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Differentiating Instruction Final Product Unit Plan


General Unit Info
Unit Title: Here today, Gone to Mali: A study of Ancient Mali
Class (grade & subject): Third Grade Social Studies
Unit Duration: 10 days (2 weeks)
Total Number of Lessons: Six

Complete this table to describe each lesson in the unit. If there are more than six lessons in the unit, add new rows to the table.
Lesson # Lesson title and/or topic
Is this lesson
For lessons included
For lessons
For lessons
differentiated below, is lesson
included below,
included
&
differentiated by
which strategy is
below, what
included
readiness, interest, or
used to
page # does it
below?
learning profile?
differentiate?
start on?
1
2
3
4

Daily Life in Mali


Village Meeting
Timbuktu
Economics, Empires, Art and
Architecture

5
6

Griots: Storytelling
Ancient Civilizations: Mali, Greece
and Rome



Yes

Readiness
Interest
Learning Profile
Interest

Tiering
RAFT
Sternberg
Learning Contract

Was this
lesson a
strategy app
task? If so,
which
number?
1
2
No
3

Learning Profile
Interest

Sternberg
RAFT

No
No


Explain the overarching purpose of this unit in one sentence.
Students will consider how we know what we know about Ancient Mali in the context of the past (Ancient civilizations), the present (applications to
their life and environment) and the future (predictions about continued development of culture, civilization, technology and economics).

Briefly describe the course in which this unit is presented and any relevant details about the students for whom this unit is intended.
This unit is positioned after a study of Ancient Greece and Rome, so the final lesson combines their knowledge about Greece and Rome with their
study of Ancient Mali. This unit occurs later in the fall semester, so the students are already knowledgeable of and accustomed to classroom routines
for group work, independent research and our differentiated classroom. They are also proficient in using internet search and collaboration tools
(google drive). Students have already spent time reflecting on their strengths and interests, so they are well suited to choose Sternberg and learning
profile-related tasks that suit them well. Additionally, this unit is time consuming and very student-centered. This unit is planned with rose-colored
glasses, knowing that many of these lessons would need a time adjustment and narrowing of scope to fit into most curriculum pacing sequences.
Additionally, this unit presumes that the classroom is 1:1 for laptops/tablets for student research purposes. The class webpage is often mentioned as

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the location for pre-selected resources. This webpage does not actually exist. I found some helpful websites as resources, but was not able to located
exactly all of the materials I would like for this unit. I am continuing to look for those materials, but many of them require institutional access (ex.
readers theater passages). Students will assemble a portfolio travel journal as they explore Ancient Mali that will be added to their work from
Ancient Greece and Rome.

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Standards Addressed by Unit (with subpoints if applicable - include only portions of standards being addressed in lesson)
(If your unit includes more than six lessons, only include the standards addressed by the six lessons below. Dont include standards that are only
addressed in lessons which arent included in this product.)

Social Studies:
- 3.2 The student will study the early West African empire of Mali by describing its government (kings), oral tradition (storytelling) and economic
development (trade).
- 3.4 The student will develop map skills by a) locating West Africa; b) describing the physical and human characteristics of West Africa c) explaining
how the people of West Africa adapted to and/or changed their environment to meet their needs.
- 3.7 The student will explain how producers in ancient Greece, Rome, and the West African empire of Mali used natural resources, human
resources, and capital resources in the production of goods and services.
- 3.8 The student will recognize that because people and regions cannot produce everything they want, they specialize in what they do best and
trade for the rest.
English:
- 3.1 The student will use effective communication skills in group activities. b) Ask and respond to questions from teachers and other group
members.
- 3.7 The student will demonstrate comprehension of information from a variety of print and electronic resources. a) Use encyclopedias and
other reference books, including online reference materials.
- 3.5 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional text and poetry. m) Read with fluency and accuracy

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Unit Learning Goals
Use these learning goal labels throughout lessons (e.g., lesson 4 might address K5, K6, K7, U2, D4, & D5).

Ks
The student will know
K1: Mali was a prosperous early West African empire in the 13th and 14th century.
K2: Salt was a valuable natural resource for food preservation and health, so it was traded for gold.
K3: The geographic location of Greece, Rome, Mali, Timbuktu, and the Sahara Desert on a map.
K4: In an empire, village chiefs and local governors report to the king.
K5: Griots served as teachers, musicians and historians, passing down Malian history through stories.
K6: Timbuktu was the center of trade in Ancient Mali
K7: Timbuktu contained a famous university with a large library of Greek and Roman books.
K8: Timbuktu is located along the Niger River between the Sahara Desert and the gold mines of West Africa.
K9: An empire is a large group of states and people of various ethnic origins united and ruled by an emperor or king.
K10: Mali, Ghana and Songhai were ancient African empires that collapsed due to military and economic weaknesses.
K11: Art and architecture were made from wood, ivory, bronze, straw, terracotta and gold because those were the natural resources available in West
Africa.
K12: Griots told stories about famous battle heroes, important events and morality.
K13: Griots served as historians, memorizing and retelling the important events and people of the village.
K14: Griots used musical instruments to entertain the village members.
K15: Greece is located on a peninsula, surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea with limited rich soil, so people were farmers, shipbuilders or traders.
K16: Rome is built on hills, located along the Tiber River, and had limited rich soil, so people were farmers, road builders or traders.
K17: Mali is located in West Africa near the Niger River, has grasslands and gold mines, so people were farmers, miners or traders.

Us
The student will understand THAT
U1: History originates in the past, applies to the present, and shapes the future
U2: The people shape their environment & the environment shapes the people.
U3: Cultures respond to development by creating tools and refining skills that help them thrive in their environment.
U4: History is not fact because it is shaped by perspective.

Ds
The student will be able to
D1: Construct an understanding of a civilization by looking at everyday life of its citizens
D2: Infer how location influences trade to understand the rise and fall of a countrys wealth
D3: Analyze a civilization through the lens of a citizen
D4: Infer how location influences trade to understand the rise and fall of a countrys wealth.
D5: Examine and draw conclusions from cultural artifacts.
D6: Identify patterns in the rise and fall of a countrys wealth and power.

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D7: Connect and compare present structures with historical counterparts.
D8: Explain how art reflects the environment and culture in which it was created.
D9: Identify the source of historical information in a civilization.
D10: Describe the influence of perspective on historical events.
D11: Interpret a story to extract the central theme.
D12: Connect the human characteristics to the physical characteristics of a place.
D13: Compare and contrast cultural development in different environments.

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Summative Assessment
Include a description of a culminating assessment for the unit, even if you dont include a lesson in the unit during which the teacher is explaining it or
students are working on it. Briefly describe the nature/format of the assessment and how it assesses student learning of the unit Us, as well as
essential knowledge and skills.

Students will assemble a portfolio of all of their work throughout the unit. They will receive 12 post-it notes that will be the summative assessment in
addition to the work in the portfolio. Students have demonstrated mastery of the Us throughout the unit, and have used the historical thinking skills to
complete their tasks along the way, which will be evident in the work in their portfoilios. For each of the four understanding, students will be
instructed to identify which piece of work best exemplifies their understanding of that U. They will write two sentences for each of those to explain
why they are the best representations AND how they demonstrate their understanding. They will also have five post-its notes for progress. They will
place those in spots where they enhanced their understanding, want to correct an error or developed a different perspective of a concept throughout
the unit. They will briefly explain how their thinking developed in those spots. Students will use one post-it note to identify the most challenging task or
information, explaining why it was difficult. With one post-it note, students will identify the piece of work they are most proud of for the effort that
they put into the task. They will briefly explain how they worked on that task and what they learned about their work habits. With the final post-it
note, students will identify the COMPLETE product that demonstrates their best product. They will briefly explain why they are most proud of that
product. Students will be assessed with a rubric for their products, processes, and reflection. Students will be assessed with an analytic rubric similar to
the one below.

Portfolios and Post-its
4 Identify which piece of work best exemplifies your understanding of each U for our unit. Write two sentences for each of
those to explain why they are the best representations AND how they demonstrate your understanding.
5 Place these in spots where you enhanced their understanding, want to correct an error or developed a different
perspective of a concept throughout the unit, and briefly explain how/why your thinking developed.
1 Identify the most challenging task or information, and explain why it was difficult.
1 Identify the piece of work you are proudest of for the effort that you put into the task. Briefly explain how you worked on
that task and what you learned about their your habits
1 Identify the COMPLETE product that demonstrates your best product. Briefly explain why you are proudest of that
product.

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Student Portfolio Rubric
Points
Required items

Concepts

Reflection/Critique

Overall Presentation
Items are clearly introduced,
well organized, and
creatively displayed, showing
connection between items.

Expert

All required items are


included, with a
significant number of
additions.

Items clearly demonstrate that the desired


learning outcomes for the term have been
achieved. The student has gained a significant
understanding of the concepts and
applications.

Reflections illustrate the


ability to effectively critique
work, and to suggest
constructive practical
alternatives.

Emerging
Expert

All required items are


included, with a few
additions.

Items clearly demonstrate most of the desired


learning outcomes for the term. The student
has gained a general understanding of the
concepts and applications.

Reflections illustrate the


Items are introduced and
ability to critique work, and well organized, showing
to suggest constructive
connection between items.
practical alternatives.

Proficient

All required items are


included.

Items demonstrate some of the desired


learning outcomes for the term. The student
has gained some understanding of the
concepts and attempts to apply them.

Reflections illustrate an
Items are introduced and
attempt to critique work,
somewhat organized,
and to suggest alternatives. showing some connection
between items.

Developing

A significant number of Items do not demonstrate basic learning


required items are
outcomes for the term. The student has
missing.
limited understanding of the concepts.

Reflections illustrate a
minimal ability to critique
work.

Items are not introduced and


lack organization.

No work submitted.

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ALIGNER: Differentiated Strategy Application Task # 1 TIERING

1. Lesson differentiated by readiness using the strategy of tiering.

2. Standard, with subpoints if applicable (include only portions of standard being addressed in lesson)
- 3.2 The student will study the early West African empire of Mali by describing its economic development (trade).
- 3.4 The student will develop map skills by a) locating West Africa; c) explaining how the people of West Africa adapted to and/or changed their
environment to meet their needs.
- 3.7 The student will explain how producers in ancient Greece, Rome, and the West African empire of Mali used natural resources. in the
production of goods and services.
- English: 3.5 The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of fictional text and poetry. m) Read with fluency and accuracy.
3. Learning goals. Dont exceed maximum #s listed. Delete learning goal labels (e.g., K5, D4) that arent needed if you have fewer KUDs.

Ks
The student will know (include 1-5 Ks)
Are your Ks

K1: Mali was a prosperous early West African empire in the 13th and 14th
1. Focused on facts that are truly essential, not just nice to know?

2. Aligned with the standard?
century.
3. Selected because the info will help the student unpack the Us?
K2: Salt was a valuable natural resource for food preservation and health, so it
4. Related to the Ds?
was traded for gold.
After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Ks and SELFK3: The geographic location of Greece, Rome, Mali, Timbuktu, and the Sahara
ASSESS. Dont delete any of these boxes.
Desert on a map.
K4: In an empire, village chiefs and local governors report to the king.
Are your Us
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Written as one complete sentence?


Focused on key concepts or big ideas?
s
Transferable, applying to multiple topics of studynot just the topic

of this lesson?

Timeless/enduring?
Written in the present tense with only common nouns?

After section
3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Us and SELF
ASSESS.



Do your
Ds
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Start with a powerful verb?


State a transferable skill, not a specific activity?
Focus on skills that are truly essential, not just nice to be able to do?
Include higher order thinking?
Each focus on just one assessable skill?
Align with standard but go beyond it to reflect key skills in discipline?
Reflect the tools students need to make meaning of the Us?

After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Ds and SELFASSESS.

U
Us
The student will understand THAT (include 1-2 Us)
U1: History originates in the past, applies to the present, and shapes the future.
U2: The people shape their environment & the environment shapes the people.



Ds
The student will be able to (include 1-4 Ds)
D1: Construct an understanding of a civilization by looking at everyday life of its
citizens
D2: Infer how location influences trade to understand the rise and fall of a countrys
wealth

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4. Targeted learning goal(s). Out of all the goals listed above, identify the goal(s) for which you expect there to be significant differences in student
readiness youll address in your lesson.
- D1: Construct an understanding of a civilization by looking at everyday life of its citizens

5. Preassessment. While this Strategy Application Task is just one lesson, it takes place within a larger unit. Usually, a preassessment is given at the
beginning of a unit to determine student readiness with a number of the unit KUDs. What question(s) would you ask on your unit preassessment
which would directly assess student readiness with your targeted learning goal(s) for this differentiated lesson?

1. Locate Mali, Timbuktu and the Sahara Dessert on a map (K3)
2. List two natural resources that were important to Mali (K2, U2)
3. Draw where those natural resources were found in West Africa (D2, K1)
4. What are three items that would be essential for a day in Ancient Mali? Explain their importance. (D1)

6. Readiness grouping. When you review students preassessments, you will look for patterns in the data which indicate that the students fall into
different groups based on their readiness with your targeted learning goal(s). Create 2 to 4 groups based on your anticipated data patterns. For
each group, (1) give it a name, which you wouldnt use with the students (e.g., higher readiness/moderate readiness/low readiness;
advanced/proficient/emerging), and (2) describe how the typical student in that group will (or wont) answer the preassessment question(s) listed
above.
Group 1: Advanced:
1) Roughly locate two or three places on the map
2) Identify gold and/or salt as important natural resources
3) Accurately locates salt in the Sahara Desert and Gold in West Africa
4) Includes water, gold or salt, an agricultural product, or donkey or camel AND explains how two or three of their items would be useful for
Malians.

Group 2: Proficient:
1) Roughly locates one of the three places on the map
2) Identify a natural resource of Mali (gold, salt, cotton, beans, peanuts, rice etc.)
3) Roughly locates salt in the Sahara Desert or Gold in West Africa
4) Includes water, gold or salt, an agricultural product, or donkey or camel, but does NOT provide an explanation of why their items would be
useful for Malians.


Group 3: Emerging:
1) Cannot roughly locate any of the three places on the map
2) Does not identify a natural resource or Identifies a natural resource that Mali did not have

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3) Does not locate salt in the Sahara Desert or Gold in West Africa
4) Does not list relevant or useful items for a Malian.

7. Tiered task. Give a brief explanation (one to two sentences) of the learning activity students will do in this lesson. Then, explain each of the
different tiers or versions of the task which the different readiness groups described above will do. Make tier 1 the task for the highest readiness
group. Differences among the tiers must reflect differences in students readiness with the targeted learning goal(s). Consult the Equalizer for ideas.

Activity explanation: Here today, gone to Mali A Day in the Life of a Malian Before students begin this activity, show the whole class a variety of
pictures from Mali. These pictures should include: The Sahara Desert, ancient temples, people carrying items on their head, the Nile river, natural
resources, etc. Briefly note important features of the photos that direct students to think about the geography, climate, economics and
government of Mali. Divide students into three groups, giving all groups the following a bag with the following materials: a small bucket of water,
small stool, cotton, birdseed, a piece of gold jewelry and a salt shaker. Instruct students to be detectives to determine what function these items
served in Ancient Mali. Students will check their conclusions with the teacher. African folktales often transform everyday activities into learning
opportunities. They are often closely related to everyday experiences of the people. All groups will use their items to perform a readers theaterstyle African folktale in a whole class setting. Whole-class we will discuss the significance of the items in the context of the folktales.

Tier 1 description: Advanced: These students receive the bag of materials plus a right-handed glove and a scarf. The right-handed glove is symbolic
of an important trading practice. The scarf is a more complex element of how Malians carried items on their head. Their instruction sheet tells
them that they must deduce why these items were important in the everyday life of a Malian person. They will make two columns in their travel
notebook. On the left side, they will predict why the item was meaningful. Then, they will can consult classroom books, textbooks and online
resources to investigate the meaning of the items. On the right side, they will record the significance of the items in Malian culture in any form
they choose (drawings, photos, sentences, etc.). After they have deduced the significance of those items, they will use them to practice an African
Folktale in readers theater style. This group will receive the most abstract folktale. Students will be encouraged to think back to the read-aloud in
Language Arts of Sundiata: Lion King of Mali by David Wisniewski.

Tier 2 description: Proficient: These students receive the basic bag of materials. Their instruction sheet tells them that they must deduce why these
items were important in the everyday life of a Malian person. They will make two columns in their travel notebook. On the left side, they will be
provided with section headings. They will place each item under a section heading, and make predictions about how each item was used in Ancient
Mali. Then, they will can consult a set of pre-selected articles, photos and online videos to understand the significance of these items. On the right
side, they will record the significance of the items in Malian culture in any form they choose (drawings, photos, sentences, etc.). After they have
deduced the significance of those items, they will use them to practice an African Folktale in readers theater style. This group will receive an
African folktale that focuses on themes that are more concrete and relatable. Students will be encouraged to think back to the read-aloud in
Language Arts of Sundiata: Lion King of Mali by David Wisniewski.

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Tier 3 description: Emerging: These students receive the basic bag of materials. Their instruction sheet tells them that they must deduce why these
items were important in the everyday life of a Malian person. They will also have an outline to glue in their notebook that includes guiding
questions for each item. They will make two columns in their travel notebook. On the left side, they will have section headings, and they will
answer a series of guiding questions to make predictions about how each item was used in Ancient Mali. Then, they will can consult a set of preselected articles, photos and online videos to understand the significance of these items. On the right side, they will record the significance of the
items in Malian culture in any form they choose (drawings, photos, sentences, etc.). After they have deduced the significance of those items, they
will use them to practice an African Folktale in readers theater style. This group will receive Mansa Musa: The Lion of Mali by Khephra Burns to use
for their readers theater performance. They will receive the book, which provides picture support, and scripts for performance. Students will be
encouraged to think back to the read-aloud in Language Arts of Sundiata: Lion King of Mali by David Wisniewski.

8. Alignment reflection.
Explain in one sentence how the tiered task responds directly to anticipated differences in student readiness with your targeted learning goal(s).
All students are able to interact with everyday elements of Malian life, but the tasks differ in the amount of support provided to understand the
significance of those items in the form of guiding questions and section headings.

Explain in one sentence how the tiered task aligns with your other (non-targeted) Ks (if applicable).
As students research the significance of the everyday items, they will encounter the role that gold and salt played in Malian trade, which
culminated in the trade center of Timbuktu between the gold mines of Mali and the salt of the Sahara Desert.

Explain in one sentence how the tiered task aligns with your other (non-targeted) Us (if applicable).
Students will interact with U2 as they investigate the abundance of certain natural resources (salt, millet) and the shortage of other resources
(wood) in Mali. Students will interact with U1 as they research Ancient Mali, which will be a larger piece of the puzzle of their study of ancient
civilizations.

Explain in one sentence how the tiered task aligns with your other (non-targeted) Ds (if applicable).
Students will be investigating D2 as they examine the natural resources that they receive in their supply bags. This will begin to form their
understanding of the centrality of trade and natural resources of Mali, allowing them to form a foundation from which to understand how those
resources and trade routes were then usurped by Europeans.

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ALIGNER: Differentiated Strategy Application Task #__2__

1. Lesson differentiated primarily by learning profile using the strategy __RAFT____.

2. Standard, with subpoints if applicable (include only portions of standard being addressed in lesson)

- 3.2 The student will study the early West African empire of Mali by describing its oral tradition (storytelling), government (kings), and
economic development (trade).
3. Learning Goals. Dont exceed maximum #s listed. Delete learning goal labels (e.g., K5, D4) that arent needed if you have fewer KUDs.
Ks
Are your
Ks
The student will know (include 1-5 Ks)

5. Focused on facts that are truly essential, not just nice to know?
K1: The empire of Mali was a prosperous West African empire in the 13th
6. Aligned with the standard?

and 14th century.
7. Selected because the info will help the student unpack the Us?

K4: In an empire, village chiefs and local governors report to the king.
8. Related to the Ds?

K5: Griots served as teachers, musicians and historians, passing down
After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Ks and SELF
Malian history through stories.
ASSESS. Dont delete any of these boxes.

K2: Salt was a valuable natural resource for food preservation and health,
Are your Us

so it was traded for gold.
6. Written as one complete sentence?

7. Focused on key concepts or big ideas?
D
8. Transferable, applying to multiple topics of studynot just the topic

of this lesson?
Us
The student will understand THAT (include 1-2 Us)

9. Timeless/enduring?
U1: History originates in the past, applies to the present, and shapes the


10. Written in the present tense with only common nouns?
future.
After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Us and SELFU2: The people shape their environment & the environment shapes the
ASSESS.
people.
Do your Ds
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

Start with a powerful verb?


State a transferable skill, not a specific activity?
Focus on skills that are truly essential, not just nice to be able to do?
Include higher order thinking?
Each focus on just one assessable skill?
Align with standard but go beyond it to reflect key skills in discipline?
Reflect the tools students need to make meaning of the Us?

After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Ds and SELFASSESS.

Ds
The student will be able to (include 1-4 Ds)
D3: Analyze a civilization through the lens of a citizen

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4. Preassessment. Delete preassessment instructions which dont apply to this lesson.
Learning profile lesson: Students will choose a row on the RAFT assignment. They will rank their preferences from 1 -8, indicating their
most preferred to least preferred (see directions on RAFT sheet for more details about assignments and groupings). There are a variety
of formats that appeal to many different strengths. Students that are more visually inclined may choose the travel advisor or the young
men strip. However, students that like a more concrete approach to learning can choose the elderly men or the people with problems.
The treasurer strip may appeal to students that find numbers more sensible and easy to approach. The students that think more
abstractly and artistically may choose the Griot or the drummer strip. This RAFT provides numerous formats that would appeal to many
types of students. However, students also always have the option of creating their own strip to suit their learning needs.

5. Differentiated Learning Activity. Give an overview of the learning activity the class will do in this lesson, and then explain the different
tasks students may complete. Include descriptions of the actual tasks or options students will be assigned or choose from (i.e., include
the RAFT strips, contract options, 3 Sternberg task prompts, etc.). The differences among the tasks/options must directly reflect
anticipated differences in students readiness, interest, or learning profile.

See attached for RAFT options. Students will assume the role of a member of a village meeting. There will be a maximum of three
students for each strip because students will simulate a village meeting based on what they learned in the RAFT assignment.

6. Differentiated Activity Reflection. Explain in one sentence how the activity responds directly to anticipated differences in student
readiness, interest, or learning profile.

The RAFT menu allows students to choose from a number of artistic, numerical, analytical and philosophical opportunities to express
their thinking through the perspective of a village meeting attendee.


7. Alignment Reflection. Delete learning goal labels (e.g., K5, D4) that arent needed if you have fewer KUDs.
Explain how the task has students working with each of the Ks.
K1: In their role as village members, students will interact with the local level of an empire structure of government. They will also fill in
an approximate date on their village meeting agenda.
K2: Students will interact with this concept as they conduct their village meeting simulation. See Kings visit section.
K3: Several of the resources students use to research their role and topic will be stories that were passed down by griots. Additionally,
griot shares in village meeting, which students record on their village meeting agenda.
K4: A majority of the roles specifically require students to think about the gold-state trade. Additionally, the gold-salt trade will certainly
be a topic of conversation at the village meeting simulation.

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Explain how the task has students making deep meaning of each of the Us.
U1: Either the format or the topic of each strip encourages students to think about a present-day application of themes or ideas from
Ancient Mali. This combination supports students in thinking about how historical concepts transcend time.
U2: As each student investigates their role, they will encounter how the salt mines of the Sahara Desert, gold mines of West Africa, the
water of the Niger River or the deforestation of African jungles influenced their daily life. Students also address this in the over-arching
question guiding their RAFT assignment. They explicitly answer it at the end of the village meeting.

Explain how the task has students practicing/using each of the Ds.
D1: Each role requires the student to assume the role of a person in Mali. Through their role, they will investigate their responsibilities in
the community, and will apply that knowledge in the village meeting. Through this perspective-taking and collaborative meeting,
students will see how each piece of daily life culminates to create a village that functions as a semi-independent subsidiary of the king in
an empire.

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Role

Audience

Format (Consult teacher if Topic


you need a template)

Village Chief

King Mansa Musa

Meeting Minutes

The State of the Union

Drummer

Villagers

Song lyrics (your own


original or rewrite the
lyrics to a popular song)

Meeting time, location and


topics

Salt, wood, water, gold,


scarcity, desert, camel,
trade

Treasurer

Village Chief & King


Mansa Musa

Record of fines and taxes

TimbukTWO

Camel, gold, salt, trade,


empire

Griot

Generations to come

Proverb

Here today, Gone to Mali

Griot, desert, trade

Elderly Men

Village Chief

Advice Column

Shortage of resources

Salt, wood, water, scarcity,


desert

Young Men

People not present at the


meeting

Painting or drawing

A picture is worth a
thousand words

Salt, wood, water, scarcity,


desert

People with problems

Village Chief

Detailed list

Grievances, concerns and


problems of daily life

Salt, wood, water, scarcity,


desert

Travel Advisor

Camels of the King

Map and Directions

Dont desert me out here


all alone!

Camels, gold, Timbuktu,


desert

Create your own

Talk to the teacher to


suggest your own strip!

Vocabulary (must include


in product in words or
graphics)
Gold, salt, water, king,
empire

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Directions:

(Students will rank preferences as part of their unpacking and getting ready for the day. Students who do not complete the ranking will be
placed in an appropriate strip based on the teachers knowledge of the students interests and passions.)
Monday: Rank these strips from 1 8, where 1 is the strip that you would most like to complete and 8 is the strip you would least like to
complete. You should especially consider which format and topic best align with your interests and skills. Only three people will complete each
strip, so you may not ultimately completely your first choice. However, you will experience all of these topics and roles on Tuesday when we
conduct a village meeting as a class.
(Teacher will prepare websites that can help students find accurate information on the class web page. Additionally, the teacher will ask the
librarian to gather content-specific books before the Mali unit begins.)
Tuesday: On your desk, you will find a RAFT strip to complete based on your preferences from yesterday. As you complete your strip, use the
books in our classroom or the websites on our class page to find key information. If you do not find adequate information there, consult the
teacher about finding additional resources. However, you should not spend the overwhelming majority of your time researching. As you
examine resources and create your product, keep in mind that we will gather in three groups to conduct a village meeting. You will perform the
same role as you investigate in your RAFT strip. Below, you will find the village meeting agenda. Add notes to the village meeting agenda as you
encounter information or formulate ideas that will be important for the whole group. Additionally, you should consider the following questions
as you complete your strip and participate in the village meeting: How does the environment shape your role? How does your role shape the
environment?
(The will be one expert for each group who has reviewed the directions with the teacher and understands them well. This person will serve as
the resource for their peers. The teacher will provide support as needed for students who seem to be struggling to move from information to
application in the village meeting.)
(Teacher will review expectations for group discussions. Teacher will set a timer for 15 minutes for the village meeting. One person that fulfilled
each role will be in each village meeting group. The teacher will organize groups to include a few students with strong leadership skills and
ability to focus the group in each meeting group.)
Wednesday: Each of you will serve an important role during the Village Meeting. You have an agenda below to guide your meeting. Continue to
consider how your role shapes the environment and how the environment shapes your role. There are several blank spaces on your meeting
agenda. You should fill in those blanks as you participate in the meeting. At the conclusion of your meeting, you should answer both of the
guiding questions based on your research, RAFT strip product, and participation in the village meeting.

17

Village Meeting
Approximate Date: ________________ (years of the Malian Empire)
I. Call to order drummer
II. Sharing of Wisdom ____________
III. Chiefs Report
IV. Meeting Minutes of the Previous Meeting
V. Treasurers Report
VI. Taxes and Fines Due
VII. Presentation of Concerns
a) Health Concerns need more ___________
b) Scarcity of ___________
c) Distance to obtain ______________
VIII. Response from elders
a) Solution for health concerns trade _________ for ____________
b) Tips and tricks to reduce use of ________
c)
d) Conserving ______________
e)
IX. Discussion of King __________________s upcoming visit
X. Important updates ______________ _______________
XI. Travel advisors
XII. King will travel by _____________ because
___________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________.
XIII. Adjournment Young Men sell their paintings as villagers exit the meeting & return home.

18

** Everyone: Write two sentences to answer: How does the environment shape your role? How does
your role shape the environment?
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction


Name:__Courtney Goodloe____

ALIGNER: Differentiated Strategy Application Task #____



1. Lesson differentiated primarily by learning profile using the strategy ____Sternberg____.

2. Standard, with subpoints if applicable (include only portions of standard being addressed in lesson)
- 3.2 The student will study the early West African empire of Mali by describing its.. economic development (trade).
- 3.7 The student will explain how producers in ancient Greece, Rome, and the West African empire of Mali used natural resources, human
resources, and capital resources in the production of goods and services.
- 3.8 The student will recognize that because people and regions cannot produce everything they want, they specialize in what they do best and
trade for the rest.
3. Learning Goals. Dont exceed maximum #s listed. Delete learning goal labels (e.g., K5, D4) that arent needed if you have fewer KUDs.

Ks
The student will know (include 1-5 Ks)
Are your Ks

K6: Timbuktu was the center of trade in Ancient Mali
9. Focused on facts that are truly essential, not just nice to know?

K7: Timbuktu contained a famous university with a large library of
10. Aligned with the standard?

Greek and Roman books.
11. Selected because the info will help the student unpack the Us?

12. Related to the Ds?
K8: Timbuktu is located along the Niger River between the Sahara
Ks and SELFAfter section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your
Desert and the gold mines of West Africa.
ASSESS. Dont delete any of these boxes.



Are your Us

Us
The student will understand THAT (include 1-2 Us)
11. Written as one complete sentence?


U1: History originates in the past, applies to the present, and shapes
12. Focused on key concepts or big ideas?
13. Transferable, applying to multiple topics of studynot just the topic
the future
of this lesson?
U2: The people shape their environment & the environment shapes
14. Timeless/enduring?
the people.
15. Written in the present tense with only common nouns?

After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Us and SELFASSESS.

Do your Ds
15. Start with a powerful verb?
16. State a transferable skill, not a specific activity?
17. Focus on skills that are truly essential, not just nice to be able to do?
18. Include higher order thinking?
19. Each focus on just one assessable skill?
20. Align with standard but go beyond it to reflect key skills in discipline?
21. Reflect the tools students need to make meaning of the Us?
After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Ds and SELFASSESS.

Ds
The student will be able to (include 1-4 Ds)
D2: Infer how location influences trade to understand the rise and
fall of a countrys wealth.
D5: Examine and draw conclusions from cultural artifacts.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:__Courtney Goodloe____


4. Preassessment.

Learning profile lesson: Students will choose either practical, analytical or creative in the Sternberg format. They will choose the option that
they believe will be the most engaging and purposeful use of their time.

5. Differentiated Learning Activity.
Before the assignment, the whole class will brainstorm key locations in major cities. The teacher will ask the students to list important
structures and places in their city. As a whole class, they will list, group and label the different places. Then, students will begin their Sternberg
task. Students can choose between the three Sternberg task prompts. They will use pre-selected resources to find the information for their
task. They will have the option to work in small groups or alone to find the information necessary for their task based on the task they select.
There will be books available at a variety of reading levels as information sources. Additionally, students will be able to access a number of
reliable website at varying readiness levels through the class webpage.

6. Differentiated Activity Reflection.
Each row appeals to a different learning profile based on Sternbergs tri-mind theory, allowing students to approach Timbuktu from the
perspective that is most appealing to their strengths.

7. Alignment Reflection.
Explain how the task has students working with each of the Ks.
K1: Students will interact with this K as they represent their location for trade in their product.
K2: Students will interact with this K as they represent their location for study in their product.
K3: Each of the tasks asks students to consider how the location of Timbuktu contributed to its development.

Explain how the task has students making deep meaning of each of the Us.
U1: In creative and practical, students interact with this U in their arrow diagram. In the analytical task, students will interact with this U in
their Venn Diagram. All three groups will trace the development of Timbuktu from the past to present day, and predict how it may continue to
change in the future. They also address this in the question of does history repeat itself?.
U2: The library and trading centers (locations that students are all required to include in their product) are reflective of the geographic location
of Timbuktu and Mali. Therefore, students will be examining how available natural resources and geography influenced the growth and
importance of Timbuktu.

Explain how the task has students practicing/using each of the Ds.
D1: As students trace the development of Timbuktu, they see how its location was far more important in the past than it is presently due to
advanced travel and trade processes.
D2: All students are required to use cultural artifacts in gathering information and creating their product (see directions).

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:__Courtney Goodloe____

Directions
Choose the creative, practical or analytical task below that most appeals to you. As you create your product,
you must cite 3 cultural artifacts as evidence or information. See the class website for resources (video clips,
audio clips, pictures of cultural artifacts, and detailed explanations).
Creative

Create a visual
representation
of the ancient
city of
Timbuktu in
the 13th
century.

1. Your representation should include the historically accurate locations to socialize, trade and study. The visual
representation should include a minimum of 3 important places. You should also include relevant geographic
features that contributed to the importance of Timbuktu. Give your visual representation a catchy, but relevant
title. Be sure to label each major building or include a key.

2. Choose a current map of Timbuktu to compare to your ancient representation of it. Complete the arrows
diagram explaining (in one or two sentences for each arrow) the function of Timbuktu in Ancient Mali, now, and
predict any changes that will occur 100 years in the future. After you complete this, in one sentence, answer the
following question: Does history repeat itself?

Practical

Design a route
and prepare
the
information
for a historical
tour of
Timbuktu.

1. Map out a route in Timbuktu that allows tourists to see the most important locations of ANCIENT Timbuktu.
Create a brochure (self-guided tour) or a talking guide (tour-guided tour) for visitors to understand the historical
and economic significance of Timbuktu. You should also include relevant geographic features that contributed
to the importance of Timbuktu. You should include locations that were used for studying, trading and socialize.
The tour group should stop at a minimum of 3 locations.

2. Find an ancient map of Timbuktu. Consider the map of Ancient Timbuktu, your tour route in present day
Timbuktu, and Timbuktu 100 years in the future. Complete the arrow diagram explaining (in one or two
sentences for each arrow) how your route would differ in the 13th century, now, and in the year 2116. After you
complete this, in one sentence, answer the following question: Does history repeat itself?

Analytical

Compare and
contrast 13th
century
Timbuktu,
present day
Timbuktu, and
future

1. List and describe three historically important locations in 13th century Timbuktu. You should include places to
socialize, study and trade. In two sentences explain how the geographic location of Timbuktu influenced the
importance of it.

2. Use a Venn Diagram or any other graphic organizer to show the similarities and differences in the three time
periods for Timbuktu. On the future Timbuktu circle, be sure to justify your predictions about how Timbuktu will
continue to change. You should choose a minimum of three key locations (places to socialize, study and trade)

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:__Courtney Goodloe____

Timbuktu.
from which you can make SPECIFIC statements about similarities and differences from past, present and future.
After you complete this, in one sentence, answer the following question: Does history repeat itself?

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




NAME __________________________________

Name:__Courtney Goodloe____

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction



Name _________________

Name:__Courtney Goodloe____

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction


Name:____Courtney Goodloe__

ALIGNER: Differentiated Strategy Application Task #_3___



1. Lesson differentiated primarily by interest using the strategy __contract______________.

2. Standard, with subpoints if applicable (include only portions of standard being addressed in lesson)
- Social studies: 3.2 The student will study the early West African empire of Mali by describing its oral tradition (storytelling), government (kings),
and economic development (trade).
- Social Studies: 3.4 The student will develop map skills by b) describing the physical and human characteristics of West Africa c) explaining how the
people of West Africa adapted to and/or changed their environment to meet their needs.
- English: 3.7 The student will demonstrate comprehension of information from a variety of print and electronic resources. a) Use encyclopedias
and other reference books, including online reference materials.
3. Learning Goals. Dont exceed maximum #s listed. Delete learning goal labels (e.g., K5, D4) that arent needed if you have fewer KUDs.

Ks
The student will know (include 1-5 Ks)
Are your Ks

13. Focused on facts that are truly essential, not just nice to know?
K9: An empire is a large group of states and people of various ethnic

14. Aligned with the standard?
origins united and ruled by an emperor or king.

15. Selected because the info will help the student unpack the Us?
K10: Mali, Ghana and Songhai were ancient African empires that

16. Related to the Ds?
collapsed due to military and economic weaknesses.
Ks and SELFAfter section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your
K11: Art and architecture were made from wood, ivory, bronze,
ASSESS. Dont delete any of these boxes.

straw, terracotta and gold because those were the natural resources

Are your Us
available in West Africa.

16. Written as one complete sentence?
K17: Mali is located in West Africa near the Niger River, has

17. Focused on key concepts or big ideas?
grasslands and gold mines, so people were farmers, miners or
18. Transferable, applying to multiple topics of studynot just the topic

traders.
of this lesson?



19. Timeless/enduring?
Us
The student will understand THAT (include 1-2 Us)
20. Written in the present tense with only common nouns?
U1: History originates in the past, applies to the present, and shapes
After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Us and SELFASSESS.
the future
Do your Ds
U2: The people shape their environment & the environment shapes
22. Start with a powerful verb?
the people.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.

State a transferable skill, not a specific activity?


Focus on skills that are truly essential, not just nice to be able to do?
Include higher order thinking?
Each focus on just one assessable skill?
Align with standard but go beyond it to reflect key skills in discipline?
Reflect the tools students need to make meaning of the Us?

After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Ds and SELFASSESS.

Ds
The student will be able to (include 1-4 Ds)
D6: Identify patterns in the rise and fall of a countrys wealth and power.
D7: Connect and compare present structures with historical counterparts.
D8: Explain how art reflects the environment and culture in which it was
created.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:____Courtney Goodloe__


4. Preassessment. Delete preassessment instructions which dont apply to this lesson.
Interest lesson: Students will choose one option from each row of the learning contract. In addition, they will answer each guiding question in
two sentences or less in their travel notebook. They will be provided with a variety of helpful sources (books, websites, videos, etc.) that they
can use to research their topic. However, students are also free to find their own resources.

5. Differentiated Learning Activity.

Students will be given the learning contract on the day prior to the actual lesson. On that day, they will select which box from each row they
want to complete. There are brief directions in the far left column for each set of tasks. On the far left column there is also a time suggestion
and a time spent blank. This serves two purposes. First, it gives students a framework to use when deciding how to spend their time. However,
there is also a time spent blank so that students can self-monitor how much time they spend. This also provides the teacher with insight on
topics that were especially challenging or interesting for students. For example, if the teacher notices that a student spent double the time on
the art row than the geography row, she could follow up with that student and examine why the student dedicated more time. In the middle
three columns, students choose one of the three boxes. On the far right column there is a guiding question. This serves to ensure that all
students are doing the Ds and grappling with the Us.

6. Differentiated Activity Reflection.
In each row, students can choose either a topic or format that interests them to investigate the economics, geography and art of Mali.

7. Alignment Reflection.
Explain how the task has students working with each of the Ks.
K1: An empire is a large group of states and people of various ethnic origins united and ruled by an emperor or king. (Students work with this in
the first row as they explore three different empires.)
K2: Mali, Ghana and Songhai were ancient African empires that collapsed due to military and economic weaknesses. (Students work with this
in the first row as well as they look at the low points of the three empires.)
K3: Art and architecture were made from wood, ivory, straw, bronze, terracotta and gold because those were the natural resources available in
West Africa. (Students interact with this in the second row as they choose a form of art to explore and answer the guiding question, which links
art to the resources available in the area.)
K4: The physical characteristics of Mali are grasslands, rivers and gold mines. (All students will interact with this basic information as they
create their map for row three, but each student will investigate on of those human characteristics more deeply for their third row. All three
are interrelated in the function of Malis economy so they will also interact with them in the first row.)

Explain how the task has students making deep meaning of each of the Us.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:____Courtney Goodloe__

U1: History originates in the past, applies to the present, and shapes the future. (Students will interact with this in the guiding question for row
1 and row 3. In row 1 they will think about how past patterns of economics could present in the future. In row 3, they will think about how past
structures are similar to present structures in society.)
U2: The people shape their environment & the environment shapes the people. (Students will interact with this in the guiding questions for
rows 1 and 2. In row 1s guiding question, they will see how plentiful natural resources shape the economies of people. In row 2, they will see
how natural resources are integrated in the art and architecture of a culture.)

Explain how the task has students practicing/using each of the Ds.
D1: Identify patterns in the rise and fall of a countrys wealth and power. (Students will engage in this skill in row 1 as they identify the high and
low points of ancient empire economies.)
D2: Connect and compare present structures with historical counterparts. (In row 3, students will answer the guiding question that links a
historical center of trade and natural resources to present day locations that serve similar purposes.)
D3: Explain how art reflects the environment and culture in which it was created. (In row 2 guiding question, students will connect how natural
resources are evident the art and architecture are related to the natural resources and physical characteristics of a place.)

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:____Courtney Goodloe__

Topic:
Ancient Mali Learning Contract: Choose one item from each row. Be sure to explicitly Guiding Question:
answer the guiding question in two sentences or less for each row.
Investigate the rise and fall of
Lifelines
the empires of Mali, Ghana and
Songhai

Time suggestion: 30 minutes

Time spent:

Cause and Effect


Venn Diagram

Imagine youre in the


year 2400. The United
States is now one of
the poorest countries
in the world. What do
you think caused this
change in economic
status?

Find pictures of 2 pieces of


Ancient African Art

Time suggestion: 15 minutes

Time spent:

Sculpture/ Masks/ Jewelry Pottery/ Utensils/ Furniture

Architecture

How do these artifacts


reflect the environment
and culture in which
they were created?

Collect photos, maps or


drawings of one of the
following places.

Note: You should locate all
three of these places on your
map, but you only need to
investigate

Times suggestion: 15 minutes

Time spent:

The Niger River

Djenne City

Consider the
importance of each of
these places in Ancient
Mali. Did they aid in
transportation,
facilitate trade or
provide valuable
natural resources?
What is a modern-day
location that would
serve the same
purpose? Explain.

The Sahara Desert

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Resources for row 1:
http://www.ducksters.com/history/africa/empire_of_ancient_mali.php
http://www.ducksters.com/history/africa/empire_of_ancient_ghana.php
http://www.ducksters.com/history/africa/songhai_empire.php
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jvnU0v6hcUo
http://www.learner.org/interactives/collapse/mali.html
http://yourhistoryteacher.com/Textbook/CJ6_164-169.pdf
http://webusers.xula.edu/jrotondo/Kingdoms/welcome.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/africa/features/storyofafrica/
Resources for row 2:
http://www.ducksters.com/history/africa/ancient_african_art.php
http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/mud-masons-of-mali
www.siris.si.edu
http://sirismm.si.edu/siris/eepa/mali/index.html
http://www.teachertube.com/video/ancient-african-culture-184136
Resources for row 3:
http://www.our-africa.org/mali
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ml.html
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/gh.html
http://www.sacredsites.com/africa/djenne.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tR1dgJ8Gnvs

Name:____Courtney Goodloe__

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction


Name:___Courtney Goodloe__

ALIGNER: Differentiated Strategy Application Task #____



9. Lesson differentiated primarily by learning profile using the strategy: Sternberg.

10. Standard, with subpoints if applicable (include only portions of standard being addressed in lesson)
Social Studies: 3.2 The student will study the early West African empire of Mali by describing its oral tradition (storytelling).
English: 3.1 The student will use effective communication skills in group activities. b) Ask and respond to questions from teachers and other group
members.
11. Learning Goals.


Are your Ks
Ks
The student will know (include 1-5 Ks)

17. Focused on facts that are truly essential, not just nice to know?
K12: Griots told stories about famous battle heroes, important events and
18. Aligned with the standard?
morality.
19. Selected because the info will help the student unpack the Us?

K13: Griots served as historians, memorizing and retelling the important events
20. Related to the Ds?

After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Ks and SELFASSESS. Dont delete any of these boxes.

Are your Us
21. Written as one complete sentence?
22. Focused on key concepts or big ideas?
23. Transferable, applying to multiple topics of studynot just the topic
of this lesson?
24. Timeless/enduring?
25. Written in the present tense with only common nouns?

and people of the village.


K14: Griots used musical instruments to entertain the village members.

Us
The student will understand THAT (include 1-2 Us)
U1: History originates in the past, applies to the present, and shapes the
future.
U4: History is not fact because it is shaped by perspective.

After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Us and SELFASSESS.

Do your Ds
29. Start with a powerful verb?
30. State a transferable skill, not a specific activity?
31. Focus on skills that are truly essential, not just nice to be able to do?
32. Include higher order thinking?
33. Each focus on just one assessable skill?
34. Align with standard but go beyond it to reflect key skills in discipline?
35. Reflect the tools students need to make meaning of the Us?
After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Ds and SELFASSESS.

Ds
The student will be able to (include 1-4 Ds)
D9: Identify the source of historical information in a civilization.
D10: Describe the influence of perspective on historical events.
D11: Interpret a story to extract the central theme.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:___Courtney Goodloe__


12. Preassessment.
Learning profile lesson: Students will choose the analytical, practical or creative task from the Sternberg options presented to them. They will
be encouraged to choose a task that they will be passionate about and interested in completing.

13. Differentiated Learning Activity.
This will be the second to last lesson in their unit on Ancient Mali, so students have some familiarity with the Griot from their Village Meeting
lesson. There is a considerable amount of independent research in this unit, so many students have also encountered information about the
Griots prior to this lesson. Students will rank the three tasks in order of preference from 1 3 prior to this lesson. Students will be divided
equally and grouped based on their preference (creative, practical and analytical group). Each group will complete their task in preparation for
a presentation to their parents. They will receive the entire Sternberg so that they can consider the other groups as they create their portion of
the performance. All three groups have the same required elements to ensure that they are all grappling with the same KUDs in their task.
Students will use pre-selected books and internet resources on the class webpage to find the information and resources needed for their
presentations. Halfway through their work time, the whole class will meet to discuss the content of each groups presentation. This will serve
to ensure that all groups are on track to complete their task. The teacher will especially check-in with the creative group on timing because
they tend to spend a lot of time in the germination period. Additionally, it will allow students to consider the flow of the presentation, and
remove any overlapping content/examples. Each group will nominate one person to explain their progress and listen to feedback from their
peers about overlapping content or suggestions. At the end, the students will meet together to rehearse their performance twice the day
before the parent performance. Students will be given three African proverbs (http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/06/africa/gallery/11-inspiringafrican-proverbs/). They will choose one to interpret and individually answer the question, How can I apply the theme of an Ancient Malian
proverb to my life? in two sentences as an exit slip.

14. Differentiated Activity Reflection. Explain in one sentence how the activity responds directly to anticipated differences in student readiness,
interest, or learning profile.

This activity allows students to choose between three different forms of expression (creative, practical and analytical) to explore the three
roles of Griots in Ancient Mali.

15. Alignment Reflection.
Explain how the task has students working with each of the Ks.
K1, K2, K3: Students are required to use specific vocabulary in their presentation that will lead them to consider all of these functions of Griots.

This is why the required elements are the same for all three groups.

Explain how the task has students making deep meaning of each of the Us.
U1: Students grapple with this applying the timeless themes of Ancient Malian proverbs to their life in their exit slip.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:___Courtney Goodloe__

U2: Students are required to use the word perspective in their final product, which is highlighted in several of the resources that students will
be given. They also address this question in their guiding question response during the task.

Explain how the task has students practicing/using each of the Ds.
D1: Students will examine historical information from Griots, who are the historians of Ancient Mali, in their task because they are required to
incorporate the word historian in their product.
D2: Students do this as consider the roles of Griots, and then answer the guiding question.
D3: Students practice identifying theme in their exit slip by interpreting Malian proverbs.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:___Courtney Goodloe__

Name: ____________________________________________ Group: ___________________________________
Sternberg: Choose the option that you think will allow you to use your strengths and best demonstrate your understanding.
Group Task
Creative Create a set of short performances
that exemplifies the three main
roles of a Griot (historian, musician,
storyteller).

Analytical Assemble a PowerPoint detailing


Griots role in Mali to teach your
parents about them. You should
include pictures and information.

Practical Find three or more primary sources


about Griots. These could be sound
clips, videos, musical instruments,
or story transcripts. Be able to
present and explain what these
primary sources tell you about
Griots and Ancient Malian history.

Required elements

Parent Performance Details



1. Vocabulary: historian, storyteller,
morals, battle heroes, events,
musician, entertainer, perspective
2. Comparison to the historical
records of another ancient
civilization (think Greece, Rome,
China).
3. Response to guiding question:
How does perspective of the Griot
influence the facts of Malian
history? Consider how the form
(oral storytelling) influenced
function (history).

15 minutes You will be the third


presenters in our performance. Your
representation should entertain the
crowd as they EXPERIENCE the
various roles of a Griot.
15 minutes You will be the first
presenters in our performance. You
should introduce the topic so that
the parents will understand what
your classmates are doing.
15 minutes You will be the second
presenters in our performance. Your
explanation of Griots should center
around SPECIFIC examples (think
primary sources) that EXEMPLIFY
important elements of Ancient
Malian history.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction


Name:__Courtney Goodloe_____

ALIGNER: Differentiated Strategy Application Task #__5__



16. Lesson differentiated primarily by interest using the strategy ____RAFT____________.

17. Standard, with subpoints if applicable (include only portions of standard being addressed in lesson)
- 3.4 The student will develop map skills by: a) locating Greece, Rome and West Africa b) describe the human characteristics of Greece, Rome
and West Africa

18. Learning Goals. Dont exceed maximum #s listed. Delete learning goal labels (e.g., K5, D4) that arent needed if you have fewer KUDs.

Are your
Ks

Ks
The student will know (include 1-5 Ks)
21. Focused on facts that are truly essential, not just nice to know?

K15: Greece is located on a peninsula, surrounded by the
22. Aligned with the standard?

Mediterranean Sea with limited rich soil, so people were farmers,
23. Selected because the info will help the student unpack the Us?

shipbuilders or traders.
24. Related to the Ds?

K16: Rome is built on hills, located along the Tiber River, and had
After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Ks and SELF

limited rich soil, so people were farmers, road builders or traders.
ASSESS. Dont delete any of these boxes.
K17: Mali is located in West Africa near the Niger River, has
grasslands and gold mines, so people were farmers, miners or
traders.
Are your Us
K3: The geographic location of Greece, Rome, Mali, Timbuktu, and
26. Written as one complete sentence?
the Sahara Desert on a map.
27. Focused on key concepts or big ideas?

28. Transferable, applying to multiple topics of studynot just the topic
Us
The student will understand THAT (include 1-2 Us)

of this lesson?
U3: Cultures respond to development by creating tools and refining
29. Timeless/enduring?
skills that help them thrive in their environment.
30. Written in the present tense with only common nouns?
U2: The people shape their environment & the environment shapes
After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Us and SELFASSESS.
the people.
Do your Ds
36. Start with a powerful verb?
37. State a transferable skill, not a specific activity?
38. Focus on skills that are truly essential, not just nice to be able to do?
39. Include higher order thinking?
40. Each focus on just one assessable skill?
41. Align with standard but go beyond it to reflect key skills in discipline?
42. Reflect the tools students need to make meaning of the Us?
After section 3 is complete, reposition this box next to your Ds and SELFASSESS.

Ds
The student will be able to (include 1-4 Ds)
D12: Connect the human characteristics to the physical
characteristics of a place.
D13: Compare and contrast cultural development in different
environments.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:__Courtney Goodloe_____


19. Preassessment.

Interest lesson: Students will choose the RAFT strip that appeals to their interests and strengths. One option also allows for group work, which
will suit some children well as they can support each other throughout the assignment. If a group of students elects to do a group option, the
teacher will discuss the different/more extensive expectations for behavior and final product.

20. Differentiated Learning Activity.
This lesson will be a review of Ancient Greece and Rome with the addition of information about Ancient Mali. Students will choose their RAFT
strip during morning transition time so that they can immediately begin working on their strip during social studies block. The whole class will
receive a brief lecture about the differences between the geography of Greece, Rome and Mali. They will also receive direct instruction about
the different roles in each community (farmer, miner, shipbuilder, trader, or road builder). Then, students will break off to work on their RAFT
strip individually or in small groups (per their RAFT strip). Students will use various reference books to collect the necessary information to
complete their task. After students complete their product, the whole class will reconvene. The teacher will ask students to create cause/effect
statements that connect the physical characteristics and human characteristics of each city based on what they learned in their RAFT strip. The
whole class will discuss possible ways that the people in each culture adapted to their environment as it developed.

21. Differentiated Activity Reflection. There are a variety options that offer students a range of opportunities from abstract perspectives like the
soil to more concrete formats like a pro/con list. Students can also choose to work individually or in a small group, which gives students an
additional opportunity to make a choice and exercise autonomy.

22. Alignment Reflection. Delete learning goal labels (e.g., K5, D4) that arent needed if you have fewer KUDs.
Explain how the task has students working with each of the Ks.
K1, K2, K3: All students will explore parts of this K in their RAFT strip, but all students will be exposed to all pieces of this K in the whole-class
cause and effect discussion.
K4: All students will have to consider the location of these three places at they complete their product. Each role is related to a geographic
feature of the country, which is addressed in the topic.

Explain how the task has students making deep meaning of each of the Us.
U1: This is the conclusion of the whole class discussion as the whole class discusses possible ways that people in each culture adapted to their
environment.
U2: This is the guiding question on the details portion of the RAFT. It is also weaved into each set of directions for the RAFT strips. For example,
the Greek shipbuilders details say, be sure that each of you relates your role to the UNIQUE natural resources and geography of your
location.

Explain how the task has students practicing/using each of the Ds.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction




Name:__Courtney Goodloe_____

D1: Each strip asks students to consider how the prominent jobs (human characteristics) reflect the physical characteristics (geography and
natural resources) of the three locations.
D2: Each strip positions students to compare across Roman, Malian and Greek civilizations.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction



Role
Audience

Format

Topic

Name:__Courtney Goodloe_____

Details In all of these products, you should consider how the


physical characteristics (geography) of each place influence the
human characteristics (jobs).

Malian, Greek
or Roman Soil

Farmer

VeggieTALE

The grass is
You will write a story from the perspective of the soil in Ancient
always greener on Mali, Greece or Rome. Describe the types of crops that are
the other side
planted in your soil. Include any special characteristics of the
geography or soil, and how the culture has adapted to those.
Compare and contrast the crops you grow to the crops of the
other two Ancient Civilizations in your story.

Greek
Shipbuilder

Roman Road builder


and Malian Miner

Dialogue (recorded
or written)

That ship has


sailed

You may work alone or in a group of 3 to accomplish this strip.


Each person in the group should assume a different role. In your
dialogue, the three of you should discuss your role in your
community. Be sure that each of you relates your role to the
UNIQUE natural resources and geography of your location. If you
are working in a group, this should be a 15-minute dialogue. If
you are working alone, about 5 minutes is sufficient.

Roman Road
builder

Greek Shipbuilder and


Malian Miner

Pro and Con list

Wreck-o-mended

You may work on this individually or a pair. You will create a


DETAILED pro and con list that outlines the reasons why Rome
built/needs roads in contrast to Greeces ships. Based on your list,
you need to make a recommendation to the Malian Miner about
which transportation infrastructure they should invest in
developing.

Malian Miner

Roman Road builder


and Greek Shipbuilder

Comic Strip

As good as gold

Illustrate and narrate a comic strip that details the value of gold
mining in Mali. Be sure to include reasoning as to why gold mining
is especially important in Mali. Your product should also
demonstrate why road and ship building would not be successful
businesses Mali.

EDLF 7390 Differentiating Instruction



Malian, Greek
Camel/Ship/Horse
or Roman
Carriage
Trader


Visual
Todays trade
representation of
the goods for trade

Name:__Courtney Goodloe_____

Create a visual representation of what people packed for trade


from each civilization. Briefly explain why they packed those
contents and what goods they hope to return with after trading.
Also include a description of your travel conditions to the trading
location and home. List three similarities and three differences
between each civilizations trading items.