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ABSTRACT

2.0

INTRODUCTION

3.0

OBJECTIVES / AIMS

4.0

THEORY

5.0

APPARATUS

6.0

PROCEDURE(5)

7.0

RESULTS

8.0

CALCULATIONS

9.0 DISCUSSION
10.0 CONCLUSION
In this experiment, all of the objectives have been achieved. All three
types of flow; laminar, transitional and turbulent flows have successfully
been illustrated. If the flow is laminar, the dye is observed to be smooth and
travelling along in a straight line path. If the flow is a transition flow, the dye
will look a little chaotic and blurred, although the dye is still travelling in a
straight line. The dye will be in a completely chaotic pattern and will
fluctuate if the flow of the water is turbulent.
The conditions in which these type flows occur had also been determined.
In a given diameter of pipe, as the speed of the flowing water increases, the
Reynolds number increases as well. The flow is a laminar flow if the Reynolds
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number is below 2100, and the flow is a turbulent flow if the Reynolds
number is above 4000. The flow is a transition flow if the Reynolds number is
in between 2100 and 4000.

11.0 RECOMMENDATIONS
There are ways to improve the accuracy of the results obtained during
this experiment. One of them checked whether the water in the tube flows in
a correct way. Make sure the flow of the water is a steady flow and stable
before measuring the flow rate by monitoring the time taken to collect
certain amount of water in the volumetric tank.
Other than that, ensure that the dye is not too much and not too little,
before injecting it into the fluid. It will be hard to stabilize the fluid to get a
laminar flow. The experiment should also be repeated twice to get a more
precise result. The person collecting the water should cooperate well with the
time keeper.

12.0 REFERENCE
1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reynolds_number retrieved at 3.00
p.m, 2 October 2015.
2. http://research.me.udel.edu/~lywang/meeg331/labs/reynolds.pdf
retrieved at 2.45 p.m., 2 October 2015.
3. http://www.mdp.eng.cam.ac.uk/web/library/enginfo/aerothermal_
dvd_only/aero/fprops/pipeflow/node8.html

retrieved

at

12.30

p.m, 2 October 2015.


4. http://www.markedbyteachers.com/universitydegree/engineering/osbourne-reynolds-apparatusexperiment.html retrieved at 11.15 a.m, 4 October 2015.
5. http://www.academia.edu/4332410/osborne_apparatus retrieved
at 11.30 a.m, 4 October 2015.
6. https://www.google.com/search?
q=osborne+reynolds+experiment+report&biw=1366&bih=633&
noj=1&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAmoVC
hMIzKq6iIaoyAIVzmqOCh3UoQpf#imgrc=0xm1biD_lLHTOM%3A
retrieved at 12.13 p.m, 4 October 2015.
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7. https://www.google.com/search?
q=osborne+reynolds+experiment+report&biw=1366&bih=633&
noj=1&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAmoVC
hMIzKq6iIaoyAIVzmqOCh3UoQpf#imgrc=RyFm6AcIUMV3BM%3A
retrieved at 12.17 p.m, 4 October 2015.
8. https://www.google.com/search?
q=osborne+reynolds+experiment+report&biw=1366&bih=633&
noj=1&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAmoVC
hMIzKq6iIaoyAIVzmqOCh3UoQpf#imgrc=7AUJxR72CVDzZM%3A
retrieved at 12.15 p.m, 4 October 2015.
9. De Nevers, N. (2005). Fluid Mechanics for Chemical Engineers (3rd Ed).
McGraw-Hill.
10.
Cengel Y.A & Cimbala J.M (2005) Fluid Mechanics: Fundamental and
Applications. McGraw-Hill.
11.
Coulson, J.M. and Richardson, J.F (1990). Chemical Engineering: Fluid
Flow, Heat Transfer and Mass Transfer (4th Ed. Vol1). Oxford: Pergamon Press
12.
Douglas, J.F. Gasiorek, J.M. and Saffield, J.A (2001). Fluid Mechanics (4 th
Ed). Prentice Hall.

13.0 APPENDIX(6)(7)(8)
Set up for Osborne Reynolds Apparatus Experiment.