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Assuming the proposed ordinance has already gone through the requisite 3

readings. It is enacted by the SB.


After the ordinance is enacted, it shall be presented to the local chief executive,
which is the Mayor,. Once he approves, he must sign each and every page of the
ordinance and return it to the SB. By law, he has 10 days within which to act on the
ordinance to veto or approve.
Within 3 days from approval, the secretary of the SB shall transmit to the
sangguniang panlalawigan for review, copies of approved ordinances and
resolutions approving and adopting the local development plans and public
investment programs formulated by the local development councils.

Within thirty (30) days after receipt of copies of such ordinances and resolutions,
the sangguniang panlalawigan shall examine the documents or transmit them to
the provincial attorney, or if there be none, to the provincial prosecutor for prompt
examination. The provincial attorney or provincial prosecutor shall, within a period
of ten (10) days from the receipt of the documents, inform the sangguniang
panlalawigan in writing of his comments or recommendations which may be
considered by the sangguniang panlalawigan in making its decision.
If no action has been taken by the sangguniang panlalawigan within thirty (30)
days after submission of such an ordinance or resolution, the same shall be
presumed consistent with the law and, therefore, valid.
Assuming, everything is in order and the Sangguinan Panlalawigan approves. The
ordinance shall still be posted.
And unless the ordinance itself provides for the date of effectivity, it shall take effect
after 10 days it is posted.
Effectivity of Ordinances and Resolutions. Unless otherwise stated
in the ordinance or resolution approving the local development plan and
public investment program, the same shall take effect after ten (10) days
from the date a copy thereof is posted in a bulletin board at the entrance of
the provincial capitol or city, municipal, or barangay hall, as the case may be,
and in at least two (2) other conspicuous places in the LGU concerned.
I must stress that the reclassification of the property by the SB, will not mean that
we can already use it for other purposes. It must undergo conversion, and such
Conversion Order can only come from the DAR.
A specific provision in the SB ordinance will state:

Section 4. CONVERSION. This ordinance shall not be construed as a


conversion order which shall be issued by the Department of Agrarian

Reform.
This sample provision is taken from an ordinance of a Sanggunian
Bayan in Baler AN ORDINANCE RECLASSIFYING A PARCEL OF LAND (LOT A OF
THE SUBDIVISION PLAN PSD-04-000235 CONTAINING AN AREA OF 3,000
SQUARE METERS) SITUATED AT BRGY. RESERVA, BALER, AURORA FROM
AGRICULTURAL TO COMMERCIAL ZONE.
You can find the document here:
http://baler.gov.ph/site/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/LGUBALER_ORDINANCE_NO_002-2013.pdf
Conversion is the act of changing the current use of a piece of agricultural land into
some other use as approved by the DAR while reclassification is the act of
specifying how agricultural lands shall be utilized for non-agricultural use such as
residential, industrial and commercial, as embodied in the land use plan, subject to
the requirements and procedures for land use conversion.

In view thereof, a mere reclassification of an agricultural land does not


automatically allow a landowner to change its use. He has to undergo the process of
conversion before he is permitted to use the agricultural land for other purposes. It
must be stressed that agricultural lands though reclassified to residential,
commercial, industrial or other non-agricultural uses must undergo the process of
conversion before they can be used for the purpose to which they are intended.