Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 33

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

XIV th INTERNATIONAL NUMISMATIC CONGRESS

GLASGOW 2009

Edited by Nicholas Holmes

PROCEEDINGS OF THE XIV t h INTERNATIONAL NUMISMATIC CONGRESS GLASGOW 2009 Edited by Nicholas Holmes GLASGOW

GLASGOW 2011

International Numismatic Council British Academy All rights reserved by The International Numismatic Council ISBN
International Numismatic Council British Academy All rights reserved by The International Numismatic Council ISBN

International Numismatic Council

International Numismatic Council British Academy All rights reserved by The International Numismatic Council ISBN

British Academy

International Numismatic Council British Academy All rights reserved by The International Numismatic Council ISBN

All rights reserved by The International Numismatic Council

ISBN 978-1-907427-17-6

Distributed by Spink & Son Ltd, 69 Southampton Row, London WC1B 4ET Printed and bound in Malta by Gutenberg Press Ltd.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

XIV th INTERNATIONAL NUMISMATIC CONGRESS

GLASGOW 2009

I

CONTENTS

Preface

18

Editor’s note

19

Inaugural lecture

‘A foreigner’s view of the coinage of Scotland’, by Nicholas MAYHEW

23

Antiquity: Greek

I Delni (distribuzione, associazioni, valenza simbolica), by Pasquale APOLITO

35

Lessons from a (bronze) die study, by Donald T. ARIEL

42

Le monete incuse a leggenda Pal-Mol: una verica della documentazione disponibile, by Marta BARBATO

48

Up-to-date survey of the silver coinage of the Nabatean king Aretas IV, by Rachel BARKAY

52

Remarks on monetary circulation in the chora of Olbia Pontica – the case of Koshary, by Jarosław BODZEK

58

The ‘colts’ of Corinth revisited: a note on Corinthian drachms from Ravel’s Period V, by Lee L. BRICE

67

Not only art! The period of the ‘signing masters’ and ‘historical iconography’, by Maria CACCAMO CALTABIANO

73

Les monnaies préromaines de BB’T-BAB(B)A de Mauretanie, by Laurent CALLEGARIN & Abdelaziz EL KHAYARI

81

Mode iconograche e determinazioni delle cronologie nell’occidente ellenistico, by Benedetto CARROCCIO

89

La phase postarchaïque du monnayage de Massalia, by Jean-Albert CHEVILLON

97

A new thesis for Siglos and Dareikos, by Nicolas A. CORFÙ

105

Heroic cults in northern Sicily between numismatics and archaeology, by Antonio CRISÀ

114

La politica estera tolemaica e l’area del Mar Nero: l’iconograa numismatica come fonte storica, by Angela D’ARRIGO

123

2

CONTENTS

New light on the Larnaca hoard IGCH 1272, by Anne DESTROOPER- GEORGIADES

The coinage of the Scythian kings in the West Pontic area: iconography, by Dimitar DRAGANOV

The ‘royal archer’ and Apollo in the East: Greco-Persian iconography in the Seleukid Empire, by Kyle ERICKSON & Nicholas L. WRIGHT

. Retour sur les critères qui dénissent habituellement les ‘imitations’ Athéniennes, by Chr. FLAMENT

On the gold coinage of ancient Chersonese (46-133 AD), by N.A. FROLOVA

Propaganda on coins of Ptolemaic queens, by Agnieszka FULIŃSKA

Osservazioni sui rinvenimenti di monete dagli scavi archeologici dell’antica Caulonia, by Giorgia GARGANO

La circulation monétaire à Argos d’après les monnaies de fouille de l’ÉFA (École française d’Athènes), by Catherine GRANDJEAN

Silver denominations and standards of the Bosporan cities, by Jean HOURMOUZIADIS

Seleucid ‘eagles’ from Tyre and Sidon: preliminary results of a die-study, by Panagiotis P. IOSSIF

Archaic Greek coins east of the Tigris: evidence for circulation?, by J. KAGAN

Parion history from coins, by Vedat KELEŞ

Regional mythology: the meanings of satyrs on Greek coins, by Ann-Marie KNOBLAUCH

The chronology of the Hellenistic coins of Thessaloniki, Pella and Amphipolis, by Theodoros KOUREMPANAS

The coinage of Chios during the Hellenistic and early Roman periods, by Constantine LAGOS

Évidence numismatique de l’existence d’Antioche en Troade, by Dincer Savas LENGER

131

140

163

170

178

184

189

199

203

213

230

237

246

251

259

265

CONTENTS

3

Hallazgo de un conjunto monetal de Gadir en la necrópolis Feno-Púnica de los cuarteles de Varela, Cádiz, España, by Urbano LÓPEZ RUIZ & Ana María RUIZ TINOCO

Gold and silver weight standards in fourth-century Cyprus: a resume, by Evangeline MARKOU

Göttliche Herrscherin – herrschende Göttin? Frauenbildnisse auf hellenistischen Münzen, by Katharina MARTIN

Melkart-Herakles y sus distintas advocaciones en la Bética costera, by Elena MORENO PULIDO

Some remarks concerning the gold coins with the legend ‘ΚΟΣΩΝ’, by Lucian MUNTEANU

‘Une monnaie grecque inédite: un triobole d’Argos en Argolide’, by Eleni PAPAEFTHYMIOU

The coinage of the Paeonian kings Leon and Dropion, by Eftimija PAVLOVSKA

Le trésor des monnaies perses d’or trouvé à Argamum / Orgamé (Jurilovca, dép. de Tulcea, Roumanie), by E. PETAC, G. TALMAŢCHI & V. IONIŢĂ

The imitations of late Thasian tetradrachms: chronology, classication and dating, by Ilya S. PROKOPOV

Moneta e discorso politico: emissioni monetarie in Cirenaica tra il 321 e il 258 a.C., by Daniela Bessa PUCCINI

Tesoros sertorianos en España: problemas y nuevas perspectivas, by Isabel RODRÍGUEZ CASANOVA

‘Ninfa’ eponima grande dea? Caratteri e funzioni delle personicazioni cittadine, by Grazia SALAMONE

The coin nds from Hellenistic and Roman Berytas (fourth century BC – third century AD, by Ziad SAWAYA

Monetazione incusa magnogreca: destinazione e funzioni, by Rosa SCAVINO

Uso della moneta presso gli indigeni della Sicilia centro-meridionale, by Lavinia SOLE

La moneta di Sibari: struttura e metrologia, by Emanuela SPAGNOLI

269

280

285

293

304

310

319

331

337

350

357

365

376

382

393

405

4

CONTENTS

Le stephanophoroi prima delle stephanophoroi, by Marianna SPINELLI

Weight adjustment al marco in antiquity, and the Athenian decadrachm, by Clive STANNARD

The Magnesian hoard: a preliminary report, by Oğuz TEKIN

Zur Datierung und Deutung der Beizeichen auf Stateren von Górtyn, by Burkhard TRAEGER

Aspetti della circolazione monetaria in area basso adriatica, by Adriana TRAVAGLINI & Valeria Giulia CAMILLERI

La polisemia di Apollo attraverso il documento monetale, by Maria Daniela TRIFIRÒ

Thraco-Macedonian coins: the evidence from the hoards, by Alexandros R.A. TZAMALIS

The pattern of ndspots of coins of Damastion: a clue to its location, by Dubravka UJES MORGAN

The civic bronze coins of the Eleans: some preliminary remarks, by Franck WOJAN

The hoard of Cyzicenes from the settlement of Patraeus (Taman peninsula), by E.V. ZAKHAROV

Antiquity: Roman

The coinage of Diva Faustina I, by Martin BECKMANN

Coin nds from the Dutch province of North-Holland (Noord-Holland). Chronological and geographical distribution and function of Roman coins from the Dutch part of Barbaricum, by Paul BELIËN

The key to the Varus defeat: the Roman coin nds from Kalkriese, by Frank BERGER

Monetary circulation in the Bosporan Kingdom in the Roman period c. rst - fourth century AD, by Line BJERG

The Roman coin hoards of the second century AD found on the territory of present-day Serbia: the reasons for their burial, by Bojana BORIĆ-BREŠKOVIĆ

417

427

436

441

447

461

473

487

497

500

509

514

527

533

538

CONTENTS

5

Die Münzprägung des Thessalischen Bundes von Marcus Aurelius bis Gallienus (161-268 n. Chr.), by Friedrich BURRER

The denarius in the rst century, by K. BUTCHER & M. PONTING

Coinage and coin circulation in Nicopolis of Epirus: a preliminary report, by Dario CALOMINO

La piazza porticata di Egnazia: la documentazione numismatica, by Raffaella CASSANO, Adriana TRAVAGLINI & Alessandro CRISPINO

Dallo scavo al museo: un ripostiglio monetale di età antonina del IV municipio

di Roma (Italia), by Francesca CECI

I rinvenimenti dal Tevere: la monetazione della Diva Faustina, by Alessia

CHIAPPINI

Analytical evidence for the organization of the Alexandrian mint during the Tetrarchy (III-IV centuries AD), by J.M.COMPANA, L. LEÓN-REINA, F.J. FORTES, L.M. CABALÍN, J.J. LASERNA, & M.A.G. ARANDA

L’Oriente Ligoriano: fonti, luoghi, mirabilia, by Arianna D’OTTONE

Le emissioni isiache: quale rapporto con il navigium Isidis?, by Sabrina DE

PACE

A centre of aes rude production in southern Etruria : La Castellina

(Civitavecchia, Roma), by Almudena DOMÍNGUEZ-ARRANZ & Jean GRAN-

AYMERICH

Perseus and Andromeda in Alexandria: explaining the popularity of the myth in the culture of the Roman Empire, by Melissa Barden DOWLING

Les fractions du nummus frappées à Rome et à Ostie sous le règne de Maxence (306-312 ap. J.C.), by V. DROST

Monuments on the move: architectural coin types and audience targeting in the Flavian and Trajanic periods, by Nathan T. ELKINS

‘The restoration of memory: Minucius and his monument’ by Jane DeRose

EVANS

La circulation monétaire à Lyon de la fondation de la colonie à la mort de Septime Sévère (43 av. – 211 apr. J.C.): premiers résultats, by Jonas FLUCK

545

557

569

576

580

592

595

605

613

621

629

635

645

657

662

6

CONTENTS

Le monnayage en orichalque romain: apport des expérimentations aux études numismatiques, by Arwen GAFFIERO, Arnaud SUSPÈNE, Florian TÉREYGEOL & Bernard GRATUZE

New coins of pre- and denarial system minted outside Italy, by Paz GARCÍA- BELLIDO

Les bronzes d’Octave à la proue et à la tête de bélier (RPC 533) attribués à Toulouse-Tolosa: nouvelles découvertes, by Vincent GENEVIÈVE

Crustumerium, Cisterna Grande (Rome, Italy): textile traces from a Roman coins hoard, by Maria Rita GIULIANI, Ida Anna RAPINESI, Francesco DI GENNARO, Daniela FERRO, Heli ARIMA, Ulla RAJANA & Francesca CECI

Deux médaillons d’Antonin le Pieux du territoire de Pautalia (Thrace), by Valentina GRIGOROVA-GENCHEVA

Mars and Venus on Roman imperial coinage in the time of Marcus Aurelius:

iconological considerations with special reference to the emperor’s correspondence with Marcus Cornelius Fronto, by Jürgen HAMER

The silver coins of Aegeae in the light of Hadrian’s eastern silver coinages, by F. HAYMANN

The coin-images of the later soldier-emperors and the creation of a Roman empire of late antiquity, by Ragnar HEDLUND

Coinage and currency in ancient Pompeii, by Richard HOBBS

Imitations in gold, by Helle W. HORSNÆS

Un geste de Caracalla sur une monnaie frappée à Pergame, by Antony HOSTEIN

New data on monetary circulation in northern Illyricum in the fth century, by Vujadin IVANIŠEVIĆ & Sonja STAMENKOVIĆ

Die augusteischen Münzmeisterprägungen: IIIviri monetales im Spannungsfeld zwischen Republik und Kaiserzeit, by Alexa KÜTER

Imperial representation during the reign of Valentinian III, by Aládar KUUN

The Nome coins: some remarks on the state of research, by Katarzyna LACH

Le monnayage de Brutus et Cassius après la mort de César, by Raphaëlle LAIGNOUX

668

676

686

696

709

715

720

726

732

742

749

757

765

772

780

785

CONTENTS

7

L’ultima emissione di Cesare Ottaviano: alcune considerazioni sulle recenti proposte cronologiche, by Fabiana LANNA

Claudius’s issue of silver drachmas in Alexandria: Serapis Anastole, by Barbara LICHOCKA

La chronologie des émissions monétaires de Claude II: ateliers de Milan et Siscia, by Jérôme MAIRAT

La circulation monétaire à Strasbourg (France) et sur le Rhin supérieur au premier siècle après J.-C., by Stéphane MARTIN

The double solidus of Magnentius, by Alenka MIŠKEC

A hoard of bronze coins of the third century BC found at Pratica di Mare

(Rome), by Maria Cristina MOLINARI

Un conjunto de plomos monetiformes de procendencia hispana de la colección antigua del Museo Arqueológico Nacional (Madrid), by Bartolomé MORA SERRANO

Monete e ritualitá funeraria in epoca romana imperiale: il sepolcreto dei Fadieni (Ferrara – Italia), by Anna Lina MORELLI

Il database Monete al femminile, by Anna Lina MORELLI & Erica FILIPPINI

La trouvaille monétaire de Bex-Sous-Vent (VD, Suisse): une nouvelle analyse, by Yves MUHLEMANN

Die Sammlung von Lokalmythen griechischer Städte des Ostens: ein Projekt der Kommission für alte Geschichte und Epigraphik, by Johannes NOLLÉ

Plomos monetiformes con leyenda ibérica Baitolo, hallados en la ciudad romana de Baetulo (Hispania Tarraconensis), by Pepita PADRÓS MARTÍ, Daniel VÁZQUEZ & Francesc ANTEQUERA

I denari serrati della repubblica romana: alcune considerazioni, by Andrea PANCOTTI & Patrizia CALABRIA

Monetary circulation in late antique Rome: a fth-century context coming from the N.E. slope of the Palatine Hill. A preliminary report, by Giacomo PARDINI

Securitas e suoi attributi: lo sviluppo di una iconograa, by Rossella PERA

Could the unofcial mint called ‘Atelier II’ be identied with the ofcinae of Châteaubleau (France)?, by Fabien PILON

794

800

809

816

822

828

839

846

856

864

872

878

888

893

901

906

8

CONTENTS

Coin nds from Elaiussa Sebaste (Cilicia Tracheia), by Annalisa POLOSA

El poblamiento romano en el área del Mar Menor (Ager Carthaginensis): una aproximación a partir de los recientes hallazgos numismáticos, by Alfredo PORRÚA MARTÍNEZ & Elvira NAVARRO SANTA-CRUZ

The presence of local deities on Roman Palestinian coins: reections on cultural and religious interaction between Romans and local elites, by Vagner Carvalheiro PORTO

The male couple: iconography and semantics, by Mariangela PUGLISI

Countermarks on the Republican and Augustan brass coins in the south-eastern Alps, by Andrej RANT

A stone thesaurus with a votive coin deposit found in the sanctuary of Campo

della Fiera, Orvieto (Volsinii), by Samuele RANUCCI

L’image du pouvoir impériale de Trajan et son évolution idéologique: étude des frappes monétaires aux types d’Hercule, Jupiter et Soleil, by Laurent RICCARDI

The inow of Roman coins to the east-of-the-Vistula Mazovia (Mazowsze) and Podlachia (Podlasie), by Andrzej ROMANOWSKI

Numismatics and archaeology in Rome: the nds from the Basilica Hilariana, by Alessia ROVELLI

Communicating a consecratio: the deication coinage of Faustina I, by Clare

ROWAN

An alleged hoard of third-century Alexandrian tetradrachms, by Adriano SAVIO

& Alessandro CAVAGNA

Some notes on religious embodiments in the coinage of Roman Syria and Mesopotamia, by Philipp SCHWINGHAMMER

Roman provincial coins in the money circulation of the south-eastern Alpine area and western Pannonia, by Andrej ŠEMROV

Recenti rinvenimenti dal Tevere (1): introduzione, by Patrizia SERAFIN

Recenti rinvenimenti dal Tevere (2): la moneta di Vespasiano tra tradizione ed innovazione, by Alessandra SERRA

A hoard of denarii and early Roman Messene, by Kleanthis SIDIROPOULOS

911

916

926

933

941

954

964

973

983

991

999

1004

1013

1019

1020

1025

CONTENTS

9

La ‘corona radiata’ sui ritratti dei bronzi imperiali alessandrini, by Giovanni Maria STAFFIERI

The iconography of two groups of struck lead from Central Italy and Baetica in the second and rst centuries BC, by Clive STANNARD

Monete della zecca di Frentrum, Larinum e Pallanum, by Napoleone STELLUTI

Personalized victory on coins: the Year of the Four Emperors – Greek imperial issues, by Yannis STOYAS

Les monnaies d’or d’Auguste: l’apport des analyses élémentaires et le problème de l’atelier de Nîmes, by Arnaud SUSPÈNE, Maryse BLET-LEMARQUAND & Michel AMANDRY

The popularity of the enthroned type of Asclepius on Peloponnesian coins of imperial times, by Christina TSAGKALIA

Gold and silver rst tetrarchic issues from the mint of Alexandria, by D. Scott VANHORN

Note sulla circolazione monetaria in Etruria meridionale nel III secolo a.C., by Daniela WILLIAMS

Roman coins from the western part of West Balt territory, by Anna ZAPOLSKA

Antiquity: Celtic

La moneda ibérica del nordeste de la Hispania Citerior: consideraciones sobre su cronología y función, by Marta CAMPO

Les bronzes à la gueule de loup du Berry: essai de typochronologie, by Philippe CHARNOTET

Les imitations de l’obole de Marseille de LTD1/LTD2A (II e s. / I er s. av. J.C.) entre les massifs des Alpes et du Jura, by Anne GEISER

Le monnayage à la légende TOGIRIX: une nouvelle approche, by Anne GEISER & Julia GENECHESI

Trading with silver bullion during the third century BC: the hoard of Armuña de Tajuña, by Manuel GOZALBES, Gonzalo CORES & Pere Pau RIPOLLÈS

Données expérimentales sur la fabrication de quinaires gaulois fourrés, by Katherine GRUEL, Dominique LACOSTE, Carole FRARESSO, Michel PERNOT & François ALLIER

1037

1045

1056

1067

1073

1082

1092

1103

1115

1135

1142

1148

1155

1165

1173

10

CONTENTS

Pre-Roman coins from Sotin, by Mato ILKIĆ

Les monnaies gauloises trouvées à Paris, by Stéphane MARTIN

Die keltischen Münzen vom Oberleiserberg (Niederösterreich), by Jiři MILITKÝ

New coin nds from the two late Iron Age settlements of Altenburg (Germany) and Rheinau (Switzerland) – a military coin series on the German-Swiss border?, by Michael NICK

Le dépôt monétaire gaulois de Laniscat (Côtes-d’Armor): 547 monnaies de bas titre. Étude préliminaire, by Sylvia NIETO-PELLETIER, Bernard GRATUZE & Gérard AUBIN

Antiquity: general

La moneda en el mundo funerario-ritual de Gadir-Gades, by A. ARÉVALO GONZÁLEZ

Neues Licht auf eine alte Frage? Die Verwandschaft von Münzen und Gemmen, by Angela BERTHOLD

Tipi del cane e del lupo sulle monete del Mediterraneo antico, by Alessandra BOTTARI

Not all these things are easy to read, much less to understand: new approaches to reading images on ancient coins, by Geraldine CHIMIRRI-RUSSELL

The collection of ancient coins in the Ossoliński National Institute in Lvov (1828-1944), by Adam DEGLER

Preliminary notes on Phoenician and Punic coins kept in the Pushkin Museum, by S. KOVALENKO & L.I. MANFREDI

Greek coins from the National Historical Museum of Rio de Janeiro: SNG project, by Marici Martins MAGALHÃES

La catalogazione delle emissioni di Commodo nel Codice Ligoriano, by Rosa Maria NICOLAI

The sacred life of coins: cult fees, sacred law and numismatic evidence, by Isabelle A. PAFFORD

Anton Prokesch-Osten and the Greek coins of the coin collection at the Universalmuseum Joanneum in Graz, Austria, by Karl PEITLER

1182

1191

1198

1207

1218

1231

1240

1247

1254

1261

1266

1278

1292

1303

1310

CONTENTS

11

Monete ed anelli: cronologia, tipologie, fruitori, by Claudia PERASSI

Il volume 21 delle Antichitá Romane di Pirro Ligorio ‘Libri delle Medaglie da Cesare a Marco Aurelio Commodo’, by Patrizia SERAFIN

Greek and Roman coins in the collection of the Çorum Museum, by D. Özlem YALCIN

Mediaeval and modern western (mediaeval)

The exchanges in the city of London, 1344-1358, by Martin ALLEN

Fribourg en Nuithonie: faciès monétaire d’une petite ville au centre de l’Europe, by Anne-Francine AUBERSON

Die Pegauer Brakteatenprägung Abt Siegfrieds von Rekkin (1185-1223):

Kriterien zu deren chronologischer Einordnung, by Jan-Erik BECKER

Die recutting in the eleventh-century Polish coinage, by Mateusz BOGUCKI

Le retour à l’or au treizième siècle: le cas de Montpellier ( Marc BOMPAIRE & Pierre-Joan BERNARD

1244-1246

), by

Le monete a leggenda ΠAN e le emissioni arabo-bizantine. I dati dello scavo di Antinoupolis / El Sheikh Abada, by Daniele CASTRIZIO

Scavi di Privernum e Fossanova (Latina, Italia): monete tardoantiche, medioevale e moderne, by Francesca CECI & Margherita CANCELLIERI

La aportación de los hallazgos monetarios a ‘la crisis del siglo XIV’ en Cataluña, by Maria CLUA I MERCADAL

Norwegian bracteates during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, by Linn EIKJE

Donative pennies in Viking-age Scandinavia?, by Frédéric ELFVER

Carolingian capitularies as a source for the monetary history of the Frankish empire, by Hubert EMMERIG

Ulf Candidatus, by G. EMSØY

Münzen des Moskauer Grossfürstentums. Das Geld von Dmitrij Ivanowitsch Donskoj (1359-1389) (über die Veröffentlichung der ersten Ausgabe des ‘Korpus der russischen M ü nzen des 14-15. Jhs.’), by P. GAIDUKOV & I. GRISHIN

1323

1334

1344

1355

1360

1372

1382

1392

1401

1408

1411

1418

1426

1431

1436

1441

12

CONTENTS

Brakteatenprägungen in Mähren in der zweiten Hälfte des dreizehnten Jahrhunderts, by Dagmar GROSSMANNOVÁ

Monetisation in medieval Scandinavia, by Svein H. GULLBEKK

A mancus apparently marked on behalf of King Offa: genuine or fake?, by Wolfgang HAHN

Among farmers and city people: coin use in early medieval Denmark, c. 1000- 1250, by Gitte Tarnow INGVARDSON

Was pseudo-Byzantine coinage primarily of municipal origin?, by Charlie KARUKSTIS

Interpreting single nds in medieval England – the secondary lives of coins, by Richard KELLEHER

Byzantine coins from the area of Belarus, by Krystyna LAVYSH & Marcin WOŁOSZYN

Die früheste Darstellung des Richters auf einer mittelalterlicher Münze?, by Ivar LEIMUS

Coinage and money in the ‘years of insecurity’: the case of late Byzantine Chalkidiki (thirteenth - fourteenth century), by Vangelis MALADAKIS

Nota sulla circolazione monetaria tardoantica nel Lazio meridionale: i reperti di S. Ilario ad bivium, by Flavia MARANI

The money of the First Crusade: the evidence of a new parcel and its implications, by Michael MATZKE

Überlegungen zum ‘Habsburger Urbar’ als Quelle für Währungsgeschichte, by Samuel NUSSBAUM

Schilling Kennisbergisch slages of Grand Master Louis of Ehrlichshausen, by Borys PASZKIEWICZ

Un diner de Jaime I el conquistador en el Mar Menor: evidencias de presencia aragonesa en el Campo de Cartagena durante la Baja Edad Media, by Alfredo PORRÚA MARTÍNEZ & Alfonso ROBLES FERNÁNDEZ

L’atelier de faux-monnayeur de Rovray (VD, Suisse), by Carine RAEMY TOURNELLE

1452

1458

1464

1470

1477

1492

1500

1509

1517

1535

1542

1552

1557

1564

1570

CONTENTS

13

La ubicación de las casas de moneda en le Europa medieval. El caso del reino de León, by Antonio ROMA VALDÉS

New perspectives on Norwegian Viking-age hoards c. 1000: the Bore hoard revisited, by Elina SCREEN

The discovery of a hoard of coins dated to the fth and sixth centuries in Klapavice in the hinterland of ancient Salona, by Tomislav ŠEPAROVIĆ

A model for the analysis of coins lost in Norwegian churches, by Christian J.

SIMENSEN

A clippe from Femern, by Jørgen SØMOD

The convergence of coinages in the late medieval Low Countries, by Peter

SPUFFORD

A perplexing hoard of Lusignan coins from Polis, Cyprus, by Alan M. STAHL,

Gerald POIRIER & Nan YAO

OTTO / ODDO and ADELHEIDA / ATHALHET - onomatological aspects of German coin types of the tenth and eleventh centuries, by Sebastian

STEINBACH

Bulles de plomb et les monnaies en Pologne au XII e siècle, by Stanislaw

SUCHODOLSKI

Palaeologian coin ndings of Kusadasi, Kadikalesi/Anaia and their reections. by Ceren ÜNAL

The hoard of Tetín (Czech Republic) in the light of currency conditions in thirteenth-century Bohemia, by Roman ZAORAL & Jiři MILITKÝ

The circulation of foreign coins in Poland in the fteenth century, by Michal

ZAWADZKI

Mediaeval and modern Western (modern)

Die neuzeitliche Münzstätte im Schloss Haldenstein bei Chur Gr, Schweiz, by Rahel C. ACKERMANN

The money box system for savings in Amsterdam, 1907-1935, by G.N. BORST

Four ducats coins of Franz Joseph I (1848-1916) of Austria: their use in jewellery and some hitherto unpublished imitations, by Aleksandar N. BRZIC

1580

1591

1597

1605

1614

1620

1625

1633

1640

1649

1664

1671

1679

1687

1693

14

CONTENTS

A king as Hercules in the modern Polish coinage, by Witold GARBAZCEWSKI

The monetary areas in Piedmont during the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries: a starting point for new investigations, by Luca GIANAZZA

Coin hoards in the United States, by John M. KLEEBERG

The transfer of minting techniques to Denmark in the nineteenth century, by Michael MÄRCHER

Patrimonio Numismático Iberoamericano: un proyecto del Museo Arqueológico Nacional, by Carmen MARCOS ALONSO & Paloma OTERO MORÁN

Moneda local durante la guerra civil española: billete emitido por el ayuntamiento de San Pedro del Pinatar, Murcia, by Federico MARTÍNEZ PASTOR & Alfredo PORRÚA MARTÍNEZ

Coins and monetary circulation in the Legnica-Brzeg duchy: rudimentary problems, by Robert PIEŃKOWSKI

Representaciones del café en el acervo de numismática del Museu Paulista - USP, by Angela Maria Gianeze RIBEIRO

Freiburg im Üechtland und die Münzreformen der französischen Könige (1689- 1726), by Nicole SCHACHER

La aparición de la marca de valor en la moneda valenciana, ¿1618 o 1640? Una nueva hipótesis de trabajo, by Juan Antonio SENDRA IBÁÑEZ

Devotion and coin-relics in early modern Italy, by Lucia TRAVAINI

The political context of the origin and the exportation of thaler-coins from Jáchymov (Joachimsthal) in the rst half of the sixteenth century, by Petr VOREL

The late sixteenth-century Russian forged kopecks, which were ascribed to the English Muscovy Company, by Serguei ZVEREV

Oriental and African coinages

The meaning of the character bao in the legends of Chinese cash coins, by Vladimir A. BELYAEV & Sergey V. SIDOROVICH

Three unpublished Indo-Sasanian coin hoards, Government Museum, Mathura, by Pratipal BHATIA

1704

1713

1719

1725

1734

1744

1748

1752

1758

1765

1774

1778

1783

1789

1796

CONTENTS

15

Oriental coins in the Capitoline Museums (Rome): further researches on Stanzani Collection history, by Arianna D’OTTONE

The king, the princes and the Raj, by Sanjay GARG

The rst evidence of a mint at Miknāsa: two unpublished Almoravid coins, a dirham and a dinar, of the year 494H/1100, by Taw q IBRAHIM

L’âge d’or de la numismatique en Chine: l’exemple du Catalogue des Monnaies Anciennes de Li Zuoxian, by Lyce JANKOWSKI

Numismatic research in Japan today: coins, paper monies and patterns of usage. Paper money in early modern Japan: economic and folkloristic aspects, by Keiichiro KATO

The gold reform of Ghazan Khan, by Judith KOLBAS

A study of medieval Chinese coins from Karur and Madurai in Tamil Nadu, by

KRISHNAMURTHY RAMASUBBAIYER

Latest contributions to the numismatic history of Central Asia (late eighteenth – nineteenth century), by Vladimir NASTICH

Silver fragments of unique Būyid and amdānid coins and their role in the Kelč hoard (Czech Republic), by Vlastimil NOVÁK

Numismatic evidence for the location of Saray, the capital of the Golden Horde, by A.V. PACHKALOV

Le regard des voyageurs sur les monnaies africaines du XVI e au XIX e siècles, by Josette RIVALLAIN

Les imitations des dirhems carrés almohades: apport des analyses élémentaires, by A. TEBOULBI, M. BOMPAIRE & M. BLET-LEMARQUAND

À propos du monnayage de Kiến Phúc (1883-1884), by François THIERRY

Glass jetons from Sicily: new nd evidence from the excavations at Monte Iato, by Christian WEISS

Medals

Joseph Kowarzik (1860-1911): ein Medailleur der Jahrhundertwende, by Kathleen ADLER

1807

1813

1821

1826

1832

1841

1847

1852

1862

1869

1874

1884

1890

1897

1907

16

CONTENTS

Numismatic memorials of breeding trotting horses (based on the collection of the numismatic department of the Hermitage), by L.I. DOBROVOLSKAYA

De retrato a arquetipo: anotaciones sobre la difusión de la egie de Juan VIII Paleólogo en la peninsula Ibérica, by Albert ESTRADA-RIUS

Titon du Tillet e le medaglie del Parnasse François, by Paola GIOVETTI

Bedrohung und Schutz der Erde: Positionen zur Umweltproblematik in der deutschen Medaillenkunst der Gegenwart, by Rainer GRUND

The rediscovery of the oldest private medal collection of the Netherlands, by Jan PELSDONK

Twentieth-century British campaign medals: a continuation of the nineteenth century?, by Phyllis STODDART and Keith SUGDEN

‘Shines with unblemished honour’: some thoughts on an early nineteenth- century medal, by Tuukka TALVIO

General numismatics

Dall’iconograa delle monete antiche all’ideologia della nazione future. Proiezioni della numismatica grecista di D’Annunzio sulla nuova monetazione Sabauda, by Giuseppe ALONZO

Didaktisch-methodische Aspekte der Numismatik in der Schule, by Szymon BERESKA

The Count of Caylus (1692-1765) and the study of ancient coins, by François de CALLATAŸ

Le monete di Lorenzo il Magnico in un manoscritto di Angelo Poliziano, by Fiorenzo CATALLI

Coinage and mapping, by Thomas FAUCHER

Classicism and coin collections in Brazil, by Maria Beatriz Borba FLORENZANO

A prosopography of the mint ofcials: the Eligivs database and its evolution, by Luca GIANAZZA

Elementary statistical methods in numismatic metrology, by Dagmar GROSSMANNOVÁ & Jan T. STEFAN

1920

1931

1937

1945

1959

1965

1978

1985

1993

1999

2004

2012

2017

2022

2027

CONTENTS

17

Les collections numismatiques du Musée archéologique de Dijon (France), by Jacques MEISSONNIER

Bank of Greece: the numismatic collections, by Eleni PAPAEFTHYMIOU

Foundation of the Hellenic World. A new private collection open to the public, by Eleni PAPAEFTHYMIOU

Re-discovering coins: publication of the numismatic collections in Bulgarian museums – a new project, by Evgeni PAUNOV, Ilya PROKOPOV & Svetoslava FILIPOVA

„Census of Ancient Coins Known in the Renaissance“, by Ulrike PETER

Le sel a servi de moyen d’échange, by J.A. SCHOONHEYT

The international numismatic library situation and the foundation of the International Numismatic Libraries’ Network (INLN), by Ans TER WOERDS

The Golden Fleece in Britain, by R.H. THOMPSON

Das Museum August Kestner in Hannover: Neues aus der Münzsammlung, by Simone VOGT

From the electrum to the Euro: a journey into the history of coins. A multimedia presentation by the Bank of Cyprus Cultural Foundation, by Eleni ZAPITI

Highlights from the Museum of the George and Nefeli Giabra Pierides Collection, donated by Clio and Solon Triantafyllides: coins and artefacts, by Eleni ZAPITI & Evangeline MARKOU

Index of Contributors

2036

2044

2046

2047

2058

2072

2082

2089

2100

2102

2112

2118

MELKART-HERAKLES Y SUS DISTINTAS ADVOCACIONES EN LA BÉTICA COSTERA

ELENA MORENO PULIDO

Melkart-Herakles

Melkart-Herakles es el verdadero dios tutelar de la región extremo occidental de la ecúmene medi- terránea; la extensión de su culto por el área meridional de la Península Ibérica justica el interés de profundizar en el estudio de todas sus manifestaciones, entre las que se cuentan los diseños iconográcos de las amonedaciones de la costa Ulterior-Baetica, objeto de este trabajo. Los navegantes de Tiro, ciudad natal del dios Melkart, aconsejados y orientados por el oráculo del dios, fundaron la colonia de Gadir en el territorio inexplorado más allá del Estrecho de Gi- braltar que, gracias al éxito de esta divinidad, se conocerá como Columnas de Hércules. Desde su mítica fundación, la relación entre Gadir y Melkart fue inseparable, el templo del dios en la ciudad será uno de los más famosos de la antigüedad, su importancia era tal que en toda la ecúmene se creía que en él se encontraba su tumba. El dios tirio fue en esencia una divinidad de la vegetación y la fertilidad, quizás fruto de la asimilación de señores ancestrales como Yam o Baal (Alfaro 1988, p. 35). Dado su carácter frugífero y pasional, propio de las divinidades orientales, resucitaba cada primavera y moría cada invierno, así, alrededor de su tumba prosperó el Santuario Oracular Ga- ditano. Sin embargo, con la evolución histórica de la región sirio-palestina, el propio dios Melkart va acumulando, junto a sus rasgos agrarios, un carácter marino, colonizador y civilizador, que pronto se convertirá en su personalidad más distintiva y que le granjeará el título de dios del com- ercio, de los navegantes y de la colonización ultramar; éste será el carácter al que principalmente se dé culto en la Bética costera, aunque sin olvidar sus orígenes rurales. La caracterización de esta divinidad es difícil por sus continuas asimilaciones y sincretismos, ya que su culto persistió vivaz y dinámico y su religiosidad y mitología no quedó estanca en el tiempo y en el espacio. Empero, es posible denir a grandes rasgos al fruto de la unión de las per- sonalidades del dios Melkart fenicio y del héroe griego Herakles. Su idiosincrasia fue fundamen- talmente militar, guerrera y apotropaica; pronto se convirtió, gracias a sus aventuras alrededor del mundo, en protector de los viajeros. La riqueza de su templo en Gadir es alabada profusamente por las fuentes clásicas, por lo que no es extraño que se le conociese como guardián del patrimonio económico, así como es sobradamente conocido el carácter comercial de sus santuarios. Se convi- erte también en guardián de los juramentos, promesas y del respeto a los contratos, la imprimación de su imagen legalizaba y otorgaba un carácter sacro especial a las amonedaciones cuya egie presidía. Tampoco debemos olvidar su carácter ctónico o infernal conferido en la mitología por sus trabajos y episodios en el Hades y complementado por la creencia fenicia en su resurrección anual. La interpretatio romana de la verdadera esencia de Melkart-Herakles es controvertida. La fuerte relación del dios con el mar le llevará en muchos casos a asimilarse, en la Ulterior-Baetica costera, no con Hercules Gaditanus, sino con Neptuno, posiblemente en ciudades como Carteia. Su carácter colonizador, marítimo y comercial está más de acuerdo con la imagen que desprendía Neptuno que con la del héroe romano Hercules, por lo que se optará por cambiar su imagen a favor de una más fácilmente comprensible para el lenguaje romano.

2

ELENA MORENO PULIDO

La Expansión del Dios por el Mediterráneo

La difusión del culto a Melkart-Herakles por el Mediterráneo tiene un origen antiguo; Chipre actuó como puente entre las culturas púnica y griega, convergiendo así la identicación de Melkart tirio con Herakles griego. La acuñación de Citium (425- 450 a.C., Larnaca, Chipre, SNGGuk3064), ya representa la imagen de Herakles con todos sus atributos, barbudo, tocado con leonté y cargando con sus armas, arco y maza. Esta tipología será la que se perpetúe, con matices, en el lenguaje helenístico. Sin embargo, siguiendo siempre un análisis diacrónico y geográcamente dinámico, podemos apreciar cómo en todo el Mediterráneo la imagen de Melkart-Herakles es, asumiendo unos rasgos substanciales, múltiple (Lam. 1). En la costa sirio-palestina encontramos, en acuñaciones tardías de Tiro (125-124 a.C, SNGCop45), la imagen del dios joven, imberbe y sin atributos (Lam. 3.2) que en Arados se representa desde antiguo (400-350 a.C, SNGGuk3206) más maduro y barbado, aún sin atributos (Lam. 3.1) y que más tarde se alternará con la representación helénica del dios. La región circundante al Mar Negro comparte imágenes del dios barbado y sin atributos junto a la representación más canónica del héroe llevando la piel del león de Nemea (Lam. 1). En la amonedación de Cyzicus (SNGBNF208) el dios aparece ya unido a la imagen del atún, lo cual ocurrirá también en la temprana amonedación de Solus (SNGANS1365, Lam. 2.2). Presididas por las acuñaciones de Alejandro Magno asimilado a Herakles, las amonedaciones macedónicas imitan y jan esta representación del dios de perl, tocado con leonté y habitualmente acompañado en reverso por sus armas, carcaj, arco y echas. Sin embargo, hay que resaltar que también encontramos en todo el Mediterráneo representaciones donde se dibuja al dios de frente, caso de Selinus (Trapani, Sicilia, SNGANS713, Lam. 1). Ambas iconografías, de frente (CNH85.22-27) y de perl (CNH83.8-13), serán importadas por Gadir (Cádiz) en sus primeras series, venciendo al nal en la ciudad la más canónica representación del dios, de perl, que se mantendrá, sin apenas modicaciones, hasta el n de sus emisiones cívicas.

En Cartago, Melkart gozó de gran popularidad durante la época Bárquida; dado que esta familia helenística se consideraba protegida por el dios, en sus amonedaciones lo encontramos representado joven, imberbe y sin atributos (SNGCop383, Lam. 3.3), una imagen que remite fácilmente a la ya comentada en Tiro. A su vez, las monedas hispano-cartaginesas alternarán la imagen de Melkart con y sin atributos, asimilado a los generales Barcas y debatiéndose entre sus dos orígenes culturales, fenicio-púnico y helénico. Éste debate iconográco de trasfondo cultural, será el que se traslade a los retratos del dios en la costa Ulterior-Baetica (Lam. 4). Melkart-Herakles fue egiado en las acuñaciones de la Bética costera de Abderat (Adra, Alm- ería) (Lam. 3.5), Bailo (Bolonia, Cádiz) (Lam. 2.6), Carteia (San Roque, Cádiz) (Lam. 2.5), Gades (Cádiz) (Lam. 2.3-4) y Seks (Almuñécar, Granada) (Lam. 2.7-8). Fue muy popular en toda Hispania, sobre todo en el sur, documentándose en cecas como Alba (Abla, Almería), Asido (Medina Sidonia, Cádiz), Callet (El Coronil, Sevilla), Carisa (Espera, Cádiz), Carmo (Carmona, Sevilla), Hasta Regia (Mesas de Hasta, Cádiz), Ilse (ubicación incierta), Ipses (Cabezo de Hor- tales, Cádiz), Lascuta (Alcalá de los Gazules, Cádiz), Sagunto (Valencia), Salacia (Alcácer do Sal, Portugal), Searo (Torre del Águila, Sevilla) y Detumo-Sisipo (Jerez de la Frontera, Cádiz).

MELKART-HERAKLES Y SUS DISTINTAS ADVOCACIONES EN LA BÉTICA COSTERA

Herakles Heleno

Desde su primera serie, Gadir escoge para su amonedación representar al dios tutelar de la ciudad, Melkart-Herakles, al estilo helénico. Refuerza la clara identicación iconográca del dios al trazar con esmero la leonté, al tiempo que se despega de la imagen tradicional del dios, imberbe y sin atributos que, como hemos visto, se acuñaba en Tiro (SNGGuk3231, Lam. 3.2) o Cartago (SNG- Guk107, Lam. 3.3), las grandes metrópolis fenicio púnicas ligadas cultural y comercialmente a la ciudad desde antiguo. Gadir elegirá para sus anversos el tipo de Herakles griego, puesto de moda desde los tetradracmas alejandrinos, pero que presumiblemente llegara a Gadir a través de prototi- pos sicilianos y cuyo paralelo más cercano podemos encontrarlo en la amonedación de Solus de V a.C. (SNGANS1365, Lam. 2.2), en la que ya encontramos al dios asociado en reverso al atún. Será este tipo ‘inmovilizado’ de Gadir el que se extienda en gran parte de la Ulterior-Bética y el que se copie, casi sin variantes, en muchas de las series de Seks (CNH104.4-15,22, Lam. 2.7-8). En contraste a esta situación encontramos las emisiones con Melkart-Herakles de Carteia (CNH412.3,413.5, Lam. 2.5). A pesar de plasmar al dios con la leonté, su estilo se aleja tanto del trazado helenístico de Gadir como del de las cabezas barbadas emitidas en la propia colonia carteiense (CNH412.1,413.4,7-34). Esto apuntaría a que estas monedas responderían a un gusto y un sentir popular e indígena, persistente en la colonia y alusivo al culto a Melkart-Herakles preexistente en la ciudad, en contraste, las cabezas de Júpiter-Baal-Hammon/Poseidón-Neptuno remitirían a la población de origen romano de la colonia, así como al deseo de ésta de señalar su condición privi- legiada sobre el resto de la Ulterior-Bética (Moreno Pulido 2009b). Carteia por tanto elige la advo- cación helena del dios, pero se aleja estilísticamente de la canónica representación gadirita. Por el contrario, Bailo grabará en I a.C. una serie monetal con un helenístico Melkart-Herakles en anverso (CNH124.5,130.3, Lam. 2.6) con una curiosa variante del tipo de Gades, en el lugar habitualmente reservado para la clava, coloca una espiga y, en reverso, toro y estrella. La relación de esta divinidad con la espiga no era extraña ni en el mundo griego, donde podemos citar un ejemplo magníco de Metaponto (Beranlda, Italia, 430-420 a.C, SNGGuk293), ni en el mundo púnico, por ejemplo, en Tingis (Tánger, Marruecos, AlexandropoulosBr.154, Lam. 3.4) donde se graba una magníca representación de Melkart africano, barbado y sin atributos, con espigas en reverso, imágenes, por otro lado, muy populares en el Norte de África. Su interpretación podría relacionarse con una alusión a la espiga acuñada en Bailo en los reversos de las emisiones del siglo II a.C. (CNH124.2-3,6), símbolo de la fertilidad y quizás referida a la primitiva economía agraria de la ciudad. Al mismo tiempo, la espiga no es un atributo totalmente ajeno a esta divinidad, pues, en origen, Melkart era un dios de carácter frugífero; en esta representación encontramos una reminiscencia de este rasgo primigenio de la deidad, no olvidado por la población. La iconografía helenística surge en Bailo con la inclusión de Melkart-Herakles helenizado, al estilo gaditano, con leonté. Esta alusión al lenguaje antropomórco clásico debe relacionarse con el momento tardío en que se fecha esta emisión; el siglo I a.C. se caracteriza por la progresiva penetración de la lati- nización, que provoca la aparición de imágenes romanizantes.

3

Melkart Africano

Seks y Abdera serán las ciudades costeras de la Bética que escogerán el estilo llamado ‘af- ricano’, a veces barbado y siempre con la cabeza descubierta, para la representación del dios Melkart-Herakles, inspirado en las amonedaciones cartaginesas de Amílcar asimilado al dios. Ab- dera (CNH113.13-15,114.16-17) copia directamente los tipos de Melkart con clava al hombro de

4

ELENA MORENO PULIDO

Seks (CNH103.1,104.2,3), sustituyendo los dos atunes de reverso por atún y delfín y simplicando los símbolos astrales, creciente con punto y estrella en dos glóbulos (Alfaro 1996, p. 21). Durante toda su acuñación, Seks alternará entre los dos estilos o advocaciones de Melkart-Her- akles. Esta situación puede explicarse por el constante ujo e intercambio cultural y poblacional que caracterizaría esta ceca costera durante la antigüedad. Seks se debate en una lucha entre hele- nizar sus tipos y mantenerse el a sus orígenes púnicos, pues esta decisión va a perlar la imagen que la ciudad va a exportar al exterior, aún así, las élites encargadas de la acuñación no olvidarían que la mayoría de los usuarios de estas emisiones serían los habitantes de la propia Seks.

Reversos asociados a Melkart-Herakles

Los atunes egiados en reverso por Gadir se generalizarán y copiarán sistemáticamente en Seks. Su interpretación aúna el sentido económico, símbolo de las famosas salazones de la Ulterior- Baetica, con el religioso, como producto procurado por el propio Melkart-Herakles. Su templo fue

de obligado peregrinaje para todos los pescadores de la almadraba occidental, puesto que en él se ofrecerían sacricios a cambio de buenas capturas o en agradecimiento de éstas (García-Bellido

/ Blázquez 2001, p. 60). El sentido marino y comercial de esta divinidad queda resaltado porque

habitualmente se acompaña en reverso de atunes y delnes, símbolo universal de la buena naveg- ación y del dominio marítimo del dios (Moreno Pulido 2009b). Como se ha visto, Bailo no utilizará los atunes en reverso para las acuñaciones con Melkart- Herakles, sino que trazará un toro alumbrado por símbolos astrales (CNH124.5,130.3, Lam. 2.6). Esta relación iconográca se utilizó en el mundo griego en acuñaciones como la de Euboia (IV-III a.C., Eubea, Grecia, SNGCop417), no hay que olvidar que los toros fueron utilizados constante- mente como sacricios augurales y fundacionales, para Melkart-Herakles cuyo oráculo gaditano residía muy cercano a Bailo. Esta imagen podría remitir también al ganado vacuno de Gerión. Según la mitología, Herakles viajó en el carro solar hacia Occidente para robar los preciados toros del gigante, por lo que podría argumentarse que la Bética, supuesta región donde se produjo el mortal enfrentamiento entre Gerión y Herakles, utilizaría la imagen del toro en este sentido, recor- dando la hazaña del dios y prestigiando la ganadería de la región. En Bailo este toro podría tener doble signicado, pues aparecía en las primeras acuñaciones de la ciudad (CNH124.2-3,6), quizás con evocaciones primitivas relativas a Baal-Hammon, divinidad púnica por excelencia represen- tada anicónicamente como un toro. A pesar de su industria salazonera, principal fuente económica

de la ciudad, no se escogen los atunes para esta emisión, diferenciando así su personalidad nortea- fricana de otras emisiones que egian al dios en la costa bética. Sin embargo, pese a la adscripción poblacional y cultural de esta ceca libiofenicia al Norte de África, Bailo no utiliza el estilo africano de representación de Melkart, sino que, dadas las tardías fechas en las que se acuña esta emisión, escoge el estilo heleno, estandarte de la cercana Gades. Esta cuestión se pone en relación con el deseo de Bailo de acercarse culturalmente a Roma, para ello escoge un tipo de clara y rápida comprensión con un fuerte culto y profundo signicado tanto para la población púnica como para la romana. El valor de Melkart-Herakles no estuvo sólo en su poder protector, sino en su decidida capacidad de unir sensibilidades con orígenes culturales muy diferentes. La clava, arma preferida del dios y unida esencialmente a éste, se acuña también como tipo principal de reverso en Carteia (CNH413.5,6) y Seks (CNH104.4,107.27,28), aunque la encontra- mos también asociada a Melkart con representación tanto helenística como africana en anverso. Fue un símbolo fenicio de fuerza y poder tan esencialmente asociado al héroe que se empleó muy

a menudo en el Mediterráneo como su tipo de reverso, así, la encontramos en las amonedaciones

MELKART-HERAKLES Y SUS DISTINTAS ADVOCACIONES EN LA BÉTICA COSTERA

5

alejandrinas o en ciudades del Mar Negro como Herakleia Pontica (SNGBM1587, Lam. 2.1). Durante el Imperio, Gades mantuvo la acuñación de la egie del dios en algunas series en las que se despega del habitual diseño del retrato del emperador o de su familia. Sin embargo, deja de trazar en reverso los tradicionales atunes y delnes a favor de imágenes con un interés político muy acusado, así, lo encontramos junto a acrostolium en la amonedación conmemorativa de Agripa (RPC78-79), signos sacerdotales (RPC85-86) y hacha de sacricios (RPC87) alusivos al ponti- cado de Balbo, fulmen asociado a leyenda Augustus Divi F. (RPC92-93) y símpulum con leyenda Ti. Clavdivs. Nero (RPC91) desplazando incluso la imagen del emperador que había ilustrado ante- riormente (RPC90). La última amonedación de Gades (DIC80), presumiblemente conmemorativa, se caracteriza por ser la única de la ciudad en la que se representa al altar que contenía las cenizas del dios. Esta imagen ya se conocía en Lascuta (CNH121.1-3), y se mantiene en la tipología roma- na, como acusa la acuñación de Adriano de 117-138 d.C. asociada a Hercules Gaditanus (RIC56).

Signicacion de los Tipos

Melkart-Herakles se convirtió, desde el siglo V a.C., en símbolo universal del Mediterráneo; acu- ñar su imagen signicaba adscribirse a esa koiné que compartía unos mismos ideales de vida y subsistencia aglutinados en la imagen del dios. La división entre culturas griegas y púnicas puede comprobarse por la diversidad de estilos utilizados para representarlo, sin embargo, esta división no es irreconciliable, desprendiéndose de la iconografía estudiada la intención de conseguir una universalidad religiosa para todos ellos. Las ciudades, y Seks es un magníco ejemplo de ello, no se cierran culturalmente a una única advocación del dios, buscan el sincretismo y la asociación de símbolos conocidos para formar un emblema nacional fácilmente comprensible en todo el Medi- terráneo, abriendo entretanto el mercado a las diferentes creencias regionales. Muestran también un origen poblacional distinto, así como una liación cultural a dos zonas diferentes del Mediterráneo. El estilo africano, sin la leonté pero con la clava, revela la existencia de un círculo de intercambio de gentes, ideas y productos entre las costas del Norte de África y del Sur Peninsular, así como el deseo de vincular monetariamente una y otra costa. La elección del tipo helenístico remite inequívocamente a Alejandro Magno, héroe extensor, como Herakles, de la cultura griega por todo el mundo conocido, así como a una relación con el Oriente Mediterráneo y las islas griegas, evidenciando poder comercial de largo alcance y vínculos entre grandes emporios protegidos y velados por el dios.

BIBLIOGRAFÍA

Alexandropoulos, J. (2007), Les monnaies de l’Afrique Antique. 100av.J-C.-40ap.J-C., Toulouse.

Alfaro, C. (1988), Las monedas de Gadir-Gades, Madrid.

Alfaro, C. (1996), ‘Avance de la ordenación de las monedas de Abderat/Abdera (Adra, Almería)’, Numisma 237, pp.11-50.

Burnett, A. / Amandry, M. / Ripollés, P.P. (1992), Roman Provincial Coinage, London-París.

García-Bellido, M.P / Blázquez, C. (2001), Diccionario de cecas y pueblos hispánicos, Madrid.

Mattingly, H. / Sydenham, E.A. (1929), Roman Imperial Coinage Vol. II ‘Vespasiano a Adriano’, London.

6

ELENA MORENO PULIDO

Moreno Pulido, E. (2009a), ‘La Imagen proyectada por la Bética costera durante los siglos III a. C. a I d. C.: Un análisis iconológico de su acuñación monetal’, Espacio, Tiempo y Forma, nº2.

Moreno Pulido, E. (2009b), ‘La iconografía marítima en la moneda de la Ulterior-Baetica costera’, AAC, vol.20.

Villaronga, L. (1994), Corpus Nummun Hispaniae ante Augusti Aetatem, Madrid.

VV.AA. (1936), Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum. Vol. I. II The Newnham Davis Coins.

VV.AA. (1939-49), Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum. Vol. III. The Lockett Collection, I-V.

VV.AA. (1942-1979), Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum. The Royal Collection of Coins and Med- als, Danish National Museum, Copenhagen.

VV.AA. (1993-2002), Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum Vol. IX, The British Museum, I-II.

VV.AA. (1995), Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum. Vol. X. The John Morcom Collection of Western Greek Bronze Coins.

ILLUSTRATIONS

Las monedas no aparecen en su tamaño original para la mejor apreciación de sus tipos iconográ- cos. En su lugar, se indica tamaño y valor.

Lam.1: La expansión de MelkartHerakles por el Mediterráneo.

Lam.2: Herakles Heleno.

2.1. Herakleia Pontica (400 – 300 a.C.) Trihemióbolo (11 mm.; 1,12 g) SNG BM 1587 (Var.) Anverso: Cabeza de Herakles barbado llevando leonté. Reverso: Clava. Leyenda: ΗΡΑΚ/ΛΕΙΑ.

2.2. Solus (300 – 240 a.C.) (12 mm.; 2,2 g) SNG ANS 1365 Anverso: Cabeza de Herakles con leonté. Reverso: Atún.

2.3. Gadir (237 – 206 a.C.) Mitad (18/20 mm.; 3,96 g) CNH 90.61 www.coinarchives. com Anverso: Cabeza de Melkart-Herakles con leonté a izquierda, clava delante. Reverso: Dos atunes a derecha, entre las cabezas creciente externo con punto central, entre las colas, letra fenicia ALEPH, punto central, encima inscripción fenicia MPL, debajo GDR.

2.4. Gadir (237 – 206 a.C.) Mitad (18/22 mm.; 3,42 g) CNH 85.26, www.moneda- hispanica.com Anverso: Cabeza de Melkart-Herakles de frente vistiendo piel de león. Reverso: Dos atunes a izquierda. En medio letra púnica ALEPH. Encima MP’L. Debajo ‘GDR (no apreciable).

2.5. Carteia (130 – 90 a.C.) Sextante (15 mm.; 2,05 g.) CNH 413.6, SNG BM 1677 Anverso: Cabeza de Melkart-Herakles con leonté a derecha, delante, dos glóbulos. Reverso: Clava a derecha, encima, dos glóbulos, debajo, en arco, CARTEIA.

MELKART-HERAKLES Y SUS DISTINTAS ADVOCACIONES EN LA BÉTICA COSTERA

7

2.6. Bailo (I a.C.) As (25 mm.; 10,67 g.) CNH 124.5, MAN 1993/67/163 Anverso:

Cabeza de Melkart-Herakles con leonté a izquierda, detrás, espiga. Reverso: Toro a izquier da. Encima A. BAILO, debajo Q MANL P CORN.

2.7. Seks (Finales del III a.C.) Cuarto (11/12 mm.; 1,67 g.) CNH 104.4, Anverso:

Cabeza de Melkart a derecha con leonté. Reverso: Clava horizontal, encima MP’L, debajo, SKS.

2.8. Seks (Primera mitad del II a.C.) Mitad (27/28 mm.; 16,15 g.) CNH 104.8, www.tesorillo. com Anverso: Cabeza de Melkart-Herakles cubierta con leonté a izquierda, clava sobre el hombro izquierdo. Reverso: Dos atunes a izquierda, entre ellos, a izquierda, creciente interior con punto central, a derecha, estrella, encima, MP’L y debajo, SKS.

Lam.3: Melkart Africano .

3.1. Arados (400 – 350 a.C.) Óbolo (20 mm.; 10.41 g.) SNG Guk 3206, www. coinarchives.com Anverso: Cabeza laureada a derecha de Melkart. Reverso:

Galera a derecha, tres líneas onduladas representando el mar debajo, encima, dos estrellas.

3.2. Tiro (125 – 124 a.C.) Tetradracma (26 mm.; 14,08 g.) SNG COP 45, www. coinarchives.com Anverso: Cabeza laureada de joven Melkart. Reverso: Águila, palma a derecha y clava a izquierda. Leyenda: TUROU IERAS KAI ASULOU.

3.3. Cartago (213 – 210 a.C.) Medio Shekel (19 mm.; 3,15 g.) SNG COP 383, www. coinarchives.com Anverso: Cabeza de Aníbal asimilada a joven Melkart. Reverso:

Elefante, debajo, aspa.

3.4. Tingis (I a.C.) Unidad (18/22 mm., 7 g.) Alexandropoulos Br154, www.coinarchives. com Anverso: Cabeza barbada de Océano/Melkart a izquierda. Reverso: Espiga. Leyenda neopúnica P<LT TYNG>

3.5. Abdera (Finales del II a. C. – principios del I a.C.) Unidad 1 y ½ shekel (26/28 mm., 14,43 g.) CNH 113.13-15 SNG BM 460 Anverso: Cabeza de Melkart a derecha, detrás, clava. Reverso: Delfín a derecha, debajo, atún a izquierda. A derecha, 2 glóbulos. Debajo, leyenda neopúnica ‘BDRT.

3.6. Seks (Finales del III a.C.) Duplo (26/27 mm., 19,24 g.) CNH 103.1, 104.2 SNG BM 404 Anverso: Cabeza de joven Melkart a derecha, detrás, clava. Reverso: Dos atunes a derecha, en medio, leyenda púnica SKS.

3.7. Mauritania Incierta ¿Cartenna o Arennaria? As (21/22 mm., 6,72 g.) RPC 886 Alexandropoulos Br188. Anverso: Cabeza barbada de Melkart-Herakles a derecha, delante, clava. Reverso: Cabeza femenina a derecha.

3.8. Seks (Finales del II a.C.) Unidad y media (23/24 mm., 12,26 g.) CNH 107.26 MH BNF 336 Anverso: Cabeza barbada de Melkart-Herakles a izquierda, detrás, clava, delante, AR. Reverso: Dos atunes a derecha, entre ellos, leyenda SKS.

Lam.4: Las distintas advocaciones de Melkart- Herakles en la Ulterior-Bética costera.

LAMINA I

LAMINA I

LAMINA II

LAMINA II

LAMINA III

LAMINA III

LAMINA IV

LAMINA IV