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The Auto Clinic
The
Auto
Clinic

No Job Too Big Or Small

We

Do It All!

The Auto Clinic No Job Too Big Or Small We Do It All! Approved Auto Repair

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929 South Barre Road, Barre 476-5379 autoclinicvt.com

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ASE CERTIFIED MASTER TECHNICIAN ON DUTY CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER Vol. 45, No.
ASE CERTIFIED MASTER TECHNICIAN ON DUTY CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER Vol. 45, No.
ASE CERTIFIED MASTER TECHNICIAN ON DUTY CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER Vol. 45, No.

CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

ON DUTY CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER Vol. 45, No. 25 403 US RTE 302 -

Vol. 45, No. 25

403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916

On the Web: www.vt-world.com

Email: sales@vt-world.com

On the Web: www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com Not Your Ordinary Bike Shop Vermont Bicycle Shop doesn’t

Not Your Ordinary Bike Shop Vermont Bicycle Shop doesn’t just sell bikes; it builds community page 4

The Great Pumpkin Search See page 4 for details

Central Vermont Polling Times & Places page 10

Halloween Safety Game page 19

Times & Places page 10 Halloween Safety Game page 19 Local Sports And Outdoors page 28
Times & Places page 10 Halloween Safety Game page 19 Local Sports And Outdoors page 28

Local

Sports

And

Outdoors

page

28

INSERTS IN THIS WEEK’S WORLD

May not be available in all papers

- L&T Auto Group -Nelson’s Ace Hardware -Sears

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Looking for that special handmade gift for this holiday season? Handcrafted Jewelry, Wood Crafts, Fiber Arts, Jams and Maple Syrup? You’ll find these items and much more from over 60 local crafters! Delicious food and pastries also available on site.

Proudly presented by
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October 26, 2016

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At the October 12, 2016 meeting at the Steak House, Erin Carter was initiated into this chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma. Teachers brought art supplies for the ART BUS wish list and discussed future chapter projects. They also held a book talk on Salman Rushdie’s book Haroun and the Sea Stories.

The American Legion Post #3 in Montpelier held its annual Past Commanders, Past Sons of the American Legion and Past President Ladies Auxiliary sup- per, Friday, October 14. After the meal, a drawing for the gun raf- fle and the second prize of $250 was held. Winner Ronald “Herc” Wells of Woodbury is seen here accepting the gun — a Henry .22 caliber rifle honoring all veter- ans — from Dick Harlow 1st Vice Commander, Post #3. Phil Reeve of Saxtons River won the second prize.

Post #3. Phil Reeve of Saxtons River won the second prize. On October 5, Dave Wilcox,

On October 5, Dave Wilcox, State Lands Forester, Amanda Garland, and her Natural Resources and Sustainability students lead Berlin Elementary Students in planting a small apple orchard at the Berlin School. The trees were purchased with grant funds obtained from the Vermont Urban and Community Forestry Program. Berlin Elementary School has been expanding health and environmental aware- ness learning. In addition to the orchard, the school encourages learning about sustainability with its Anne Burke Community Garden, nature trail, Mystery Boxes from Community Harvest of Central Vermont, healthy snack program, worm composting, reuseable dishes, utensils and dish washing stations in classrooms. These learning opportunities provide hands on experience for students to also learn numerous literacy, math, science, and social studies lessons as well as sustainability and conservation of natural resources. Many thanks to Dave and Amanda for all your efforts!

151 Mad River Canoe Road in Waitsfield (in the Green Warehouse right next to Shaw’s)

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QUANTITIES ARE LIMITED, SO TO PRE-ORDER CALL HOUSENEEDS AT 802-583-5500

Montessori School of Central Vermont is settling into its new loca- tion in Barre at

Montessori School of Central Vermont is settling into its new loca- tion in Barre at the former Knights of Columbus building. MSCVT currently serves approximately 60 children in the region, and the new facility is licensed to an enrollment of up to 100.

Montessori School of Central Vermont Relocates to Barre, Celebrates with Public Open House, Oct. 29

The Montesorri School of Central Vermont (MSCVT) will host an open house on

October 29 from 1-4 p.m. at

84 Pine Hill Road in Barre to

celebrate the opening of its new school. MSCVT acquired the former Knights of Columbus building and

10-acre property in January, commenced renovations at the end of April, and began the school year on September

6 at the new location (for-

merly located on Rte. 2 in Berlin). “We are very pleased to acquire a building that was

well suited for our programs,” says Kristen Martin, the Head of the School. “The design and layout accommodates the staff and children exceedingly well, and provides enough space for additional enrollment. We would like community members to see this beautiful environ- ment and the changes that have been made to the building,” she adds. MSCVT is a 5 STARS, prequalified, licensed program and recognized as an Independent School. Its programs serve chil- dren ages 15 months to age 12. Montessori environments are mixed age classrooms based upon an educational theory developed by Dr. Maria Montessori, an Italian teacher and physician. Montessori programs inspire children through spe- cial direction, educational materials, and the natural world, fostering lifelong creativity and a passion for independence and learning. The renovations were funded by grants and loans from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development and the Vermont Community Development Program and includes totally new electrical, mechanical, fire suppression, security and telecommunications systems. Additionally, an elevator and a wood fired pellet boiler were installed, energy efficient windows were added around all sides of the building, and the thermal envelope was upgrad- ed with additional insulation. The facility is also fully compli- ant with accessibility standards. “We would not have been able to finish this project on time without the cooperation of federal and State agency employ- ees, the efforts of the construction crews, and a very dedicated staff. We are also appreciative of the support we have received from the Town of Barre,” says Martin. MSCVT currently serves approximately 60 children in the region, and the new facility is licensed to an enrollment of up to 100. For more information on the Montessori School of Central Vermont and their programs, for toddlers through elementary, please contact Kristen Martin or Lana Bodach- Turner (info@mscvt.org, 802.479.0912) or visit www. mscvt.org.

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Running for Office

in Washington County?

Our Readers Vote In the last election 8 out 10 newspaper readers went to the
Our Readers Vote
In the last election 8 out 10 newspaper readers went
to the polls. Our weekly readership is over 30,000
adults, ages 25 to 75 years old.
LAST
WEEK
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Election
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The WORLD Consistently Reaches Voters

The printed community paper isn’t dead! The printed free paper is the only media reaching the entire community. Cable TV is fractured by an overabundance of channels. Radio stations are narrow casting to specific musical audiences. Paid circulation newspapers are losing subscribers. If you want to reach the most voters for an affordable cost – Advertise in the WORLD!

The WORLD Reaches Crucial Undecided Voters

The conventional wisdom among consultants says that only 10-15% of the electorate is typically up for grabs at the end of any campaign. Among those who say they experience some indecision, three out of four are regular newspaper readers. We can put your message into the hands of this crucial constituency.

The WORLD Makes Targeting Easy

We can get your message in the hands of the voters you need to reach. In addition to print ads, we offer inserts of your flyer or brochure or a “post-it “ note placed on the front page.

Election Day

Tuesday, November 8

Call or email us today for advertising prices.

November 8 Call or email us today for advertising prices. ✔ 479-2582 | 800-639-9753 sales@vt-world.com

8 Call or email us today for advertising prices. ✔ 479-2582 | 800-639-9753 sales@vt-world.com
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WILLIAMSTOWN

Pump &

Pantry

SPECIALS GOOD THROUGH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30

Now Hiring both Cashier & Deli Positions

Stop by and fill out an application today. Good pay and benefits!

LAST CHANCE FOR HALLOWEEN!

Fresh Pumpkins

$6.99

ea.

Cold Hollow Cider

GALLONS & HALF-GALLONS

IN STOCK

Coca-Cola Family 12 pk cans

1 at $4.99 or

3 for $11.00 + dep.

Great Price! Green Mountain Coffee

K-Cups 24-count All Flavors

$14.99

Archway Cookies Assorted flavors & sizes

in the bread aisle

Wise Chips

Family Size Bags

Shurfine English Muffins,

Hot Dog & Hamburger Rolls &

White Bread 14-oz

Lay’s Chips Family Size

2 for $5.00

$2.99

2/$3.00

 

1 at Regular Price or

2 for $6.00

 

2 for $5.00

Shurfine Milk

at $3.00 or

Skim, 1%, 2% Gallon

$2.99

 

Hood Ice Cream

at Regular Price or

2 for $2.50 + dep.

Assorted Flavors, 48-0z

$3.39

This Week’s Meat Specials

 
 

NEW! Veal or Beef Fly Away Birds!

 

MADE FRESH IN STORE!

Beef Cube Steak or Stew Meat Family Pk

$3.99

lb.

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Chicken Boneless Thighs Family Pk Italian Sausage HOT or SWEET Pork Boneless Chops or Spare Ribs Family Pk SPECIAL! Chicken Tenders Family Pk

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Coca Cola Brand 2 liters

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Pork Loins Whole Premium Kayem Natural Casing Franks 2.5 lb. box

$2.19 lb.

$11.98

We Carry Black Diamond Steaks!

Mike Ziter’s Prepared Beef & Pork Roasts

available by special order - 24 hour notice appreciated

“Check out our Fresh Meats & Produce”

PROUD TO SELL VP RACING FUELS GASOLINE

Our 91 Octane Premium at the pump is non-ethanol. We also have specialty fuels avail- able in 5-gallon cans.

Stop by and check our great selection of VP Merchandise!

Meat Dept. Manager Mike Ziter

EBT/SNAP Cards Welcome

Serving Central VT for 50 Years

EBT/SNAP Cards Welcome Serving Central VT for 50 Years OPEN EVERYDAY: Mon.-Thurs. 5a-9p, Fri. 5a-10p, Sat.

OPEN EVERYDAY: Mon.-Thurs. 5a-9p, Fri. 5a-10p, Sat. 6a-10p, Sun. 6a-9p

Rt. 14, Williamstown • 802 433-1038

Mon.-Thurs. 5a-9p, Fri. 5a-10p, Sat. 6a-10p, Sun. 6a-9p Rt. 14, Williamstown • 802 433-1038 Most Cards

Most Cards Accepted

DEBIT
DEBIT
Williamstown • 802 433-1038 Most Cards Accepted DEBIT Vermont Bicycle Shop owner Darren Ohl works on

Vermont Bicycle Shop owner Darren Ohl works on repairing a tire for a customer. Since opening in

April, Ohl has been pleased with the amount of business as he continues to build community through his shop’s offerings.

Not Your Ordinary Bike Shop

Vermont Bicycle Shop doesn’t just sell bikes; it builds community

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of articles highlighting local businesses that go beyond what one might expect. They don’t just focus on the bottom line. They’re also concerned with building and improving com- munity. This is our way of recognizing these business and hoping others will be inspired by their stories. By Aaron Retherford As you walk into the Vermont Bicycle Shop at 105 N. Main St. in Barre, you might think it looks like a typical bike shop. Owner Darren Ohl might be working away

on the line of bikes in need of repair. The lat- est and greatest bicycles are lined up neatly along the wall for sale, and there are even some discs for the disc golfers who share the trails with mountain bikers in the Barre Town Forest. However, Ohl is not your typical bicycle shop owner. Before he officially opened his doors in April, he had his sights set of unit- ing Barre City and the surrounding com- munities. And while his means to that end has changed slightly, his goal of building community has not. “My ultimate goal is rather than having a company loyalty program, we have a com- munity loyalty program instead,” Ohl said. “We’ve made it so if you’ve volunteered more than 20 hours in the Barre area, you can have whomever you volunteered for write you a little letter, and we put you in the sys- tem so you can get 10 percent off products and accessories. “It doesn’t seem like much for one busi- ness to do it, but I hope to see other busi- nesses kind of do the same thing. Because if everyone is doing it, maybe that encourages a

lot more people to volunteer

Our goal is to

create a system that other businesses can see and think they should do that, too. Because there are a lot of places in Barre that need that volunteer effort.” Granite City Grocery members are auto- matically entered into the bike shop’s loyalty program, which also allows members access to closeouts early. Another way Ohl differentiates his shop from others is he doesn’t sponsor a race team. Instead, the bicycle shop’s team is made up of trail builders at Millstone Trails, giving them access to specialized high-end bicycles that only racers usually can access. Ohl explained this in a recent Facebook post, “Vermont Bicycle Shop does not sponsor a racing team. Instead, our ‘Team’ discounts and benefits go to those amazing people who volunteer their time at Millstone Trails. They are a group of people who have literally changed our little world here in Barre for the better. They represent everything I love about Barre and I am so very proud to call them

I love about Barre and I am so very proud to call them friends, to ride

friends, to ride bicycles with them, and most of all, to be a part of honoring them.” Of course there are the health benefits of cycling that Ohl’s store brings to the commu- nity, exhibited by the store’s motto of “Happiness & Health Thru Bicycles & Cycling.” But Ohl doesn’t just sell bicycles and send you on your merry way. He gets to know you as a cyclist, and will adjust your new bike until it fits you and your needs per- fectly. Ohl has also been working closely with hand cyclists who have mobility issues and cannot ride a two-wheeled bike comfortably or efficiently. He’s aiming to hold some rides focused around that group of riders because there is not much available in terms of orga- nized riding. While encouraging volunteerism is a key way Ohl’s shop is building community, he also encourages local cyclists to participate in the weekly community bike rides with Millstone Trails Association. But if you’re looking for more than just a typical ride, there’s Ohl’s Adventure Club. The “adven- tures” include an overnight camping trip along with bike rides to and from the camp- grounds. Ohl hopes to make them monthly outings next year. “The idea was to have it be open to people who had never done anything like it before. Ninety percent of the people who joined us had not, so it really opened up people to how easy they could go out and have these adven- tures in Vermont,” Ohl said. For more information on Vermont Bicycle Shop, visit https://vermontbicycleshop.light- speedwebstore.com/ or stop on by the shop during its new winter business hours: Wed-Fri 9:30-6:30, Sat 9-4, and Sun 10-2.

Win A $ EXAMPLE Gift ONLY The Great Pumpkin Search SHOWN Certificate ACTUAL SIZE 1.
Win A
$
EXAMPLE
Gift
ONLY
The Great Pumpkin Search
SHOWN
Certificate
ACTUAL SIZE
1. Throughout this week’s WORLD, advertisements contain
this special pumpkin. All of the pumpkins are the same size
and there are at least 11 small pumpkins to find.
a participating
from advertiser
2. On a separate sheet of paper, list all the advertisers who
have the special pumpkins in their ads. Also include your
name, address, and daytime phone number.
3. Mail your entries to:
The World’s Pumpkin Contest
403 U.S. Route 302-Berlin
Barre, Vermont 05641
Fax 479-7916
Or email to sales@vt-world.com
4. Deadline for entries is 5PM, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016.
5. Winners will be drawn at random from the contest entries.
Only 1 entry per person. Winners will be published in the
November 10 edition.
If I win, I'll choose my Gift Certificate from
MONTPELIER PHARMACY 69 Main Street, Montpelier, VT 05602 802-223-4633 Locally owned and proud of our

MONTPELIER

PHARMACY

69 Main Street, Montpelier, VT 05602 802-223-4633

Locally owned and proud of our independence

Barre Evangelical Free Church in conjunction with Connecting Hope Barre

Winter Warm-Up Event

New and Used Coats, Jackets, Hats, Mittens, Gloves, Boots, Blankets

Everything given away

FREE

To those in our community in need of warm clothing this winter

Saturday,

November 12, 2016

10:00 AM to 2:00 PM

this winter Saturday, November 12, 2016 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM Spaulding High School Ayer Street,

Spaulding High School Ayer Street, Barre

Lunch Provided

Freely given in the name of Jesus!

For questions, call Barbara McMahon 802-476-7002

Judy Tartaglia, UVM Health Network - CVMC President and CEO, to Retire in March

Health Network - CVMC President and CEO, to Retire in March Judy Tartaglia, The UVM Health

Judy Tartaglia, The UVM Health Network - Central Vermont Medical Center’s President and CEO, announced that she will retire on March 31, 2017. Tartaglia became CEO of Central Vermont Medical Center in 2007. Prior to joining CVMC, she was the President and CEO of Miles Health Care in Maine. “Over the past nine years, I am proud that we have taken CVMC to the next level of outstanding quality medical care,” said Tartaglia. “We are the preferred provider in our region and have an excellent reputation in the community for high-quality care and superior customer service.” In announcing her retirement, Judy noted, “while there is never a perfect time to retire, now seems the

right time for my family and for our organiza- tion.” Under Tartaglia’s leadership, CVMC increased access to health care by expanding the number of providers and practices and by offering many new medical services to the community including: hospitalist services, palliative and spiritual care, ExpressCare, rheumatology, endocrinology, radiation oncology, cardiac rehab, integrative medi- cine, spine surgery, occupational medicine, podiatry and wound care. “Judy’s love and care of the community has been evident in her passion to ensure that the people of central Vermont receive the type of care that we all deserve,” said Mike Dellipriscoli, CVMC Board Chair. “Thankfully, we still have a few months more

to work with Judy, but we will greatly miss

her, and the leadership and enthusiasm she has brought to CVMC over the last nine years.”

In 2016, CVMC won several national awards for quality and service, including being named one of Becker’s Top 100 Community Hospitals in the United States, an iVantage Top Performing Hospital, and a Leapfrog Grade A Hospital. In addition, CVMC won the Governor’s award for well- ness and environmental stewardship and earned the Energy Star certification for per-

forming in the top 25 percent of all hospitals nationwide for energy efficiency.

In 2011, Tartaglia also played an important

role in creating what became The University of Vermont Health Network.

“I am excited for the future of CVMC,”

Tartaglia said. “We are incredibly fortunate to be part of The University of Vermont Health Network – an organization that is leading the charge in health care reform and is at the

forefront of health care quality in the nation. It’s an inspiring time for our growing network and the changing health care environment in the state and country. CVMC is well-posi- tioned to not only survive, but thrive in the future.” Dr. John Brumsted, President and CEO of The UVM Health Network noted that, “Judy’s leadership has not only been instrumental in helping to ensure outstanding care is avail- able in central Vermont, but also in helping to set the vision of providing coordinated care for communities across Vermont and northern New York through the establishment of The UVM Health Network.”

In a letter to CVMC staff, Tartaglia wrote,

“CVMC is a truly remarkable place. We have

an incredible Board of Trustees, exceptional medical staff, talented and caring manage- ment team, amazing volunteers, and extraor- dinary – the BEST – employees. I adore you all and will miss you dearly.”

A search to find the new president of The

UVM Health Network – CVMC will begin in the near future.

VEDA Announces Retirement of COO Steve Greenfield

The Vermont Economic Development Authority (VEDA) has announced two key management changes. Long-time Chief Operating Officer (COO) Steve Greenfield will retire at the end of 2016 and current Director of Operations, Cassie Polhemus, will assume the COO position. “This is a watershed moment for the Authority,” said Jo Bradley, Chief Executive Officer. “Steve has been VEDA’s institutional memory for decades. He has also been a wise and generous management partner and is a beloved member of our Staff. We will all miss

him tremendously. But, we are delighted that Cassie Polhemus, whose own leadership has contributed greatly to the efficiency of VEDA’s operations, will be taking on even greater responsibilities in helping to manage VEDA’s future growth and success.” Greenfield has served as VEDA’s Chief Operating Office since 2004, but his tenure at VEDA goes back more than 31 years. Greenfield joined VEDA as a Loan Officer in 1985, after having served as the Coordinator for the Vermont Job Start Program. In 1997,

he was named VEDA’s Deputy Manager, and

was part of the management team that helped transition the Authority’s capitalization to a Commercial Paper Program,

a move that helped VEDA

become the self-funded orga- nization it is today. “I have very much enjoyed working with my public and private sector friends and acquaintances in the econom- ic development financing arena,” said Greenfield. “Together over the years we have supported and strength- ened Vermont commercial and agricultural businesses of all kinds and sizes all around

Students in the News

Garrett Pembroke of Berlin, Vt., and teammates won the 2016 Yankee Small College Conference golf championship Oct. 15 in Portsmouth, N.H. Pembroke, a sophomore majoring in for- estry, helped defeat Southern Maine Community College the New Hampshire Technical Institute in the tournament final by 19 strokes. The Bobcats’ total was 348. The win represents the team’s sec- ond straight championship.

the state, and created many good job opportu- nities for Vermonters. VEDA has a strong Board, Management Team and Staff that I know will continue this work in the years to come.” Polhemus joined VEDA in 2013 as a Commercial Lender and became VEDA’s Director of Operations in 2014. She has over twenty years of experience in commercial lending and risk management with financial institutions. Prior to joining VEDA, she was Senior Vice President and Risk Manager for Northeast Member Business Services, a cred-

it union service organization providing small business lending services to credit unions in New England and California. From 1987 to 1999, she held various commercial lending and credit management positions at banks in Connecticut and Vermont.

“I am honored to assume this new manage-

ment position at VEDA,” said Polhemus. “Steve’s leadership over the years has helped to make VEDA the economic development engine it is today, and I look forward to work- ing more closely with Jo Bradley and the rest of the VEDA team to continue that good work.”

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The Noyle Johnson Group would like you to meet Dain Herring

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High School in 1983 and attended Champlain College. I currently reside in Barre Town with my husband, Brad and three sons. I play in the Central Vermont Women's Broomball league and I enjoy watching my youngest son play sports I am a recent addition to the Noyle W. Johnson family, joining in February 2016. I have been working with businesses and individuals on their unique insurance needs statewide for over 30 years. Insurance can be confusing, and I enjoy helping my clients navigate through it to ensure their needs are met. I am a past Board of Director for the Vermont Chamber of Commerce. There is no place in the world I would rather work and reside. Vermont is not only great because of its beauty, but because of its strong communi- ties. I am happy to be part of the NWJ family and I am proud to have been working with so many Vermonters on their insurance needs. I look for- ward to helping you as well. Please give me a call to see how I can help you today!

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Scrag Mountain Music’s Halloween Cabaret Features Schoenberg’s ‘Pierrot Lunaire’

Scrag Mountain Music, directed by double bassist Evan Premo and soprano Mary Bonhag, opens its 2016-17 season with a “Halloween Caberet,” a characteristically adventurous, virtuosic program for which the group has become well-known. Their pro- gram, presented in three diverse venues, will take listeners to the café and cabaret music scene in early 20th-century Germany, and 21st-century United States. Concerts will be given on Friday, October 28, 7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Church of Montpelier; Saturday, October 29, 7:30 p.m. at First Light Studio in Randolph; and Sunday, October 30, 7:30 p.m. at the Warren United Church in Warren. Admission is “come as you are, pay what you can.” Featuring Mary Bonhag, this concert also brings to Vermont five members of New York City-based chamber collective Decoda: pia- nist David Kaplan, flutist Catherine Gregory, clarinetist Paul Won Jin Cho, violinist/violist Anna Elashvili, and cellist Hamilton Berry. The program takes as its genesis Arnold Schoenberg’s striking “Pierrot Lunaire,” writ- ten in 1912. “Pierrot” consists of 21 songs, all quite short, each evocative of its own musical, poetic, and social world. Flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and piano will accompany Bonhag who will sing with a “spoken voice,” a voice half- way between singing and speaking. One of the most influential compositions of the early 20th century in Europe, “Pierrot

Lunaire” was premiered in Berlin on 1912 after 40 rehearsals. Present at the premiere was the composer Anton Webern who report- ed that while some in the audience were “whistling and laughing,” it was, in the end, “an unqualified success.” Among Schoenberg’s most frequently per- formed compositions, “Pierrot Lunaire” is organized into three groups of seven poems, the subjects ranging from love and sex, to violence, crime, and religion. The instrument ensemble used by Schoenberg in “Pierrot Lunaire” has become influential, duplicated by contemporary groups like the Da Capo Chamber Players, eighth blackbird, and the Finnish contemporary group Uusinta Lunaire, while the “spoken voice” solos have been performed on recordings by avant-pop star Björk and jazz singer Cleo Lane. Bonhag says, “Think cabaret and melodra- ma, imagination and the inner workings of the subconscious. Let go of what you think a melody is and you will be happily lost in the world that Schoenberg created in 1912.” Accompanying the justifiably famous “Pierrot Lunaire,” which will form the second half of the concert, will be café and cabaret music by Arnold Schoenberg and American composers Paul Schoenfield and William Bolcom. Premo comments, “We hope this cabaret concert will uniquely and accurately frame ‘Pierrot.’”

SEE PAGES 18-25 IN THIS WEEK’S WORLD FOR MORE HALLOWEEN HAPPENINGS

The Official Blues Brothers Revue Ready to Raise The Barre Opera House Roof on Oct. 28

Get ready to shake a tail feather when The Official Blues Brothers Revue travels to The Barre Opera House on Friday, October 28 at 8 p.m. Produced by Judy Belushi Pisano and Dan Aykroyd, The Official Blues Brothers Revue pays homage to Chicago’s rich history of blues, gospel and soul music. Under the musi- cal direction of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame impresario, Paul Shaffer, Jake, Elwood and the high-energy eight-piece Intercontinental Rhythm & Blues Revue Band deliver a big sound, performed with the passion and preci- sion of the original Blues Brothers band. Laying down a playlist that’s a virtual encyclopedia of American music, The Official Blues Brothers Revue strikes the right bal- ance of humor, music and mayhem. Wayne (Jake) Catania and Kieron (Elwood) Lafferty were hand-picked by Aykroyd and Belushi- Pisano because, once the duo bounds on stage, they become the original characters created by Dan and John Belushi in 1978 when the original act debuted on Saturday Night Live. “Kieron and Wayne are not imitators, they live the music and embody those characters. They understand the spirit of The Blues Brothers and revel in the joy of being Jake and Elwood,” observed Judy Belushi. Dan, Judy and her husband, Victor Pisano, hand-

picked Wayne and Kieron, whose uncanny ability makes the multi-media show an acces- sible interactive experience for audiences of all ages who jump to their feet to sing along and dance to a repertoire that includes, “Shout,” “Gimme Some Lovin,” “Sweet Home Chicago” and the signature classic, “Soul Man.” The only artists sanctioned by the show’s producers to perform as The Official Blues Brothers Revue, Wayne and Kieron front an incendiary live concert that combines the comedy and hits from the original 1980 Blues Brothers blockbuster film and subsequent albums with a multi-media presentation that combines the music with an audio/video introduction that puts the original concept of Jake and Elwood as frontmen for a fictitious American blues and soul band into historical perspective. It’s no accident that they’ve suc- ceeded in bringing the irreverent characters that have resonated with people around the world back to life, reminding everyone why Jake and Elwood catapulted into a cultural phenomenon—a musical, comedic and cine- matic legend. Tickets for Official Blues Brothers Revue are $32-37. Order online at barreoperahouse. org or call the box office at 802-476-8188. The Barre Opera House is handicapped acces- sible and equipped for the hearing impaired.

Jail Branch Is Closed For The Year! Thank You for another great season. We'll see
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Between Barre & East Barre
Jackie Abts, Owner

Jim Miller’s ‘R-U Scared’ Featured in Barre’s Big Halloween Party

Just in time for Halloween, Barre native and musician of all trades Jim Miller has announced that his spooky soundtrack “R-U Scared” will be featured at Bury The Needle tattoo and Platinum Salon at the Sidewalk Village located in downtown Barre. The production features over 70 minutes of eerie music and sounds. It came about 18 years ago while Miller was an employee at Play It Again Sam, the music store in Montpelier. He was checking out new equipment at the store during business hours and with head- phones on, Miller plugged into a recording machine, and the next thing he knew he was creating “spookified” sounds and music. “I had to stop and go to take care of cus- tomers and answer the phone,” Miller said. “I was recording going by the seat of my pants and never once did I delete a track and start over again.” Then Miller’s son, Max, entered the pro- cess. “Max was 10 years old at the time and I played it for him, and he said some of it was really scary and other tracks not that scary,” Miller said. “I asked him to listen to the whole

record and pick out the most scary stuff and thus came his producing name “Mr. Max”. “He went into the studio room and turned the lights out and then he came out of the room and said, ‘Dad, this part is good or not so good.’” Since the creation of “R-U Scared”, the elder Miller claims his son has discovered himself musically over the years and is planet waves ahead of Dad. Miller has had fun with “R-U Scared” every Halloween. Locals may have heard parts of it in local stage productions like “Dracula”, “Wizard of Oz”, and “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory to name a few. Also in the past, “R-U Scared” has been available at music stores, party stores, and of all places, a pumpkin stand in Middlesex. It was a big hit at a party in Burlington, and last Halloween in Barre, it was presented on the sidewalk, as it will do again this year. “When I first created the studio sounds for R-U Scared, I never dreamed how many Halloweens over the years it would be used for this festivity,” Miller said.

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Lights, Camera, Save! Video Contest Underway; Union Bank Accepting Entries through Dec. 1, 2016

Union Bank is requesting submissions for its Lights, Camera, Save! video contest in Vermont and New Hampshire. The contest, organized by the American Bankers Association Foundation, is a national, bank-driven competition that encourages teens to use video to communicate the value of saving and to inspire others to become lifelong savers. “Lights, Camera, Save! Is an opportunity for teens to harness their creativity, learn about using money wisely and communicate those les- sons with their peers,” said David Silverman, President & CEO. “We understand the importance of financial edu- cation and are thrilled to par- ticipate in a contest that helps build a generation of smart money managers.” To participate, students (ages 13-18) must create a 90-second video on saving and using money wisely and submit a link to the video along with a completed entry form to the bank by December 1, 2016. Union Bank will host the first round of judging and will select a winner to repre- sent it on the national level for a prize up to $5,000, plus a scholarship for a teacher at their school to attend the 2017 Jump$tart National Educator Conference. Videos will be judged on their quality, message, con- tent and the criteria set forth by the contest’s official rules.

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10:00–11:00 am

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10:00–11:00 am

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information and applications. For accommodations of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-888-713-5536 .

The annual election period for MVP Health Care Medicare Advantage health plans is Oct. 15–Dec. 7, 2016. MVP Health Plan, Inc. is an HMO-POS/PPO/MSA organization with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in MVP Health Plan depends on contract renewal. This information is not a complete description of benefits. Contact the plan for more information. Limitations, co- payments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, premiums and/or co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1 of each year. You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. Y0051_3110 Accepted 09/2016

Youth Sight-In Day Youth hunters come sight your rifle in preparation for youth deer hunting

Youth Sight-In Day

Youth Sight-In Day Youth hunters come sight your rifle in preparation for youth deer hunting weekend!

Youth hunters come sight your rifle in preparation for youth deer hunting weekend!

When: Saturday October 29th, 2016 9:00am until 2:00pm

Where: Boonie Club, Grandview Road Williamstown Club members will be on hand to help all participants. Targets will be provided.

Contact Ralph Gerrish at 917-4048 or Dave Wilder at 249-2685 for more details and directions.

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ON PAGE 26 CRYPTO QUIP STICKLERS SNOWFLAKES SUDOKU EVEN EXCHANGE GO FIGURE MAGIC MAZE KAKURO FEAR

Aldrich Public Library

KAKURO FEAR KNOT SUPER CROSSWORD Aldrich Public Library Poetry Slam Friday, October 28 from 6-8 p.m.

Poetry Slam Friday, October 28 from 6-8 p.m. This “Anything Goes” slam features a 5-minute time limit for poets and performers, with music allowed and covers okay if identified as such. Even group performances are encouraged. This is an all-ages event, so some dis- cretion is required. Can the single voice of an impassioned poet outscore

a drum solo? Come early and enjoy free pizza and writing prompts at 6!

NaNoWriMo Kickoff Saturday, October 29 from 2-4 p.m. in the Milne Community Room Challenge yourself to write 50,000 words during National Novel Writing Month this November! We’re kicking off NaNoWriMo with snacks, socializing, and advice from fellow writers. Whether you’re a casual writer or a published author, all are welcome.

Bird’s Eye View of Vermont: Drone Photography with Travis Oakes Wednesday, November 2 at 1:30 p.m. in the Milne Community Room Come see stunning aerial images of the central Vermont region and learn about drone photography. Fly High Photography, LLC takes photography to new heights — liter- ally. Travis Oakes, UAV Pilot, uses an action cam/compact drone, with three axis-gimbals stabilized GoPro Camera, to bring the beauty of your surroundings into focus. Park of our Senior Day series, brought to you by the Friends of the Library. Light refreshments follow the program.

Knitting and Fiber Craft Drop-in Group Thursdays from 1-3 p.m. in the Vermont Room There’s a new time and place, but knitters and crafters of all sorts and experience levels are still welcome to gather togeth- er for help, company, and encouragement in their fiber proj- ects.

Monthly Art Jam Second Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the Vermont Room Socialize and draw together at this casual art jam! Pencil and paper provided, but you’re welcome to bring your own materials. For teens and adults.

Tech Help Tutoring Available Wednesdays from 4-7 p.m. and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. Do you have a new tablet you can’t quite figure out? Wondering how to stay safe on the internet? Find yourself needing to write a resume for the first time in decades? Our intern will work with you one-on-one to help you achieve your technology learning goals. Call 476-7550 to schedule an appointment or stop by during her office hours.

Thanksgiving Pie Raffle! Win two homemade pies of your choice — pumpkin, pecan, or apple. Pies will be made by Friend of the Library and leg- endary Barre baker Marilyn Blake. The drawing will be held Monday, November 21. You can pick up your freshly baked pies at the library on Wednesday, November 23. Tickets are $1 for 1 or $5 for 6.

Ainsworth Public Library Williamstown

Ainsworth Public Library

Williamstown

Look for us at WES:

We will be at the ice cream social on Tuesday, October 25

at 5:30 p.m. If you need a library card from our library, stop

over and see Ms. Snow at her table. Library cards are free. Children 4 and up can get a card with a guardian/parent sig- nature. We do not have library fines, we have many new youth books and lots of youth materials to choose from.

Spooktacular Halloween Party:

Saturday, October 29 at 11 a.m. ALL AGES. We will read stories, do a craft and share snacks together. Come in costume and we will give you a special surprise. Free. No need to register, just pop in.

Volunteer at our Halloween Party:

Are you someone who likes to put smiles on other people’s

faces? Then go to our website and click on “Volunteers needed”

or go to our Facebook page, scroll down and fill out the volun-

teers needed survey. We are looking for people to make goodies and to help with the party. (Saturday, Oct 29 at 11 a.m.) Don’t like to bake? Bring a beverage or paper product, or something else to share.

Trick or Treating at the Library:

We will have trick or treating at the library on Halloween, Monday, October 31 from 2-6 p.m. Stop in a get a special treat!

Senior Book Group:

Our book group meets monthly and is open to anyone over the age of 50. We are currently reading, The Emperor’s

Children by Claire Messud. Our next meeting is November 3

at 4 p.m. at The Gardens in Williamstown. Free. You do not

need to be a Williamstown resident to join us.

Coming Soon Williamstown Academy:

The library will be sponsoring free professional classes from local arcticians, crafters and professionals. We will have an introductory night on Friday, November 4 at 6 p.m. where we will introduce our upcoming classes for the winter season, answer questions and have light refreshments. Upcoming events include: November 26th Holiday Wreath Making, December 10th Holiday Ornament Making, December 13th Rug Hooking. You can register for classes at our Introduction Night. Please contact the library if you have questions.

Jeudevine Memorial Library Hardwick

Jeudevine Memorial Library

Hardwick

Classic Film Series First Wednesdays at 7 p.m. Rick Winston will introduce each film, and afterwards will lead a discussion. For more info contact Tom Blachly at 229- 5290 or at blachly@together.net November 2nd: (2005) Broadcast journalist Edward R. Murrow looks to bring down Senator Joseph McCarthy. Director:

George Clooney. Stars: David Strathairn, George Clooney, and Patricia Clarkson.

Winter Clothing Drive Saturday, November 5 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free good quality clothing is available at the Old Schoolhouse Common gym. If you have good quality clothes to donate, please drop them off at the library during the week before the event. Co-sponsored by the Onion River Food Shelf and the Jaquith Public Library.

Planetary Gods and Goddesses: Astronomy and Myths of the New Solar System with Kelley Hunter Ph.D. Wednesday, November 9 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Astronomers are discovering more and more planetoids in the far reaches of our solar system, naming them for lesser-known gods and goddesses from many cultures around the world. Join Kelley for an exploration of updated astronomy and the new stories in the stars, with illustrations from her newly published Planetary Gods and Goddesses Coloring Book. This presentation builds on Kelley’s first program two years ago and the after school AstroMythology program last winter.

Climate Degradation and Local Preparedness with Michael Billingsley Thursday, November 10 at 7 p.m. Rapidly-warming Arctic oceans, melting Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, and other big effects such as the warming of Russian and Alaskan permafrost tundra, are shifting ocean cur- rents, affecting our health and changing our weather. These somewhat unpredictable changes have never occurred before in known human history. As it occurs, such degradation is going to challenge local patterns of weather, wildlife and insects, and may include more extreme rainfall, infestations of forests and prob- lems we have never encountered before. Getting together and thinking ahead can solve and prepare for weather-caused local hazards and regional emergencies.

Remedies for Digestion & Energy with Acupuncturist Baylen Slote Friday, November 11 at 7 p.m. Join Baylen Slote of Black Turtle TCM at the Jaquith Library to learn about remedies for digestion and energy. How can we break the patterns that created troubling symptoms and generate new ones that we can call healthy habits? These simple remedies, including acupressure and qi gong, can be learned easily and practiced at home. They have been used effectively, in some cases, for generations in clinical and folk tradition. Now they become available to you! The practice of these remedies will be followed by tea and questions and answers.

Moving Pictures: Films about Immigration Third Wednesdays at 7 p.m. November 16: (1990) Life among the Lakota in the early days of the invasion of their country by American immigrants who truly threaten their lives and culture. Directed by Kevin Costner, this winner of 7 academy awards, including best picture, is best on a big screen.

“Crostic” talk and Community Puzzle Construction with Rick Winston Friday, November 18 at 7 p.m. Anyone interested in words, games, and puzzles will have a treat coming up at the Jaquith Library. Rick Winston, who has been constructing twice-a-month “double acrostic” puzzles for the Times-Argus for ten years, will host a Community Puzzle Construction at the Jaquith on Crostic puzzles are related to crosswords in that they both involve answering clues. However, the final result of an acrostic puzzle is the uncovering a quote from a book. The first letter of each clue answer, read down, will spell out the name of the author and the title of the book. Rick will talk about the history of these puzzles and how they are constructed, with tips on how to solve them; then the group will all construct one from scratch, to be published in the Times- Argus in December. Admission is free.

Experience Stop-Motion Animation Workshops at Waterbury Public Library

The Waterbury Public Library is holding a new 3-part tech workshop for kids ages 7 through 11 as part of the Library’s “Tech Tuesdays” being held on November 1, November 15, and November 29 from 3-4 p.m. This Stop-Motion Animation Workshop is a three-session program designed to help young people learn about film his- tory, storyboarding, and moviemaking. Kids will utilize an iPad app to piece together a short movie. iPads and apps will be provided by the library for the workshop, courtesy of a grant provided by the Waterbury Rotary. Space is limited. Please call the library to register your child at 244-7036.

40th Army Band to Perform in Williamstown

The Vermont National Guard and the Office of the Adjutant General are proud to present “Vermont’s Own” 40th Army Band Concert Band performing a free concert on Saturday, November 5, 2016 at 7 p.m. in the Williamstown High School Auditorium located at 120 Hebert Rd. The program will fea- ture traditional patriotic American tunes, as well as contem- porary musical favorites. Members of the 40th Army Band serve one weekend a month and two weeks of Annual Training each year in the Vermont Army National Guard. As civilians the rest of the year, they are engaged in such diverse occupations as educa- tion, law, security, technology, medical, and sales. This concert is free and open to the public.

Montpelier Senior Activity Center

Montpelier Senior Activity Center The Montpelier Senior Activity Center is your home for healthy aging and

The Montpelier Senior Activity Center is your home for healthy aging and lifelong learning. We are an active community, and there’s always some- thing to do, no matter

your interest. If you’re 50 or older, we’d love to welcome you as a mem- ber of the Montpelier Senior Activity Center! Read on to learn about our latest updates and our upcoming events, many of which are free and open to the public. If you’d like to learn more, call us at 223-2518 or stop by at 58 Barre Street in Montpelier.

Door-to-Door Shopping Shuttles The Center is offering free door-to-door transportation to seniors in Montpelier and Berlin with transportation challenges who wish to attend the center or go shopping. The center’s wheelchair-accessible van can pick up passengers for the center every Tuesday for classes, lunch and activities. Shopping shuttles to the Berlin Mall and other Berlin stores are available on Friday, Oct. 28 and Nov. 18. Riders will have flexible options for pickups from their door, and a friendly volunteer can help riders onto the bus and carry packages. Interested riders can con-

tact Eileen Jones at 262-6288.

“Introduction to Acupuncture” Lecture and Acupuncture Clinic Tues., November 1, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Kerry Boyle Jenni, licensed acupuncturist with Integrative Acupuncture will present an introduction to acupuncture from 10-10:30 a.m. This free lecture will be followed by an acupuncture clinic from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Treatment takes place in a group setting. Treatments are all auricular (outer ear) acu- puncture. Treatments are about 30 minutes each. You must arrive by noon to have a treat- ment. No appointment necessary. Open to everyone 50 and older. Treaments are $10, payable to Integrative Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine.

Election 2016: The Vermont Story Wednesday, November 2, 7-8:30 p.m. Join Secretary of State Jim Condos, Mark Johnson, senior reporter and editor at VTDigger.org, and Susan Clark, co-author of “Slow Democracy: Rediscovering Community, Bringing Decision Making Back Home,” for a discussion of Vermont elec- tions. Presented by MSAC and the League of Women Voters of Vermont. Free and open to the public.

•If you would like to be part of Poetry Corner in The WORLD, please submit
•If you would like to be part of Poetry
Corner in The WORLD, please submit your
original work to editor@vt-world.com or
mail it to The World,
403 US Rte 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641
October
snap-shot
Broken Shovels
Afternoon
By Wayne F Burke
By Travis Papineau
By Wayne F Burke
I squint
the camera-carrying people
are back:
As I poke my head
Out of the terrain.
The light is a jolt
sky
black
baby blue
charcoal gray
After keeping myself
In that hole
streaked white
and full of specks,
For so long.
I dug through numerous
Rock bottoms
Destroying many a spade
birds, windblown leaves;
the hissing trees
jiggling
In the process.
With the remains
Of those
and a witch
with pointed hat
broomstick
shoots
Broken Shovels,
I fashioned a
Rickety,
Precarious,
Unstable ladder
That I climbed
like an arrow
behind two big pines
and goes down
somewhere
along the ridge line
and the air
they are taking pictures of the
leaves
the trees
the church steeples
the park statues--
snap-happy people
from somewhere else;
people who have no names;
some who speak in a strange
dialect,
some who don’t;
they stop and gawk,
take a snap-shot
and walk on
to the next view;
people a lot like me
and you
but not quite:
Towards this open ground.
turns ice-cold
I was in that darkness
A long time.
But my eyes
Will adjust.
and a mile-long train
of crows
ragged scraps
flap their fingered wings
over trees
blood-red and
tangerine.
they’re peepers
and they live in
different time zones
different zip codes.
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Saturday Oct 22

Vermonters Clean Up Local Rivers Across the State

A few Saturdays ago, anyone driving along Route 2 through Montpelier would have noticed something peculiar happening in the Winooski River. Adults and children were wading in the shallow water, eyes scanning back and forth, occasionally reaching down to grab something embedded in the riverbed, like herons grabbing a fish. These river walkers were not after any aquatic creatures, but were searching for inanimate objects that don’t belong in a riverbed: tires, scrap metal, one-eyed dolls, cans. They were volunteering at a river cleanup hosted by Friends of the Winooski River as part of Vermont’s official River Cleanup Month. In 2014, the Vermont legislature designated September as River Cleanup Month. Watersheds United Vermont (WUV), a network of over 35 watershed groups around Vermont, col- laborated with the Connecticut River Watershed Council’s Source to Sea Program and American Rivers to promote River Cleanup Month this year. Kelly Stettner, who as head of the Black River Action Team organized their 16th River Sweep this year, said: “River cleanups are an opportunity for people of all ages, abilities, and interests to come together in the mutual stewardship of

Polling Times & Places

Barre City, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Barre City Auditorium Barre Town, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Barre Town Middle & Elementary School Gymnasium Berlin, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Berlin Municipal Office Bethel, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Whitcomb High School Gym Bradford, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Bradford Academy Cabot, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Willey Building Calais, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Town Hall Chelsea, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Chelsea Town Hall Corinth, 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Town Hall Danville, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Danville Town Hall East Montpelier, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., East Montpelier Elementary School Elmore, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Town Clerk’s Office Hardwick, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Elementary School

Marshfield, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Old Schoolhouse Common Montpelier, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., City Hall Moretown, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Moretown Elementary School Northfield, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Northfield High School Orange, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Town Hall

Plainfield,

Building Waitsfield, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Waitsfield Elementary School Warren, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Warren Elementary School Waterbury, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Thatcher Brook Primary School Williamstown, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Williamstown Middle/ High School Worcester, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Doty Elementary School

Municipal

9

a.m.

to

7

p.m.,

Plainfield

their river. Families with small children, school athletic teams, local company employees, paddlers, anglers, hikers,

bikers, permanent residents and passers-by all participate and

reap the satisfaction of doing something positive to improve

the health of the water resources they enjoy.” Lyn Munno, director of WUV, said: “We are excited that River Cleanup Month provides an opportunity to highlight the annual cleanups of watershed groups around Vermont and encourage more cleanups to take place.” Vermonters worked together to host 27 cleanups this September and earlier in the summer. What sort of trash are river cleanup volunteers pulling out of riverbanks and stream channels? At Friends of the Winooski River’s cleanup, volunteers found 100 tires, part of an old wood stove, and corroded pieces of metal, forming part of the 5,000 pounds of trash they removed. Montpelier High School students re-purposed scrap metal from the cleanup as outdoor sculptures. In southern Vermont, volunteers with the Southeastern Vermont Watershed Alliance found evidence of parties and picnics in the form of crushed beer cans, empty

liquor bottles, food wrappers and unmatched shoes.

Stephanie Nyzio, who helped clean up access areas along the Williams River in West Dummerston with the Southeastern Vermont Watershed Alliance, said, “I think it’s great that watershed groups and Vermonters come together to clean up our rivers as part of River Cleanup Month. It’s unfortunate that there are people who access the natural beauty of Vermont’s rivers that do not follow the ‘leave no trace’ prin- ciples, and leave behind cigarette butts and plastic bottles.” River Cleanup Month depends on hundreds of volunteers, watershed associations, school groups and businesses work- ing together to clean our waterways. To read stories and see photos from this year’s cleanups, visit http://www.watershed- sunitedvt.org/vtrivercleanup/story. Please contact WUV at watershedsunited@gmail.com or 585-3569 with any ques- tions about Vermont River Cleanup Month. Watersheds United Vermont (WUV) is a state-wide net- work of local groups dedicated to improving the health of their home watersheds. WUV’s mission is to empower com- munity-based watershed groups throughout the state to pro- tect and restore Vermont’s waters.

Vermont Proposal Would Set Opioid Prescription Limits

Gov. Peter Shumlin and Health Commissioner Harry Chen,

MD announced last week proposed changes to the Health

Department’s rule governing the prescribing of opioids for

pain. When finalized in December 2016, the amended rule

will, for the first time ever, give guidance to prescribers and

set legal limits on the dosage and number of opioid painkillers that may be prescribed. For some minor procedures, the pro- posal calls for a limit of between nine and 12 pills. “Vermont, and the rest of America, will not get a handle on the opiate and heroin addiction crisis until we confront head on the source of the problem: F.D.A. approved opiates that are handed out like candy,” Gov. Shumlin said. “Vermont doctors and providers have been on the leading edge of curbing the irrational exuberance with which opiates are handed out. These proposed limits will solidify that progress and help Vermont continue to lead the nation when it comes to combat- ting this crisis.” The proposed limits come after Gov. Shumlin identified the

over prescription of opiates as a primary challenge in tackling

the addiction crisis in America. In his 2016 State of the State

Address, the Governor called F.D.A. approval of high-pow-

ered opiates the “match that ignited America’s opiate and

heroin addiction crisis”. The Governor pointed to the fact that in 2010, enough OxyContin was prescribed to keep every

adult in America high for an entire month. By 2012, enough prescriptions were written to give every American adult their

own personal bottle of pills.

Studies have shown there is a wide variety in prescribing habits among medical professions and even within the same practices. Many patients are prescribed twice as much medi- cation as they need, often leaving the leftovers in medicine cabinets available for misuse, abuse and diversion. “Opioids are powerful and useful pain killers, but they are

powerfully addictive,” said Dr. Chen. “We must flip the pre- sumption that a patient needs opioids to manage pain. The rule allows doctors to make decisions with their patients, while requiring them to consider other treatments before opi- oids are prescribed, rather than as a last resort. And when opioids are prescribed, they can be prescribed for as much as a patient needs – but not more than they need.” The Health Department proposal uses severity and expect- ed duration of pain to determine limits for the prescription of opioids. After a minor procedure that results in moderate pain, for example, a provider would be limited to prescribing between nine and 12 opioid painkiller pills (depending on the type of medication). The limits are higher for more compli- cated procedures, but no more than a seven-day supply limit would apply to all opioid prescriptions. There are exemptions for treating severe pain due to multi-system trauma or major procedures, like back surgery. The proposal also requires providers to discuss risks, pro- vide a patient education sheet, and receive an informed con- sent for all first opioid prescriptions. It requires a co-prescrip- tion of the overdose reversal treatment naloxone for all pre- scriptions over a specific strength, as well as opioids co-pre- scribed with benzodiazepines. “I believe prescribers will welcome the new rules, because they provide much needed structure to guide appropriate pre- scribing for pain,” said Patricia Fisher, MD, medical director for case management and medical staff affairs at the University of Vermont Medical Center. “This will help us have meaning- ful conversations with patients about just how dangerous these medications can be, and help reduce excessive prescrib- ing and variability that goes on now – with one doctor being more lenient in prescribing, and another more restrictive, and patients not understanding why.”

VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE

VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE Carl Etnier for
VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE Carl Etnier for

Carl Etnier for House

East Montpelier/Middlesex

Committed

Innovative

Ready

Paid for by Carl Etnier for House Adam Rosen, Treasurer

for House East Montpelier/Middlesex Committed Innovative Ready Paid for by Carl Etnier for House Adam Rosen,
BILL RE-ELECT DOYLE Washington County Senator For many years, I’ve had the honor of serving
BILL
RE-ELECT
DOYLE
Washington County Senator
For many years, I’ve had the honor of serving
as your representative in the Vermont State Senate.
Many of you know me through my annual
Town Meeting Day Survey, which helps ensure that
the opinions of regular Vermonters are heard
in the State House. With your support, I’d like to
continue listening to your needs and concerns,
and representing you in Montpelier.
Please VOTE on November 8!
Senator Doyle with his wife Olene, daughter, and granddaughter, in their garden.
PAID FOR BY DOYLE FOR SENATE,
186 MURRAY RD, MONTPELIER VT 05602; OLENE DOYLE, TREASURER.

Scott for Governor Fitzhugh for State Senate

Scott for Governor Fitzhugh for State Senate A Good Team For a Strong Vermont For more

A Good Team For a Strong Vermont

For more information about John “Josh” Fitzhugh, check out www.fitzhugh.com FB:fitzuvts Tw: fitzuvt

check out www.fitzhugh.com FB:fitzuvts Tw: fitzuvt Paid for by Fitzhugh for VT Senate, 206 Pine Hill
check out www.fitzhugh.com FB:fitzuvts Tw: fitzuvt Paid for by Fitzhugh for VT Senate, 206 Pine Hill

Paid for by Fitzhugh for VT Senate, 206 Pine Hill Dr, W. Berlin, VT 05663, Judi Wernecke, Treasurer

VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE H VOTE

Guest Opinion

Just the Facts: About Rigged Elections and Voter Fraud

By Jim Condos, Vermont Secretary of State Recent unsupported allegations and sensationalized report- ing are sowing seeds of doubt about our democratic process. This undermines voter confidence and calls into question whether all voices will be heard on November 8th. As Vermont’s Secretary of State and chief elections officer, former State Senator, former City Councilor, and lifelong

voter, I’ve been following our elections my entire adult life. I am frustrated by the careless way in which these stories attack our very democracy. They show a real lack of understanding of the true risks. I’d like to set the record straight. Vermont’s elections will not be “rigged” and “voter fraud” is essentially non-existent here and across the U.S. In fact, a Loyola University study by constitutional law professor Justin Levitt found just 31 instances of potential voter fraud between 2000 and 2014. According to Levitt, more than 1 BILLION ballots (local, state, federal) were cast in that period. Vermont’s elections process is nonpartisan, transparent and decentralized to the town level. Any hacking or altering of results would require a conspiracy on a massive scale.

I can assure Vermonters we have taken every precaution to

insure our elections are secure. I’m confident my elections team, our IT security staff, law enforcement, and local elec-

tion officials will continue to protect the integrity of our electoral process.

I have faith in our system, and you should too. Here’s

why:

·Vermont’s Election process is decentralized – to the local level. Someone trying to influence or change an election would have to hack into each town’s vote tabulators. ·Our tabulators are not connected to each other, the internet or any other software – either hard-wired or wireless. ·It has been suggested that the memory cards (MCs) in these machines could be tampered with, but from the time the MCs are delivered, 2-4 weeks before the election, the clerks are instructed to keep them secure. As long as the MC is stored securely, it cannot be manipulated. ·10-14 days before the election, the clerks complete a logic & accuracy test on the MCs. ·Vermont requires a paper ballot for our statewide elections.

That ballot is sealed, secured and stored for 22 months after each statewide election. ·After each General election, we randomly audit several towns to insure results are accurate. Another story that makes for great headlines is the risk of cyberattacks. Are we vulnerable? There is always a risk and there will always be vulnerabilities, but the risk has been overstated. There are only two confirmed cases of successful hacking in other states, and those breeches were of voter registration databases having nothing to do with election results. In Vermont, we have taken many precautions to secure our systems and data including a cyber risk assessment, penetra- tion test, and firewalls. We are on high alert and in contact with federal law enforcement to identify and respond to any threats as they arise. I have faith in our hard-working city/town clerks, local elections officials, and volunteer poll workers who conduct Vermont’s elections. We work directly with those individuals, providing training, supplies, and other support. They appreciate voting and cherish it as a fundamental right. They know what it means for democracy and are pas- sionate about ensuring free and fair elections and careful, accurate results. To say that elections will be “rigged” or “hacked” or voter fraud is “very common” ignores the facts and insults their integrity. Regrettably, the more harmful effect of casting unfounded aspersions is to rattle our confidence and prevent us from vot- ing or trusting the outcome of those votes - a direct attack on democracy. That should concern us all, making us even more determined not to allow such threats to work. I’m confident in our democratic process and how we have secured our elections. While there will always be vulnerabili- ties and risks, Vermonters should know they can go to the polls on November 8 and cast their ballots with the full expec- tation that their votes will be counted and their voices will be heard. Remember, Your Vote is Your Voice! Jim Condos is Vermont’s Secretary of State. Vermont’s voter registration deadline is November 2 @ 5PM. Register by visiting your town clerk or online at www.olvr.sec.state.vt.us.

Berlin

Northfield

ReElect

Representatives

Lewis

Patti J.

and

Anne B.

Donahue

ReElect Representatives Lewis Patti J. and Anne B. Donahue
ReElect Representatives Lewis Patti J. and Anne B. Donahue
ReElect Representatives Lewis Patti J. and Anne B. Donahue
ReElect Representatives Lewis Patti J. and Anne B. Donahue
ReElect Representatives Lewis Patti J. and Anne B. Donahue
ReElect Representatives Lewis Patti J. and Anne B. Donahue
ReElect Representatives Lewis Patti J. and Anne B. Donahue
ReElect Representatives Lewis Patti J. and Anne B. Donahue

Anne Donahue and Patti Lewis have been your voice fighting for:

Reform to the property tax and education fund Budgets that are balanced without increasing taxes A health care system that is accessible and sustainable Common sense in legislation Anne and Patti have deep roots in Northfield and Berlin with a commitment to the future of our state. Vermont needs to be an affordable place to live for the genera- tions to come. They have a track record of leadership in the legislature, ensuring that your voice is heard.

Make your vote count to restore balance in the legislature. Re-elect Representatives Anne B. Donahue & Patti J. Lewis for the 2-seat Berlin-Northfield district.

Paid for by Patti Lewis for House, 449 East Rd., Berlin, VT 05641

for by Patti Lewis for House, 449 East Rd., Berlin, VT 05641 www.facebook.com/vtworld.news Paid for by

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

Paid for by Bram Towbin
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Join Bernie Sanders Re-elect SENATOR ANTHONY POLLINA � � “I have known Anthony for over
Join Bernie Sanders
Re-elect SENATOR ANTHONY POLLINA
“I have known Anthony for over
25 years. He has been a strong
& consistent voice for working
Vermonters, farmers, health care
reform, the environment, women,
and the LGBT community.
I’d appreciate your vote.
Proudly endorsed by VT Teachers (NEA),
State Workers (VSEA), VT Sierra Club,
VT Conservation Voters and
VT Workers (AFL-CIO).
He has stood up to powerful
special interests and pushed new
ideas to strengthen Vermont’s
economy. We need to keep
Anthony in the Vermont State
Senate.”
—Senator Bernie Sanders
Washington County State Senate
paid for by: pollinaforstatesenate.com v deborah wolf, treasurer
for by: pollinaforstatesenate.com v deborah wolf, treasurer A DIFFERENT CHOICE—A DIFFERENT VOICE Dottye Ricks—VT

A DIFFERENT CHOICE—A DIFFERENT VOICE

Dottye Ricks—VT House, Barre Town

DIFFERENT VOICE Dottye Ricks—VT House, Barre Town A VOTE FOR DOTTYE IS A VOTE FOR: �
DIFFERENT VOICE Dottye Ricks—VT House, Barre Town A VOTE FOR DOTTYE IS A VOTE FOR: �

A VOTE FOR DOTTYE

IS A VOTE FOR:

�� Strengthening the Economy

�� Budget Prioritization and Reallocation

�� Reallocation Affordable Health Care

�� Small Business Support

�� Equitable Taxation

�� Local Control of Schools

“Dottye Ricks is dedicated to helping the

middle class and working

families of Vermont. She is thoughtful and caring and will be an asset to have in Montpelier.”

—Senator Bernie Sanders

Endorsements: Senator Bernie Sanders, VT Senator Anthony Pollina, Rights and Democracy VT, VT NEA, VSEA, VT Sierra Club, VT Conservation Voters, AFL-CIO, AFT

Paid for by: Supporters of Dottye Ricks

Shirley A. Luce Shirley Averill Luce, 84, died peacefully, in the comfort of her home

Shirley A. Luce

Shirley Averill Luce, 84, died peacefully, in the comfort of her home with her loving family at her bedside. She was born June 2, 1932 in Marshfield, the daughter of the late Albert and Gladys (Gray) Johnson. She attended Marshfield public schools. In 1949 she married Roy Collins Luce in Marshfield. Together they raised eight children. Shirley was employed by several area businesses including, the Tassie Nursing Home, Sprague Electric, Rowan Court and McFarland House. She also helped her husband deliver grain to area farmers. In 1984 she retired to provide care for her mother-in-law, Margaret Luce. She was a member of the Ladies Home Mission. She enjoyed cooking, riding her 4 wheeler, doing crafts, quilting and gardening. Shirley was lovingly devoted to her large fam- ily, and truly enjoyed spending time with all of them. Survivors include: six children, Andrew Luce and his wife, Joanne of Cabot, Richard Luce and his wife, Marie, Timothy Luce ,Peter Luce and his wife, Sandy, all of East Calais, Dennis Sicely of Plainfield and Debi Sicely of Montpelier; 19 grandchildren; 31 great-grandchildren; numerous great-great- grandchildren; a sister Marjorie Cochran of Shelburne, sev- eral nieces, nephews and cousins. She was predeceased by her husband of 57 years, Roy Luce, a son Michael Luce, a daughter Averil Dunham, a grandson David Dunham, a grand-daughter Beverly Locke, a great-great grandson Matthew Locke, six siblings: Harold, Glen and Gerald Johnson, Beverly Peryer, Dorothy Debray and Kathleen McNanis, and a daughter-in-law, Patricia Luce. Public visiting hours were held from 6-8 p.m. on Thursday, October 20, 2016, at the Northern Vermont Funeral Home, 60 Elm St., Hardwick. To honor her request the Memorial Service will be private at the convenience of her family. In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory may be made to the Calais/Woodbury United Church, Roofing Fund, P.O. Box 93, East Calais, Vermont 05650 or to the Bible Baptist Church, 68 Vine Street, Berlin, Vermont 05641. Arrangements are in the care of Dian R. Holcomb of Northern Vermont Funeral Service, 60 Elm Street, Hardwick.

Northern Vermont Funeral Service, 60 Elm Street, Hardwick. Michael Ridley Witham, Sr. Michael Ridley Witham, Sr.,
Michael Ridley Witham, Sr. Michael Ridley Witham, Sr., 65, of Barre, died peace- fully with
Michael Ridley Witham, Sr.
Michael Ridley
Witham, Sr., 65, of
Barre, died peace-
fully with his drum
sticks in hand sur-
rounded by family
on October 17, 2016,
in Orange, Vermont
at the home of his
daughter.
He was born Feb-
ruary 3, 1951 in
Middlesex, VT, the son of Laurence and Cath-
erine (Ridley) Witham. He attended Barre
Public Schools and later attended Spaulding
High School.
Michael lived as an Entertainer/Musician in
the Central Vermont area. He was a kind per-
son, who was passionate about his family, the
arts and helping others. He inspired and paved
the way for many local musicians.
Michael was a proud longtime member of
the Vermont Old Cemetery Association. He
was also an Elder of the First Presbyterian
Church in Barre.
Survivors include his children: Ludwig
Witham of Barre, VT; Jessica Foster of Or-
ange, VT; Merrill Witham of Los Angeles,
CA; Michael “Mickey” Witham, Jr. and
Nicholas Witham, both of Randolph, VT;
sisters, Patty Witham of Waterbury, VT; Eva
Morse of Calais, VT and Sue Mason of Barre.
He also leaves behind granddaughters Bella
Foster of Orange, VT and Ruby Witham of
Barre, VT, and several nieces, nephews and
cousins.
There will be no calling hours. A memorial
service, “The Final Curtain Call” will be held
2:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 29, 2016 at
the First Presbyterian Church in Barre. The
Witham Family is holding a food drive in
honor of Mike and asks that people bring a
nonperishable food item to the service. Do-
nations can be made to the First Presbyterian
Church in Barre.
Rock In Paradise, we love you.
Those wishing to express online condolenc-
es may do so at www.guareandsons.com

page 12

The WORLD

October 26, 2016

Other passings

JAMES D. AUBERTIN, 56, of South Hill Road, passed away on Aug. 24, 2016, at his home. Born in Barre on Sept. 5, 1959, he was the son of Edward and Agnes (Corbett) Aubertin. James, better known as Jim, attended Barre schools and was a graduate of Spaulding High School, class of 1978. After his schooling he was employed as a truck driver for the Coca-Cola Bottling Co. in Barre. He retired after 33 years of employment due to ill health. Jim loved the outdoors and enjoyed spending time at his hunting camp in Groton. He was an avid reader and enjoyed spending time with his family, especially his special niece, Jody.

time with his family, especially his special niece, Jody. GEORGE J. CHANDLER JR. , age 94,

GEORGE J. CHANDLER JR., age 94, died , age 94, died

Tuesday in Orange. Mr. Chandler was born Sept. 12. 1922, in Waterbury, Connecticut, the son of George J. and Lillian Chandler Sr. He grew up in Waterbury, and graduated from Levingworth High School in Waterbury in 1939. He served in the U.S. Army stateside during World War II. He married Anna L. Steventon on Oct. 13, 1945, in Bridgeport, Connecticut. The couple moved to Rochester, Vermont, in 1947 and later moved to Barre and then to Orange. Mr. Chandler was employed as a radio technician for the Vermont State Police from 1951 until retiring in 1984. He was a radio ham operator with the call sign W1MMN. He held a commer- cial pilot’s license and had restored two airplanes in his life.

license and had restored two airplanes in his life. TAMMY LYNN DOUCETTE , 51, died Friday,

TAMMY LYNN DOUCETTE, 51, died Friday, Oct. 14, 2016, at Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. Born Aug. 15, 1965, in Marshfield, Massachusetts, she was the daugh- ter of Steven H. Berry and Evelyn M. King. She attendedhighschoolinMansfield,Massachusetts. On Aug. 6, 1983, she married David Doucette in Mansfield, Massachusetts. They later separated. Mrs. Doucette was a homemaker and enjoyed cleaning, camping, going to the ocean, especially the Maine coast, as well as watching soap operas and scary movies.

coast, as well as watching soap operas and scary movies. RONALD ERSING SR. , 84, died
coast, as well as watching soap operas and scary movies. RONALD ERSING SR. , 84, died

RONALD ERSING SR., 84, died Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, at his home, surrounded by his family. Born in Buffalo, New York, June 7, 1932, he was the son of Henry and Clara (Berry) Ersing. After his schooling, he was employed as a lumberman and later worked as a chef at vari- ous Barre area restaurants. On Nov. 12, 1957,

Mr. Ersing married Betty Durkee in Barre, where they made their home and raised their family. He attended Project Independence in Barre.

their family. He attended Project Independence in Barre. CARTER PHILLIP GRIFFIN , 4 months, passed away

CARTER PHILLIP GRIFFIN, 4 months, passed away unexpectedly on Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016. Born in Burlington on June 2, 2016, he was the son of Erik S. and Carrie M. (Grace) Griffin. Carter will be remembered for his bright eyes, unending smiles and adoring sweet- ness, gone too soon from our world.

and adoring sweet- ness, gone too soon from our world. LINDA J. HALL , age 72,

LINDA J. HALL, age 72, passed peacefully after a long battle with COPD. Linda was prede- ceased by her parents, Donald (Slim) Drinkwine and Pauline (Touchette) Drinkwine. Linda grad- uated from Stowe High School in 1962 and worked at Stoweware and the Vermont State Hospital. Linda met and married Dennis “Babe” Hall, and both worked for Property Maintenance Co. for many years before starting their own business. It didn’t take long for them to establish a reputation of being trustworthy and dependable hard workers. Linda and Babe enjoyed many

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years of fishing and boating at their “Condo” in North Hero and Alburg. Linda also enjoyed being with family and friends.

Alburg. Linda also enjoyed being with family and friends. BETTY HEALY passed away at home in

BETTY HEALY passed away at home in the comfort of her family on Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. She was born at home on Sept. 8, 1933, and grew up on the family farm in Graniteville, Vermont. Her parents were John Arthur and Esther (Belville) Pallas. Betty attended the schoolhouse in Graniteville through eighth

grade. She then walked many miles to high school in Williamstown, which was, as we all know, uphill both ways. While in high school, Betty enjoyed playing soft- ball on the school team. Betty was married to (the late) James Norman Healy for many years before divorcing. As a single parent, she worked hard for her family. Betty retired from the State of Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles in 1995. Previously, she had worked at Sprague Electric and the Barre Town school system. Betty was a proud member of the American Legion Auxiliary.

LOGAN ALLAN JACOBS, age 20, of Barre, passed away unexpectedly on Saturday, June 25, 2016. Logan was born in Berlin on Nov. 28, 1995, and grew up in Plainfield. He attended Twinfield Union School and graduated from Spaulding High School. Logan was a hard worker, employed at L& D Safety MarkingLOGAN ALLAN JACOBS

since 2014, recently earning employee of the year. But in his spare time he enjoyed being with friends and family. He loved anything with an engine - mud trucks, motorcycles, dirt bikes, snowmobiles, and of course, the only car he would have was a Honda. He had a heart of gold and cared deeply about the people in his life. He would drop everything to help a friend in need. He was never afraid to show affection, and was always the goof to make them laugh.

CLAYTON “BEEBE” LUCE, 80, died

Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, at the Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. He was born in Brookfield on April 1, 1936, the son of William and Helen (Barcomb) Luce. He is a graduate of Northfield High School, class of 1954. He married Doris Regina Delude in Northfield on Jan. 13, 1958. After 43 years of marriage, Doris predeceased him on Aug. 10, 2001. Beebe was a United States Navy veteran, having served honorably during the Korean War. He had worked for the Nantanna Woolen Mill in Northfield for a few years and later joined Lafayette Construction Company in Sheldon, Vermont, where he worked virtually his entire career. He was a member of St. John the Evangelist Church, American Legion, Knights of Columbus, all of Northfield, and the Elks Club in Montpelier. He enjoyed golf, camping, sports, reading history and crossword puzzles.

camping, sports, reading history and crossword puzzles. GERMAINE (JERRY) MARINELLI , 84, of Seminole, Florida, died
camping, sports, reading history and crossword puzzles. GERMAINE (JERRY) MARINELLI , 84, of Seminole, Florida, died
camping, sports, reading history and crossword puzzles. GERMAINE (JERRY) MARINELLI , 84, of Seminole, Florida, died

GERMAINE (JERRY) MARINELLI, 84, of Seminole, Florida, died Monday, Oct. 17, 2016, at Hospice House, Pinellas Park, Florida. Born Oct. 13, 1932, in Barre, Vermont, she was the daughter of Emile Pinard and Jean (Fortier) Massey. On Feb. 10, 1947, she married John Marinelli. They had made their home on Maple Hill in Plainfield, and later at their current home in Seminole, Florida. Baking, crocheting, deer hunting, gardening, danc- ing, spending time at their camp on Lake Groton and their Time Share on the beach here in Florida, they enjoyed travel- ing especially their trips to Hawaii and Spain, were her special interests, she handed out many handmade blankets to family members and homemade baked goods. She was a member of the Eastern Star while living in Vermont.

was a member of the Eastern Star while living in Vermont. BLAKE ADAM SCHOENBECK, 42, of

BLAKE ADAM SCHOENBECK, 42, of Church Street died unexpectedly on Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016, at his home. He was born on Sept. 27, 1974, in Buffalo, New York, the son of Roger Schoenbeck and Lynda (Krebs) Schoenbeck. Blake graduated from Burlington High School in 1992 and later received an Associate’s Degree in Engineering from Vermont Technical College in 1998. He previously worked for a number of CAD design companies in the area but had been working for New England Precision in Randolph for the last 10 years as their quality engineer and IT coordinator. Blake was a friend to everyone he met. He was kind, generous and full of life with a ready smile. From early on, he adopted and nurtured animals and people, always wanting to inject their lives with love and support. His humor and love of life was infectious and touched many lives. He enjoyed outdoor activities, including fishing, golfing and snowmobiling. The love of his life was his daughter, Sydney, age 8, with whom he spent many happy hours sharing his favorite activities.

he spent many happy hours sharing his favorite activities. PATRICIA LOU SMITH , 61, of Richardson

PATRICIA LOU SMITH, 61, of Richardson Road, passed away on Friday, June 24, 2016, at the Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. Her loving family had been at her bedside. Born on Sept. 7, 1954, in Houlton, Maine, she was the daughter of Keith and Francis (Ruth) Vose. She attended Houlton Elementary School and was a graduate of the Houlton High School class of 1972. She mar- ried Bruce Brown in the summer of 1972 in Houlton. They made their home in the Houlton and Dixfield area for a num- ber of years. She remarried to Jerry Smith in 1982 and remained in Houlton for the majority of their lives together. Patricia enjoyed crocheting and most importantly loved spending time with her family. She will always be remem- bered as a loving and dedicated mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend.

WENDY R. SPENCER, 64, of Williamstown Square passed away on Monday, Oct. 17, 2016, at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire. Born Feb. 15, 1952, in Barre, she was the daughter of Silas Robert and Ruth

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Winifred (Martin) Cochran. Wendy attended Websterville Elementary School and later in life earned her GED.

Winifred (Martin) Cochran. Wendy attended Websterville Elementary School and later in life earned her GED. On Dec. 24, 1975, she married Fillmore Frank Pinky Spencer in Orange. They made their home in Orange. They divorced in 1983 and she moved to Williamstown. He died in 1992. She was a homemaker and loved spending time with her grand- children. Wendy enjoyed putting together puzzles, crafts, crossword puzzles and playing cribbage.

FRANCIS “FRANK” TEDESCHI JR., 65, Cobble Hill Road, passed away peacefully at home on Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, after a long illness, with his loving family at his bedside. Born Jan. 26, 1951, in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, he was the son of the late Francis and Veronica (Pyne) Tedeschi. Frank was raised in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, and he moved to Vermont, after graduating from Career Academy in Boston, where he landed a job at radio station WSKI in Montpelier. Many people remember Frank as Frank OT at WSKI. After years at the station, he became owner of Gustos Bar in Barre. This is where he met many lifelong friends. For many years, he played baseball and hockey where Gustos sponsored his baseball team. This was his passion. One of his greatest accomplishments in life was earning his black belt in karate from Freddie Lapan at Fred Villaris Studio. Anyone who knew Frank, knew what a more than generous person he was.FRANCIS “FRANK” TEDESCHI JR.

VERA OLIVE WARD, 81, a longtime resident of Moretown, passed away at the Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin on Oct. 10, 2016. Born in Fayston on Nov. 13, 1934, she was the daughter of the late Ernest and Mabel (Brooks) Luce. On July 30, 1954, she married Ronald E. Ward in Warren. Vera was raised byVERA OLIVE WARD

her mother, Mabel, and her stepfather, Dean Cameron. She attended schools in Warren and Waitsfield and was a 1953 graduate of Waitsfield High School. Following her marriage, she and Ron lived in Barre and then migrated back to the Mad River Valley, settling in Moretown where they later built their home on Freeman Hill. For the past several years she was a resident of Berlin Health and Rehabilitation Center. Vera worked briefly for the National Life Insurance Co. and then was happy and busy as a homemaker, wife, mother and Gram. She later was employed as an assistant town clerk for Moretown, assisted her husband when he served as tax collec- tor, and worked cleaning rental properties. Vera was a found- ing member of the Mad River Ridge Runners Snowmobile Club where she served as their secretary for several years and was an active member of the Moretown United Methodist Church. She enjoyed knitting, crocheting, tending her flower gardens and camping at Kampersville.

tending her flower gardens and camping at Kampersville. THOMAS CLAYTON WHITE , 69, of Pine Street,

THOMAS CLAYTON WHITE, 69, of Pine Street, passed away unexpectedly at the Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. His loving family had been at his side. Born on Oct. 4, 1947, in Barre City, he was the son of Clayton and Ellen (Fitzgerald) White. He attended ele- mentary school at St. Monica Catholic School in Barre and was a graduate of Marian High School in the class of 1965. Following his high school graduation, he attended Johnson State College where he earned his bache- lor’s degree. On Aug. 30, 1969, he married his loving wife, Linda (Robar) White, in the St. Monica Catholic Church in

Barre. Following their marriage, the couple lived in Virginia, Massachusetts and Connecticut. They returned to Barre in

1977 and had raised their family in their current home since

then. Tom worked for the federal government from 1969-

1977 and for the state of Vermont from 1977 until his retire-

ment in 2010. He was a longtime member of both the Genealogical Society and the Washington County Stamp Club. Following his retirement from state government, he enjoyed volunteering at the Restore in Barre.

How to Protect Your Small Business From Business Email Compromise Scams

Companies of all sizes are being targeted by criminals through Business Email Compromise scams. In these scams, cybercriminals gain access to an employee’s legitimate busi- ness email through social engineering or computer intrusion. The criminal then impersonates the employee ¾ often a senior executive or someone who can authorize payments ¾ and instructs others to transfer funds on their behalf. According to the FBI, more than $3 billion has been lost due to these scams. “This is a difficult scam to detect because the hackers are using legitimate email accounts to authorize wire transfers,” said Tricia Hogan, SVP and Senior Risk Officer. “Companies can protect themselves and their employees through education and layered authorization procedures.” Union Bank recommends the following tips to help busi- nesses and employees avoid business email compromise:

Educate your employees. You and your employees are the first line of defense against business email compromise. A strong security program paired with employee education about the warning signs, safe practices, and responses to a suspected takeover are essential to protecting your company and customers. Protect your online environment. It is important to protect your cyber environment just as you would your cash and physical location. Do not use unprotected internet connec- tions. Encrypt sensitive data and keep updated virus protec- tions on your computer. Use complex passwords and change them periodically. ·Use alternative communication channels to verify signifi-

cant requests. Have multiple methods outside of email – such as phone numbers, alternate email addresses – established in advance through which you can contact the person making the request to ensure it is valid. ·Be wary of sudden changes in business practices or con- tacts. If an employee, customer or vendor suddenly asks to be contacted via their personal e-mail address, verify the request through known, official and previously used correspondence as the request could be fraudulent. ·Be wary of requests marked “urgent” or “confidential. Fraudsters will often instill a sense of urgency, fear or secrecy to compel the employee to facilitate the request without con- sulting others. Use an alternative communication channel outside of email to confirm the request. ·Partner with your bank to prevent unauthorized transac- tions. Talk to your banker about programs that safeguard you from unauthorized transactions such as call backs, device authentication and multi-person approval processes. For more tips, see the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Internet Crime Complaint Center’s public service announce- ment. If you fall victim to a business email compromise scam:

Contact your financial institution immediately to notify them about the fraudulent transfer and request that they con- tact the institution where the fraudulent transfer was sent. Contact your local Federal Bureau of Investigation office as they might be able to freeze or return the funds, if notified quickly. File a complaint, regardless of dollar loss, at www.IC3.gov.

Chickering Fen in Calais one of Four Unique Vermont Wetlands Slated for Class I Protection

The Agency of Natural Resources is starting a process to provide special protections for four unique Vermont wetlands by designating them Class I. The four wetlands vary in size, region, and function, but all have been determined to be irre- placeable or exceptional in their contribution to Vermont’s natural heritage. The Agency has reviewed over 20 wetlands with potential for Class I status and is focusing on the following four:

Chickering Fen in Calais, Black Gum Swamps in Vernon, Dennis Pond Wetlands in Brunswick, and Sandbar Wetlands in Milton and Colchester. Three wetlands are currently desig- nated as Class I, with the most recent being designated over

ten years ago. “Class I designation has historically been an underuti- lized tool for managing the State’s highest value wet- lands. In this effort, we are putting a spotlight on these

special wetlands to conserve them, and emphasize the importance of their remarkable natu- ral features and functions,” said Agency Secretary Deb Markowitz. Chickering Fen, locally known as “Chickering Bog,” is a 10-acre Fen wetland, a size that is large and rare in Vermont. The wetland provides a home for rare and threatened species, and is exceptional in its value for education and research in the natural sciences. The owners of this wetland, The Nature Conservancy, is in support of the designation. The Black Gum Swamps in Vernon are seven distinct areas of Red Maple-Black Gum Swamp communities, a rare natural

community found at the northern edge of the normal range for this type of wetland. These pocket swamps contain some

black gum trees aged at over 400 years. Members of the Town of Vernon have been in active support of the proposal. The 370-acre Dennis Pond wetland complex includes two relatively small open water areas, Mud Pond and Dennis Pond, and about 140 acres of peatland. The diverse habitat is

exceptional for wildlife and host a number of rare and threat- ened species and natural community types. Much of this wetland is part of the West Mountain Wildlife Management Area. The Sandbar Wetland is a 1,359-acre wetland delta com- plex composed of special natural communities that span along the shores of Lake Champlain and the Lamoille River, and is

home to many rare wildlife and plant species. This wet- land provides a large area for flood waters to be stored where sediments and nutri- ents are used by wetland veg- etation rather than heading

straight into Lake Champlain. The dense vegetation prevents erosion along the lake and river, and provides spawning habitat for fish such as Northern Pike. In order to designate a new wetland as Class I, the Vermont Wetland Rules need to be amended. Proposed changes to the rule are currently posted on the Secretary of State’s website, and are on public notice until November 2nd. Three public meetings will be held in proximity to the four proposed Class I wetlands. To learn more about Class I designations and how your town may help protect these vital resources, visit the Vermont Wetlands Program website at http://dec.vermont.gov/water- shed/wetlands.

Chickering Fen, locally known as “Chickering Bog,” is a 10-acre Fen wetland, a size that is large and rare in Vermont. The wetland provides a home for rare and threatened species.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

Natural Resources and Sustainability Advisory Committee For Central Vermont Career Center Regular Meeting Thursday, October 27, 2016 5:00 pm

Bare Roots Farm 175 Snowbridge Road South Barre, VT 05670

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

WASHINGTON UNIT

NORTH COUNTRY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff

v.

TAUSHA M. SIMMONS, A/K/A TAUSHA SIMMONS, MICHAEL SIMMONS, AND OCCUPANTS RESIDING AT

133 CATHY ROAD, CABOT, VERMONT, Defendants

CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NUMBER 116-2-16 WNCV

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE

By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain Mortgage given by Tausha M. Simmons and Michael Simmons, dated May 8, 2015 and recorded on May 18, 2015 in Book 82 at Pages 134-147 of the land records of the Town of Cabot, which Mortgage NorthCountry Federal Credit Union is the present holder, for breach of the conditions of said Mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same, will be sold to the highest bidder at Public Auction at 133 Cathy Road, Cabot, Vermont at noon (12:00 P.M.) on the 18th day of November, 2016, all and singular the premises described in said Mortgage, subject to any unpaid taxes and municipal assessments. The land and premises shall be sold in AS IS condition. The property is known as 133 Cathy Road, Cabot, Vermont.

The real estate is described in the aforesaid mortgage as follows:

Being all of the same land and premises conveyed to Michael Sim- mons and Tausha Simmons by Quitclaim Deed of Cedric W. Houston and Norma K. Dutil dated March 9, 2011 and recorded in Book 75, Page 649 of the Town of Cabot Land Records.

Being further described as a parcel said to contain 2.20± acres and mobile home dwelling located at 133 Cathy Road, Cabot, Vermont.

Reference is hereby made to the aforementioned instruments, the re- cords thereof and the references therein contained, all in further aid of this description.

The description of the property contained in the Mortgage shall control in the event of an error in this Notice.

TERMS OF SALE: The purchaser at the sale shall pay cash or certified funds (or a combination thereof) in full at the time of the sale, OR $10,000 down (non-refundable) at the time of sale and the remainder within ten (10) days of the issuance of an Order of Confirmation of Sale from the Vermont Superior Court, Washington Unit, Civil Division.

The public sale may be adjourned one or more times for a total time not exceeding 30 days, without further court order, and without publication or service of a new Notice of Sale, by announcement of the new sale date to those present at each adjournment or by posting notice of the adjourn- ment in a conspicuous place at the location of the sale.

The sale is subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens, if any, which take precedence over the said Mortgage above-described or have not been foreclosed.

The record owner is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the Judgment Order, Decree of Foreclosure, Shortened Redemption Period and Order of Public Sale dated and filed on July 19, 2016, including the costs and expenses of sale.

Other terms to be announced at the sale or inquire at Ward & Babb, 3069 Williston Road, South Burlington, Vermont 05403; (802) 863-0307.

Dated at South Burlington, Vermont this 13th day of October, 2016.

WARD & BABB Attorneys for NorthCountry Federal Credit Union By: s/Cynthia R. Amrhein CYNTHIA R. AMRHEIN, ESQ. 3069 Williston Road South Burlington, VT 05403 Tel. No.: (802) 863-0307

WANTED TO BUY Older Items & Antiques Call before you have a tag sale! We

WANTED TO BUY

Older Items & Antiques

Call before you have a tag sale!

Older Items & Antiques Call before you have a tag sale! We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls,

We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls, Pottery, China, Glass, Vases, Candlesticks, Sterling, Coins, Costume Jewelry, Toys, Jugs, Crocks, Canning Jars & Bottles, Lamps, Prints, Paintings, Knick-Knacks, Holiday Decorations, etc., etc.

Full House - Attic/Basement Contents - Estate Liquidations

802-563-2204 • 802-595-3632 CELL

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Once a Catholic
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for Catholics who have not been practicing
their faith and may have questions or
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Starting November 2 at 7:00PM
at St. Monica Church (Church Basement)
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“What We Believe”
“How We Worship”
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STORAGE UNITS AUCTION Sat., Oct. 29, 2016 - 9 AM Baroffio’s Storage 616 No. Main
STORAGE UNITS AUCTION
Sat., Oct. 29, 2016 - 9 AM
Baroffio’s Storage
616 No. Main
Northfield, VT
05663
Contents of the
following units will
be sold for non-payment
of rent (Cash or Credit Card)
#13 E. Slayton
24
O. Pittsley
47
K. Preis
15
J. Armstrong
37
D. Vilbrin
67
T.Comstock
18
J. Cyr
39
S. Wood
69
J. Buik

“Central Vermont’s Newspaper”

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT WASHINGTON UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 490-9-16 Wnpr IN RE THE ESTATE OF:

DIVISION DOCKET NO. 490-9-16 Wnpr IN RE THE ESTATE OF: 403 Route 302-Berlin Barre, VT 05641
DIVISION DOCKET NO. 490-9-16 Wnpr IN RE THE ESTATE OF: 403 Route 302-Berlin Barre, VT 05641
DIVISION DOCKET NO. 490-9-16 Wnpr IN RE THE ESTATE OF: 403 Route 302-Berlin Barre, VT 05641
DIVISION DOCKET NO. 490-9-16 Wnpr IN RE THE ESTATE OF: 403 Route 302-Berlin Barre, VT 05641

403 Route 302-Berlin Barre, VT 05641 Tel.: (802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

Fax: (802)479-7916 email: editor@vt-world.com

AVE MARIE HAVILAND

or sales@vt-world.com web site: www.vt-world.com

MEMBER

LATE OF:

FAYSTON, VERMONT

GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION
GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION

CENTRAL

VERMONT

CHAMBER

OF

COMMERCE

GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION CENTRAL VERMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
GOLD STANDARD PUBLICATION CENTRAL VERMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Notice To Creditors

Publishers: Gary Hass and Deborah

To the creditors

of Ave Marie

Phillips. Classified Manager: Ruth Madigan. Receptionist: Darlene Callahan. Bookkeeping: Lisa Companion. Production Manager:

Christine Richardson. Production: Kathy Gonet. Copy Editor: Aaron Retherford. Sales Representatives: Kay Roberts Santamore, Robert Salvas, Mike Jacques. Circulation: Aeletha Kelly. Distribution: Jim Elliot, Gary Villa, Paul Giacherio. The WORLD is published by WORLD Publications, Inc. in Berlin, Vermont. The WORLD is distributed free, and serves the residents of Washington and north- central Orange counties. The WORLD is published every Wednesday. The WORLD assumes no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertising but will reprint in the following issue that part of any advertisement in which the typographical error occurred. Notice by advertisers of any error must be given to this newspaper within five (5) business days of the date of publication. The WORLD reserves all rights to advertising copy produced by its own staff. No such advertisement may be used or reproduced without express per- mission. Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.; Closed Saturday and Sunday. Subscriptions: $8.00/month, $48.00/6 months, $96.00/year. First Class.

Haviland, late of Fayston, Vermont. I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the date of publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the Court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month deadline.

Dated: October 18, 2016 Signed: Mark Haviland, Executor 5708 Millbrook Road Fayston, VT 05673 Phone: (802) 496-4002 Name of Publication: The WORLD Publication Date: 10/26/2016 Address of Court:

Washington Unit Probate Division 65 State Street Montpelier, VT 05602

Unit Probate Division 65 State Street Montpelier, VT 05602 The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor
Unit Probate Division 65 State Street Montpelier, VT 05602 The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor

The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor concerning public issues. Letters should be 400 words or less and may be subject to editing due to space constraints. Submissions should also contain the name of the author and a contact tele- phone number for verification. For letters of thanks, contact our advertising department at 479-2582; non-profit rates are available.

Support TJ Donovan for AG

Editor, There was something really wrong. Every Monday police summon scores of Vermonters are to Court – many for failing to be the person they would like to be, others whose conflicts outweighed their resources to deal with them. They await for the Judge to assign a punishment: jail here, a fine there, a license lost here, work crew there, a disqualifying criminal record over there. Society assumed punishment would purify

– it would correct. It didn’t. It was the same week after week. Until T.J. Donovan decided to act. He lit a candle in that darkness. He started a movement for real reform of the Criminal Justice System in Vermont. One reform was a program to allow Vermonters lacking the money to pay accumulated fines to regain their driver’s licenses. TJ’s innovative driver restoration day recog- nized that being poor should not force a person to commit a

crime, or go without work. Those unable to pay were given their driver’s license back upon payment of a small fine. That program is being taken statewide. Another reform was to allow low-level offenders to avoid jail. TJ has encouraged them to resolve disputes by restorative justice – talking with their victims, leaning how their behavior hurt other people, thinking of others and being responsible. People with drug dependence could be treated as victims and receive medical care. People with mental health issues could be given guidance on how to address mental health issues. Some low level offenders might not even be charged or appear in Court if they took responsible action. TJ under- stands that giving Vermonters the resources to improve their lives leads, and care about other people, leads to greater pub- lic safety. I support TJ for Attorney General, not because he was sim- ply aware of these problems as many others were, but because he provided the leadership and energy to seize the tide of cries for criminal justice reform, invigorate it, shape it, and lead it on to realization. The office of Attorney General is not only about criminal law, the Attorney General has respon- sibility for consumer protection, giving advice and guidance to executive agencies, prosecuting fraud, and processing civil litigation to name a few of many responsibilities. Rarely in

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Rarely in continued on next page • • • No Small Miracles By G. E. Shuman

No Small Miracles

By G. E. Shuman

A lbert Einstein once stated, and I paraphrase: “We must accept the premise that either nothing

is a miracle, or everything is a miracle.” Well, Mr. Einstein, I am one who, if that premise is true, believes that everything is a miracle. I have eyes, and I can clearly see this beautiful, immensely complex

world. From your statement, I think you saw it, too. I certainly do believe that miracles happen, and that they probably hap- pen more frequently than we realize. After 62 years of living and of observing life, I don’t see how I could ever believe otherwise. I also believe that

miracles are where you find them, and that, to our dismay, sometimes we don’t even look for them. I don’t think that this means some miracles are ‘small’, in fact, I think

that none of them are small. They are all big, especially when they happen to you. I’m writing about this today because of something that hap- pened to my grandson, Devon, just last Sunday evening. It was about 10 p.m., and that thoughtful grandson of mine had just driven to the Walmart in Manchester, NH, where he and his family live. He had gone to the store because his girlfriend was having a craving for oranges, and he wanted to buy her some. What a nice guy, right? Somehow, during that late night run to the store, Devon’s wallet had slipped out his pocket, in the huge parking lot. Now, it’s never good to lose your wallet, but much worse when that wallet contains your license, your debit card, your social security card, and, (this part gives me

a sick feeling in my stomach) $400 in cash from the paycheck

you had just received. Ouch! It also didn’t help that the wallet

was lost in that large city, at a very busy shopping center. We, as a family, believe in the power of prayer. So do our children, and, also, their children. Our daughter, Cathy, (De- von’s mom) and her distraught son obviously prayed that night, and so did my wife and I, and others, when we heard about what had happened. Yes, you need to understand, this

was a joint effort. “For where two or three are gathered to- gether in my name, there I am in the midst of them.” Matthew 18:20. Holy Bible. Okay, so now let me tell you about the miracle. (Pay atten- tion, as there will be a quiz.) As I’m sure you have already guessed, the wallet was found, which, to me, was miracle enough. A young lady about Devon’s age contacted him on Facebook, told him she had found his wallet, and asked if they could meet so that she could give it back to him. They

arranged that, and Devon went to meet her. To Devon’s sur- prise, and obvious relief, his wallet still contained his license, his debit card, his social security

card, AND the $400 from his hard-earned paycheck. Wow! My grandson thankfully offered to give that young lady a reward for what she had done, or to at least buy dinner for her, but she

wouldn’t let him. Devon told her that it was a huge blessing for him, and she replied that people have done many good things to help her before, and she want- ed to help him. Now…here’s the quiz. Did you understand the miracle, or did you miss it? It was surely a ‘God thing’ that Devon got his wallet back, with his identification, his license, and even his money…ev- ery penny of it. To my grandson, I’m sure this was no small miracle. Still, to my mind, the miracle really happened in the heart of a young stranger, who found someone’s wallet in a parking lot that night, could have kept the cash, thrown the wallet away, and never given a thought to finding its owner. No one would have ever known. Really, no one would have. Instead, this young lady chose to remember what others have done for her, and to ‘pay it forward’ with no thought of self, and without ANY reward, even when it was offered. In this strange year of terrorism, fear, and an increasingly nasty presidential election which seems to shout uncertainty, distress, and danger for the future of our nation, there are still people of integrity, and still young people of surprisingly ster- ling morals. This, to me, is no small miracle.

Somehow, during that late night run to the store, Devon’s wallet had slipped out his pocket, in the huge parking lot.

Reiss’s Pieces By Judy Reiss STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT WASHINGTON UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET

Reiss’s Pieces

By Judy Reiss

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT WASHINGTON UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 413-7-16 Wnpr IN RE THE ESTATE OF:

AGNES VIOLA

THIBAULT

LATE OF:

EAST MONTPELIER, VERMONT

Notice To Creditors

To the creditors of Agnes Viola Thibault, late of East Montpelier, Vermont. I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the date of publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the Court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month deadline. Dated: October 17, 2016 Signed: Bruce Donovan, Administrator P.O. Box 499 Barre, VT 05641-0499 Phone: (802) 476-5075 Name of Publication: The WORLD Publication Date: 10/26/2016 Name of Probate Court:

Vermont Superior Court Washington Probate Division 65 State Street Montpelier, VT 05602

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT WASHINGTON UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 271-5-16 Wnpr IN RE THE ESTATE OF:

REGINALD D.

LAUNDRY

LATE OF:

EAST MONTPELIER, VERMONT

Notice To Creditors

To the creditors of Reginald D. Laundry, late of East Montpelier, Vermont. I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the date of publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the Court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month deadline. Dated: October 19, 2016 Signed: Sheena Chadwick, Executor P.O. Box 156 Waterbury, VT 05676 Phone: (802) 244-7121 Name of Publication: The WORLD Publication Date: 10/26/2016 Address of Court:

Vermont Superior Court Probate Division, Washington Unit 65 State Street Montpelier, VT 05602

W hen I was a little girl, I can’t remember any holiday that I looked forward to more than

Halloween. I lived in a neighborhood that was filled with children, mostly boys. And because we had the biggest lawn and backyard, the boys allowed

me to play and be part of the gang. Now if you wonder what any of that information had to do with Halloween, let me tell you. For literally weeks before the big day, all of us discussed what our costume would look like. Of course back then no one bought their costumes. So when the discussion was about

a costume, it really had to be something that you could put

together by yourself. I know that it was possible to buy your mask, although there wasn’t much of a choice. And regardless

if it was called a pirate, or a princess the masks looked the

same…and smelled the same! I distinctly remember getting my mask and it was made out of strange material that looked like bandage stuff and then it was waxed. Now if you were a pirate or a princess, the facial features were put on your mask before it was waxed and we all thought that they were super. What I also remember was when we started out our masks looked OK. However, after about an hour and everyone’s hot breath, the masks started to melt! By the time I would get home, the mouth was a flabby piece of some strange material,

that was, if you were lucky. If not, your entire mask could melt and it was almost impossible to see out of the eye holes. Now we see great differences between Halloween today and what it was those many years ago. I think that the most and biggest difference was the children from 3 or 4 to about 13 all went trick or treating without their parents. Without their par- ents and no one got snatched or hurt? Yes, can you imagine? We all went trick or treating in a large group and although we always met other big groups and I think the only discussion we ever had was what house had very poor treats, like graham crackers instead of candy or a popcorn ball. And by the time we went home, which was about 9:00, we had enough candy to last us way past Christmas! Now I did know kids whose parents would only let them have one piece of candy a day, which could stretch that bag of candy for months. However, not in my house. My Mother said I could eat the entire bag of goodies if I wanted to. Which I have to admit was what I did with my children. The theory was you could eat it all and then

it was done. No lingering over a nasty bag of old candy.

Regardless of what I might tell you about Halloween, even with my own children, things have changed so much you can hardly recognize the day. Back when my children were young

and I had a lot of energy, I worked with another group of par- ents and turned the gym in the Waitsfield Elementary School into a scary Halloween place to gather. Over the years we did have wonderful tricks for the children to enjoy. However, one Halloween a group of new parents and new residents decid- ed that the Halloween party was just too scary for their little darlings and the party was over! My children still remember those parties and they made good memories. It should be not- ed that back then, parents were the drivers in the cars because our area was so rural. But they didn’t go trick or treating with their children, nor did they involve themselves in any and all of the parties, games or sports that their children did. Back in the good old days, parents were parents and they didn’t try and be their children’s best friends. Did you know that the widely held story of someone putting razor blades in apples was just an urban myth? And because people believe that story, Halloween has changed for the chil- dren of today. Unless they were shaving or driving, parents take their children by the hand and only let the children trick or treat in a specified area. And I know that many of the par- ents dress up, too! Halloween has changed so much and many of the children are only allowed to buy their costumes and cer- tainly not ones that are too scary! Poor Halloween has become more like Easter with soft and cuddly costumes. When I was young we had several neighbors who dressed up and made scary tableaus in their foyers. In order to get your treat you had to go in and take your treat from wherever it was for that particular year. I still fondly remember the year the elderly woman who lived in that house, as she was lying in a coffee in a very scary room and you had to walk up and take your candy from her hand. I want to tell you that there were lots of kids outside her house waiting for their turn and the longer they waited the worst the adventure got to be. I still don’t know who had a better time, the kids or the elderly lady in the coffin! And where were their parents? home in bed or handing out candy in their own homes. I don’t know if Halloween has passed yet or if it is time to prepare. I hope if it is over that you kept a bowl of candy right by the front door and that you enjoyed the little kids as much as possible. But if it hasn’t come yet, remember when you were young and don’t think of the evening as a chore but as a time to allow everyone to be whomever they want to be. And that includes you, be a kindly old man or woman who treats the children this one night of the year as enjoyable guests. You don’t ;have to wear a costume, but you can if you want to. And if not a costume, at least a mask! HAPPY HALLOWEEN! From the old witch in Waitsfield!

opponent contracting a similarly devastating virus, like HIV or tuberculosis. Did Milne see Trump’s latest attacks on Clinton’s health and think — hey, fair game? Whatever his reasoning, Milne should know voters don’t support such crass attacks in our elections. This is surely not the kind of elevated discourse we’ve come to expect from individuals seeking office in Vermont. Ryan Scott Pavek

Two Untrustworthy Candidates

Editor, We know that many politicians make promises they cannot keep and they typically use manipulative and ambiguous lan- guage to hide their true ideas and feelings. They hope the public will forget their false statements. However, Trump and Clinton might have the record for the most lies conveyed to the public during the campaign for President. James Green in a letter in the Londonderry, NH Times ref- erenced the fact checking website politifact and exposed the false statements by the Presidential candidates. Approximately 29% of Clinton’s statements were either mostly false, false or pants on fire. Trump fared even worse. Approximately 71% of his statements were either mostly false, false or pants on fire. Trump cannot be trusted when he said he will bring jobs back to America. He has outsourced jobs to China, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Indonesia, Bangladesh and Mexico. He employs many foreign workers. Unfortunately, Johnson, the Libertarian candidate for President, has made two significant gaffes in recent inter- views, and he appears to lack knowledge of world affairs. We can’t trust Clinton or Trump to tell the truth. I am writ- ing in myself for President. Donald Moskowitz Londonderry, NH

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

WASHINGTON UNIT

VERMONT HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY, Plaintiff

v.

MARIE A. GORDON, N/K/A MARIE A. BERNIER, AND JOSHUA M. BERNIER Defendants

CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NUMBER 797-12-15 WNCV

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

By virtue of the Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure by Judicial Sale (“Foreclosure Judgment”) filed March 21, 2016 and the Power of Sale con- tained in a certain mortgage granted by Marie A. Gordon, n/k/a Marie A. Bernier and Joshua M. Bernier (“Mortgagor”), to Northfield Savings Bank dated May 31, 2007 and recorded in Book 239 at Pages 655-672 of the City of Barre Land Records, of which mortgage Vermont Housing Finance Agency is the present holder under an Assignment of Mortgage dated June 7, 2007 of record in Book 242 at Page 803 of the City of Barre Land Re- cords, for breach of the conditions of the mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same, the undersigned will cause to be sold at public auc- tion (“Sale”) at 10:00 AM on November 7, 2016, the lands and premises known as 4 Elmore Street, Barre, Vermont (“Mortgaged Property”) more particularly described as follows:

Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Marie Anne Gordon, now known as Marie A. Bernier, and Joshua Michael Bernier, as joint tenants with the right of survivorship, by Warranty Deed of Bev- erly Flanagan dated May 31, 2007 and of record in Book 239 at Pages 653-654 of the City of Barre Land Records. Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Beverly Flana- gan by Warranty Deed of Eva Brown and Russell C. Brown, Jr. dated April 14, 2005, and recorded April 18, 2005 in Book 221, Page 451 of the City of Barre Land Records. It being all and the same land and premises conveyed to Russell C. Brown, Jr. and Eva Brown by Warranty Deed of Edward T. Rubalcaba, Irene R. Rubalcaba and D. Alita George by deed dated March 13, 1978 and recorded in Book 104, Page 482 of the Land Records of the City of Barre. This conveyance is subject to and with the benefit of any utility ease- ments, spring rights, easements for ingress and egress, and rights in- cidental to each of the same as may appear of record, provided that this paragraph shall not reinstate any such encumbrances previously extinguished by the Marketable Record Title Act, Chapter 5, Subchap- ter 7, Title 27, Vermont Statutes Annotated. Reference is hereby made to the above mentioned instruments, the records thereof, the references therein made, and their respective re- cords and references, in further aid of this description. TERMS OF SALE: The Sale will be held at the Mortgaged Property. The Mortgaged Property will be sold “AS IS, WHERE IS, WITH ALL FAULTS, WITH NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND”, sub- ject to easements, rights of way, covenants, permits, reservations and restrictions of record, superior liens, if any, encumbrances that are not extinguished by the sale, title defects, environmental hazards, unpaid real estate taxes (delinquent and current, including penalty and interest), and municipal liens, to the highest bidder. The successful bidder shall pay a deposit of at least $10,000 of the pur- chase price in cash or bank treasurer’s/cashier’s check at the time of Sale. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid within ten days after entry of a confirmation order. The successful bidder will be required to sign a purchase and sale contract with NO CONTINGENCIES except confirma- tion of the sale by the court. Title will be transferred by Confirmation Order. The Sale may be postponed one or more times for a total time of up to thirty (30) days, by announcing the new sale date to those present at each adjournment or by posting notice at a conspicuous location at the place of the Sale. Notice of the new sale date shall also be sent by first class mail, postage prepaid, to the mortgagor at the mortgagor’s last known address at least five days before the new sale date. Other terms to be announced at the Sale or contact Susan J. Steckel at

802-563-4400.

The Mortgagors, or their personal representatives or assigns, may redeem the Mortgaged Property at any time prior to the Sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including post-judgment expenses and the costs and expenses of sale. Dated at Cabot, Vermont, this 27th day of September, 2016. Vermont Housing Finance Agency By: Steckel Law Office By: /s/ Susan J. Steckel By: Susan J. Steckel, Esq. P. O. Box 247 Marshfield, Vermont 05658-0247

802-563-4400

The WORLD

page 15

Letters continued from previous page

political life are we as voters given the chance to move a per- son who has shown leadership on one stage as State’s Attor- ney to another where there will be a greater scope for action and benefit to the public. This is one of those times. T. J. Donovan will make a great Attorney General, and I urge you

to vote for him.

Kimberly B. Cheney Attorney General 1973-1975

Milne’s Zika Ad Tasteless

Editor, While the negativity of the Milne campaign up until now has sadly kept pace with the tone of national politics, the “DiCa” ad Milne debuted last week struck me as particularly tasteless. For those of you that haven’t seen the web-only ad, a mos- quito is shown biting Senator Leahy as a narrator explains Milne’s opponent has contracted the “DiCa” virus from all his time in Washington, D.C. While the ad fits with Milne’s fre- quent claims that public service corrupts any and all who pursue it, making light of Zika virus is out-of-line with Vermont politics. Although the CDC reports that less than four thousand cases of Zika virus have been identified in the United States, it’s important to recognize that this is a very serious infectious disease which ravages parts of South America. Over 1.5 mil- lion people in Brazil may have contract this virus which causes abnormal brain development in unborn babies and Guillain-Barré syndrome, a condition that can lead to paraly- sis. The World Health Organization has declared the spread of Zika virus a global emergency. Though Zika may not be on the minds of many Vermonters, this is a very real issue that should’ve never been co-opted for a negative attack ad. Voters would never accept a politician joking about their

• • •
• •

October 26, 2016

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Heather’s NEARLY NEW WOMEN’S • CHILDREN • MATERNITY
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Thank You, Thank You, Everyone Everyone for the cards, best wishes and visits! We are
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BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address & phone number for prize notification.

OCTOBER 23 Camryn Fewer, 15, Barre Olivia Rose Wise, 1, Northfield OCTOBER 26 Michael White, 56, Barre OCTOBER 27 Joan Moreau, Montpelier Alissa Keough, 19, Barre Isaac Fowler, 2, Barre OCTOBER 28 Kiersten Potvin, 9, Middlesex Jenna Day, 15, Berlin

OCTOBER 29 Eric Z. Evans, 32, Proctorsville Olivia Cyr, 12, Waterbury Center Mallory Kate Hladik, 2, Milton OCTOBER 30 Jerrold A. Poitras, 51, East Barre Jean Lovely, 61, Williamstown OCTOBER 31 Carter Maxfield, 21, Cabot NOVEMBER 1 Jimmy Poitras, 54, Malta, NY Don Touchette, 75, Montpelier

This Week’s Cake Winner:

On OCTOBER 29, KENALLYNN RAE PILETTE of BARRE will be 1 YEAR OLD!

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) at 479-9078 and ask for Julie Fandino (Bakery Manager) or Beverlee Hutchins (Cake Decorator) by Thursday, October 27th to arrange for cake pick-up.

PRICE CHOPPER

“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE NAME AGE (this birthday) ADDRESS

PHONE

(802)793-7417 Barre Text or Call
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for William & Pat Royce Card Shower 60 th Anniversary October 27 Send Greetings To:
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accepted. ANNIVERSARY DATE # YEARS NAMES ADDRESS PHONE “Floating Bridge at Sunset Lake” by Brookfield Artist
accepted. ANNIVERSARY DATE # YEARS NAMES ADDRESS PHONE “Floating Bridge at Sunset Lake” by Brookfield Artist

“Floating Bridge at Sunset Lake” by Brookfield Artist Gene Parent

Works by Brookfield Artist Gene Parent at Gifford Gallery

An exhibit of watercolors and pen and wash drawings by Brookfield artist Gene Parent is currently on display in the Gifford Gallery through November 16. A member of The Barre Paletteers, the Vermont Pastel Society, and the Vermont Watercolor Society, Parent often depicts natural landscapes and old Vermont structures like barns and covered bridges. Familiar scenes from around Brookfield are captured in “Ice Harvest,” (Sunshine Lake) and “Floating Bridge at Sunset Lake.” “I often work in ink and pastel but watercolors are my favorite medium,” he writes in his artist statement. Parent has had solo and group shows throughout northern Vermont, including previous exhibits at Gifford, shows at Copley Woodlands in Stowe, the Kellogg-Hubbard Library in Montpelier, and the Chandler Gallery in Randolph, as well as the Mary Bryan Art gallery in Jeffersonville, Old Mill Gallery in Essex Center, V Gallery in Woodstock, and galleries in Burlington, Montpelier, and Barre. This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be dis- played through November 16, 2016. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

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ARIES (March 21 to April 19)

The pitter-patter of all those Sheep feet means that you’re out and about, rushing to get more done. That’s fine, but slow down by the weekend so you can heed some

important advice. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You’re in charge of your own destiny these days, and, no doubt, you’ll have that Bull’s-eye of yours right on target. But don’t forget to make time for family events. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Be prepared for a power struggle that you don’t want. Look to the helpful folks around you for advice on how to avoid it without losing the important gains you’ve made. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Congratulations! You’re about to claim your hard-earned reward for your patience and persistence. Now, go out and enjoy some fun and games with friends and fam- ily. LEO (July 23 to August 22) The Big Cat might find it difficult to shake off that listless feeling. But be patient. By week’s end, your spirits will perk up and you’ll be your perfectly purring self again. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A problem with a co- worker could prove to be a blessing in disguise when a superior steps in to investigate and discovers a situation that could prove helpful to you. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) This is a favorable time to move ahead with your plans. Some setbacks are expected, but they’re only temporary. Pick up the pace again and stay with it. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your creativity is recog- nized and rewarded. So go ahead and claim what you’ve earned. Meanwhile, that irksome and mysterious situation soon will be resolved. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A new associate brings ideas that the wise Sagittarian quickly will realize can benefit both of you. Meanwhile, someone from the workplace makes an emotional request. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) It might be a good idea to ease up on that hectic pace and spend more time studying things you’ll need to know when more opportunities come later in November. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A relatively quiet time is now giving way to a period of high activity. Face it with the anticipation that it will bring you some well-deserved boons and benefits. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Go with the flow, or make waves? It’s up to you. Either way, you’ll get noticed. However, make up your own mind. Don’t let anyone tell you what choices to make. BORN THIS WEEK: You like to examine everything before you agree to accept what you’re told. Your need for truth keeps all those around you honest.

(c) 2016 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

keeps all t h o s e a r o u n d y o u

Marijuana: Is There A Responsible Way To Approach Its Increasing Use?

BY MICHAEL ROIZEN, M.D., AND MEHMET OZ, M.D.

W eed, ganga, pot -- what- ever you call marijuana,

facts about its risks and benefits seem harder to come by than a sober fan at a Willie Nelson concert. But facts we need! More than 31 million U.S. adults smoke marijuana, and almost 8.5 million use pot a lot, according to a recent study published in The Lancet Psychiatry. Somewhere around 1,246,170 folks in 24 states have authorized prescriptions for medi- cal marijuana (that number includes estimates

from states that don’t require registration, and New Hampshire and Maryland, where no numbers are available yet). Plus, the National Institute on Drug Abuse estimates that almost

45 percent of 12th graders and 16 percent of

8th graders have smoked marijuana at least once. Ironically, the more folks smoke pot (the increase since 2002 is about 30 percent), the less people believe it delivers real physical and psychological risks. True, for folks who use it for medical benefits such as end-stage- cancer pain relief, to stimulate appetite in the face of chemotherapy or to ease Parkinson’s symptoms, the risks may be less significant than the benefits, but for purely recreational users, especially heavy users, well, some think it can send your health up in smoke.

YOUR LUNGS ON POT Any smoke, be it from a wood fire, a ciga-

rette or a joint, delivers toxins to the lungs. Inhaling deeply and holding your breath when smoking marijuana increases exposure. Additionally, researchers from Health Canada found ammonia in pot smoke at levels up to

20 times that of tobacco; hydrogen cyanide

and aromatic amines at concentrations three to five times that of tobacco smoke; and side- stream (secondhand) marijuana smoke with more carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) than secondhand tobac- co smoke. Frequent users risk developing chronic cough, phlegm production, wheezing and acute bronchitis. Those hydrocarbons also contribute to inflammation throughout your body, including in your joints, your back, your arteries and your brain. So while you may feel less back or joint pain while smoking, you may actually increase the pain from which you’re seeking relief. These same inflammatory molecules don’t seem to accumulate when marijuana is eaten. But if you’re going to eat pot brownies, gum-

is eaten. But if you’re going to eat pot brownies, gum- mies or hard candies, beware

mies or hard candies, beware of kids’ access to them. Overdoses are dangerous -- and increas- ingly common -- among chil- dren who pick up pot-laced foods left lying around. YOUR BRAIN ON GANGA The most serious cognitive risks from marijuana are to teens (especially girls) and guys up to age 24. One study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences showed frequent marijuana smokers LOST eight IQ points between the ages of 13 and 38! And even if they quit as adults, the researchers found the youthful indulgers’ mental ability did not fully recover. Fortunately, folks who start smoking pot as an adult do not show such a decline in IQ. THERE ARE POTENTIAL BENEFITS When used in a well-regulated program to address specific medical issues, marijuana can convey some benefits. For example, one study found that users had 16 percent lower fasting insulin levels and smaller waist sizes than non-users, so marijuana may be helpful in controlling Type 2 diabetes. Medical mari- juana does seem to ease multiple sclerosis spasms and reduce vomiting from cancer medications, according to the NIDA. And some studies find that marijuana extracts ease neuropathic diabetes pain, while others do not. DON’T GO ONE TOKE OVER THE LINE Whatever you think about smoking mari- juana recreationally or taking it for medicinal purposes, clearly it is increasingly accepted by many people and state legislatures. So what’s needed is a realistic understanding of its risks. If you smoke or munch it, be aware of pot’s ever-increasing potency and avoid heavy use. Discourage kids from using it at all. And treat it with the same understanding of its inherent risks and benefits as you do -- or should -- alcohol, which can be used in a recipe for a tasty fish stew or be a toxic sub- stance that kills. * * *

Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike Roizen, M.D. is Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, tune into “The Dr. Oz Show” or visit www.sharecare.com.

(c) 2016 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

THANK YOU FOR SAYING I SAW IT IN

Features Syndicate, Inc. THANK YOU FOR SAYING I SAW IT IN Organic Farmers Join Together for

Organic Farmers Join Together for ‘Rally in the Valley’

The organic farmers and eaters of northern New England will be gathering at noon on Sunday, Oct 30 at Cedar Circle Farm in East Thetford, Vermont to let the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) know that they do not support hydroponic production to be allowed to be certified organic. Since its inception in 1990, the National Organic Program (NOP), a department of the USDA, has been charged with maintaining meaningful and strictly enforced standards for organic certification. Despite a 2010 rec- ommendation from its advisory board (the NOSB) stating that hydroponic should not be allowed to be certified organic, the NOP has continued to allow certification of soilless production. Whereas organic farming has always been based on protecting and enhanc- ing the health and vitality of the soil, hydro- ponic systems rely on soilless growing medi- ums and nutrient feeding solutions. The NOSB will be having a crucial vote in mid-November to decide whether to keep the soil in organic, or to allow hydroponic to dominate the organic industry. In recent years, an explosion of hydroponically grown ber- ries, tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and let- tuce have been showing up on grocery store shelves, labeled as organic, but unmarked as hydroponic. “Most organic growers would not consider a tomato grown in a little bag of coconut husk suspended 3 feet over the ground and fed entirely through an IV drip system to be organically grown,” explained Dave Chapman, an organizer of the event and owner of Long Wind Farm, which specializes in organic tomatoes. “Virtually all of the tomatoes labeled as ‘organic’ in large chain stores (such as Wal-Mart) will soon be hydro- ponic tomatoes from Mexico. People might not realize they are buying factory food that has never touched the soil.” Unchallenged, the hydroponic industry

will transform the “certified organic” produce that is available to most Americans: from soil-grown to hydroponic. There will be no way of knowing what is hydroponic, and what is not. Vermont’s Congressional delegation— Senator Leahy, Senator Sanders, and Congressman Welch—have written public letters to the USDA supporting soil-based organic farming. Along with 40 international organizations and over a thousand organic farmers and supporters, they have called for a moratorium on all new hydroponic organic certifications until this failed system can be fixed. “The vote at the upcoming NOSB meeting in St. Louis is incredibly important,” says Davey Miskell, of Miskell’s Premium Organics. “It’s important, not just for our industry, but for the health of the planet. We want to be heard loudly and clearly that this is not what organic means. We won’t get a second chance to keep the soil in organic.” Supporters and spectators are invited to convene for the Rally in the Valley at Cedar Circle Farm, 225 Pavillion Road, East Thetford, Vermont. There will be a tractor cavalcade leading a parade of farmers and organic eaters, speeches by leaders in the organic movement, including U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy and Representative Peter Welch, delicious wood-fired pizza baked in the NOFA Vermont mobile pizza oven, and live music. Organic farmer and agrarian elder Eliot Coleman is coming from Maine. Eliot is a highly regarded leader and teacher of organic farming. He will discuss why this issue is so important to the future of organic. Last fall, more than 100 organic farmers and supporters showed up at the NOSB meet- ing in Stowe, Vermont to protest organic cer- tification of hydroponics That impromptu rally made international news.

Time Again to Check Your Medicare Health and Drug Plans

Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Now’s the time for people in Vermont with Medicare to check their health and drug cov- erage for 2017. Medicare’s open enrollment period began on Oct. 15 and runs until l Dec. 7. Open enrollment is the best time to make sure your health and drug plans still meet t your individual needs, , especially if you’ve had d any changes in your r health.

your search for a new health or drug plan. Just click on “Find Health and Drug Plans.” After entering your ZIP code and the list of your prescriptions, you can use the “Medicare Plan Finder” tool to compare your coverage and out-of-pocket costs under different

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provides pro star ratings for each plan. A

gold star will show plans with the

five-star rating, while a

warning icon will alert you to plans

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pocket costs for next year. ar. The average monthly pre- mium for a Medicare Advantage plan will drop by $1.19 to $31.40, while the average monthly premi- um for a basic drug plan will inch up $1.50 to

$34.00.

People in Vermont in Medicare’s original fee-for-service program can choose from 21 drug plans with monthly premiums ranging from $14.60 to $127.70. Look beyond premiums, though. The only way to determine the true cost of your drug coverage is to consider other factors like deductibles, co-payments and coinsurance. Medicare Advantage remains a strong alternative for people who prefer to receive care through a private insurer rather than through Medicare’s original fee-for-service program. Enrollment in the private Medicare Advantage plans is expected to grow by 1.2 million to 18.5 million people in 2017 – about 32 percent of Medicare beneficiaries. Even if you’ve been satisfied with your health and drug coverage, you may benefit from reviewing all your options. Shopping around may save you money or improve your coverage. Medicare’s website – www.medicare.gov – has the best tool for helping you narrow

out-of-

“Medicare “Me & You 2017 Handbook,”

which was mailed to you in late September. One-on-one benefits counseling is also available through your State Health Insurance Assistance Program. In Vermont, you should call 1-800-642-5119. Thanks to the health care law, you’ll enjoy more savings on your prescriptions in 2017 once you land in the coverage gap, known as the “doughnut hole.” You’ll receive a 60 per- cent discount on your brand-name drugs and

a 49 percent discount on your generic drugs

while in the gap. The doughnut hole begins once you and your drug plan have spent $3,700 for your drugs. If you’re having difficulty affording your medications, you may qualify for extra help with your drug coverage premiums, deduct- ibles and co-payments. The amount of help

depends on your income and resources. But, generally, you’ll pay no more than $3.30 for generic drugs and $8.25 for brand-name drugs. Thirty-six percent of people in Vermont with Medicare’s drug coverage now get such

a break. To learn more about whether you

qualify for extra help, visit www.socialsecu-

rity.gov/prescriptionhelp or call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213.

9 TH Chakra Activation Technique Or SRT Technique (Sub-Occipital Release Technique) freemyatlas.com The 9th Chakra
9 TH Chakra Activation Technique
Or SRT Technique
(Sub-Occipital Release Technique)
freemyatlas.com
The 9th Chakra is about your spiritual body or Universal Knowledge which is
transmitted through the Silver Cord (Spinal Cord) and in the Crown (Medulla
Oblongata).
What happens when the 9 TH Chakra is misaligned?
1. Distorted Brain messages
2. Misalignment of the spine
3. Headaches/neck pains
4. Contracted shoulder muscles (shoulder/arm pain)
5. Contracted spinal muscles (back pains)
6. Contracted hip muscles (hip pain)
7. Tighten hamstring (knee pain)
8. Tight calf muscles (foot pain)
Resulting in Body imbalance and shortened leg lengths
Possible Side Effects after receiving
the 9 TH Chakra Activation Technique:
By releasing the distortion of Kundalini flow you may
experience Peace and Healing flowing more abundantly
throughout your physical and spiritual body.
To schedule an appointment please
call or text me @ 802-793-9371 or
stop in to see me at Many Words
Herbs Apothecary @ the First In
Fitness building in Berlin
Therapeutic Practice & Apothecary
Rosalene Bussiere
Certified in Herbalism & Reiki III
652 Granger Rd., Berlin, VT 05641
802-793-9371
manywordsherbs1.weebly.com
No Trick Here: Just the Treat of Halloween Safety Tips It seems like only last

No Trick Here: Just the Treat of Halloween Safety Tips

It seems like only last year that I was teaching you a few safety tricks to make Halloween a treat for you and your chil- dren. Well, here we are a year later, and many of you are asking me for a few more hints to prevent Halloween from being a safety nightmare for anyone. First, it is important to know that while people always worry about the safety of the treats your chil- dren bring home, the most serious injuries on Halloween involve eye injuries from carrying sharp objects, burns from

flammable costumes, and injuries from collisions with cars. If you want to prevent these from happening, here are some tips:

1. If you are a trick-or-treater, remember to see and be seen.

Avoid masks that can block your vision and replace them with

non-toxic, hypoallergenic face paint or make-up. Wear bright- colored, non-baggy, flame-retardant costumes with reflective tape. Carry a flashlight, stay on the sidewalk, and approach only houses that are lit and in a neighborhood you know.

2. If you are the parent of a trick-or-treater, make sure your

children are well-fed before they go out, so you can inspect what they bring home before they want to eat it. My motto in this case is, “when in doubt, throw it out.” Even if tampering

is, “when in doubt, throw it out.” Even if tampering Congratulations to Sally McKee of Montpelier
Congratulations to Sally McKee of Montpelier Winner of a $10 Gift Certificate from Morse Farm
Congratulations to
Sally McKee
of Montpelier
Winner of a
$10 Gift
Certificate from
Morse Farm

with Halloween treats is rare, it can still happen. And don’t

forget: small, hard candies can be a choking hazard for young children.

3. Parents should accompany children under 10 on their trick-

or-treating route. Make sure that older children are traveling in groups. Know the route they plan to take, and give them a time to be home. Give them a cell phone if you can, so they can reach you and you can reach them. Remember that the smaller the trick or treat bag, the shorter the distance traveled.

4. If you are a home that will be giving out treats, make sure

your yard is clear of anything that could trip up a child – or adult – such as hoses, wet leaves, or flower pots. Don’t forget to keep lit pumpkins far out of the way of trick-or-treaters. Remember that a candle in a pumpkin can be a fire hazard: a glow stick is a safer way to go and can light up that pumpkin just fine. Hopefully tips like this will scare away any concerns you might have when it comes to making sure your Halloween is not frightening, but a safe holiday for all involved.

Lewis First, MD, is chief of Pediatrics at The University of Vermont Children’s Hospital and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. You can also catch “First with Kids” weekly on WOKO 98.9FM and WPTZ Channel 5, or visit the First with Kids video archives at www.UVMHealth.org/ MedCenterFirstWithKids.

Sally’s Second Act

Will Be Closed Oct. 27 th – Nov. 1 st

We will not be accepting donations during that time

Happy Halloween!

970 Route 2 • Middlesex, VT 05602

802-223-3302

970 Route 2 • Middlesex, VT 05602 802-223-3302 Shop in your downtown Beautiful Downtown Barre! Hey,
Shop in your downtown Beautiful Downtown Barre! Hey, Kids, Enjoy Downtown Barre 12 years Trick-or-Treating
Shop in your downtown
Beautiful
Downtown Barre!
Hey, Kids, Enjoy
Downtown Barre
12
years
Trick-or-Treating
and
under
Monday, Oct. 31, 4-5PM
29th
29th

Swap Your Garden Bounty at the Annual Harvest Barter Fair

Did you have a bumper crop of potatoes this year, but never got around to making any jam? Do you long for a chance to try someone else’s home-grown handiwork or would like some more variety on your pantry shelf? Come and participate in the 5th Annual Harvest Barter Fair hosted by the Swap Sisters. On Sunday, November 6 we’ll be swapping the season’s bounty at the Lakeview Union School in Greensboro from 2-4 p.m. Bring items that you have grown, preserved, baked, or raised to swap with neighbors. Items will be swapped on a one for one basis. Bring items with an estimated value of $5, or $5 incre- ments. For example: a quart of canned tomatoes, a jar of jelly, a bag of tasty baked goods, a large winter squash, a pound of frozen meat, a bag of tea or other herbal product, tubers or house plants. Please label your items with ingredients. Come and participate whether you have a little or a lot to share, and bring a friend. People of all ages are encouraged to participate. This could also be a good place to find homes for items like extra canning jars. Contact us at swapsisters@ gmail.com or 755-6336 for more information.

THE AMERICAN LEGION BARRE POST 10 - 320 N MAIN ST., BARRE, VT Karaoke with
THE AMERICAN LEGION
BARRE POST 10 - 320 N MAIN ST., BARRE, VT
Karaoke with Sherri Lamberton
FRI., Oct. 28 7:00PM $3 cover
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29
COME AS YOU ARE
OR WEAR
A COSTUME FOR
A CHANCE TO
WIN PRIZES!
7:00PM • $5 cover
with the band
Classic Rewind
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 21 & OVER
For information, call the Post at 479-9058
CANADIAN CLUB ROUTE 14 479-9090 Just outside of Barre SATURDAY, OCT. 29 Choice of 14-oz.
CANADIAN
CLUB
ROUTE 14
479-9090
Just outside
of Barre
SATURDAY, OCT. 29
Choice of 14-oz. Sirloin Steak
or Stuffed Chicken Breast
$15 per person
Cocktails 6PM • Dinner 7PM
DJ: John Nelson
ADULT ADULTADULT
HalloweenHalloween HeadquartersHeadquarters Rubber Bubbles BALLOON & PARTY SUPPLY ZAGONE COSTUMESCOSTUMES ••
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MON-THU
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SUN11AM-4PM
Dot Sale:
o Blue Dots
10%off
SUICIDE
o Yellow Dots
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Barre-Montpelier Road, Berlin
o Green Dots
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o Red Dots
rubberbubbles.com
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START
START
NEVER enter FOLLOW all traffic laws and signals, and cross streets only at crosswalks. a
NEVER enter
FOLLOW all
traffic laws and
signals,
and cross
streets only at
crosswalks.
a stranger’s
house or car
under any
circumstances.
REALTOR ®
98 So. Main Street, Waterbury
802-223-5757
tina@c21jack.com
Tina Golon
WEAR a watch
that lights up,
so you
can read it in
the dark easily.
1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village on Rt. 14 (follow signs)
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED
802-522-9216
ONLY eat candy in
sealed wrappers,
and have your
parents inspect all
of your candy.
REMEMBER
802-476-4724
DIRECT SERVICE LINE:
Domino's
www.midstatedodge.com
322 North Main St.
Barre, Vermont
www.midstatehyundai.com
Toll Free 866-410-3541 Local 479-0586
479-2222
to walk, not run,
from house to
house while
trick-or-treating.
Toll Free 866-410-3541 www midstatedodge com
US Route 302 • Barre-Montpelier Rd.
Montpelier
223-0928
US Route 302 • Barre-Montpelier Rd. Montpelier 223-0928 YOUNG You forgot to look both ways before
YOUNG You forgot to look both ways before crossing the street LOSE A TURN children
YOUNG
You forgot to look both
ways before crossing
the street
LOSE A TURN
children
should always
be
accompanied
by an adult.
COSTUMES
223-2740
GO BACK
should be
bright enough
for others to
spot you in the
dark.
155 Washington St.
Barre, Vermont 05641
"The Capital City's Beautiful Backyard"
2 SPACES
170 N. Main St., Barre • 476-9200
(802) 476-3401 • qualitymkt.com
BOO!
Barre
B-M Road-Berlin
479-0629
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TRICK-or- ALWAYS 708 Rte 302 - Berlin, Barre treat only Rubber Bubbles PROPS like a
TRICK-or-
ALWAYS
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treat only
Rubber Bubbles
PROPS like a
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BALLOON &
in familiar
PARTY SUPPLY
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neighbor-
toy sword or
wand should
be flexible, with-
out sharp edges
or points.
802-476-6011 or
800-244-6011
carry a flash-
light with you
when trick-or-
treating at night.
STAY on side-
walks as much
as possible,
avoiding streets
and empty lots.
hoods
www.twincitylanes.com
JACKETS
close to
LIGHT your
your home.
jack-o’-
lantern with
a battery
HALLOWEEN
SAFETY GAME
powered
light instead
of a
provide
warmth.
Take one
with you on
a cool
Halloween
night.
candle.
GO BACK
2 SPACES
BOO!
BUY
costumes
that are
made of
flame-
RULES
resistant
1.
materials.
KNOW
You will need a single dice and a coin or small
object to use as playing pieces.
your
2.
Place your playing piece in the start position
parents’ or
3.
Roll to see who goes first. Highest number starts.
MAKE sure you
wear shoes that fit
well and are tied
tightly.
guardians’
4.
Roll the die and advance that many spaces.
contact
5.
numbers
Read the Safety Tips as you move around the game
board and follow the directions on the squares.
and always
6.
The first player to reach finish is the winner
keep them
with you.
Stay Off The Grass
IF there is no
sidewalk, then
walk on
the left side of
the road, facing
traffic.
MOVE AHEAD
3 SPACES
JJJ
124 North Main Street, Barre VT
802-476-4031
www.richardjwobbyjewelers.com
FINISH
VISIT only those
houses that are
well-lit,
and never approach
a house alone.
HAVE A SAFE
HALLOWEEN
(802)476-4181 www.wdmlaw.com 172 N. Main St. Barre, VT
Barre-Montpelier Rd. • 476-6580
(across
from Fassetts
store)
Mon.-Fri.
7:30am-4:30pm
• Sat. bread
8:00am-3:00pm
Paul with
& Lynn
Staff are
Happy Owners
to Help You
your Putney
Special & Projects
American Member
Rental
Association
Affordable
Hair
Styling for
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Children
with