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Effects of Post-Tensioning in Design of

Columns and Walls of Multistory


Buildings
2012 PTI Convention, Nashville, TN
ADAPT Corporation | Redwood City, CA, USA
ADAPT Latin America | Miami, FL, USA
ADAPT International Pvt. Ltd. | Kolkata, India
ADAPT Europe | Perugia, Italy
Dr. Florian Aalami
www.adaptsoft.com
May 2012

Copyright 2012 ADAPT Corporation all rights reserved

Agenda

Motivation
Redistribution of axial loads in columns and walls
Differential column shortening
Loss of PT force due to support restraints

Motivation
To date, we have carried out the design of post-tensioned floor
systems using 2D strip or finite element method analysis models
that only model a substructure of the real structure (strip or
single floor).
We cannot determine the effects of post-tensioning on the floor
system, columns and walls as an integral structural building
model because it is too time consuming and cost prohibitive.
ADAPT has developed new software that now makes it practical
to model and analyze a fully integrated concrete building with
post-tensioned floors and or beams.
The objective of this presentation is to begin quantifying the
effects of post-tensioning on a complete building and identify
areas where there is opportunity to improve our design process.

Typical Single-Level Model for Floor


Using current finite element software, single-level slabs are modeled
with columns and walls that are sitting on fixed rollers. This allows the
slab to undergo in-plane elastic shortening but does not account for its
interaction with the remainder of the building.

Typical Single-Level Model for Floor


Deflection contour

Typical Single-Level Model for Floor


Diagram showing distribution of Hyperstatic axial force in columns
calculated using single-level slab model.

1.18k
Safety design of columns and floor system should include secondary
effects of post-tensioning (hyperstatic)
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Typical Single-Level Model for Floor


Diagram showing distribution of Hyperstatic moment in design
strip and columns for a single-level slab model.

Representative design moment:


28.4 k/ft

Representative column moment:


13.2 k/ft

Multi-Level Model
New design tools support the creation of fully integrated
building models including detailed floor behavior and
post-tensioning

Distribution of Hyp Moment in Columns


5.3 k/ft

Level 21

4.1
Level 1

21 k/ft
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4.5

Distribution of Hyperstatic Axial Force


Level 21

1.3k

Level 1

28k
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Differential Support Shortening


As the deflection contours highlight, differential support shortening
in tall concrete buildings can change the distribution of bending
moments in slabs and may need to be accounted for in the design.

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Additional Moment from Diff Settlement


Diagrams showing distribution of bending moment along design
strips at different levels of a concrete building.
Level 21

259 k/ft
10% increase
Level 1

235 k/ft
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Loss of PT Force Due to Restraints

Model of a typical multi-level frame


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Loss of PT Force by Level


This elevation of a building frame shows the residual post-tensioning
force (red) at each level of a building. The model was creating using
ADAPT-ABI software that models the time-dependent effects of concrete
including creep and shrinkage as well as all support restraints.
Level

ResidualPT InitialPT
Loss
7
217
230
6
217
230
5
216
230
4
215
230
3
214
230
2
211
230
1
209
230

6%
6%
6%
7%
7%
8%
9%

kips

Note that the loss reduces to


6% at level 5 and does not
decrease any further at higher
levels. It is highest at the base
level.

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In-Plane Shortening at Each Level


This diagram shows the calculated long-term, in-plane movement due to
shortening at each end of the slab. It illustrates that the difference in inplane movement reduces as one moves up in the building.

Lateralmovement
Left
Right
in
0.34
0.036
0.31
0.035
0.36
0.024
0.44
0.000
0.51
0.000
0.55
0.000
0.60
0.002

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Difference
0.38
0.031
0.35
0.039
0.38
0.056
0.44
0.070
0.51
0.040
0.55
0.048
0.60
0.598

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