treat that has a flat surface.

1 Cut the transfer sheet slightly larger than the treat. it does not have to be exact. For example, if using a round cookie, it is not necessary to cut the transfer sheet into a circle.

2 Dip the treat in melted candy coating or melted and tempered chocolate. place the treat on parchment paper. immediately place the cut transfer sheet, texture-side-down, on top of the dipped treat.

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texture-side-down, on top of the dipped treat. 1 2 6 6 The Comple T e p

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

3 use your index finger to manipulate the flow of the choco- late into the shape desired.

4 Allow the chocolate to set for 25 to 30 minutes. When set, peel back the chocolate transfer sheet.

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S

T riping

wi T H

a

Decora T ing

wi T H

c

o n T raSTing

c olor

c anDY w r i T e r S

1 Dip the treat in melted candy coating or melted and tem- pered chocolate. allow the dipped treat to completely set. line the treats up on a sheet of parchment paper. Make a parchment cone following the directions on page 37. Melt candy coating or melt and temper chocolate. pour choco- late into a parchment cone. Cut a small opening on the parchment cone. pipe stripes by squeezing the chocolate while moving your hand back and forth.

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1

aDD a n D

n u T S , e D i B le

Sprinkle S , l aY -on S

1 Dip the treat in melted candy coating or melted and tempered chocolate. place the treat on parchment paper. immediately add sprinkles, nuts, or edible sugar or icing decorations.

1 Dip the treat in melted candy coating or melted and tem- pered chocolate. allow the dipped treat to completely set. Melt candy in the candy writers following the directions on page 28. pipe designs onto the dipped treat.

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Dou B le

Dippe D

( T wo- T one)

1 Dip the treat in melted candy coating or melted and tempered chocolate. allow the dipped treat to completely set. Melt candy coating or melt and temper a contrasting color of chocolate. place a glove on your hand. Hold on to the dipped treat and dip half of the treat in the contrasting color of chocolate. remove the piece quickly so the choco- late from the first dipping doesn’t melt.

dipped treats, barks, and clusters

remove the piece quickly so the choco- late from the first dipping doesn’t melt. dipped treats,

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Dippe D

Trou B leSHoo T ing

perfectly dipped treats will have a smooth finish with a subtle shine. pop any air bubbles immediately after dip- ping and before the chocolate sets. The base of the dipped treat should have a minimal amount of puddled chocolate.

Trea T S

Dipped Treats Have white Streaks

White streaks are caused by using chocolate that is not properly tempered or chocolate that is contaminated. see page 32 for chocolate tempering instructions and page 33 for troubleshooting. When items are dipped in choco- late, residue or part of the item may begin to mix and contaminate the chocolate, causing streaking. To avoid contamination, dip the item as fast as possible, getting it in and out of the chocolate quickly.

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getting it in and out of the chocolate quickly. 6 8 T H e C OMple

T H e C OMple T e pHOTO

Gui D e TO Can D y M akin G

Dipped Treats are Dull

Dipped treats are duller characteristically than treats that are molded because they set up slowly at room tempera- ture. Keeping the room at 72°F (22°C) or cooler will allow the pieces to set quickly. if shinier pieces are desired, the dipped treats can be placed in the freezer to set. Touching the treat may also cause fingerprints and dull spots. Wear food-handling gloves to avoid fingerprinting treats.

Dipped Treats are Sticky

sticky chocolate can be caused by chocolate that is not properly tempered. see page 32 for chocolate tempering instructions and page 33 for troubleshooting. Chocolate- dipped treats placed in the refrigerator will have a sticky outer shell. store dipped treats at room temperature. The

exception is dipped strawberries. Chocolate-covered strawberries will often become sticky because the straw- berries

exception is dipped strawberries. Chocolate-covered strawberries will often become sticky because the straw- berries contain a lot of moisture. For best results, dip strawberries no more than a few hours before serving.

Dipped Treat Has Thick puddle around the Base

a thick base is caused by chocolate dripping off the sides and puddling around the treat. To avoid excess choco- late around the base, tap the dipping tool against the rim of the bowl until chocolate no longer drips from the treat. slide the dipping tool against the rim of the bowl to remove any excess chocolate from the dipping tool. if the chocolate still puddles once it is on the parchment, use the dipping tool to slide the dipped treat to a clean area of the parchment paper until the chocolate no lon- ger puddles. Trim away excess chocolate with a pair of kitchen scissors. Take care to make sure you do not cut the treat under the chocolate.

Take care to make sure you do not cut the treat under the chocolate. D ippe

D ippe D T reaT s, B arks, an D C lus T ers

Take care to make sure you do not cut the treat under the chocolate. D ippe

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Crunchy Barks

easy, crunchy barks are practical for gift giving. Barks can be made quickly, are pretty, and are eco- nomical. One batch of bark will fill several candy boxes or bags. The typical volume ratio for barks is twice the amount of chocolate to crunchy food items.

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B a S ic

i n STruc T ion S

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1 lay a sheet of parchment paper on the countertop or line a 17" x 12" (43 x 30 cm) sheet pan with parchment. avoid using smaller sheet pans, as they may make the bark thick and difficult to score or break into pieces. in a microwave- safe bowl, melt candy coating, or melt and temper real chocolate. add crunch.

Chopped nuts

or melt and temper real chocolate. add crunch. Chopped nuts

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if a recipe calls for chopped nuts, chop the nuts in small pieces. Do not use the finely chopped nut crumbs because they can make barks and clusters crumbly.

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The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G
The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G
The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

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2 stir until the ingredients are thoroughly combined. spread the mixture onto parchment paper. spread thin and as even in thickness as possible. The thinner the mixture is spread, the easier it is to cut the bark into pieces.

3 if squares of bark are desired, allow the candy to set at room temperature for several minutes. When the chocolate is no longer shiny, hold a dough cutter perpendicular to the work surface, or use a pizza cutter and score the bark.

4 allow the candy to set for several more minutes. When the candy is completely set, break apart the scored pieces. The bark can also be broken into pieces (and not scored) for a variety of random shapes and sizes.

Molded Crunch

for a variety of random shapes and sizes. Molded Crunch

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The crunch mixture can be spooned into a candy mold. if using a mold with a lot of detail, add a little less crunchy product.

with a lot of detail, add a little less crunchy product.

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dipped treats, barks, and clusters 71

dipped treats, barks, and clusters

dipped treats, barks, and clusters 71

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7 2 commercial crunch variations (listed from top to bottom) • 11/2 cups (210 g) toffee

commercial crunch variations (listed from top to bottom)

11/2 cups (210 g) toffee crunch combined with

1 pound (455 g) milk chocolate

11/2 cups (210 g) peppermint crunch combined with

1 pound (455 g) white chocolate

11/2 cups (48 g) tiny crisp rice combined with

1 pound (455 g) milk chocolate

11/2 cups (210 g) key lime crunch combined with

1 pound (455 g) white chocolate

11/2 cups (210 g) espresso crunch combined with

1 pound (455 g) dark chocolate

11/2 cups (210 g) lemon crunch combined with

1 pound (455 g) white chocolate

c ommercial

c runc H e S

several commercial crunches are available at candy sup- ply stores. peppermint crunch is one of the more popular varieties. These finely chopped pieces of red and green candies mixed with white chocolate are festive for the holidays and addictive. another favorite is toffee crunch. small pieces of toffee combined with milk or dark choco- late makes a quick candy for toffee lovers. Commercial crunches will vary in piece size. The same crunch can also vary from batch to batch. sometimes the pieces will be large, while other times the pieces will be small or even fine crumbs of crunch. if smaller pieces are desired, the crunch can be crushed into smaller pieces by placing it between two jelly roll pans and smashing them together.

by placing it between two jelly roll pans and smashing them together. The Comple T e
by placing it between two jelly roll pans and smashing them together. The Comple T e

The Comple T e p h o T o Guide T o Candy makin G

Swee T

an D

Sal T Y

Bark

Swee T an D Sal T Y Bark Swee T an D Spic Y Bark Melt

Swee T

an D

Spic Y

Bark

Melt 1 pound (455 g) milk chocolate candy coating or melt and temper milk chocolate. add 3/4 teaspoon (1.5 g) cayenne pepper and 1 teaspoon (2.3 g) cinna- mon. Stir in 11/2 cups (48 g) tiny crisp rice.

Melt 1 pound (455 g) milk chocolate candy coating or melt and temper milk chocolate. Stir in 1/2 cup (56 g) chopped pretzels and 1/2 cup (73 g) chopped peanuts.

Stir in 1/2 cup (56 g) chopped pretzels and 1/2 cup (73 g) chopped peanuts. dipped
Stir in 1/2 cup (56 g) chopped pretzels and 1/2 cup (73 g) chopped peanuts. dipped

dipped treats, barks, and clusters

Stir in 1/2 cup (56 g) chopped pretzels and 1/2 cup (73 g) chopped peanuts. dipped

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