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Winter Solstice 2008

Volume II, Edition 3

In this edition
Tarot Talismans and Telesmatic
Images
by Sandra Tabatha Cicero
There is much more to the Tarot than
mere divinationread here how to
do far more.

Dear Readers,
The Festive Season is upon us again in many different traditions. It represents a
time of joy and hopecustomarily a time when people come together in love if they
can or think with longing of each other if they cannot be together.
Whoever and wherever you may be, we wish you every blessing at this magical time of
the year. As 2009 looms ever larger on the horizon, let us join together to celebrate
the power of Light in our troubled world and work together to bring peace, mutual
understanding, thoughtfulness and compassion to it.
May you all be blessed with good health, progress on your chosen path, fulfilment
and love in the coming year.
In Light,
Your Hermetic Virtues Team

The Star
by Harry Wendrich
A new painting of the Tarot trump.

26

Ars SententiaThe Art of the Motto


by Samuel Scarborough
Nomen est Omenhow does one
choose a motto and what implications
does it have?

28

In Defence of the Lesser Invoking


Pentagram
by Nick Farrell
There has been a lot of discussion
about the LBRP but what about the
Lesser Invoking Ritual? some surprising facts and new impulses.

45

The Origins of Heredom of


Kilwinning
by Ian Cowburn
An examination of the historical roots
of an order that gave rise to many
others against the turbulent background of Scotland.

49

A Cleansing Ritual
by Samuel Scarborough
A practical and effective way to
cleanse your ritual space

67

Page 2

Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
by Sandra Tabatha Cicero
Next to astrology, Tarot is perhaps the most widely accepted of the esoteric arts. In the
early 1960s it was difficult for interested students to simply find a tarot deck for sale.
Nowadays, tarot enthusiasts can hardly keep track of the number of different decks that
are published every year. For those of us who love the Tarot, this is indeed a golden age
of plenty.
Astrologers have a saying about their art: The stars impel, they do not compel. The
same can be said of the Tarot. A Tarot reading simply provides you with tools to help you
analyze a specific situation or problem and offer a possible solution or outcome. The key
word here is possible. Because you have free will, you are the master of your own destiny. The Tarot simply offers you another perspectivea way to look at a given circumstance from another angleoften a spiritual or psychological angle.
The Tarot is an illustrated book of spiritual wisdom. It has many uses besides divination
tarot cards are also used for meditation, skrying, pathworking, and ritual magic. A Tarot
reading is like a road map: it can give you many different routes to take you where you
want to go. You always have options. You can take the straight road, or the long, winding one. The cards may show that the path you are currently on is full of construction,
obstacles, and potholes. A bridge on the road ahead may be washed out. You can
choose to stay on the road and take your chances, or get off at the next exit and find another route. Even when the cards indicate a bad time ahead, they also show a way
around the situation.
The Tarot is like a
filing cabinet
packed with timeless knowledge
and magical correspondences. It
is a complete
system for describing, understanding and
working with the
hidden forces of
the universe.

A traditional Tarot deck contains seventy-eight images that are associated with various
divine qualities and astrological energies. The Tarot is like a filing cabinet packed with
timeless knowledge and magical correspondences. It is a complete system for describing,
understanding and working with the hidden forces of the universe. Some have called
the cards of the Tarot the hieroglyphs of the Western Mystery Tradition.
The different human figures portrayed in the cards are archetypal godforms that manifest
though the collective spiritual unconscious of humanity. The Fool is the innocent pilgrim
on a quest for spiritual meaning, the Empress is the Great Mother and nurturing impulse,
the Chariot is the victorious warrior, the Star is the eternal capacity for imagination and
hope and so on. Each card is a visual image of a specific divine power and attributes.
Each has its own zodiacal or elemental energy, its own holy name of power and its own
angel or pair of angels.
Far from being omens of unalterable fate, the cards of the Tarot are quite the opposite
they are magical tools for initiating change and transformation! Every Tarot card can be
used as a talisman and ritually consecrated to accomplish a specific purpose. For every
goal that you may wish to manifest, there is a Tarot card that will embody it.

Talismans, Magic and Tarot


One of the main reasons why the Tarot succeeds so elegantly as the premier tool of divination and talismanic magic is because it provides us with an excellent pattern, model, or
paradigm of universe. Human beings constantly discover and create such patterns in
order to understand and shape our environment. The Qabalistic four-fold division of the
universe, the four elements of the ancient Greek philosophers, the Ptolemaic ordering of
the seven ancient planets, the (current) ten planet and twelve house systems of the astrologers, the seven-day week, the twenty-four hour day and the 365-day yearall represent various ways in which humans divide, classify and organize the world we live in. We
use classification as a tool to help us gain knowledge.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 3

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
The same is true for the seventy-eight card divisions of the traditional Tarot deck that help
the diviner classify and understand what he or she is looking at in a card reading. It is the
readers own knowledge and familiarity with this cosmic pattern that makes divination
possible. A Tarot deck works as a tool for divination and magic because the universe is

completely defined or patterned within the context of the seventy-eight cards of the
deck. When we perform a card reading with a Tarot deck, we select or separate out from
the pack a small number of cards that pinpoint what part of the universal pattern needs
to be addressed.
In a divination, the chance selection of a card determines which aspect of the universe
should be examined in relation to the question or subject of the reading. If a divination is
performed with the proper spiritual intent and is accompanied by meditation and an invocation to the divine, then those of us who believe that the universe is divine and is inhabited by a higher intelligence, will be lead to a divined rather than a random answer to our questions.
The cards of the Tarot do not simply represent various fields of human activity or convenient cosmic divisionsthey represent real powers and forces that comprise the universe.
The Tarot is not just a collection of symbolic imagesit is a living magical system. The universe depicted in the seventy-eight cards of the Tarot is a living ecosystem,, if you will, of
interconnected particles, substances, energies and entities.
In this divine universe, spirit and matter form a symbiotic relationship that has resulted in
life as we know it. Each card symbolizes a specific energy, whether elemental, planetary
or astrological. They also stand for the holy emanations of the Qabalah and the various
divine names, angels and archangels attached thereto. Because of this, the cards of the
Tarot provide a perfect medium for the creation of magical talismans.
Creating and working with talismans is an important part of ceremonial magic. Several
books have been written about talismans and it is common to run across various terms
that seem to be synonymous with the word talisman. These include amulet, sigil, seal,
and pentacle. Although similar in meaning, there are subtle differences between them.
Sigil:
The word sigil comes from the Latin word sigillum meaning signature or mark. A
sigil is an abstract symbol created from the name of a divine, angelic, or spirit name that is
used in magic. It is considered the signature or symbolic representation of the force behind the magical name.
Seal:
Closely related is the term seal, which comes from the Latin signum which means
signet, token, or sign. It is usually an abstract symbol that, unlike a sigil, is not necessarily created from a name. For example the seals of the Qameoth or Planetary seals are
based on grids of numbers. In medieval and Renaissance magic, sigils were often created
from the Qameoth or planetary seals. Both sigils and seals are considered to have potent
magical propertiesthey may be drawn on paper and used as simple talismans, or they
may be drawn on more complex talismans that contain many sigils.
Pentacle:
The word pentacle or pantacle is derived from the Latin word pentaculum, which is
said by some to mean small painting. This refers to a small drawn or painted talisman
consecrated to a specific magical force.

Each card symbolizes


a specific energy,
whether elemental,
planetary or astrological ... the holy
emanations of the
Qabalah, the various
divine names, angels
and archangels attached thereto.
Because of this, the
cards of the Tarot
provide a perfect
medium for the creation of magical talismans.

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Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
Pentacles are usually circular and painted or engraved with hexagrams, pentagrams, or
other symbols. In Western ceremonial magic they are often used as symbols, implements
or talismans of elemental Earth. The pentacle can be said to represent a container for the
magical forces inscribed on itit is used to encircle these forces and bring them into
physical or earthy manifestation. In the Tarot, the suit of pentacles is sometimes called
disks or coins.
Talisman:
Talisman is a term that comes from the Arabic tilsam, which in turn comes from the
Greek words telein, to consecrate and tetelesmenon, that which has been consecrated. A talisman is an object that has been charged or consecrated with magical energies toward the achievement of a given purpose. A talisman is considered a lifeless object before the magician magically brings it to life by charging it with specific energies
that are usually astrological or qabalistic in nature.

Since each of the


78 cards has a different correspondence, the Tarot
offers 78 different
opportunities for
creating potent
magical objects,
whether the cards
are used for talismanic (invoking) or
amuletic
(banishing) purposes.

Amulet:
The word amulet comes from the Latin, amuletum or charm and is probably derived
from the Latin amolior, meaning to repel, baffle, or drive away. Other suggested
sources include the Arabic words amula, signifying a small receptacle used for healing
and hamla, an object carried on a person for protection. The word charm, which is applied to small amulets worn on necklaces or bracelets, is derived from the Latin carmen or
song, which originally indicated the incantation that was intoned over an amulet or
talisman, to consecrate it and empower it with magical force.
Unlike a talisman, the primary power of an amulet is to protect its possessor from harm.
In ancient Babylon, amulets of stone carved into the image of the wind demon Pazuzu
were worn by pregnant women because they were believed to have the power to
frighten away the dreaded vampire Lamastu. The ancient Egyptians wore charms in the
form of the ankh, the scarab and the Eye of Horus.
One school of thought states that, unlike a talismanwhich is considered inert until consecratedan amulet is usually made from a magically active substance and is often not
consecrated at all. An amulet can be either natural or man-made but its substance or
symbolism is believed to have magical potency of its own. However, it is probable that in
ancient times magical incantations were chanted over amulets as well as talismans, in
order to give them added magical power. Therefore the primary distinction between the
two is this: talismans can be consecrated to any specific purpose but are often used to
attract somethingsuch as a physical object, a beneficial force, a helpful quality or a favorable set of circumstances, while amulets are mainly used for a protective purpose, to
repel somethingsuch as a detrimental force, a harmful quality or an unfavorable set of
circumstances.
Most ceremonial magicians today believe that a commercially-bought Tarot deck is an
inert, man-made object that needs to be ritually consecrated in order to bring out its
magical qualities. Since each of the seventy-eight cards has a different correspondence,
the Tarot offers seventy-eight different opportunities for creating potent magical objects,
whether the cards are used for talismanic (invoking) or amuletic (banishing) purposes.

The Magical Process: How Talismans Work


Tarot cards are perfect for use as talismans. The most important aspect of a talisman is
that it must be charged by a suitable means, most often by performing a consecration
ritual that imbues the talisman with magical energy.

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Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
In short, magic is the ability to make changes in your life and in your immediate environment. But how exactly does magic work? We believe that the workings of magic can be
described in four laws or theories. These are:
the Law of Willpower
the Law of the Astral Light
the Law of Correspondence
the Law of Imagination (or Visualization)
In short, these four laws state that:
1) human willpower is a potent force that can cause real change in the physical
world;
2) an invisible astral substance is a matrix that permeates everything in the cosmos (like the Eastern ideas of prana or chi);
3) certain objects, symbols, or natural substances are connected with or correspond to different magical energies and finally
4) the human imagination with its capacity for visualization is what focuses the
human will, chooses the appropriate correspondence and manipulates the
subtle astral blueprint behind the physical world resulting in an act of magic.
The potency of the magicians willpower is a crucial factor in magic because every physical action has a magical reaction. Even our so-called mundane actions will trigger a
magical response. Every cause has an effect and the effort you put into your magic will
determine its ultimate success. For example, if you do a Jupiter talisman ritual to get
money but never once go out of the house to actually apply for a jobyour action (or
inaction in this case) on the material plane shows a lack of willpower and will defeat your
purpose. If you perform a twenty-minute ritual invoking peace and harmony in your
household and then spend six hours fighting with your spouse, you will defeat your
magic. Negativity will also counteract your magic because magic requires positive thinkingif you think your magic is going to fail, it will.
The astral plane is a region where the magical process begins. This is an invisible plane of
initial formation where everything in the physical universe first comes into being as an
incorporeal idea or prototypal design. When something is created in the astral light, it
will eventually filter down and become a reality in the physical realm. This is essentially
how magic works.
When performing an act of magic such as the ritual consecration of a talisman, the magician puts these four laws into action. For example, lets say that you wanted to use a
tarot card as a talisman designed to cultivate communication skills. Your decision to
charge a talisman for this end is itself an act of willpower but one that you will have to
reinforce with your thoughts and actions in the mundane world. For an appropriate correspondence, you might choose the card of The Magician, which is attributed to the
planet Mercury. You would imagine yourself in the role of the Magician and visualize
yourself as already possessing the needed skillin fact you could visualize yourself in the
future as having already used the skill to complete a goal. This visualization will be created as a living thought-form in the astral light. Finally, the physical act of performing the
ritual consecration of your tarot talisman is a potent act of willpower, energized and focused through the powerful lens of the imagination. What you plant as a seed in the
astral world may then grow and blossom in the material world.

The potency of
the magicians
willpower is a
crucial factor in
magic because
every physical
action has a
magical reaction.
Even our socalled mundane
actions will trigger a magical
response.

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Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
It is important to keep in mind that magic in and of itself is neither black nor white, good
or bad, beneficial or harmful. Magic is just a process. It is the intent of the magician which
makes it positive or negative. I should not have to remind anyone that ethical magicians
who seek spiritual wisdom do not engage in harmful acts of black magic. Therefore it is
wise to remember that whatever magic you send out into the universe, is exactly what the
universe will send back to you.
Finally, the practice of magic usually involves just thatpractice. To some people, magic
just comes naturally but, to most of us, it is an art that requires training, preparation and
repeated practice to become skilled at it.

The Role of the Divine in Magic: Gods and Angels


At this point some readers may get the mistaken impression that magic is simply a cold,
mechanical formulajust an unusual method for building a better widget.. Some may ask,
But where does the Divine fit into to this four-step theory of magic? How is this a spiritual
process? What about God, the Goddess, the angels and spirits? If I create a talisman and
invoke a deity to bless and charge it, isnt that what makes a talisman magical? Or does
magic work because the magician trains him or herself to become skilled in visualization
and the ability to focus willpower?

It is important to
keep in mind that
magic in and of
itself is neither
black nor white,
good or bad,
beneficial or
harmful. Magic is
just a process. It is
the intent of the
magician which
makes it positive
or negative.

The answer to both of the last two questions is yes. This is because ceremonial magicians believe the universe is completely divine. The divine world of Spirit and the physical
world of matter are two halves of a symbiotic whole and therefore everything that exists
out in the Macrocosm, the Greater Universe, also exists in the Microcosm, the Lesser
Universe, within the soul and psyche of humanity. They are both connectedand what
effects one will affect the other. This divine symbiosis is easily recognized by those who
have a religious or mystical inclination. It has been plainly yet eloquently described by the
Hermetic axiom As Above,, so Below.
Simply put, there exists a Nous or universal consciousness that permeates everythingit
gives purpose and meaning to all things in creation. Whether one calls this consciousness
God, Goddess, Deity, the Divine, Ain Soph, the Oversoul, the Eternal Source or the Absolute Unityis basically irrelevant so long as the term used is understood to be ones highest
idea of transcendent Divinity. Western ceremonial magicians often profess what might be
described as ultimate monotheismthe idea that the Divine manifests in various diverse
forms including gods, archangels, angels, intelligences and spiritsbut ultimately all of
these beings may be traced back to the One Divine Source of All.
The Golden Dawn focuses much attention on godnames: A
godname is a potent divine name or word of power used
to invoke the highest aspects of deity, especially those holy
names assigned to the ten Sephiroth of the Tree of Life.
Many of these names are presented in the Hebrew scriptures as the various sacred names of God. Magicians also
work with archangels: An archangel is a very powerful,
high-ranking angel who governs large groups of lesser angels. The archangels assigned to the elemental are the wellPietro dAbano known archangels visualized in such rites as the Lesser BanH.C. Agrippa
ishing Ritual of the Pentagram. The zodiacal and planetary archangels of the Golden
Dawn are derived from grimoiric sources such as Pietro dAbanos Heptameron (12501316) and Henry Cornelius Agrippas Three Books of Occult Philosophy (1531). The latter
text was used as a primary source book for much of the Golden Dawns teachings.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

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Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
Hosts of lesser angels serve under the archangels. The angels that correspond to the
elemental trumps are to be found in another important grimoiric source book, The
Greater Key of Solomon the King, where they are listed as the angels of the elements.
The planetary angels are found in Agrippa. The zodiacal angels are listed in a Golden
Dawn manuscript entitled The Schem--Hamphorasch or the Divided Name. They are
also listed in Eliphas Levis works The Magical Ritual of the Sanctum Regnum and Ritual
de la Haute Magie.
Intelligences: the name for this group of spiritual beings is from the Latin Intelligentia
and it refers to intelligent/sapient beings usually of an angelic or archangelic nature.
The term was used by pagan Neo--platonists and later by mediaeval Christian mages.
Today the term is most often used to describe planetary angels derived from the
Qameoth or planetary squares. The planetary intelligences are derived from sources
such as Agrippa. It is possible that Agrippa used the term intelligence because the origins of the Qameoth system are probably non-Judaeo-Christian and he wished to avoid
the term "angel" in describing them.
The Divine enlivens the universe and ultimately grants the human mind those creative,
psychic faculties needed to perform the art of divination and other acts of magic. In ritual, magicians usually invoke the highest aspect of the Divine before all else. The magicians ability to tap into this universal consciousness will determine the accuracy of his or
her divinations, as well as the success of magical workings.
Magic has been defined as the method of science,, the aim of religion. Science and
spirituality are not diametrically opposed to each other as some would believe; rather
they support one another like the black and white (or male and female) pillars of the
Qabalistic Tree of Life. Both are essential and interrelated.. Thus the theory of evolution
can be described as the process or mechanism by which God continually creates new
forms of life on earth. The Big Bang theory of the creation of the universe, along with
its resulting expansion of matter, can be described as the process by which the Divine
caused the cosmos to come into being.
In the same way, magic, which constantly involves the invocation of deities and angels
to look with favour upon this ceremony...., simply utilizes the four laws listed above as
the mechanism that that sets the magical process in motion. But in order to accomplish
magic, the magician strives to achieve true spiritual growth and inner illumination so
that his will is in a state of alignment with the Higher Will of the Divine.. If it is, then the
magicians will power is immeasurably strengthened. If the magicians will is conflict
with the Higher and Divine Will, then the magic will fail.
In keeping with the laws of magic, the deities and angels invoked in ritual magic are
chosen because of their attributions and correspondences. Prayers and powerful invocations recited to spiritual beings for the accomplishment of a specific magical purpose
are affirmations that the magicians will is in alignment with the will of the invoked deity.
An image of the deity or angel may be created in the Astral Light through the faculty of
the imagination. This image will act as a focal point for the magicians will power, resulting in the rituals success.
Angels are spiritual beings that are considered to be specific aspects of God, each with a
particular purpose and jurisdiction. The word angel comes from the Greek angelos,
which is itself a translation of the Hebrew word melakh, meaning messenger. They
have been described as messengers of the soul. More precisely, an angel is an intermediary intelligence between the human and the One in the Great Chain of Being.

Science and spirituality are not


diametrically
opposed to each
other ... rather
they support one
another like the
black and white
(or male and
female) pillars of
the Qabalistic
Tree of Life.

Page 8

Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
These divine intermediaries work with the magician in two ways: as direct intercessors
between the human and the Divine and as governors in the spiritual hierarchies who
command lesser angels, spirits and elementals to carry out the goal of the ritual.
Angels are our companions in the magical arts, working together with us in the Great
Chain of Being. They are of particular importance to talismanic work. Each Tarot card is
associated with a specific energy, whether it is elemental, planetary, astrological or Qabalistic. Because of this every card in the deck falls under the authority of certain divine
powers, archangels and angels. The magician can invoke one or more of these entities in
a ritual designed to consecrate a tarot card, empowering it as a magical talisman.

Simple Techniques for Working with Tarot Talismans


One easy way to work with Tarot talismans is to create a ritual card spread. Although the
ritual card spread may look like an ordinary card spread, rather than reading or interpreting the cards as they fall in a divination, here we are choosing the cards we want to use
as talismans and actively influencing the manner in which we want to manifest our goals.
This spread is called the Triangle of Art Spread because it is based on the triangle of evocation, where the magician calls forth spiritual entities into the center of the triangle. The
cards that make up the triangle represent those energies or actions that the magician
wishes to bring into manifestation.
Each Tarot card is
associated with a
specific energy,
whether it is elemental, planetary,
astrological or
Qabalistic. Because of this every
card in the deck
falls under the
authority of certain
divine powers,
archangels and
angels.

Card number 1 represents the subject or Significatorwhich could stand for the magician
himself. Card number 2 is the Initial Action that the magician wants to visualize as a
stimulating magical influence. Card number 3 is the Progressive Action that the magician
visualizes as a continuing influence that moves the development of the magic forward an
on the right track. The central card is the Tarot Talisman card itselfit is the outcome that
the magician hopes to bring about.
The following example uses the Golden Dawn
Magical Tarot to create a Tarot Talisman in order
to develop skill in magic.
1) Signficator:
This is a card that represents the subject of the
ritual. Most often this will be the magician himself
or someone else that the talisman is being prepared for. In the Golden Dawn system, the court
cards are most often used as Significators, so you
should choose the court card that you particularly
identify yourself with. For this example we will
choose the King of Pentacles..

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Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
2) Initial Action:
In order to become the magician, you have to open your psyche up to the higher powers of the Divineto listen to the divine teacher within. Here we will choose the card of
the Hierophant to represent the initial action of opening up the mind to the Divine
Teacher and being able to take in, to receive, that divine influence from above.
3) Progressive Action:
For the card of continuing development of the matter, we will choose the Hermit card.
This card is attributed to the sign of Virgo, which is ruled by Mercury. Virgos have a tendency to be meticulous and thorough. The regenerative power of Virgo is called upon
to add continuing, renewing force to the ritual.
4) Tarot Talisman Card:
This card is the goal of the ritualto become the Magician.. It is this card that is the primary focus of the rite. However, all the cards are used for the purpose of visualization
that lead up to the final desired outcome. Notice that the final three cards, the Hierophant, the Hermit and the Magician, are known in the Tarot as the Three Magithe
three great magicians.
Ritual
So how would we go about performing the ritual for the Tarot talisman consecration?
On page 154 of our book The Essential Golden Dawn, we describe a number of basic
steps involved in the working of a Golden Dawn Ritual. You can follow these steps exactly to design your own ritual, or you could simplify them down to just the following
steps:
a Banishing Ritual to clear the area of unwanted energies;
an Invocation to the Highest Divine Powers;
the Invocation of the Divine Powers represented in your Tarot Talisman card, including a clear statement of your intended goal;
visualization of your stated goal as exemplified in the cards you have chosen.
1. The Banishing Ritual, such as the LBRP, is used to clear the area of unwanted energies and set up a circle of protection.
2. The Invocation to the highest aspect of Deity is then performed. Here the magician
can say a prayer or invocation of his/her own choosing, so long as the Deity invoked
represents the magicians highest ideal of the Divine Source of the Universe
(Example: GDs simple Adoration to the Lord of the Universe.)
3. Lay down the cards in order, 1 through 4, while using the following visualizations:
Lay down card one, the Significator, your own self-image card and visualize yourself with all of the natural strengths that you already possess.
Lay down card two, the Initial Action card, the Hierophant and visualize the
Teacher within you, your own Higher Selfbeginning to open up your psyche to
the Sacred Knowledge of the Divine.
Lay down card three, the Progression card, the Hermit and visualize your own
Higher self holding out the lantern of Divine Light to guide you. This light is a
perpetual source of strength and wisdom that guides you toward your goal.
Next, lay down card four, the Tarot Talisman card. With a wand or perhaps just
the first two fingers of your right hand, trace a circle over the Talisman card.

The Invocation to the


highest aspect of
Deity is performed,
when the magician
can say a prayer or
invocation of his/her
own choosing, so
long as the Deity
invoked represents
the magicians highest ideal of the Divine
Source of the Universe (e.g.: GDs simple Adoration to the
Lord of the Universe).

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Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
The invocation of the energies that correspond to your Tarot Talisman card is now given. In this case, the Tarot Talisman card is the
Magician, which is attributed to the planet Mercury. In the Golden
Dawn system, the planets are always invoked by drawing the figure
of a Hexagram, so you would trace the Invoking Hexagram of Mercury over the card and intone the appropriate divine Hebrew godnames, archangels and angels associated with Mercury(Elohim Tzabaoth,Raphael [Kokabiel] and Tiriel). These higher entities will put
the magical forces into action.
At this point you should clearly state your purpose for consecrating the talisman. It
should be something to the effect of I, (Soror/Frater NAME), open this temple to perform
a working in the Magic of Light. I seek to become the Magician and gain skill in the Sacred Art of Magic. Look with favour upon this ceremony. Grant me what I seek, so that
through this rite I may obtain greater understanding and thereby advance in the Great
Work.
Finally, you should visualize your stated goal as exemplified in the Talisman card you have
chosen. In your minds eye, see yourself standing in your magical regalia, with all the
knowledge, skills and implements of a master magician at your fingertips. Remember to
always visualize the goal of the Talisman card as if it has already come to pass. Dont
think that you are becoming the magician, think that you already ARE the magician.
For the ritual,
you would first
do a banishing
ritual and then
invoke the highest aspect of
Deity. Then you
would lay down
the cards in order and proceed
with the work of
visualization.

For another example,, lets say that you wanted to create a Tarot Talisman in order for a
general increase in financesspecifically for getting a bonus or promotion at work. Well
use the Rider Waite Tarot to illustrate this example.
For card one, the Significator, lets take the Page of
Cups. For card two, the card of Initial Action, you
might choose the Empress.. The card of the Empress is attributed to the planet Venus, associated
with social status. It is also a card of manifestation
and Venus is often called the gateway to initiation.
She is the Great Mother who brings all life into
physical existence. For card three, the card of Progression, you select the Three of Pentacles. Here
we see a sculptor working in a church while a
monk and an architect look over his work. It is a
card of skill and the appreciation for work well
done. For card four, the Tarot Talisman card, you
choose the Ace of Pentacles. This card indicates
your goalincreased wealth and monetary gain.
For the ritual, you would first do a banishing ritual
and then invoke the highest aspect of Deity. Then
you would lay down the cards in order and proceed with the work of visualization:
1. As you lay down the Significator, your own self-image card, visualize yourself ready to
display your abilities and creative talents in your place of employment.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

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Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
2. As you lay down the Initial Action card, visualize the Empress as the divine force of
Venus which helps you move more easily in social circles and improves your people
skills. She also helps you manifest your creative potential into solid results.
3. As you lay down the Progression card, visualize your work being admired and appreciated by your co-workers, your supervisor or your boss.
4. Finally, lay down the Tarot Talisman cardthe Ace of Pentacles. Trace a circle over
the Talisman card.
Next, invoke the energies that correspond to your
Talisman card which, in this case, is a pip or numbered card. Although this card is attributed to the
Qabalistic Sephirah of Kether, through its number
Onehere its correspondence as a primary card of
Earth takes precedence in this particular ritual
spread, which is being performed for the purpose
of monetary gain. Therefore, here you would trace
the pentagrams that are associated with the element of Earth. (The Invoking Pentagram
of Spirit Passive and the Invoking Pentagram of Earth.) Recite appropriate prayers or
invocations.
At this point you should clearly state your purpose for consecrating the talisman and
always be specific when vocalizing your stated goal. Again, you should visualize your
stated goal as exemplified in the Talisman card you have chosen. In your minds eye,
you might picture yourself at work, perhaps sitting in a larger office and enjoying the
recognition and benefits that have been bestowed on you. Visualize this as if it had already happened.

For a final example,, suppose you wanted to create a


Tarot Talisman in order to send healing energy to a
sick friend. Here well use the Babylonian Tarot. for
card one, the Significator, well choose the Queen of
Wands, Aya, who in this case might represent a
woman friend in need of healing. For card two, the
card of Initial Action, you might choose the Ace of
Wands, which will provide a protective natural force
that will begin the process of healing. For card
three, the card of Progression, you select the Six of
Arrows (the Six of Swords in other decks). Here we
see Gula, the goddess of healing, standing over an
injured man. She is removing arrows from his side
and applying a healing herb to his wounds. The
Keyword of the card is Relief. For card four, the
Tarot Talisman card, you select the Four of Arrows,
which has the keyword of Rest. This is a card of
convalescence and recovery from illness.
Ritual:
In performing the Tarot Talisman consecration ritual, you would first do a banishing ritual and then invoke the highest aspect of Deity. Then you would lay down the cards in
order and proceed with the work of visualization.

you should
clearly state
your purpose for
consecrating the
talisman and
always be specific when vocalizing your stated
goal.

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Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
1. As you lay down the Significator, you would visualize your friend and think about your
desire to see her healthy and happy again
2. As you lay down the Initial Action card, visualize the Ace of Wands as a divine purifying force that is used to root out the source of the disease and destroy infection.
3. As you lay down the Progression card, visualize a great protective goddess standing
over your friend and continuously applying her therapeutic powers to heal your friend
and provide constant relief.
4. Finally, lay down the Tarot Talisman cardthe card of Rest. Trace a circle over the Talisman card.
Invoke of the energies that correspond to your Tarot Talisman card.
In this case, the Tarot Talisman card is a pip or numbered card. Its
zodiacal attribution is that of Jupiter in Libra and through the number four it is attributed to the Qabalistic Sephirah of Chesed. In the
Golden Dawn system, the Sephiroth are also invoked by drawing the
figure of a hexagram, so you would trace the Invoking Hexagram of
Chesed (Jupiter) over the card and intone the proper divine Hebrew
godnames and archangel (Al, Tzadqiel).

After performing
the Tarot Talisman
ritual, you may
leave the ritual
card spread set up
on your altar, place
the card somewhere where you
will see it often or
if that isnt convenient, you can just
clean up and put
everything away.

The Tarot Talisman card of Rest is attributed to the 2nd decanate of Libra
(20 o-30o), which is Jupiter in Libra.. The Golden Dawn uses pentagrams to
invoke zodiacal signs, so at this point you could trace the invoking pentagrams associated with Libra (Spirit Active, Invoking Air with Libra sigil) and
intone the appropriate divine name..
After tracing these figures, clearly vocalize your intended purpose of sending healing energy to your friend. After performing the Tarot talisman
ritual, you may leave the ritual card spread set up on your altar. Or, you
can place the card somewhere where you will see it often. If that isnt
convenient, you can just clean up and put everything away. The ritual will
go on working.
Of course it is not necessary to lay out a ritual card spread for this purpose. You could
choose to consecrate only the Tarot Talisman card itself. The other cards are present to
simply facilitate the visualization of achieving your goal.
After the Tarot Talisman card has done its work, banish it with the appropriate pentagram
or hexagram, wipe it off with a clean cloth and put it back in the deck. If your cards are
plastic-coated, wipe them off using a damp with a cloth of water mixed with salt.

Decanate Angels and the Shem Ha-Mephoresh


There are angelic powers associated with every Tarot card. In the last example, the Tarot
Talisman card is associated with the decanate of Jupiter in Libra. Therefore the magician
can invoke two angels who are specifically associated with this card and who rule over
the decanate of Jupiter in Libra. A decanate is a 10 degree division of the zodiacal wheel.
Each zodiacal sign contains three decanates. The 36 numbered or pip cards of the tarot
(minus the Aces) are each assigned to the 36 decanates of the Zodiac. As a result, each of
these cards has two decanate angels associated with it.
The Decanate angels are derived from a Qabalisitc teaching known as the Shem HaMephoresh or Divided Name, which refers to the seventy-two divine names of God. It is
a divine name of 216 letters derived from the Book of Exodus 14:19-21. Each of these

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

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Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
three verses from Exodus contains seventy-two letters which are then organized (by Hebrew Gematria) to generate the seventy-two Names. These names are obtained by writing out these three verses from Exodus in Hebrew with alternating lines in opposing
directions. In other words, the verses are to be written out one above the other, the first
verse from right to left, the second verse from left to right and the third from right to left.
The result is seventy--two columns of three letters apiece, which are read from top to bottom.
From these seventy-two godnames, the names of 72 Angels are formed by adding the
suffix Yod Heh (hyiah) or the suffix Aleph Lamed (laal) to the end of the Name. Iah
signifies mercy and beneficence, whereas al embodies severity and judgment. Each of
the 36 decanates of the zodiac are ruled over by two of these angels. Likewise, each of
the 36 pip card (minus the Aces) are ruled over by these same angels.

Visualization and Imagination


One of the meanings of the word visualize is to make visible. This involves creating a
mental image or envisaging something, especially as a future possibility. In the magical
use of the term it refers to making something visible in the astral plane.
Some of the archangels and angels that are used to invoke the energies of the Tarot
cards are easy for us to visualize because theyve been described many times in rituals
such as the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram. The archangels of the four elements are well known to most Western magicians. Many people already know what
colours and symbols are associated with these angels: Raphael, archangel of Air; Michael, archangel of Fire; Gabriel, archangel of Water; and Uriel, archangel of Earth.
However, other angels, including many of the planetary and zodiacal angels and archangels, are more obscure and not so well known. These angels are not so easy for magicians to visualize because there is quite simply no visual description of them anywhere.
For many of the these angels, such as Adnakhiel, the archangel of Sagittarius or Nakhiel,
the Intelligence of Sol, all we know about them is their name, the numerology of their
name and their basic function. No grimoire tells us what they look like. To resolve this
problem we must turn to the magical faculty of the imagination.

Magical Images of the Tarot Angels


Making a viable connection with an angel you wish to invoke is an important step in the
ritual consecration of tarot talismans. One way to do this is to improve your faculty of
imagination, is to create magical images and sigils of the angels.
Now you must know that angelic spirits, seeing that they are of a pure intellect, and altogether incorporeal, are not marked with any marks or characters, and pingible figures, or any other human signs; but we not knowing
their essence, or quality, do from their names, or works, or otherwise, according to our fancies devote and consecrate to them figures, and marks,
by which we cannot any way compel them to us, but by which we rise up
to themwe calling upon them in spirit, and truth, by true names and characters do obtain from them that virtue or power which we desire. (Agrippa, Three Books of Occult Philosophy)

Some of the archangels and angels


that are used to
invoke the energies
of the Tarot cards
are easy for us to
visualize because
theyve been described many
times ...other angels, including
many of the planetary and zodiacal
angels and archangels, are more obscure and not so
well known.

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Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
In scriptural texts, angels are often described as taking on the form of geometric shapes,
fireballs or great pillars of fire and light. When assuming these forms, angels display their
breathtaking power and are viewed with awe by the Biblical authors:
And I saw another mighty angel come down from
heaven, clothed with a cloud: and a rainbow was upon his
head, and his face was as if it were the sun, and his feet as
pillars of fire. And he had in his hand a little book open:
and he set his right foot upon the sea, and his left foot on
the earth. And he cried out with a loud voice, as when a
lion roareth: and when he cried, seven thunders uttered
their voices. (The Book of Revelations: 10:1)
Angels certainly can and do present themselves to us in human
form for our better understanding. This is evidenced by numerous encounters between humans and angels as recounted in
religious texts from various traditions. The Book of Tobit describes one incident where
the archangel Raphael was mistaken for a human:

A telesmatic image is an illustration constructed


according to a
predetermined
set of correspondences.. This image is then consecrated and
charged to
achieve a specific purpose.

Tobiah went to look for someone acquainted with the roads who would
travel with him to Media. As soon as he went out, he found the angel Raphael standing before him, though he did not know this was an angel of God.
Tobiah said to him, Who are you, young man? (The Book of Tobit 5:4-5.)
Many angelic representations are classified as mantic or dream images. These are forms
that angels and archangels assume spontaneously without any conscious effort on the
part of the magician viewing them. Unfortunately, visual representations of angels are far
and few between and they do not begin to cover the various angels specified in talismanic magic. If no written descriptions of particular angels and archangels exist, how
can we know what they look like? How can we get a firm picture in our minds in order to
connect with them? What can we do to visualize them in our magical work? One approach to tackling this problem is to use telesmatic images.

Telesmatic Magic
All of the work that goes into the planning of a talisman consecration ritual is a crucial
part of the ritual. Preparation helps the magician focus on the goal of the ceremony,
rather than worrying about ad-lib speeches or unrehearsed movements. Telesmatic
magic, a system of magic developed by the Golden Dawn, is all about correspondences,
preparation and visualization.
The word telesmata is a Greek term which means talismans. A telesmatic image is an
image of a deity or angel that is consciously constructed by the magician. The energy
that is put into the telesmatic image is known as telesma. It is the force used to activate
and charge the image.
A telesmatic image is an illustration constructed according to a predetermined set of correspondences.. This image is then consecrated and charged to achieve a specific purpose.
And the charged image becomes a sacred icona powerful living symbol of the force it
represents. The image of the angel may be drawn or painted and serve as a physical talisman in its own right, or it may be simply envisioned on the astral to give power and energy to a talisman consecration ritual.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

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Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)

General Telesmatic Images


A general telesmatic image is a coherent, logically constructed image of a deity or angel
that is formulated in accordance with a standard set of colours, symbols and other correspondences employed by Western magicians. The chart given below gives a breakdown of the Golden Dawns colour correspondences which are used to create these
magical images.
Attribution
Kether
Chokmah
Binah
Chesed
Geburah
Tiphareth
Netzach
Hod
Yesod
Malkuth
M Air
S Mercury
R Luna
T Venus
A Aries
B Taurus
C Gemini
D Cancer
E Leo
F Virgo
V Jupiter
G Libra
N Water
H Scorpio
I Sagittarius
J Capricorn

Hebrew
Letter
----------a aleph

Main Colour

Complementary Colour

white
grey
black
blue
red
yellow
green
orange
violet
citrine, olive, russet, black
yellow

black
white
white
orange
green
violet
red
blue
yellow
white
violet

b
g
d
h
w
z
j
f
y
k
l
m
n
s
u

beth
gimel
daleth
heh
vav
zayin
cheth
teth
yod
kaph
lamed
mem
nun
samekh
ayin

yellow
blue
green
red
red-orange
orange
yellow-orange
yellow
yellow-green
violet
green
blue
blue-green
blue
blue-violet

violet
orange
red
green
blue-green
blue
blue-violet
violet
red-violet
yellow
red
orange
red-orange
orange
yellow-orange

U
K

Mars
Aquarius

p
x

peh
tzaddi

red
violet

green
yellow

Pisces

qoph

red-violet

yellow-green

Q
O
d
W
L

Sol
Fire
Spirit
Saturn
Earth

resh

orange
red
white
blue-violet
citrine, olive, russet, black

blue
green
black
yellow-orange
white

c shin
t tav

A general telesmatic image is a


coherent, logically constructed
image of a deity
or angel that is
formulated in
accordance with
a standard set of
colours, symbols
and other correspondences.

Page 16

Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
By utilizing these basic colour attributions, as well as other symbolism, anyone can create
a general telesmatic image of a given angel.
For example: the archangel of Mars and the Tower card is
Zamael. This entity can be pictured as a mighty warrior angel,
dressed in robes of red ornamented with green, with flaming
red hair and wings composed of red and green feathers. He
may have the symbol of Mars or the Hebrew letter Peh (the
letter assigned to Mars) emblazoned on his chest. Zamael
might also be visualized with a sword and a shield
implements that are well suited to a Martial temperament.
Any of the tarot angels can be visualized in this fashion, using
their own correspondences to build them up in the imagination.
It may be somewhat more difficult for readers to create general telesmatic images of the angels of the thirty--six decanate
cards, since these angels are derived from the Shem ha-Mephoresh and each card has
two angels attributed to it. However, this can also be accomplished with a little effort.

By utilizing
these basic colour attributions,
as well as other
symbolism, anyone can create a
general telesmatic image of a
given angel.

Example: Two of Pentacles. This card corresponds to the first decanate of Capricorn
(Jupiter in Capricorn 1o10o). The two angels who correspond to this card are Lekabel
and Veshiriah. It would be logical to visualize one of these angels as male and the other
female but which one is which?
One school of thought says that angels that whose names end in the suffix iah are masculine and those that end in el are feminine because these are the respective masculine
and feminine names of God on the male (Yah) and female Pillars (Ehohim) of the Qabalistic Tree of Life. However, in the Hebrew language, names that end in ah are usually
considered feminine. Also, some pip cards have two angels whose names both end in
el or both end in iah, so this rule of thumb is not helpful in all cases.
Lekabel is listed as Shem ha-Mephoresh angel number 31, while Veshiriah is angel number 32. The first angel of any decanate card is called the day angel, while the second
angel is known as the night angel. For millennia day and night have been assigned
respectively to male (solar) and female (lunar). Therefore, in our current example, it
would be a natural conclusion to make Lekabel appear male and Veshiriah to appear female.
One simple way to visualize this pair of angels is
to apply them to the correspondences of their
cards decanate. The Two of Pentacles corresponds to the first decanate of Capricorn
specifically, Jupiter in Capricorn. You could apply
the first angel of the pair (Lekabel) to Jupiter and
the second angel (Veshiriah) to Capricorn. Using
this method, Lekabel could be imagined as a male
angel wearing violet-coloured robes emblazoned
with the symbol of the planet Jupiter in yellow.
Veshiriah could be visualized as a female angel
dressed in robes of blue-violet ornamented with the symbol of Capricorn in yelloworange. Both angels would have wings in the appropriate colours and they could hold a

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Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
single pentacle between them, the symbol of this cards suit. Following the symbolism
of the pillars on the Tree of Life, Lekabel would stand on the right or masculine side and
Veshiriah would be on the left or feminine side.
Another example: the Ten of Cups. This card is
attributed to the second decanate of Pisces
Mars in Pisces, 20 o30 o. The two angels assigned to this card are Ashiliah (angel number
47) and Mayahel (angel number 48). The first
angel, Ashiliah, could be visualized dressed in
robes of red, emblazoned with the symbol of
Mars. The second angel, Mayahel, could be
imagined in red-violet robes ornamented with
the symbol of Pisces. The two angels could hold
a large Cup between them. You could envision
the day angel Ashiliah as male and the night angel Mayahel as female. Or, if you tend to think of angels whose name end in iah as
feminine and those whose names end in el as masculine, go right ahead and reverse
the gender for your magical image of these two Beings. Keep in mind that angels can
appear to us in any form that they wish. In many instances, we choose the manner in
which angels will appear, because they will take on whatever form is needed in order to
communicate with us.

Literal Telesmatic Images


A literal telesmatic image is an image of a deity or angel that is constructed from its
name, letter by letter. In other words, the Hebrew name of a spiritual entity is first analyzed. The various correspondences of each Hebrew letter are then used to construct
the image of the being.
To create a literal telesmatic image of an angel, you must first have its name transliterated into Hebrew letters. Next, you would construct the image of the angel so that the
first letter of the name represents its head and the last letter represents its feet. All the
remaining letters would represent the rest of the body, in order from head to foot.
There will be as many body parts as there are letters in the name. Refer to the chart that
shows the Golden Dawns traditional telesmatic attributions of the Hebrew alphabet on
page 18.
In a traditional telesmatic image, any angel whose name ends in el may have golden
wings which may partially cover the lower part of the figure. The figure may also have
the symbols of justicethe scales of Libra and the Sword of Justice in green. These implements may be held in the angels hands or lying at the angels feet. Any angel whose
name ends in yah may look like a King or Queen sitting on a throne with a brilliant
aura around its feet. But these suffixes may be thought of as incidental attributions and
they do not need to have too much notice given to them in the construction of telesmatic images.

Telesmatic Images of Godnames


The Qabalah teaches that there are four distinct levels or planes of existence. These are
known as the four Qabalistic Worlds. Each world emanates from the one before it, progressively becoming more solid as the divine energy manifests from pure spirit into
dense, physical form. These Four Worlds are: Atziluth, Briah, Yetzirah, and Assiah:

A literal telesmatic
image is a semblance of a deity or
angel that is constructed from its
name, letter by
letter. In other
words, the Hebrew
name of a spiritual
entity is first analyzed. The various
correspondences of
each Hebrew letter
are then used to
construct the image of the being.

Page 18

Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
Hebrew
Letter

The magician
astrally formulates the image
from symbols,
creating it from
visual correspondences
found in the
astral world of
Yetzirah, the socalled Treasure
House of Images.

Attribution

Traditional GD Telesmatic Attribution


Generally hermaphroditic but leaning more toward
masculine, spiritual, winged, slender.

aleph

Air

beth

Mercury

gimel

Luna

daleth

Venus

Masculine, active, slender.


Feminine, grey, beautiful yet changeable, full face
and body.
Feminine, beautiful, attractive, full face and body.

heh

Aries

Feminine, fiery, strong, fierce.

vav

Taurus

Masculine, steady, strong, heavy, clumsy.

zayin

Gemini

Masculine, thin, intelligent.

cheth

Cancer

Feminine, full face without expression.

teth

Leo

Feminine, strong and fiery.

yod

Virgo

Feminine, white, delicate.

kaph

Jupiter

Masculine, big and strong.

lamed

Libra

mem

Water

nun

Scorpio

Feminine, well-proportioned.
Generally hermaphroditic, but leaning more toward feminine, reflective, dreamlike.
Masculine, square, determined face, full, dark,
sinewy.

samekh

Sagittarius

Masculine, thin, expressive face, active.

ayin

Capricorn

Masculine, mechanical.

peh

Mars

Feminine, fierce, strong, full and resolute.

tzaddi

Aquarius

Feminine, thoughtful and intellectual.

qoph

Pisces

Masculine, full face.

resh

Sol

Masculine, proud and dominant.

shin

tav

O
d
W
L

Fire
Spirit
Saturn
Earth

Generally hermaphroditic but leaning more toward


masculine, fierce and active.
Generally hermaphroditic but leaning more toward
feminine, dark and grey.

In telesmatic magic,, the highest divine Hebrew godnames are assigned to the divine or
archetypal world of Atziluth. The names of archangels are assigned to Briah, the creative world. The lesser angels and groups of angels correspond to Yetzirah, the formative
world. Elementals, lower spirits, and human beings are all attributed to the material
world of Assiah.
It would be difficult to apply a telesmatic image to a divine Atziluthic name, for in reality,
all telesmatic images belong to the world of Yetzirah, the formative world. This is because the magician astrally formulates the image from symbols, creating it from visual
correspondences found in the astral world of Yetzirah, the so-called Treasure House of
Images. Therefore the telesmatic image of a Hebrew godname such as Shaddai El--Chai

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 19

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
or Adonai ha-Aretz could not really represent that force in the divine world of Atziluth,
because such a holy name cannot be accurately portrayed in telesmatic fashion.
Instead, any godname constructed in a telesmatic manner would represent the counterpart of that name in Yetzirah. Telesmatic images of the mighty archangels would also
portray the Yetziratic image of a Briatic name. However, the magicians of the Golden
Dawn, as well as its offshoot orders the Stella Matutina and the Alpha et Omega, certainly
did make telesmatic images from the highest godnames and archangels as evidenced by
the following description:
The name ADONAI will represent the figure from the
head to the waist; and HA- ARETZ from the waist to
the feet. This is the Divine Name of the Zelator Grade,
answering to MALKUTH and the material Universe.
ALEPH: winged: white brilliant radiating crown.
DALETH: beautiful womans head and neck with a
stern and fixed expression. Hair long, dark and very
waving. The hair is dark to represent Malkuth, which
derives its radiance from the spiritual force of Kether
which crowns it. NUN: arms and hands bare and
strong, extended in the form of a cross, holding a
golden cup in the left hand and in the right ears of
ripe corn bound together. Large, dark and spreading
wings. YOD: deep yellow-green robe, covering the
strong chest, on which is a square gold Lamen with a
scarlet Greek Cross occupying the centre thereof. This
does not quite touch the borders of the Lamen. In the angles are 4 small red
Greek Crosses. A broad gold belt surrounds the waist and thereon is written in
scarlet, thus, in the Theban characters. The feet are shown flesh-coloured with
golden sandals. Long yellow-green drapery, rayed with olive, reaches down to
the feet. Beneath are black and rolling clouds with lurid patches of colour.
Around the figure are red flashings of lightning. Sword is girt to the right side
of the figure. It is a terrific form which stretches through the Universe, the
crown being in Yetzirah and the clouds bordering on the Qlippoth. (1)
However, the magicians of the Golden Dawn also created Atziluthic images of godnames by drawing the letters of the name in the formation of
a cross. The name would be written twicefrom right to left and from
top to bottom. A flaming aura would be drawn around the figure. This
cross formation was considered a more accurate representation of the
holy power of a godname such as Adonai ha-Aretz or Shaddai El-Chai on
the level of Atziluth.
The gender of the telesmatic figure is determined by the predominance of the gender of
the letters. In higher divine beings, gender can be described more in terms of energy
forces: movement and stability. Activity and movement are considered masculine traits.
Stability and composure are feminine traits.

(1) From a paper entitled Flying Roll No. XII: On Angelic Telesmatic Images & Vibratory Mode of
Pronouncing Divine Names: (Mathers).

The gender of the


telesmatic figure
is determined by
the predominance of the gender of the letters.
In higher divine
beings, gender
can be described
more in terms of
energy forces:
movement and
stability.

Page 20

Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)

Lists of Telesmatic Attributions

The Hebrew letters that represent


the elements were
thought to be
primarily gender-neutral or hermaphroditic, but
of these, the gender of the element
influences that of
the letter: AlephAir / Shin-Fire are
more masculine,
Mem-Water / TauEarth are more
feminine.

The Golden
Dawn teachings
Hebrew
Traditio- AmenHebrew
Traditio- Ameninclude a list of
Letter
nal GD
ded
Letter
nal GD
ded
the traditional
gender attribuH/M
H/M
F
F
a aleph
l lamed
tions of the HeM
M
H/F
H/F
m mem
brew letters. We b beth
have also develF
F
M
F
g gimel
n nun
oped our own
F
F
M
F
d daleth
s samekh
amended list of
Hebrew letter
F
F
M
M
h heh
u ayin
gender attribuM
M
F
M
w vav
p peh
tions (see table
to the right).
M
M
F
F
z zayin
x tzaddi
Why have we
revised the genF
F
M
F
j cheth
q qoph
ders of some of
F
M
M
M
f teth
r resh
the letters? The
Golden Dawn
F
H/M
H/M
M
y yod
c shin
originally divided
M
M
H/F
H/F
k kaph
t tav
up the letters
into male and
female because of their sound. They thought that some letters had a prolonged (or ACTIVE) sound, while others had an arrested (or STABLE) sound. Those that were prolonged were said to be masculine, while those that were arrested were said to be feminine.
The Hebrew letters that represent the Elements (Aleph, Mem, Shin, and Tau) were
thought to be primarily gender--neutral or hermaphroditic. But of these, the gender of
the element influences the gender of the letter. Therefore Aleph-AIR and Shin-FIRE are
more masculine. Mem-WATER and Tau-EARTH are more feminine.
Next, the Golden Dawn divided up the letters assigned to the Planets as alternately masculine and feminine. This classification appears to have been derived not so much from
the sound of the letters, but primarily from each planets correspondence to the sephiroth in a descending sequence on the Tree of Life.
Planet

Sephirah

Hebrew

Gender

Saturn

(Binah)

tav

= Feminine

Jupiter

(Chesed)

kaph

= Masculine

Mars

(Geburah)

peh

= Feminine

Sol

(Tiphareth)

resh

= Masculine

Venus

(Netzach)

daleth

= Feminine

Mercury

(Hod)

beth

= Masculine

Luna

(Yesod)

gimel

= Feminine

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 21

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
The twelve simple letters were assigned to the Zodiacal Signs.
Hebrew Letter

Zodiacal Sign

Hebrew Letter

Zodiacal Sign

h heh

Aries

lamed

Libra

vav

Taurus

nun

Scorpio

zayin

Gemini

samekh

Sagittarius

j cheth

Cancer

ayin

Capricorn

f teth

Leo

tzaddi

Aquarius

Virgo

qoph

Pisces

yod

These simple letters were divided up into two groups (6 male and 6 female). This classification was based, on the sounds of the lettersand whether they were prolonged
(MALE) or arrested (FEMALE).
We decided to change some of the gender attributions from traditional Golden Dawn
teachings for our own personal use. This is because we thought there were some inconsistencies in the old attributions. The major inconsistency (in our opinion) was the letter
Yod being called a feminine letter. In the Tetragrammaton or Four-lettered name of God,
Yod is always described as masculineit is the archetypal Father image. Another example
of inconsistency was the letter Peh being described as feminine. In Golden Dawn symbolism, Peh is assigned to Mars, a planet of fiery masculine energy. It did not seem practical
from a Hermetic-alchemical point of view to have the letters assigned to both Venus and
Mars as feminine in characteristic.
Also, the traditional explanation of the prolonged and arrested sounds of the letters being responsible for their gender assignment did not seem totally consistent either. In reality, vowels are the only letters that can be prolonged--consonants are notand Hebrew is
an alphabet that has no vowels. (In Hebrew, vowel sounds are indicated by a series of
pointings called dageshes, which are generally not used in magic.) A vowel sound is created by the relatively free passage of breath through the larynx and oral cavity, usually
forming the most primary sound of a syllable, while a consonant sound is produced by a
partial or complete obstruction of the air stream by the constrictive action of the tongue,
teeth, or throat.) It is difficult to see how the letter Nun (or N) is supposed to sound prolonged, while the letter Lamed (or L) is supposed to sound arrested.
Outside of the four letters that directly represent the elements (Aleph, Mem, Shin and
Tau), the elemental attributions of the zodiacal signs seem to play no part in the gender
attributions of the Hebrew letters. For example: the letter Heh is assigned to Aries, a fiery,
masculine sign, but Heh is traditionally a letter that is associated with the Great Mother
and with Water and Earth and so the letter Heh is Feminine.
In our amended list of gender attributions, we have changed the genders of 6 out of 22
letters. The result is a list that is balanced 11 and 11-- half masculine, half feminine.

Aside from the


four letters that
directly represent
the elements
(Aleph, Mem,
Shin and Tau),
the elemental
attributions of
the zodiacal
signs seem to
play no part in
the gender attributions of the
Hebrew letters.

Page 22

Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
Keep in mind that a telesmatic image is meant to be a personal magical creation. The list
of correspondences is meant to be used merely as a guideline. You can use either the
traditional Golden Dawn telesmatic attributions or our own amended list of attributions.
The choice is yours. None of this Gospel.. You may find that a particular angel you are working
with should have a different gender or symbol than one given on the list. If this is the case, use
what seems to work best for you.

The Construction of the Image


To create the telesmatic Image of a deity or angel, you must first have its name transliterated into Hebrew letters. Next you would construct the image of the Being so that the
first letter of the name represents its head and the last letter represents its feet. All the
remaining letters would represent the rest of the body, in order from head to foot.
There will be as many body parts as there are letters in the name.
Example: to make a Telesmatic image of Gabriel, the archangel of Yesod. To do this you
could use the traditional correspondences, or the amended attributions. (For all of the
examples here, we will use the amended version.)
The name of Gabriel (layrbg) is composed of the Hebrew letters: Gimel, Beth, Resh,
Yod, Aleph and Lamed. If we placed the letters in a vertical line we can form the body of
the image:
Each letter is
also assigned a
certain colour.
These colours
would be
blended together to get the
overall colour of
the image.

g
b
r
y
a
l

Gimel
Beth
Resh
Yod
Aleph
Lamed

head and crown


neck and shoulders
chest, arms, hands
stomach
hips and legs
feet

F
M
M
M
H/M
F

yellow-green
yellow
orange
yellow-green
yellow
green

Each letter is also assigned a certain colour. These colours would be blended together
to get the overall colour of the image. This colour could be used on the figures clothing, or as an aura of light which surrounds the Being. According to the amended list of
attributions, there is a majority of masculine letters. (On the old list of attributions, Yod
would be feminine. This would have given us 3 male and 3 female letters, resulting in a
gender-neutral Being.)
So if we created the Telesmatic Image of Gabriel from our
amended list, the result would be this:
A youthful Angelic Being, possibly a hermaphrodite, but leaning toward the masculine. Rather boyish. The face is very
attractive and full. His hair and eyes are dark but his skin is
pale. Upon his brow is the Lunar crescent. His neck and
shoulders are slender. Upon his shoulders are large delicate,
golden wings which partially cover the lower part of his
body. His body shows poise, balance, dominance and a deep
sense of tranquillity. Upon his chest is a Rose--Cross Lamen
bearing his sigil. The golden glow of the Lamen radiates outward from his chest. He wears a yellow tunic that is trimmed
with green. He wears a wide belt engraved with his name in Hebrew letters. His hands
are long and artistic. In one hand he holds a Crosier Staff. His slender feet stand upon

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 23

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
the clouds. The sword of justice hangs from his waist. Around the figure is a greenish-yellow light, the synthesis of all his colours. The complimentary colour of greenish--yellow
is reddish-violet. This colour could be used to accent certain parts of our telesmatic image
of Gabriel.
Whatever letter is used to represent the chest of the figure also indicates the symbol for
the lamen or badge worn on the chest. Likewise, whatever letter is used to represent the
crown also indicates the symbol worn on the crown.
For another example, we could make an image of Mahashiah, one of the angels of the
Shem ha--Mephoresh or 72-fold name of God. This particular angel, Mahashiah, rules over
Mars in Leo. Its name means Seeking Safety and could be used for protection. The
name of Mahashiah (hychm) is composed of the Hebrew letters: Mem, Heh, Shin, Yod,
and Heh. If we placed the letters in a vertical line we can form the body of the Image:

m
h
c
y
h

Mem
Heh
Shin
Yod
Heh

head, crown, face


neck, shoulders, chest
arms, hands, stomach
hips and legs
feet

H/F
F
H/M
M
F

blue
red
red
yellow-green
red

Using our correspondences, the figure would look like this: a beautiful female warrior of slender build. Her face is full and dreamlike.
She has dark brown hair and eyes. Upon her brow is the symbol of
the Tet (tjet) or Knot of Isis in blue. Her body is strong, fiery and active. She wears red armor and chain-mail. Upon her chest is a
golden Lamen with a green Pyramid Cross.. In both hands, she holds
red pyramids of flame. Her name in Hebrew is engraved upon a
wide green belt. She has fiery red wings. Her wrists are also winged.
She is seated upon a throne like a queen. A flaming glory is at her
feet. The figure is surrounded by a red-violet lightthe synthesis of
all her colours combined.

To demonstrate a telesmatic image of the godname Shaddai El Chai:: to create a Yetziratic


version of the name, you would follow the same method as before. In this case, the name
is formed from two namesShaddai (spelled Shin, Daleth, Yod) and El-Chai (Aleph,
Lamed, Cheth, Yod). The word Shaddai would form the upper part of the body and ElChai would give shape to the lower part:

c
d
y
a
l
j

Shin
Daleth
Yod
Aleph
Lamed
Cheth
Yod

head
neck and shoulders
chest
arms
hips and thighs
the legs
the feet

H/M
F
M
H/M
F
F
M

red
green
yellow-green
yellow
green
yellow-orange
yellow-green

Whatever letter
is used to represent the chest of
the figure also
indicates the
symbol for the
lamen . Likewise, the letter
that gives the
crown also indicates the symbol
worn on it.

Page 24

Hermetic Virtues

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
Your Yetziratic image of Shaddai El-Chai could look like this: the figure would have a white winged crown upon which is a triangle and
trefoil united. The figure itself would be a hermaphroditic with a
slight masculine leaning. Light hair and eyes. The face is peaceful
but active. The neck and shoulders are graceful and well-formed.
The chest is slender. The Lamen is a stylized hand. One hand holds
a rosethe other a fan. The figure is dressed in a yellow-green robe.
A golden winged belt surrounds the waiston it are the letters of the
name Shaddai El-Chai in violet letters. A sword hangs from the belt.
The lower part of the body is well-proportioned. The feet stand upon
the ground. The figure is surrounded by a yellow-green aura, the synthesis of all the
corresponding colours.
A further example of a telesmatic image of Shelachel, the intelligence of the Moon associated with the trump card of the High
Priestess: the Hebrew letters of this angels name are: Shin, Lamed,
Cheth, Aleph, Lamed. The letters would form the body of the angel thus:

c Shin
Great magical aid
can also be given
to the our planet
from on high. To
this end you can
devise modified
Middle Pillar and
Qabalistic Cross
rituals which could
be used daily to
provide the Earth
with healing
energy.

l
j

a
l

Lamed
Cheth
Aleph
Lamed

crown, head, & face


neck, shoulders, & chest
arms, hands, & stomach
hips and legs
feet

H/M
F
F
H/M
F

red
green
yellow-orange
yellow
green

It is also possible to create telesmatic images out of words which can be used to represent archetypal forces. For example, if the magician had a strong affiliation with Egyptian magic, she could create a magical image out of the word Egypt.. Such a figure
might be considered an archangelic guardian of the Egyptian current of energy. The
English letters of the word Egypt would be transliterated into the
Hebrew letters Aleph, Gimel, Yod, Peh and Tav.

a Aleph
g Gimel
y

p
t

Yod
Peh
Tav

crown, head, & face


neck, shoulders, & chest
arms, hands, & stomach
hips and legs
feet

H/M
F
M
M
H/F

yellow
blue
yellow-green
red
blue-violet

The telesmatic image of the name Egypt would appear male,


since the majority of letters are male. The head of this angelic
figure would be winged, with fair hair and eyes. It would also wear the lunar horned
headdress surrounding a disk containing the image of a spiral. The figure would have
an attractive full body and upon his chest is the lamen of the Lunate Cross. In one hand
he holds a Lotus Wand.. The lower part of his body is strong and muscularand it is covered with a red linen kilt. The feet stand upon a vast field of stars. The entire figure is
surrounded by a blue-violet aura, tinged yellow around the edges.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 25

Tarot Talismans
and Telesmatic Images
(continued)
There are times when a magician might want
to create an Elemental form out of an Angelic
name. In this case the figure could have an animal head such as the Kerubim or Protective
spirits of Babylon..
This Elemental Being would represent more of
a synthesis of the elemental powers of the
name. Its skin could be any colour. It would be
a synthetic Kerub or sphinx, rather than an Angel. This figure would correspond more to the
plane of Assiah than Yetzirah. We could build this figure using the same list of correspondences.
The Elemental form of the name Mahashiah would look like this:
m
h
c
y
h

Mem
Heh
Shin
Yod
Heh

blue
red
red
yellow-green
red

N
A
O
F
A

Head of an eagle.
Neck and shoulders shaggy.
Chest of a woman. Winged.
Hips / legs are slender.
Feet of a ram.

The result is a figure with the head of an eagle surrounded by a blue


halo. The neck and shoulders are shaggy like that of a ram. There is a
majority of feminine letters, so the figure will have the chest of a
woman. Fiery red wings emerge from the shoulders and wrists. The
legs are slender and athletic and the feet end in the hooves of a ram.
The skin-colour is red. The figure is surrounded by a bright red-violet
aura, a synthesis of all the colours.
The methods for creating tarot talismans and telesmatic images presented here are certainly not the only ways to create such talismans.
Much of what we have imparted here is traditional Golden Dawn
information and yet some of it isn't. Some of it is purely our own creation. No matter what the origin, none of this material is cast in stone.
No one can show you "The One True Way" of all magic, so don't bother chasing Secret Chiefs or
the guru of the month. What ultimately matters is what works for you, the ceremonial magician.
Take what useful kernels you find here and there and create your own techniques.
(This lecture was from the book Tarot Talismans: Invoke the Angels of the Tarot by Chic Cicero
and Sandra Tabatha Cicero)

Copyright 2008 Sandra Tabatha Cicero

The methods for


creating tarot
talismans and
telesmatic images
presented here
are certainly not
the only ways to
create such talismans.

Page 26

Hermetic Virtues

The Star
by Harry Wendrich
From the HorusHathor Temple GD Tarot deck, researched by Nick Farrell and painted by Harry
and Nicola Wendrich of Wendrich artHouse.

The Star, Key 17, Aquaruis, Tzaddi

Few people
understand the
meaning of the
Star. It is often
one of those
cards that people describe as
'boring', particularly after
the seemingly
more dramatic
Tower or Devil
cards.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 27

The Star
(continued)
Few people understand the meaning of the Star. It is often one of those cards that people describe as 'boring', particularly after the seemingly more dramatic Tower or Devil
cards. This is partly confirmed by the Golden Dawn keyword being meditation
although a necessary part of the spiritual path, it never has an association with danger
and excitement.
When creating the Star card, we found that the archetypal influence is a sensual, uplifting
energy unsurprisingly, since Venus predominates the image in her most youthful and
beautiful aspect. She reflects the Hebrew letter Tzaddi (hook) in the water below. It is
interesting to note that Crowley felt that a hook was the wrong symbol for the Star and
changed it to Heh (window). In doing so, he seems to have opened up a way for sex
magic to be used in conjunction with the scarlet woman.

To me, Tzaddi as a hook has the suggestion of sexual magnetism that brings two people
together, uniting them for the purpose of procreation. Pat and Chris Zalewski, in their
book The Magical Tarot, say that the original symbol for Tzaddi was a rod, the masculine
principle, which was later divided into two. (p 176)
As Venus is placed in Aquarius, she radiates sensual magnetism, manifesting as a colour
wheel (which here demonstrates that magenta is the true primary red, the energy of
which is more feminine than masculine). She invites us into her sphere of sensation a
rhapsodic expression of love.
The rays of colour emanate from her sexual centre outwards, creating fertile ground
which has an anticlockwise movement, showing the expanding energy of her nature. In
the background can be seen the Tree of Life: Involution and the Tree of the Knowledge
of Good and Evil: Evolution.
Above her head is the Star of Venus, also considered to be the star Sirius, which completes an arc over her head, depicting the night sky of the Goddess Nuit.
As the Supernal Mother, Aima Elohim, she holds the jugs of Chokmah and Binah, pouring
out the sacred waters of life which unite as one river below. Shaped as a heart, it shows
the true nature of this card: A sustaining and replenishing force of love, bringing about
the healing of a wounded world.
In the sequence of the major keys, the Star follows the destruction of the Tower. In the
aftermath of that carnage, the mysteries of the Tarot tell us there is a period of calm and
hope where we plan the construction of our new life. It should also be remembered that
in the myth of Christian Rosenkreuz, the Vault was entered through the Venus Wall after
the demolition of the surrounding obstructions.
The hint that the Star is giving us, is that after the blinding divine realization that shatters
our life, we should rebuild it on the idea of love and hope.

Divination:
Sexual magnetism; self-awareness; inspiration and meditation; the rising feelings of wonder for Creation; astrological influences; hope for the best outcome; altruistic love; a period of calm and reflection; going within to find the answers; healing.

Copyright 2008 Harry Wendrich

The hint that


the Star is giving
us, is that after
the blinding
divine realization that shatters our life, we
should rebuild it
on the idea of
love and hope.

Page 28

Hermetic Virtues

Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
by Samuel Scarborough
When we first come to the Art of Magick we are asked to choose a motto or a magickal
name of some sort. Each of the various traditions within the Western Mystery Traditions
has different criteria for what composes a motto or magickal name. Some of these traditions use names that reflect the goals and aspirations of the magician, while some use
magickal names chosen from spirit guides, totem animals, or some other means to
choose a designation for the new magician.

Just what does this motto or name represent? This is one of the first questions that often come up when we decide to begin doing the Great Work or Magnum Opus. The
next question that we ask ourselves about the motto is, Just how do I choose a motto?
This is followed by, Why should I use some strange, often very foreign, language for a
motto? And finally, Just how do I determine how to choose a motto that is right for
me? These and other questions concerning the choosing of the motto will be answered in this article.
The very first question is, What does the motto or magickal name represent? We are
told that the motto represents the goals and aspirations that we are striving for when
doing the Great Work. What does this truly represent and why should a magician create a motto for themselves?

A motto is an
adopted expression of a guiding
principle or ideal
of a person, organization, city or
nation. It can be
a word, phrase or
sentence, expressing that
principle or ideal
to which the
bearer ascribes.

So just what is a motto? A motto is an adopted expression of a guiding principle or ideal


of a person, organization, city or nation. It can be a word, phrase or sentence, expressing that principle or ideal to which the person, organization, city or nation ascribes.
Most nations have a motto, often inscribed on an official seal or on a flag. In the United
States, for example, the motto is E Pluribus Unum, Latin, meaning Out of Many, One.
This represents that the original United States was composed of separate States which
came together to form a larger whole. Even within the United States, for instance, each
State also has a motto. North Carolinas state motto is Esse Quam Videri, Latin, meaning
To be rather than to seem, and New York States motto is Excelsior, Latin for Higher.
These mottos all express what the country or state aspirations are for itself and its people. In a similar vein, organizations often have mottos which reflect their goals or aspirations that they are working towards.

The same applies to a motto being used by a person for magical means but the magical
motto of a person also fulfills another function for the magician. It creates the magical
persona or personality, which is something separate from the mundane persona or personality of the magician in everyday life. There are certain psychological effects that occur when the magician puts on the Robe, Slippers and Nemyss (if in the GD tradition),
which immediately connect them to the magical persona or personality and differentiates the mundane life from the magical.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 29

Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
But how do you develop this magical motto and persona that is associated with it? The
first thing is to decide on what your goals and aspirations are in doing the Great Work;
from there you meditate on these aims. The particular tradition that you are working
with will determine what form your motto or magical name takes. Below I am going to
go through the process of choosing a motto in the Golden Dawn tradition, using a fictional person to show how this is done.
Our fictional person is John Dee Aspirant and he has decided after long thought and extensive reading of Golden Dawn material by Regardie, the Ciceros, Pat Zalewski and others that he is now ready to take the next step and perform actual Golden Dawn work. He
contacts the local Golden Dawn temple, where he is given an application. This he
promptly fills out but runs into a snag when he is asked what motto he will choose and
told that these mottos are traditionally in Latin, Greek, Hebrew or Gaelic. The first
thought that runs through Johns mind is that he does not know Latin, Greek, Hebrew or
any other foreign language to write in for his motto.
The actual thought of coming up with a motto representing his hopes, dreams, goals and
aspirations now really seems overwhelming to John. He approaches the person who
gave him the application and asks about the motto. This person promptly tells John to
meditate on what his goals are in the Great Work, to write these down in English (Johns
native language) and then translate into Latin or one of the other languages. John immediately says he does not know how to translate into Latin nor Latin grammar. This gets
a smile from the Golden Dawn person helping him, who lends John a battered and wellused Latin dictionary to use for ideas. Also he gives John a list of former, historical Golden
Dawn members with their mottos so that he can get an idea. This person then warns
John that the list of mottos is merely for illustration and that he should not use one of
those at all, but to create his own. John goes home thoroughly bewildered.
Now that we have seen John has arrived at the point where many of us have been, let us
look at some of the mechanisms that he was told to work through in coming up with a
motto. Our fictional aspirant was told to solidify his aspirations for doing the Great Work
into words and then to meditate on his aspirations. From there he can translate those
aspirations into Latin. Okay, so why was our fictional aspirant told to meditate on those
goals and aspirations?
It is an act of will on the part of the would-be magician to begin the magical path and
since it is an act of will to begin this particular path, the magician in many ways needs to
divorce themselves from their old ways and their normal mundane life. To signify this
change in the consciousness, the would-be magician must create a new persona which
lives the magical life and does the Great Work. This is something of a death and a rebirth
for the would-be magician and is the first real act of magick which is performed on their
part. This first real act of magick potentially creates a schizophrenic split in the personality
of the would-be magician when the choice of a magical motto is taken to represent the
magical persona.
This concept is explored by W. E. Butler in his The Magician: His Training and Work when
he states:
It must, however, be kept in mind that the personality-splitting or
schizophrenic tendency, has to be reckoned with in this work. We see a
similar state of affairs in connection with certain actors and actresses who
have to play some particular character in a play which enjoys a very long

The first thing


is to decide on
what your
goals and aspirations are in
doing the
Great Work;
from there you
meditate on
these aims.

Page 30

Hermetic Virtues

Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
run. The stage character they have been portraying for so long seems to
gain a certain kind of individual existence in their mind and does at times
appear to intrude into and supersede the normal waking consciousness.
But this, of course, is what we do not want to happen in our magical work.
In that work we must always be positive and dominant masters of the temple of our personality. This is one of the cardinal points in magical work.
Although the personality must be held open to any inflow of power, light
or wisdom from the deeper self within, it must be so built and trained that
no involuntary alterations can take place in it. When we begin to build up
the magical personality, therefore, we must so work that all involuntary
manifestations of it are stopped at source. The magical personality must
never be allowed to manifest suddenly unless the will and waking consciousness of the normal personality concur. So rule one is always build

the magical personality positively and never allow it to manifest without


your definite personal agreement.(1)
Part of the reason that the would-be magician then actively meditates and contemplates
the goals and aspirations is make sure that they are creating this persona and the motto
which it represents in a positive manner without allowing it to become the dominant
personality in their life.

we must always be positive


and dominant
masters of the
temple of our
personality.
This is one of
the cardinal
points in magical work.

According to W. E. Butler, there are three basic aspects of life that must be considered
when building up a balanced magical personality; these are Power, Love and Wisdom. (2)
He further elaborates that these aspects are to be meditated on in order to better understand how these aspects should be incorporated into the magical personality. In fact,
Butler stresses that further work on the magical personality should not be undertaken
until these three aspects have been thoroughly meditated on.
It is most important that the building up of the form-aspect of the magical
personality should not be commenced before these three aspects of Life
have been thoroughly meditated upon and some realisation of their nature
gained. Now comes the next step. To build up a faulty magical personality
is worse than useless; it can cause quite serious trouble under certain circumstances. So the apprentice magician should most carefully consider
what he is doing and patiently carry out the routine training. (3)
To further the idea of building up of the magical personality, Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips, writing in their seminal work on the material of the Aurum Solis, The
Foundations of High Magick, as part of the Magical Philosophy series, state the following:
In attaining this independence, one of the principle and most significant
practices is to take on a special personality which is reserved for magical
working and which, from the outset, is kept apart from external influences
of all kinds. From the beginning of training, this personality begins to be
developed: the special times set apart for exercises, the fact that these exercises are different from anything used for other purposes, the use of a special personal name, the keeping of a diary which includes only personal

(1)
(2)
(3)

W.E. Butler. The Magician: His Training and Work, p. 122.


Ibid, pp. 122 123.
Ibid, p. 123.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 31

Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
matters of directly occult significance, the ban on discussion of these matters
with persons external to them; all these factors begin to isolate a certain part
of the mind and imagination as a nucleus from which the magical personality is to take its growth. As training continues, this segregated nucleus, or
rather the new personality which develops from it, expands to occupy more
and more of the total personality until only so much of the old self remains
as may be needed as an instrument or as a mask for ordinary mundane
purposes. In the early stages, however, the expansion of newly- forming
magical personality has to be carefully guarded, checked almost, just as a
young tree may be fenced round or even tied to a prop in order to protect it
and direct its growth aright. The magical personality needs to be strictly
conserved, to be deliberately put on for a definite purpose and put off again
afterwards, until at last these two acts become, not necessary or unheeded,
but so much a second nature as to seem casual. (4)
It is clear that what Butler, as well as Denning and Phillips, are referring to is a portion of
the mind or a psychological element of the would-be magicians personality that is used
for building the magical persona. This is why we develop the motto to give that new
portion of our personality or psychological element a name, a means to form around.
Understanding some of the psychological implications of choosing a
motto or magical name, Dion Fortune, who in her more mundane aspect of Violet Firth was trained in psychology, wrote:
It may be that the use of the magical name has some relationship
to the process of going back into the past and reawakening the
mode of consciousness of a phase of development long outgrown. Primitive names are imitative sounds or descriptive
phrases and so the barbarous syllables of the magical names may
serve to awaken memories in the far-wandering soul. We cannot
unfold in evolution that which was not unfolded in involution; we forget
that a phase of preparation must precede all manifestation. We possessed
powers in the primitive phases of our development which had to be sacrificed in order to achieve the higher powers of the human mind. If, while
retaining these powers, we can recover the lost secrets, we have the means
of fashioning a Horvendile consciousness that shall transcend the limits of its
creator, for we have added the past to the present, or, if another terminology be preferred, we have extended consciousness into the realms usually
occupied by the subconscious. (5)
Francis King and Stephen Skinner further expound and clarify the above sentiment of
Dion Fortune as well as that of Denning and Phillips, in their Techniques of High Magic:
Just as you will find that having some particular garment associated exclusively with the magical aspect of your daily activities helps your creative
imagination to transform an ordinary room into a Temple of the gods, so
you will find that the traditional custom of adopting a magical motto a
new name, symbolising your occult life - will aid you in the task of building

(4)
(5)

Melita Denning & Osborne Phillips. The Foundations of High Magick, p. 57.
Dion Fortune. Applied Magic and Aspects of Occultism, pp. 56 57.

As training continues, this ... new


personality ... expands to occupy
more and more of
the total personality
until only so much
of the old self
remains as may be
needed as an instrument or a mask
for ordinary mundane purposes.

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Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
up your magical personality. This motto is not, in the words of an instructional manuscript of the Golden Dawn, a name given to the outer mans
body, but an occult signifier of the aspiration of his soul. (6)

This motto is
not a name
given to the
outer mans
body, but an
occult signifier
of the aspiration
of his soul

Let us look at our would-be magician John Dee Aspirant again. He has been studying hard in the time
since he came home with his application from the
local Golden Dawn temple and has been contemplating just what his motto for the temple should be. He
has read the thoughts of such people as W. E. Butler
and Dion Fortune on developing the magical personality and now understands that this new element of
his psychology has to have a name like a newborn
physical baby would. He looks over the list that his
sponsor at the Golden Dawn temple gave him, with
the names and mottos and their translations. Some of
these mottos seem to jump off the page at John as he
reads them. Demon est Deus Inversus, the Latin
motto of the Nobel Prize-winning poet William Butler
Yeats, which means The Devil is the Converse of
God (7); Sapere Aude Dare to be Wise (8) for William
Wynn Westcott, one of the founders of the Golden
Dawn in the Nineteenth Century. For the famed esoteric and occult writer, Arthur Edward Waite, John
found Sacramentum Regis the Sacrament of the
King (9); for the writer who made much of the Golden
Dawn material available to the public, Dr. Francis Israel Regardie, he found Ad Majorem Adonai Gloriam
To the Great Glory of God (10); for Ms. Lilli Geise, an
American member, Nunc et Semper Now and Forever (11); for one of the prime movers for Irish independence from the United Kingdom, Maud Gonne,
the Latin Per Ignem Ad Lucem Through Fire to the Light (12); and finally for that famous
(or infamous) magician of the Twentieth Century, Aleister Crowley, Perdurabo I will Endure (13) was listed.
Reviewing these names, John sat down with the old, battered copy of the Latin dictionary that his sponsor had lent him and began thumbing through it, looking up the various
portions of the mottos that had appealed to him from the list. With pen and paper, John
began compiling a list of Latin words and their meanings as a rough guide then began
looking at the rules for grammar and pronunciation that were presented in the battered
copy of the Latin dictionary. He reread various portions of his occult library, trying to see
what other occult and esoteric writers said about the choosing of a magical name or
motto to symbolize this new aspect of his life and personality. Since this was something
important, John decided to read through several respected authors works to get an idea
how to proceed with this portion of choosing a motto.
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
(10)
(11)
(12)
(13)

Francis King and Stephen Skinner. Techniques of High Magic, p. 19.


Darcy Kntz. The Golden Dawn Source Book, p. 221.
Ibid, p. 219.
Ibid.
Ibid, p. 209.
Ibid, p. 191.
Ibid.
Ibid, p. 184.

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Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
One of the things which quickly struck our would-be magician is that most of the occult
and esoteric authors agreed on so many points in regards to choosing a motto. Francis
King and Stephen Skinner clearly state:
Ideally this motto should be of your own construction, but if your languages are shaky then for ideas you could refer to the list of magical mottos
used by some members of the Golden Dawn, (14)
Reading the above advice from King and Skinner, our would-be magician is struck by the
fact that choosing or creating a motto or magical name of your own is a very tough act.
A would-be magician must give an enormous amount of thought and energy to something which must express their own aspirations, hopes and ideals. There are several
sources for this new name or motto. In some traditions, a source for this new name can
be from mythology and legend where there are stories of gods and heroes. Another can
be in mythical creatures or totem animals that have a history of use in some sort of magical tradition. Yet another option is to use some combination name of a god, hero and
animal or object. (15) This final option produces a magical name such as Thrush-Harp,
derived from an animal and an object.
These particular options for mottos are more common in the Neo-pagan or Wiccan traditions, rather than in the traditions dealing with ceremonial or High Magick such as the
Golden Dawn or its derivative orders and groups. In these groups, it is more traditional
to determine what the specific goals and aspirations are and then develop those on an
individual basis.
John, our would-be magician, now begins to wonder, What are the possible detriments
to taking on the motto of some other long-dead magician? He reads through his books
and meditates on this precise question for some time trying to ascertain if there would be
any drawback to this option.
So, are there possible detriments to choosing a motto of some long-dead magician?
What about choosing the magical name of a deity? A motto like Perdurabo, which Crowley chose is a very definite statement of his aspirations Crowley and his works certainly
have endured. Choosing Perdurabo as a motto because of an admiration of Crowley
and no other reason, robs the would-be magician of making that connection with their
own Higher Self and may have some rather negative effects as well.
Since our motto or magical name is suppose to link us to our Higher Self and helps create
our magical personality, then deciding to use the motto or magical name of some longdead magician causes a link to be formed, not so much to the Higher Self of the would-be
magician, but rather to all the energy associated with that long-dead magician, both the
positive and the negative. Using Crowleys motto as an example, then all the sensational
and often very negative energy and thoughts that have built up around the concept of
Crowley and all that is linked to Crowley, takes on a life of its own this then affects the
would-be magician who then takes on the motto. As we have seen, the creation of the
magical persona can be a tricky thing and must be done carefully.
The potential negative effects associated with adopting another magicians motto, or
even the name of a legendary hero or god, is illustrated in the following comments,
where the karmic link or associations with that name come into play:
(14) Francis King and Stephen Skinner. Techniques of High Magic, p. 19.
(15) Raven Kaldera and Tannin Schwarzstein. Magical Names; Llewellyns 2005 Magical Almanac, pp. 163-164.

Ideally this motto


should be of your
own construction, but if your
languages are
shaky then for
ideas you could
refer to the list of
magical mottos
used by some
members of the
Golden Dawn.

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The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
Therefore, think carefully before you choose such a name. For example,
choosing the name Lilith can give you strength and courage and the ability
to defy social pressure. It will also mean that the experience of alienation
will be a recurring theme throughout your life. Involvement in codependent
relationships will generally result in break-up and abandonment, because
the Lilith pattern forces separation at the first hint of possible sub-service. If
this all sounds like a good idea to you if the struggles inherent in the name
are ones youre gladly willing to take on then go ahead, but do it with
your eyes open. (16)
There is even the idea that taking on the name of a god or goddess as your magickal
name, especially if the primary deities of a particular pantheon are chosen for the
magickal name or motto may be interpreted as implying arrogance on the part of the
magician. (17) In essence it is saying that the nascent magician equates themselves to this
particular deity and that can pose a problem in the case of deities which may still be worshipped as part of a particular religious observance.
Aleister Crowley, in Magick Without Tears, illustrates the concepts discussed above when
talking about invocations of various gods the same rules apply to such invocations for
the magician as to the choice of a motto and are relevant to the would-be magician to
demonstrate the possible dangers associated with taking on the name of even the most
beneficent deity, entity, or person:
if he takes for a
motto the name
of a sacred object, a mythological god, hero, or
of a once living
magician, he will
begin to take on
certain aspects of
that entity or
thing, for both
good and bad.

Invocations of even the most positive Gods are dangerous, unless care can
be taken to keep the personality of the God distinct from ones own. Athene
is a superb deity; but one does not want to be nothing but Athene (18)
So, in the case of Crowleys motto, a person is likely to draw into their life some of the
more harsh aspects of Crowleys life such as being argumentative, strife-causing and arrogant. Not to mention that the dysfunctional manner in which many of his interpersonal
relationships, with both men and women, were handled may creep unnoticed into not
only your magickal, but also your daily life.

While it may seem that I am picking on poor Aleister Crowley, I am not. I am merely using him as an example due to his well-known behaviour from the many books about
him. Some of the information about him is merely sensationalistic but those sort of energies attach themselves to the legend of Crowley and thus by extension to those things
possessed by Crowley, including his mottos.
Let us return to our fictional budding magician, John, who is now better armed with information about choosing a motto. He knows that if he takes for a motto the name of a
sacred object, a mythological god, hero, or of a once living magician, he will begin to
take on certain aspects of that entity or thing, for both good and bad. John now
scratches off the motto of Perdurabo from his list of choices since that particular motto,
while appealing, is more linked with Aleister Crowley. John wants his motto to be more
unique and reflective of his own aspirations; not a copy of someone famous (infamous).

(16) Ibid., p. 164.


(17) Janet and Stewart Farrar. A Witches Bible, p. 24 of Part II.
(18) Aleister Crowley. Magick Without Tears, p. 277.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

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Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
He sets up an area of his home with a makeshift altar, decides on some appropriate incense, lights some candles and then performs the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram (with which he is familiar from books). Following this, he sits down to meditate on
his aspirations for the Magnum Opus, the Great Work
Having now looked at some things that should not be considered when working on
creating a motto or magickal name, let us look at some things to bear in mind when undertaking this very important first act in the life of the magician.

Meditate or pray on your aspirations or goals.


Define your aspirations or goals.
Decide on a language to express these aspirations (Latin, Greek, etc.)
Be original in choosing your motto.
Do a divination on your motto.
Always keep notes on what you are doing and always review these notes.

In the first point above, meditate or pray on your aspirations or goals. The idea is to do
some serious contemplation on just what you as a would-be magician would like to do as
your utmost in reaching towards the Magnum Opus.
Prayer may seem a bit out of place in this point or even in doing any magickal work at all,
but it definitely is useful. It is often the Divine Will that has led you to this point in your life
to consider a magickal life, so why not pray? This does not mean that you have to pray to
the Divine Architect of the Universe, the Lord of the Universe, Allah, Jehovah, Christ, or
any other Judeo-Christian-Muslim god name, but your own concept of the Divine or
Creator of the Universe is fine. The object is that you are involving in your work and
very first magickal act the ultimate power or the Highest in aiding you to get a feel or
grasp on your aspirations and goals. The act of prayer to the Highest has the effect of
starting the process of raising the vibratory rate of your sphere of sensation and attuning
you to the higher energies of the Divine Light for which you are striving in searching for
a motto in the first place. This also has the benefit of making you more receptive to information passed from the Highest or Lord of the Universe to your Higher Self and thence to
your conscious self.
This prayer need not be something found in any particular Scripture or Holy Book and
can be of the aspirants own design if they like. If some prayer, Psalm, invocation or the
like seems like it would help in connecting with your Higher Self and the Divine, then by
all means use that instead of creating a prayer.
Using this idea, our would-be magician John decides to pray and meditate on what his
aspirations and goals are for starting along this particular path and to fulfill the requirement of having a motto for his application to his local Golden Dawn temple. He sets up a
ritual space in his home which includes a small table and chair to use for meditations.
Having been practicing several magickal techniques for over a year prior to his application to the local temple, John performs the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram as
described in several books.

meditate or
pray on your aspirations or goals.
The idea is to do
some serious contemplation on
just what you as a
would-be magician would like to
do as your utmost
in reaching towards the Magnum Opus.

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Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
He then sits down, bows his head and prays the following prayer:

Oh Lord most High, I implore You to aid and guide me in my search for
seeking to draw closer to You through the Great Work. Grant me, that I may
enter into Your Sanctuary of the Mysteries, a better understanding of my Will
and Aspirations. This I pray in the Ineffable Name. Amen. (19)
John sits quietly, clearing his mind and relaxing, before meditating on what his aspirations are for doing the Great Work. This takes some time, several weeks in fact, before
certain thoughts begin to formulate for John during his nightly prayer and meditation.
The thoughts that came to him were that it would be hard or difficult work to draw
closer to the Divine Source of everything.
This realization brings us to the next point in considering a motto, defining your aspirations or goals. Through the meditations the overall idea of your thoughts, aspirations,
and goals should coalesce into some coherent pattern that can be easily defined and
written down, or at least what comes to you in meditation should be written down in a
notebook to aid in the task of better defining the aspirations and goals for the motto.

He avoided any
karmic tie with
the specific
name associated
with another
person, entity,
object, or god
by working out
his own motto
and expressing
it in his own
words in Latin.

Our would-be magician, John, has dutifully been taking notes in his notebook (a ringbinder with lined paper) each night after completing his meditations for that night. Over
time, a particular pattern began to be seen in his notes. Hard or difficult labour or work
to reach what he wished to accomplish from this part of his life was one theme that continued to be evident. A gnawing hunger to be closer to the Divine, to complete the Magnum Opus and have that Divine Union of his Lower and Higher Selves, thus becoming
more than human kept intruding upon not only his daily meditations but also on his life.
John reviewed his notebook and notes, copying down some of his thoughts. Eventually,
he came up with the phrase By Hard Work, Close to Divinity. Consulting that well-worn
Latin dictionary that had been lent him, John began working to translate the English
phrase into Latin for his motto. For By, he came up with Per; for Hard Work, Opera;
Close yielded Vicinus and finally for Divinity John found that Divinitas fit. After some
playing with the various spellings, John settled for the Latin phrase, Per Opera Vicinus
Divinitas to be his motto.

John had found an original phrase to express his aspirations without using the motto of
some past member or any famous magician. He avoided any karmic tie with the specific
name associated with another person, entity, object, or god by working out his own
motto and expressing it in his own words in Latin.
Before writing his motto on the application to the local Golden Dawn temple, John
wanted to see if this was the best motto or phrase for him. To do this, he decided to use
the Tarot and do a divination concerning this motto. He had used the Tarot for some
divinations before, so felt confident that he could get a good answer from the cards.
Taking out his Tarot deck, John held it in his hand and asked, Is the motto Per Opera
Vicinus Divinitas the best motto for me? Before using his favourite Tarot spread, John
kept the question in his mind as he shuffled and cut the deck. Laying the cards out, he
was surprised to see so many very positive cards (he had to consult the book that came
with his tarot deck). He jotted down the results of his tarot reading in his notebook before continuing.
(19) This prayer is something written by the author to illustrate the use of prayer at this point in the
process of choosing a motto. For inspiration look to any number of Psalms and Prayers in the
Judeo-Christian tradition. Other holy books besides the Bible can be used as well. S.S.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

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Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
Now that a motto has been developed, what do you do with it? How is it incorporated
into your life? A popular Neo-pagan writer states:
Once youve chosen a magical name, how do you incorporate that name
into yourself? You might like to begin with a ceremony. You should write
the ritual yourself so that the entire process will be tailored to your personal
energies, rather than looking for such a ceremony in a book. You may wish
to purchase a gift for yourself, such as a necklace, ritual robe, a ring, statue,
wall hanging, plaque or bracelet to signify this step forwarding your spiritual
training. Designing a personal sigil that incorporates your name is another
way to manipulate the energies that you wish to manifest. (20)
While the above author is coming from the Neo-pagan and even the Wiccan traditions,
some of the points are very valid. You now have to incorporate your new motto or
magickal name into your magickal life and practice. The idea of a ceremony is a very
good one. The aspirant can also use positive affirmation to make the connection with
their Higher Self and the Divine for doing their magickal work.
Below I am going to explore both methods, starting with the affirmation method, which
is something of a basic means of incorporating the motto in your life and then giving a
small ceremony based on Golden Dawn principles as a more advanced method of incorporating the motto into your life. As we discussed earlier in this paper, the magical personality needs a name or image to link to and the motto is this link and image.
Affirmation Method of Incorporating the New Motto
John has now settled on his motto, which expresses his hopes and aspirations for doing
the Great Work within the local Golden Dawn temple and he wishes to begin to take on
this magical personality and make the appropriate link between this motto and his magical personality.
John enters into his ritual area and begins doing his daily ritual work. Once he gets
started and has set up the ritual space, he makes the following statement as an affirmation of his new life and commitment to doing the Great Work:

I am Frater(21) Per Opera Vicinus Divinitas, who has been permitted to enter
thus far into the Sanctuary of thy Mysteries. I am committed to performing
the Great Work so that thereby my Mighty and Secret Soul may stand at
length in the Presence of the Divine Light. Not unto my name, but unto Thy
Ineffable Name be the Glory forever! Amen! (22)
This prayer or affirmation is merely an illustration and can be worded as the aspirant sees
fit. The main idea with this method is that the aspirant connects their motto or magical
name to themselves and thus to their magical personality. The main link is accomplished
by stating, I am Frater/Soror (Brother/Sister), (motto or magical name). This makes the
bridge between your physical self and your magical self. Adding in the Divine Name likewise aids in the forming of this interface, much like prayer was used earlier to raise the
vibratory rate of the aspirant to accept the Divine Light.
(20) Silver RavenWolf. Choosing a Magical Name; Llewellyns 1999 Magical Almanac, pp. 258259.
(21) In the case of a female aspirant, Soror would be used. Brother or Sister can also be substituted
for the Latin. S.S.
(22) This Prayer or Affirmation is of the authors own composition to illustrate such an affirmation.
It is in a more Christian format, but can be in any format that the aspirant wishes. S.S.

The main idea with


the affirmation
method is that the
aspirant connects
their motto or magical name to themselves and thus to
their magical personality. The main
link is accomplished
by stating, I am
Frater/Soror
(Brother/Sister),
(motto or magical
name).

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Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
Since the aspirant is still groping in darkness trying to reach the Light of the Hidden Mysteries, the continued use of some form of invocation to the Highest both pushes and pulls
the aspirant into the direction of the Divine Light through the Higher Self, which at this
point is probably no more than an invisible concept for the prospective magician, but
which exerts a tremendous amount of influence on the actions taken so far on his or her
journey.
Ideally, the aspirant should utilize this method daily during the performance of their regular ritual work. This, like putting on the robe and other magickal regalia, helps to create
not only the link to the magical personality but also sets up the psychological split between the ordinary mundane life activities and the magickal activities of the candidate.
Ritual Method of Incorporating the new Motto
This method is more an in-depth method of creating the link with the magical personality
and the motto chosen by the aspirant. It need not be used but once or can be used sporadically by the aspirant. Think of it as a sort of christening or naming ritual or ceremony.
This is only an example and not something officially used within the Golden Dawn community.

The idea of wearing the ritual regalia is that it is a


physical representation of your commitment to doing
the Great Work
and to create a
change from your
normal daily routine of work and
general life to
something more
spiritual.

It is also helpful for the would-be magician to don what ritual attire they have; in the case
of someone in the Golden Dawn tradition, this would be a simple black Tau robe, red
slippers and a black and white nemyss (think Egyptian headdress). Other traditions can
wear other things, but normally in the Hermetic or modern Ceremonial Magick traditions
a Tau robe (black or white) and slippers are worn.
The idea of wearing the ritual regalia is that it is a physical representation of your commitment to doing the Great Work and to create a change from your normal daily routine of
work and general life to something more spiritual. This wearing of special clothes further
builds the connection with the magical personality and magical persona. This concept is
very clearly discussed by Donald Michael Kraig in his Modern Magick and echoes the use
of choosing a motto and incorporating it into the magical personality:
The purpose of putting on a robe is to physically show both your conscious and subconscious that you are no longer in your daily dress. It
strongly shows that you are about to do something very special and spiritual. If you do not have access to the things needed to make or obtain a
robe, simply go through your closet and find some clothes that you have not
worn in a long time, or buy some new clothes. Wash them thoroughly.
Now, only wear these clothes when you are going to do ritual work and
never for any other reason. Thus, even though they are ordinary clothes,
they become something magickal, and you will know that when you put
them on you are going to do something special. (23)

(23) Donald Michael Kraig. Modern Magick, pp. 27-28.

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Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
Example Ritual
You will need:
Ritual attire (a robe and slippers or socks as described above and a nemyss if available)
An Altar (in the GD tradition a double black cube but at the beginning
improvisation is possibe)
2 pillar candles (one black, one white) and 1 votive candle (white)
Incense (either in a censer with charcoal or as an incense stick with a
holder)
A cup with Holy Water
Set up your ritual space as normal. Have on
the Altar a pair of candles, one black and
one white, set to the eastern part of the Altar. The black candle is to the left and the
white to the right when facing the Altar
from the West. In the center of the Altar
place a single white votive candle. On the
southern side of the Altar have a censer
with incense (or an incense stick in a holder)
and on the northern side a cup of holy water. Use Frankincense, Olibanum, Myrrh,
Sandalwood or some combination of these for the incense to be burnt in the censer.
Be sure to wear your new black Tau robe and red slippers (red socks work just fine too).
Enter your ritual space and go to the West of your Altar facing East.
Light the two pillar candles (the black and white ones) on the eastern edge of the Altar.
Light the incense.
Perform the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram (LBRP).
Return to the West of the Altar. Take up the cup with the holy water, go to the East.
Draw a cross with the cup and then sprinkle three times at the center of the cross towards the East.
Go to the South, West, and North, where you will repeat drawing the cross and sprinkling at each Quarter. From the North, return to the East and raise the cup on high. Say:

I purify with Water!


Return to the West of the Altar and return the cup to its place. Take up the incense and
go to the East. In the East, draw a cross in the same place you drew the one with the
water. Wave the incense three times at the center of the cross.
Go to the South, West, and North, where you will repeat drawing the cross and censing
at each Quarter. From the North, return to the East and raise the cup on high. Say:

I consecrate with Fire!

Remember to
always move
clockwise in
your ritual
space, so to
get from West
to South, you
would pass the
North and East
on the way.

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The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
Return to the West of the Altar and return the censer to its former position.
Perform the Lesser Invoking Ritual of the Pentagram (LIRP).
Kneel before the Altar, place your right hand upon the Altar and raise your left hand skyward. Say:

I (given name), shall henceforth be known as (motto or magickal name),


whenever I strive to enter thus into the Sanctuary of the Divine Mysteries.
May the Divine Light shine upon me and through me, bringing me closer to
the Divine Throne so that my Mighty and Secret Soul may act in accordance
with my Higher Self and be an agent in the service of the one, most Ineffable
Name, the Creator of the Universe. May I, (motto or magickal name), strive
ever to become a co-worker with the Divine Masters whose abode is the Invisible. May you also be the Guardians of this Mystic Sphere. Keep far removed the Evil and the Unbalanced. Strengthen and inspire me, so that I
may preserve unsullied this abode of the Mysteries of the Eternal One. Let
my Sphere be pure and holy, so that I may enter in and become a partaker of
the Light Divine.
Bow your head and pray silently to the Divine.
In some traditions it
is acceptable for
the aspirant to
actually create their
own naming or
magical name christening ceremony,
as this further links
the new magical
name or motto, not
only with the person, but with their
magical personality.

Stand and light the candle in the center of the Altar saying:

As I light this candle to represent the Divine Light, the Light of the Hidden
Mysteries, may this same Divine Light also light within me, (motto or
magickal name), that I may be more than human and reach the Philosophers Stone. This I pray, not unto my name, but unto the most Holy and
Ineffable Name. Amen!
Stand in the form of a cross facing East for a few moments and contemplate the link between the magickal self represented by the motto and the Divine.
Perform the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram (LBRP).
Put out the pillar candles on the Altar, but leave the central candle burning (up to one
hour), and depart from the temple.
This ends the ritual.

In some traditions it is acceptable for the aspirant to actually create their own naming or
magical name christening ceremony, as this further links the new magical name or motto,
not only with the person, but with their magical personality. If the aspirant wishes to do
this within the Golden Dawn or Hermetic Tradition, it is acceptable but is not generally
practiced, though in some self-initiation material and ceremonies a ritual such as this is
performed to aid the aspirant in incorporating the new motto into their magical personality or persona.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 41

Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
Of course, both methods discussed above can be used by the aspirant conjointly to connect their motto and their magical personality. If that is the manner in which a person
wishes to make the link, then they would perform the ritual method and then use the
affirmation method daily during their ritual practice time. Over a period of time, approximately one month or so, the aspiring magician should begin to see and feel a definite
bond to the motto and magical personality so that any time that the aspirant dons their
ritual regalia, they subtly become the person associated with their motto.
Further Considerations
Now that we have seen how to create a motto and incorporate it into our daily lives to
create the magical persona and personality, let us look at some further issues from using
a motto.
What happens if you out grow your motto or want to change it as you learn more along
the magickal path? This is a very common occurrence within the magickal community,
regardless of specific tradition. Also, it is not uncommon to change mottos as a person
advances from the Outer Order of the Golden Dawn to the Inner Order of the R.R. et
A.C. So, how is this new motto chosen and integrated into the magical personality of
the magician and aspirant? The magician or aspirant goes through the same process as
illustrated above to select a new motto. In the latter case where an additional motto is
created for moving into another Order or higher grade, the magician follows the process and builds an addition to the magical personality that utilizes the new motto, which
signifies this new stage of growth for the practitioner but still retains a great deal of the
original magical personality that was developed as part of the motto associated with the
Outer Order. This original magical personality is often subsumed over time as the new,
higher magical persona takes the place of the original persona.
What happens if you decide that you have chosen the wrong motto due to misunderstanding of how a motto is chosen or by choosing someone elses motto by mistake?
That is to say that you have picked a motto which is a god name from some pantheon, a
specific mythical item (Excalibur for example) or some mythical beast, or even taken on
the motto of someone like W. B. Yeats (Demon est Deus Inversus). The answer is the
same; you remove it from your magical personality and begin the procedure again from
the beginning.
Even these changes can be done in a very formal and ritualized manner. The old name,
whether mistakenly chosen or outgrown, can be laid to rest in a method similar to the
naming ceremony shown above.
There is the danger of just making a change for the sake of change when it comes to
adopting a motto. Try to avoid this if at all possible. As one popular Wiccan writer illustrates there can be consequences to this practice:
The only caution I will present is that of popping from one name to another, and then another, and so on, in short span of time. Yes, we can
grow out of our names, or even get tired of them, but choosing too many
names actually minimizes the original spiritual significance. So too, if you
have used a magical name for many years and are well known in the magical community, it may be difficult, if not impossible, for those who know
you to let that name go because you have taken on its symbiotic identity. (24)
(24) Silver RavenWolf. Choosing a Magical Name; Llewellyns 1999 Magical Almanac, p. 259.

There is the danger of just making a change for


the sake of
change when it
comes to adopting a motto. Try
to avoid this if
at all possible.

Page 42

Hermetic Virtues

Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)

The most important consequence of choosing too many mottos in such a short period of
time is that you diminish your connection with your magical personality by spreading
that personality too thin across several mottos without fully developing any single personality. In essence, the would-be magician is creating a case for magical multiple identity disorder of sorts by engaging in this sort of behaviour. As pointed out, too many mottos also lessen the spiritual significance of each successive motto to the aspirant, as well
as undermining any meaningful and lasting mystical connection which should be taking
place when linking the motto with the magical personality.
While it is fine to change mottos and further or deepen the connection that has been
built with the magical personality, do so in a healthy manner that will not lead to weakening the divine connection that you are attempting to create in the first place. If a magician does take on the practice of choosing too many names in a short span of time, the
loss of the connection to the Divine Light, current, or egregore can then seriously affect
their magickal work, as there is no directing or focusing energy represented by a formidable magical personality that has a substantial identity and this is counter-productive to
any theurgical work that the magician is striving towards.

While it is fine to
change mottos and
further or deepen
the connection that
has been built with
the magical personality, do so in a
healthy manner
that will not lead to
weakening the
divine connection
that you are attempting to create
in the first place.

Conclusion
The choosing of the magickal motto or name is likely the first serious thought and practical work of magick that an aspirant will likely ever perform. It is also one of the most important works of theurgy that will take place as it forces the would-be magician to seriously look at the reasons for wanting to begin following a magickal tradition or path.
Each of the various traditions that make up the Western Mystery Tradition, whether following the Hermetic, Qabalistic or Neo-pagan traditions, have their members choose a
new name to actually work within that particular tradition and each have their own rules
for the choice of a magickal name or motto. It is up to any applicant to their particular
tradition to follow those rules for the choice of motto so that they are able to perform this
most important of acts.
We have looked at the methods to choose a motto so that the aspirant can work to forge
that link with not only their Higher Self through the choice, but also to help create that all
-important magical personality which is used to actually do the Great Work. As already
stated, there are certain things that should be kept in mind when choosing a motto and
these are:

Meditate or pray on your aspirations or goals. Think long and hard on

what these aspirations are and the reasons for wanting to begin the Magnum Opus, the Great Work.
Define your aspirations or goals as developed through meditation or
prayer so that you better understand them and can express them to yourself and others.
Decide on a language to express these aspirations (Latin, Greek, Hebrew,
Gaelic, etc.) These are the traditional languages used to formulate a
motto, but other languages could be used. Something like Enochian,
though, should not be used for a motto by the novice magician.
Be original in choosing your motto do not choose another magicians
motto or magickal name! The same applies to the use of the name of a
deity from any pantheon do not use it if at all possible.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 43

Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)

Do a divination on your motto use a method of divination you are comfortable with, i.e., Tarot, Geomancy, Pendulum, etc.

Always keep notes on what you are doing and always review these notes.
The main thing to remember when choosing a motto is that it is supposed to express
your aspirations and goals while working to be a better person and striving towards that
union with Divinity. This is an important and serious part of becoming a magician the
way that a motto is chosen reflects this and the amount of time sincerely contemplating
those goals and aspirations. Take time to weigh all the possible implications for choosing an explicit motto that will accurately reflect those aspirations.
Create a motto or name that is free from any preconceived concepts within the magickal
community avoid the motto of someone else, especially a famous or infamous magician. The same applies to the choosing of the name of a deity or demigod or even a
mythical hero. Many such names have very specific concepts that are attached to them.
Zeus, Lilith, Thor, Heracles, Perseus, Siegfried or Arthur all have images and concepts
that these names immediately conjure that reflect the being from the pantheon or legend. Some of these names, while very strong and appealing, have some rather negative
karma attached to them. Obviously, Lilith is seen as a demon in most of the JudeoChristian material; Zeus a womanizer who often did not do the right thing for mankind;
or Siegfried, who had arrogance and pride in his abilities and invulnerability. Not all of
these negative traits are things that a magician would want to incorporate into their
magical persona and personality and certainly these are the negative traits that a well
balanced magician would have overcome as part of their personal Work.
Remember that taking on a motto or magickal name is like being reborn with a new
name but first your old self or name must die symbolically for the new name to help
you formulate the magical personality built around the name or motto. Once the motto
is chosen, work with it so that the link between the physical person of everyday and the
magical personality of the Great Work are firmly established. Choose carefully and with
deliberate consideration when working out what your motto is to be based on your preliminary work in setting your aspirations to a word or phrase.
Double check yourself through a divination use a method that you are familiar with
such as Tarot, geomancy, or dowsing with a pendulum. Keep detailed notes in your
journal, not only on your divinations, but also on your meditations and dreams leading
up to choosing a motto consult the journal frequently during the process of creating
the motto.
Be discriminating in your Work, but enjoy the process of working out for yourself what
your magical personality is and in establishing that all-important link to it through the
creation of the motto. Be creative! Be diligent in working out your motto nothing is
more fulfilling than creating something for your magickal self. Take that first crucial step
to becoming a magician create a motto and then work with it daily until you reach the
heights of your aspirations, goals, and dreams, not only in your daily life but in your
magickal one as well.
Copyright 2008 Samuel Scarborough

The main thing to


remember when
choosing a motto
is that it is supposed to express
your aspirations
and goals while
working to be a
better person and
striving towards
that union with
Divinity.

Page 44

Hermetic Virtues

Ars Sententia
The Art of the Motto: Choosing Your Motto
(continued)
Bibliography
Buckland, Raymond. Bucklands Complete Book of Witchcraft. St. Paul, Minn., USA: Llewellyn Publications, 1998.
Butler, W.E. The Magician: His Training and Work. North Hollywood, CA, USA: Wiltshire Book Company, 1969.

Cassels Latin English Dictionary. New York, New York, USA: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1987.
Cicero, Chic & Sandra Tabatha. The Essential Golden Dawn. St. Paul, Minnesota, USA: Llewellyn
Publications, 2003.
________________________. Self-Initiation into the Golden Dawn Tradition. St. Paul, Minnesota,
USA: Llewellyn Publications, 1998.
Crowley, Aleister. Book 4. York Beach, ME, USA: Samuel Weiser, Inc., 1998.
________________. Magick in Theory and Practice. Secaucus, NJ, USA: Castle Books, 1991.
________________. Magick Without Tears. Tempe, AZ, USA: New Falcon Publications, 1998.
Denning, Melita, and Phillips, Osborne. The Foundations of High Magic; Volume 1 of The Magical
Philosophy Series. St. Paul, Minnesota, USA: Llewellyn Publications, 1991.
_______________________________. Mysteria Magica; Volume 3 of The Magical Philosophy Series.

Be discriminating
in your Work, but
enjoy the process
of working out
for yourself what
your magical personality is and in
establishing that
all-important link
to it through the
creation of the
motto.
Be creative!

St. Paul, Minnesota, USA: Llewellyn Publications, 1992.


_______________________________. Planetary Magick. St. Paul, Minnesota, USA: Llewellyn Publications, 1989.
_______________________________. The Sword and the Serpent; Volume 2 of The Magical Philosophy Series. St. Paul, Minnesota, USA: Llewellyn Publications, 1992.
Farrar, Janet and Stewart. A Witches Bible: The Complete Witches Handbook. Custer, WA, USA:
Phoenix Publishing, Inc., 1996.
Fortune, Dion. Applied Magic and Aspects of Occultism. London, UK: The Aquarian Press, 1987.
____________. Esoteric Orders and Their Work and The Training and Work of an Initiate. London,
UK: The Aquarian Press, 1987.
Greer, John Michael. Circles of Power. St. Paul, Minnesota, USA: Llewellyn Publications, 1997.
________________. Inside a Magical Lodge. St. Paul, Minnesota, USA: Llewellyn Publications, 1998.
________________. Learning Ritual Magic. York Beach, ME: USA: Weiser Books, 2004.
________________. The New Encyclopedia of the Occult. St. Paul, Minnesota, USA: Llewellyn Publications, 2003.
Kaldera, Raven, and Schwarzstein, Tannin. Magical Names. Llewellyns 2005 Magical Almanac,
Llewellyn Worldwide, 2004, pp163 -167.
Kearton, Michael. The Magical Temple. Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, UK: Aquarian Press,
1980.
King, Francis, and Skinner, Stephen. Techniques of High Magic. Rochester, VT, USA: Destiny Books,
1991.
Kraig, Donald Michael. Modern Magick. St. Paul, Minnesota, USA: Llewellyn Publications, 1997.
Kntz, Darcy. The Golden Dawn Source Book. Edmonds, WA, USA: Holmes Publishing Group,
1996.
Ravenwolf, Silver. Choosing a Magical Name. Llewellyns 1999 Magical Almanac, Llewellyn
Worldwide, 1998, pp. 257 259.
Torrens, R.G. The Golden Dawn: The Inner Teachings. New York, USA: Samuel Weiser, Inc., 1980.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 45

In Defence of the Lesser Invoking


Pentagram
by Nick Farrell

The lesser banishing ritual of the pentagram is considered the most


important ritual of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, in that it has
been borrowed by almost every magical order in the last 120 years. Along
with its chum, the cabbalistic cross, it is performed before every ritual. But
have we made a mistake? What if it is NOT the lesser banishing ritual that
is the most important, but the INVOKING one?
When we look at the Golden Dawn, we look through eyes tuned to Tiphareth in the
King Scale. We assume that the original adepts got it all right and that the things we
know and love about the Golden Dawn were there in the first place. Yet study of
Golden Dawn history and texts has revealed the original Golden Dawn was nowhere
near as clever as later developments. Things that are happening in modern Golden
Dawn orders are a lot more magical and interesting than anything Westcott and
Mathers dreamed up but since the lines between the past Golden Dawn orders are cut,
we often miss something important from the past that is staring directly in our face.
In my previous papers on the Lesser Banishing Ritual, I was looking at its use in terms of
the Sphere of Sensation and the 0=0 ritual. I had come to the conclusion that the LBRP
was a microcosmic re-enactment of the 0=0, which, if performed daily, would instil that
important initiation's symbols into the Sphere of Sensation. However, there was a flaw
in this idea and that was the concept of banishing. Why would you need to banish all
the time? True, the 0=0 ritual is about a four-fold purification and consecration but there
is also the connection with the divine forces that is the opposite of a banishing.
The breakthrough came when I was talking with a very experienced magician who is
not connected with the Golden Dawn tradition. She flippantly said that one of the
problems she had with the GD tradition was that it was "banishing, banishing, banishing
all the time. If you keep doing that you will have nothing left!" She believed that the
Golden Dawn was told to do an LBRP before every ritual (which the modern Golden
Dawn does). But was this true?
For years I had known that the Golden Dawn had an invoking ritual of the pentagram,
but had never actually used it. So I wanted to find out what the original GD used an
invoking pentagram? and I went back to the original instructions and knowledge papers to find out.
Surprisingly, the rituals of the pentagram papers for the outer order were consistent
since the beginning to the closure of Whare Ra but what I saw when I read them was
something I didnt expect. For years, like many people, I had assumed that I knew the
banishing ritual of the pentagram, so didn't actually read the paper other than to check
that I was saying the same words as everyone else in the order. Looking at it with fresh
eyes, it revealed some things I didnt know. Firstly, the ritual described is called the
Lesser Ritual of the Pentagram not the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram.
Secondly, the knowledge paper does not describe the banishing ritual at all.
"Make in the air towards the East the invoking(1) PENTAGRAM as
shown, bringing the point of the dagger to the centre of the
pentagram."
(1)

Emphasis is mine.

Why would you


need to banish all
the time? True,
the 0=0 ritual is
about a four-fold
purification and
consecration but
there is also the
connection with
the divine forces
that is the opposite of a banishing.

Page 46

Hermetic Virtues

In Defence of the Lesser Invoking Pentagram


(continued)
The banishing ritual gets an aside in the last paragraph of the paper;
"For Banishing use the same Ritual, but reversing the direction of the
lines of the Pentagram."
The first thing that crossed my mind was that the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the
Pentagram was considered much less important than its invoking cousin and is simply
a footnote. This is the complete opposite of received wisdom.
The next thing that was clear is that the invoking pentagram was different from the
method that the modern GD teaches to do the banishing pentagram. In the modern
GD, the divine name is projected into the pentagram using the sign of the enterer at
the point that the name is vibrated. This is not described in the knowledge paper,
where the divine names are placed in the invoking pentagram with a dagger. The
implication is that a banishing ritual of the pentagram would be carried out the same
way. So where did the idea of a projection sign with the pentagram come about?
In a second paper for neophytes, The Uses of the Pentagram Ritual, the projection
sign is mentioned. The neophyte is instructed to imagine an image of an obsession
and project it "out of your aura (sic) with the saluting sign of a neophyte and when it
is about three feet away, prevent its return with the sign of silence." The lesser banishing ritual of the pentagram is then performed to dissolve it.
However, it is also
clear that the
banishing ritual is
not any more important than the
invoking one.
Indeed, when the
paper talks about
using the Lesser
Ritual of the Pentagram to enhance visualisation skills, it is
talking about the
invoking and not
the banishing.

This a minor point, but it certainly indicates that modern GD groups do their Lesser
Pentagrams a slightly different way from the original order. This is fine, as the reasons
used, i.e. the outwards projection of energy using the divine names, are valid and are
an enhancement of the original idea.
Another GD paper suggests that a neophtye should use the banishing ritual at night
and the invoking one in the morning. I assume that was because the banishing ritual
would enable you to sleep better!
However, it is also clear that, other than the reference to getting rid of obsessions, the
banishing ritual is not any more important than the invoking one. Indeed, when the
paper talks about using the lesser ritual of the pentagram to enhance visualisation
skills, it is talking about the invoking and not the banishing.
Let us look at the other witness. Now, while I still think Aleister
Crowley is the most over-rated magician since Paul Daniels, he is
a valid historical resource about what he was taught about the
'LBP'. His take on the ritual, which says that the little ritual is the
key to everything magical, appears in Magic without Tears but
fails insofar as it is not clear whether it is to the banishing or to
the invoking that he refers. The fact that he refers to the rite by
its traditional name of the Lesser Ritual of the Pentagram probably means that he is referring to the invoking pentagram rather
than the banishing.
The only other reference we have to the Lesser Ritual of the Pentagram is in inner
order documents, where it points out that they work because they are have
similarities to the Earth pentagrams of the inner order(2):
(2)

They are not Earth pentagrams because they are not opened by spirit or have the sign
of an Ox in them.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 47

In Defence of the Lesser Invoking Pentagram


(continued)
"This lesser ritual of the pentagram is only of use in general and
unimportant invocations. Its use is permitted to the outer order that
neophytes may have protection against opposing forces and might have
some idea how to attract and come into communication with spiritual and
invisible things."
So now we have some idea of how the Lesser Ritual of the Pentagram is supposed to be
used by those in the outer order and how it is just as important to use the invoking
pentagram as it is the banishing one.
The banishing is designed to protect by repelling the sphere of sensation from lower
astral nasties and connecting the person to their higher self. It can be used to remove
those parts of your personality, such as habits, that you do not want.
However, the invoking ritual is just as important to this process. The invoking allows
you to bring things into your life that you want and brings about your connection with
spiritual forces. In other words, the banishing ritual of the pentagram is the purification
and consecration aspects of the 0=0 ceremony, while the invoking ritual mirrors those
aspects of the 0=0 which draw your higher self to you.
In the 0=0 ceremony, the candidate starts with their sphere of sensation so black that it
is impossible to see the four pillars of their sphere of sensation. During the four-fold
purification process the aura is cleared. However, the candidate is also exposed to spiritual forces represented by the visible and invisible godforms. The danger, then, of just
doing lesser banishing pentagrams is that you would not be drawing these forces to
you.
Recently a person who came into contact with a temple I know said that he had been
performing the Lesser Banishing Ritual of Pentagram every day for 15 years and had felt
it had not got him anywhere. It was suggested by the head of a temple that he try the
invoking pentagram instead and suddenly everything changed for him. He started
making the spiritual and material progress he craved.
So it is clear that the obsession with the banishing pentagram needs to be tempered by
the same amount of use as the invoking one. In fact, as a spiritual practice, they should
be used at least on a 50/50 ratio with the emphasis being on the invoking.
The question, then, becomes how this can be done when we are trained to perform a
banishing ritual as a form of protection before all our workings, including meditation.
Well, the answer lies in what the LRP actually does. The GD material implies that both

the invoking and the banishing provide protection, by virtue of the divine names, the
angels and the pentagrams and the fact that the six rayed star is placed in your aura.
When you are drawing your spiritually-empowered
pentagrams and calling up your angelic guardians, you
are saying that you are human and manifest the elements
of Spirit, Fire, Air, Water and Earth. You are asserting the
dominance of spirit over the elemental nature. You are
binding this statement into a magic circle, powered by the
divine energy of your higher self. This is most of the
protection you need. This divine force spiritualises the
room so that anything that does not operate on that
frequency cannot get in. All you need to do is to tune
your sphere to either throwing things away or drawing
things towards you.

the banishing
ritual of the pentagram is the
purification and
consecration aspects of the 0=0
ceremony, while
the invoking ritual mirrors those
aspects of the
0=0 which draw
your higher self
to you.

Page 48

Hermetic Virtues

In Defence of the Lesser Invoking Pentagram


(continued)
The banishing protects you from internal and external harm when you need it. If you are
being attacked by the denizens of hell, you would use the banishing ritual to get rid of
them. If you arent, you dont need it. The likelihood of the forces of darkness being
interested in the first magics of a 0=0 is incredibly low, although it is possible that your
own shadow might cause them a few headaches, so you might end up using a banishing
more often than you think.
If you want to attract an angel, you would use the invoking one before your working. So
if you were doing your general daily meditation, you would perform the invoking
pentagram ritual because you would want to gain information. However, if you were
meditating on your own shortcomings, you would do a banishing, because you would
want to get rid of something inside you. If you were doing a middle pillar exercise, it
would be an invoking pentagram because you would want to draw the powers of those
divine names to you.
Besides drawing other forces to you, the Invoking Pentagram has a direct effect on the
person performing it. Rather than becoming 'guardians' and 'protectors', the Angels and
divine names work differently when you perform an invoking pentagram. What you are
doing is drawing their energies into your sphere of sensation. Over a period of time this
would have a tremendous positive effect on the person's spiritual life.

Besides drawing
other forces to
you, the Invoking
Pentagram has a
direct effect on the
person performing
it. What you
are doing is drawing ... energies into
your sphere of
sensation. Over a
period of time this
would have a tremendous positive
effect on the person's spiritual life.

While there is something to be said for the GD's morning and afternoon alternating
invoking and banishing rituals, it my opinion it would be better to do one ritual in the
morning independent of any other rituals or meditations you might perform. This ritual
would be guided by the phase of the moon. So you would do a banishing on a waning
moon and an invoking on a waxing moon. You could then divide your magical
programme into things you want to get rid of, in the waning moon, and things you want
in your life in the waxing moon.
It also begs another question. Before each working, the temples of the modern orders of
the Golden Dawn perform a Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram to protect the
working. Since we have seen that the working would be protected by either the invoking
or the banishing, it might be time to re-think this idea. It might be that the invoking is
more appropriate.
Our modern orders have in many ways moved forward but perhaps it is time that the Invoking Ritual of the Pentagram was restored to its former glory and becomes the subject
for more experimentation.
Copyright 2008 Nick Farrell

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

Page 49

The Origins of Heredom of Kilwinning


by Ian Cowburn

Was helften facheln licht oder brillen, so die leute nicht sehen wollen!(1)
For several years I have been intrigued by the various historical elements making up
what may be called the Ormus Legenda, given wide circulation in esoteric circles by
the creation of the Primitive Misraim Rite, although previously drawn upon, notably by
Swedenborg, for his Scottish Rite of 1722 and the several following 18th century
Scottish Rites (see separate table on pages 63-65). Briefly, the essential elements are:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)

Ormus, a seraphic priest (earlier stated as Serapic), is converted to


Christianism in Alexandria by St. Mark in 43, or 96, CE.
His spiritual descendants, to the number of seven, who go by the
name of the Brethren of Light, transfer to Calabria in the 11th century.
Thence there is a descent via a Calabrian hermit called Ursus to the
abbey of Orval in the Ardennes.
Then the whole group transfer to the abbey of Kilwinning in Ayrshire,
Scotland, in 1140, or 1155, under Norman aegis (Rotrou II of Perche,
founder of the Order, cousin of the Montgomeries).
The archives of the group are again transferred to the Crypt of the
Three Kings at the ancient Swedish capital of Uppsala in the reign of
King Inge.

In this brief sequence, the number of cross-references to other Legenda or assem-

blages of founding myth is astounding, as well as connecting up historically attested


events that are also linked by history and genealogy. Here are just a few :

It is said that there existed in Egypt a secret order called the Brethren of
the Orient. This Order was allegedly also known in French as the
Ordre de Kadosh. It is stated that the count of Toulouse had heard of
its existence. In 804 A.D. the count ordered the Frenchman Arnaud to
travel to Thebes, Egypt, where Arnaud was initiated into this secret order. When he returned to Toulouse, with his three degrees of the Order
of Kadosh, they formed the foundation of LOrdre dOrmus. Authors as
well as Masons like Thory, J.E. Marconis, Baron de Westerode, Baron
Tschoudy, Mackenzie as well as A.E.Waite, refer to these Kadosh Fathers.
The wisdom of these fathers of the desert allegedly was an amalgamation of the old wisdom of the Magi, the priests of ancient Egypt, and
Christianity. It is stated that a certain Ormus reformed these teachings
and doctrines. Ormus, a Serapic Priest of Alexandria and Egyptian
Sage, is said to have been converted by St. Mark in the year 43, or 96
CE, after which he reformed the doctrines of the Egyptians, in accordance with the principles of Christianity. According to other Masonic
traditions, Ormus started an order in Alexandria having the "rose-cross"
as symbol.

The body of St Mark, stolen from Alexandria by two Venetian merchants


in 827: Buono of Malamocco and Rustico of Torcello, in order to avoid
discovery by customs officials, smuggle the relic back to Venice in a barrel of salt pork and cabbages.
(1) Of what use would torches, light or glasses be if the people do not wish to see!

In this brief sequence, the number of crossreferences to


other Legenda or
assemblages of
founding myth is
astounding, as well
as connecting up
historically attested events that
are also linked by
history and genealogy.

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(continued)
The Calabrian monastery of Santa Eulalia, later the home base of
Joachim de Flore, was founded by a member of the same tightly-knit family group of Norman knights as was Kilwinning. Tommaso Campanella, a
Calabrian monk, followed the doctrine of Joachim de Flore (1130 1202)
who was a disciple of Ursus, a hermit in the Hermetic sanctuary of the
Cistercian abbey of Sambucino. Some writers claim that a group known
as the "Illuminated Ones" was founded by Joachim and taught a primitive, unitarian doctrine of "poverty and equality", later taken up by the
Moravian Brethren.

Ursus later moved to the Abbey of Orval in the Ardenne, which is one of
the geographical nodal points of the Rennes- le-Chteau/Gisors scam,
closely associated with Godefroy de Bouillon, the original Swan Knight.
Ursus is one of the code words for the R-l-C Merovingian roleplay.

Calabria was also a major centre for the stregha culture and the later Carbonari, whose leaders also joined Misraim. The Cathars were persecuted
in Italy 1150-1224 and were compelled to perform their Rites in woods
and forests, like the stregha and the Carbonari, and it is not improbable
that the latter are derived from one of their branches.
How and from
whence did the
assemblers of
the Primitive
Misraim Rite collect this, at first
sight, unlikely
and incoherent
string of events?
Who first started
fitting them
together?

Kilwinning, besides being founded by the same family as Santa Eulalia,


was, as is widely known, the Mother Lodge of Scottish Masonry and
was situated in the territories of the Montgomeries, the Setons and the
Stewarts, all names familiar to Rosicrucian history and legend. James
Stewart, a century after the foundation, is notably associated with the
creation of the Order of the Thistle, along with Gilbert de Clare and others. These same families seem to steal through the thickets of British
woodland elf lore, too ; with Isabella of Mar, Robert the Bruces Queen,
being the patron of the Carbonari!

And finally, the transfer of the archives to Uppsala brings us full circle
(Orobouros) by following the trail of the Varangs via Old Novgorod and
Kiew to Byzance, with the Varangian Guard. It is curious and stimulating
to see that the avatar of the Tail of the Dragon constellation (Astarot)
follows this same trail from Uppsala to the Normans of Sicily and Calabria
where it snakes its way into the Ghibelline tradition of the German Empire, to rejoin the Ardenne line (Orval, supra) in the person of Sigmund of
Luxemburg! (2)
How and from whence did the assemblers of the Primitive Misraim Rite
collect this, at first sight, unlikely and incoherent string of events? Who
first started fitting them together? One answer would seem to lie with
Emanuel Swedenborg, whose Scottish Rite dates from 1722 and was
transmitted to Cagliostro in Curland early in his long career; another
trail seems to lead to the various Rose Croix dOrient legenda and the
Byzantine/Venetian connection. And a third to the Royal Arch
workings of the late 17th and early 18th centuries.
Emanuel Swedenborg
29.1.1688-29.3.1772

(2) Hermetic Virtues Vol. II, issue 5, Summer 2008

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(continued)
Mother Kilwinning
About the end of the seventh century, St. Finnan, or Winning,
founded a Celtic monastery (cill) by the Garnock River in the
Lordship of Cunninghame in Ayrshire, Scotland and the settlement of Kilwinning took its name from him. The Abbey of
Kilwinning was built some centuries later, the chief benefactor being the Norman Hugh de Morville, High Constable of
Scotland in 1157 and a liege man of the King of Scots, David I.
The Morvilles came to England in 1066 and settled in the
great Huntingdon Earldom that passed to David of Scotland,
along with many other Norman knights who accompanied
him on his assumption of the Scottish throne. The Norman
family of de Morville was closely connected to other Norman
families in England, Wales, Scotland and Southern Italy at this
time (and in Ireland twenty years later), like the Grandmesnils,
one of whose members was head of the above-mentioned
Abbey of Santa Eufemia in Calabria.
One source dates the foundation of Kilwinning to 1157, ascribing it to Sir Richard before
he succeeded his father as Constable in 1162. (This source was said, in the Rev. W. Lee
Kerrs book Kilwinning Abbey, to have been copied from a register in London by Hugh
Coulter and found amongst papers at Eglintoun Castle, which have since disappeared).
However, the date commonly assigned to the building of the Abbey is 1140. A party of
Calabrian masons is supposed to have come there under the direction of Rotrou II of
Perche, cousin of the Montgomery family of Belesme, for the purpose of building the
Monastery of Kilwinning and to have founded there the first regularly constituted Lodge
in Scotland. This legend is curiously mirrored in the reports of the Seven Knights of Ormus moving from Calabria in Italy to Kilwinning at the same time. They are later purported to have transferred the Archives of the Rose Cross of the East to the Crypt of the
Three Kings in Uppsala in Sweden in 1155.
The Lodge of Kilwinning is reputed to have been
held in the Chapterhouse, a chamber measuring
15 x 8 m and situated on the Eastern side of the
cloisters. On the broken walls and mouldering
arches of the Abbey numerous and varied masons'
marks may be seen, some very beautiful in design.
The monks of Kilwinning were members of a
branch of the Benedictines, known as Tironensians, that is to say that they had adopted the ideals of the Abbey of Tiron near Chartres in France.
It is more than likely that they came to Kilwinning
from the Monastery at Kelso, as the Morvilles held
land there also.
From Kilwinning Lodge proceeded the Lodge of Scone (crowning place of the Kings of
Scots) and Perth in about the year 1195, as is confirmed by a charter now in the archives
of the Grand Lodge of Scotland. Little else is known of the early history of Mother Kilwinning, as all the records have been lost. Whether these records were involved in the
destruction which overtook the building at the period of the Reformation (1560) has
never been clearly ascertained. Tradition affirms that they were carried away by the
Tironensian monks to France on the downfall of Catholicism in Scotland.

One source dates


the foundation of
Kilwinning to
1157, ascribing it
to Sir Richard before he succeeded
his father as Constable in 1162.
However, the date
commonly assigned to the
building of the
Abbey is 1140.

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(continued)
With the destruction of the buildings certainly perished some Abbey records, including the Pensile Tables which contained the
genealogies of buried persons, registers of
miracles, histories, etc. Fraser, in his memorials of the Eglintoun family says: it has generally been supposed that the Cartulary of Kilwinning was preserved in the Crater Room
at Eglintoun Castle, but after a diligent
search in that repository, it has not been
found." A disastrous fire occurred at Eglintoun Castle in 1544 and this may account
for the loss.

Eglintoun Castle

James, Lord Steward of Scotland, in 1286 held a Lodge at Kilwinning and initiated the
Earls of Gloucester and Ulster into the Order. Tytler, in his History of Scotland, shows that
these two Earls were present in that year at a meeting of the adherents of Robert Bruce at
Turnberry Castle, which is about 30 miles west of Kilwinning Abbey, and were concerting
plans for the vindication of his claims to the Scottish throne. The Earl of Gloucesters ancestor Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Pembroke, was employed by King Stephen in 1135 to build
four Abbeys, two Nunneries, and the Church of St. Stephen at Westminster.
After the establishment of the Kilwinning
Lodge and that of York
(1285 ...: the antiquity
of the Grand Lodge of
York over other English Lodges has always
been acknowledged by
the whole Fraternity),
the principles of operative Freemasonry
rapidly spread through
both Kingdoms and
several Lodges were
erected in different
parts of the island.

After the establishment of the Kilwinning Lodge and that of York


(1285, by Archbishop Giffard ; the members included the same Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and his son-in-law Ralf de Monthermer, Richard de Burgh, Earl of Ulster and David of Strathbogie, Earl
of Atholl: the antiquity of the Grand Lodge of York over other English Lodges has always been acknowledged by the whole Fraternity), the principles of operative Freemasonry rapidly spread
throughout both Kingdoms and several Lodges were erected in different parts of the island. The Scottish Freemasons always owned
their King as Grand Master; he, when not a Mason himself, appointed one of the Brethren to preside as his deputy at meetings
and to regulate all matters concerning the Craft. James I (1406-37)
James I, 1406-37
was Royal Grand Master until he settled a yearly revenue of four
pounds Scots, to be paid by every Master-Mason in Scotland, to a Grand Master chosen by
the Brethren and approved of by the Crown.
James II (1437-60) favoured the Lodges with his presence and
granted the office of Grand Master to William de St. Clair, the Builder
of Roslin Chapel, Earl of Orkney and Caithness, and Baron of Roslin,
and to his successors. The hereditary Grand Masters ruled their
Lodges without interruption until 1736, when William Sinclair, the last
heir in the direct male line, resigned the hereditary office into the
hands of the Scottish Lodges. The Barons of Roslin assembled their
Grand Lodges at Kilwinning and the Masonic Courts were held there.
James II, 1437-60

On one occasion at least King James IV visited Kilwinning Lodge. In the accounts of the
Lord High Treasurer of Scotland published by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury
(Edinburgh) 1877, p.172, there is the following entry:
"On Fryda, xiii Novembria (1491) in Kilwynnyng to the King before the supper and efter, xx vnicornis."

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(continued)
(The unicorn was a gold coin, valued about a pound sterling. A very considerable sum in
those days.) It is probable that this was an entertainment given at the expense of the
King when holding High Festival there.
It is recorded that Henry Sinclair, a son of the House of Roslin, became Abbot or Perpetual Commendator of Kilwinning in 1541, which office he exchanged with Gavin Hamilton for the Deanery of Glasgow in 1550. In the "Eglintoun Papers" it is also recorded
that "Henrie Sinclair, Dean of Glasgow," was a witness to the marriage between Hugh,
third Earl of Eglintoun and Lady Jane Hamilton, daughter of James, Duke of Chatelhrault, on 13th February, 1554.
By 1544 Kilwinning Abbey had 17 monks, but no abbot in the sense set out by St. Benedict. The death of James V two years earlier led to the succession to the throne of Mary,
Queen of Scots, aged one week. Protestantism at this time in Scotland was also becoming widespread and a following was building up. In 1543 the first outstanding Protestant preacher, George Wishart, arrived in Scotland. By 1545 he had organised a conspiracy against the government of the Regent Arran and Cardinal Beaton, their pro-French
policy and the Catholic church. Wishart was hanged and his body burned in March
1546, this was followed by the murder of Cardinal Beaton by Wisharts supporters in
May 1546. Extremists, including John Knox, joined the murderers in St Andrews Castle
and were captured by a French fleet and sent to the French galleys. A Hamilton, John,
became Archbishop of St Andrews, he was also the president of the council appointed
to prepare and publish the Catholic theological reply to the spread of Protestantism. He
became a monk at a very early age and was placed in Kilwinning Abbey before moving,
aged 15, to Paisley Abbey.

Kilwinning Abbey

During the 1559 Protestant Reformation it is reported that in September of that year an attack was made on Kilwinning Abbey by
Cuthbert de Cunninghame, Earl of Glencairne and his troops, following which pictures, statues, books, vestments and all other
images, idols and popish stuff were burned on a huge fire on
the Abbey Green. In 1561, by order of the Protestant Lords of
Secret Council, the Abbey was cast down by the earls of Glencairne, Argyll and the Protestants of the West. This led to the altars, choir stalls, vestments, the ornamental structure of the tombs
(and some actual graves) and the windows, especially the stained
glass windows depicting the Christ, the Virgin and all the images
of Saints, being destroyed. Doors, screens and wooden furniture
were broken up to provide another bonfire on the Abbey Green.

During the month of May in 1560, the first Book of Discipline recommended that the
Scottish Parliament should utterly suppress abbeys, monasteries, friaries, nunneries,
chapels, chantries, cathedral kirks, canonries and colleges other than presently are parish kirks or schools (except only the palace, mansions and dwelling places adjacent
thereto with orchards and yards of the same). In August 1560 the Reformation Act was
passed by an illegal parliament of lay abbots, lesser barons and lairds with an eye to social advancement. According to the Act, papal authority was no longer to be recognised in Scotland, the celebration and attendance at Mass was forbidden under pain of
imprisonment, torture and even death. A Protestant Confession of Faith was approved
but the reformed church received no financial endowments, as the barons were not
interested in destroying and replacing churches, their main interest was in the lands of
the church, although they retained their administrative title such as Abbot and Prior. To
safeguard their own interests, the lay abbots continued to enfeof the monastic lands.

During the 1559


Protestant Reformation it is reported
that in September of
that year an attack
was made on Kilwinning Abbey ... following which pictures,
statues, books, vestments and all other
images, idols and
popish stuff were
burned on a huge
fire on the Abbey
Green.

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(continued)
Religious houses all over Scotland had been physically under attack for a long time before
1560. Kilwinning Abbey had been plundered by the earls of Glencairn and Angus as
early as 1513 and invaded again in the 1540s by some of Wisharts followers. A letter
under the Great Seal dated 20th January 1552 refers to recent raids, day and night, on
the lands and the goods of Kilwinning Abbey, even on the church.
In 1561 by order of the Lords of Secret Council, Kilwinning Abbey was cast down by the
earls of Glencairn, Argyll and the Protestants of the West. This led to the monastery being
attacked, its altars, pictures, statues, choir stalls, vestments, books, the ornamental structure of the tombs (and some actual graves) and the windows, especially the stained glass
windows depicting Christ, the Virgin Mary and all the images of Saints were all destroyed.
Doors, screens and wooden furniture were broken up to provide a bonfire on the Abbey
Green. Altar vessels and domestic furnishings were looted. Bed clothes, habits, food supplies, meal, malt, flesh, fish, coats, pewter, tins and many other items were stolen.
Much of Kilwinning Abbey did, however, survive the attack of
1561. When seen by Timothy Pont at the beginning of the
17th century, he described the structure of the monastery as
solid and great, all of free stone cut, the church fair and stately,
with a fair steeple of seven score feet high (42.67 m). It is probable that two parts remained intact, the dwelling places, which
the barons in 1560 were anxious to preserve and the area of
the church used as a parish church until 1774.
In 1561 by order
of the Lords of
Secret Council,
Kilwinning Abbey was cast
down. Much of
Kilwinning Abbey did, however, survive the
attack.

A number of the monks of Kilwinning Abbey may have fled by


1560 to France, the Low Countries, or the Scottish Benedictine
Abbey of St James at Ratisbon (today known as Regensburg),
in Germany to avoid these turbulent times and any community
life as recognised by St. Benedict would have disappeared before 1560.

Kilwinning Abbey

Changes came about in Kilwinning with the death of Gavin Hamilton in the Civil War of
1571. Hamilton was killed fighting for Mary, Queen of Scots, near the Watergate in Edinburgh. The estates of the abbey then passed to Alexander Cunningham, son of the Earl
of Glencairne. Lands previously feued to the Hamiltons were granted to the Cunninghames. This affected the tenants, as the displaced landlord resisted the newcomer and
both attempted to collect rents. The final acts in the Abbeys long history did not take
place until after the assassination of Alexander Cunninghame on 1st August 1586. He
was shot at Montgreenan after being involved in the long feud between the Montgomeries and the Cunninghames and charged with being accessory to the murder of Hugh,
fourth earl of Eglinton. Thereafter, William Melville was appointed Commendator on the
5th August 1591. The estates of the Abbey were declared the property of King James IV
around the period April 1592 but were later declared no longer church lands and regranted to William Melville on 17th May 1592. The two great families of influence in
North Ayrshire, the Montgomeries and the Cunninghames, had their share of the spoils
of the monastery. In 1603, Hugh, fifth earl of Eglinton, bought from William Melville all
disposable rights of the Abbey.

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The Origins of Heredom of Kilwinning


(continued)
The Traditional Rite of the Order of Heredom of Kilwinning
There are two degrees in the traditional rite of the Order, beyond the Craft :
I. Knight of Kilwinning (later of the Black Eagle)
II. Rose Cross of Heredom (later Knight of the East)

Heredom of
Kilwinning

Swedenborg later inserted the degree of the Chapter of the Red


Cross of Enoch after the Craft degrees, obviously representing
the Royal Arch; he also added the governing 7th degree of the
Council of the Eastern Monarch, Sons of the Valley, later Kadosh.
Seven degrees for the Seven Brothers of Ormus.
From the Ritual for the Degree Knight of Kilwinning:

Tirshatha: What is the highest and most sublime Degree of Masonry?


SGG:
The Royal Order of Heredom of Kilwinning is so named.
Tirshatha: Where was that Order first established?
SGG:
On the holy top of Mount Moriah in the Kingdom of Judea.
Tirshatha: Where was it afterwards re-established?
SGG:
At Kilwinning, where the King of Scotland first sat as Grand
Master.
The traditional history of the Order represents the First Degree as dating from the time of King David I of Scotland, in 1157, and the Second
Degree as instituted by King Robert the Bruce on the battlefield of Bannockburn, 24th June 1314, to commemorate the valour of a band of
Scots Knights Templars who had rendered him signal aid in that great
victory.
According to the French annalist of Freemasonry,
M. Thory, Robert Bruce founded the Order of the
Rosy Cross of Heredom of Kilwinning after this battle, reserving to himself and successors on the
David I
throne of Scotland the office and title of Grand
1124-1153
Master. Charles Edward, the Young Pretender and
the last of the Stuarts, believed that he possessed this hereditary
right and distinction and granted Charters to Lodges on the Continent. There is also evidence that the whole system of Templary, advanced by Ramsay and other partisans of the exiled House of Stuart,
was based on the conviction that the Chevalier de St. George was
the hereditary head of the "Royal Order" of Bruce. This "Royal Order" Robert I the Bruce
is now conferred by the different Continental Obediences, under the
1274-1329
title of "Rose-Croix Chevalier Heredom de Kilwinning".
The Lodge of Constancy at Arras preserves an original charter of the Order granted to
their Chapter in 1747 by Charles Edward Stuart and signed by himself, as the representative of the Scottish Kings.

Robert Bruce
founded the Order of the Rosy
Cross of Heredom
of Kilwinning
after this battle,
reserving to himself and successors on the
throne of Scotland the office
and title of Grand
Master.

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(continued)
In 1736, as we have seen, William St. Clair of Roslin, hereditary Grand
Master of Scotland, assembled thirty-two Lodges in and about Edinburgh and resigned into their hands all right, claim or title whatever,
which he or his successors had, to provide as Grand Master over the
Masons of Scotland. The Grand Lodge was thus reconstituted and
erected on 30th November 1736.
The Grand Lodge then put St. Mary's Chapel of Holyrood as No. 1 and
Mother Kilwinning as No. 2. This verdict greatly annoyed the representatives of Mother Kilwinning, who withdrew from Grand Lodge. From
1744 to 1807, Mother Kilwinning remained outside the Grand Lodge
of Scotland and continued to grant charters and hold meetings independently. However, successful efforts were made to effect a reconWilliam St. Clair (3)
ciliation in 1807.
Thory, who was "Atharsata," or Most Wise, of the French Branch (of Heredom) in 1807
makes the Mason of Heredom be the Knight of the Tower (trowel in the one hand and
sword in the other); and the Rosy Cross to correspond with the degrees of Scotch Master,
Knight of the East and Prince Rose Croix; the fourth and last step converted into the Templar Kadosh.

Mother Kilwinning
possesses no charter even today,
since she, herself,
issued charters
prior to the formation of Grand
Lodge. Indeed,
although possessing few early records she may
claim precedence
over other Lodges.

Mother Kilwinning possesses no charter even today, since she, herself, issued charters prior
to the formation of Grand Lodge. Indeed, although
possessing few early records (for reasons already explained) she may claim precedence over other Lodges
for four reasons:
(i)

The fact that she had issued charters for the


erection of other Lodges from time immemorial. (In the Schaw Statutes of 1598, Kilwinning
is referred to as an ancient Lodge.)
(ii) The existence of documents relating to chartering of the Lodges of Scone
and Perth founded in 1193, and preserved in the archives of the Grand
Lodge of Scotland.
(iii)
A Kilwinning Minute of 1659 says that the Six Quarter Masters
of Cunninghame, Carrick, and Barrowthrow continued to meet
once a year at Ayr to "tak order with the transgressors of the
Acts of Court." These would seem to be duly Passed Masters
and would correspond with what we hear of as "Heredom" in
Durham.

The Auld Lodge

(3)

The Present-day Kilwinning Lodge

Portrait The Grand Lodge of Scotland, reproduced by kind permission.

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The Origins of Heredom of Kilwinning


(continued)

(iv) The fact that the Canongate Lodge of Edinburgh was constituted by
Mother Kilwinning in 1677, and would not at that period have come so
far as Kilwinning to ask for privileges to hold meetings in Edinburgh if
there had existed in the Metropolis any body of whom they could have
derived such authority; it was no later than the year 1736 that that very
Lodge applied for, and obtained from Kilwinning, a renewal of their
Charter.

Some Kilwinning Personalities


Little is known about the man who gave his name to the town of
Kilwinning. St. Winning (also known as Finnan) was a Christian
missionary from Ireland who came to Scotland at the end of the 7th
century. He travelled through the west of Scotland, converting the
locals to Christianity and establishing churches for worship, notably
in Glenfinnan. Nothing survives of his small church at Kilwinning,
but it was almost certainly on the same site as the later Tironensian
monastery, built in the late 12th century and dedicated to St Winning and the Virgin Mary.
St Winning died around 715, probably on 21st January, since that
date became his feast day, and is thought to have been buried in
the churchyard at Kilwinning. In addition to the town, a number of other local places
bear his name, including Caerwinning Hill and St Winnings Well.
There remains a piece of a Celtic Cross said to have been erected by Winning in honour
of St. Brigit outside the church which he built on the present site of Kilwinning Abbey.
The fragment of the cross is preserved in the North Ayrshire Museum, Saltcoats, but unfortunately, no trace of the original church or settlement survives.
Robert de Montgomery, of the leading Norman family of the Welsh Border Palatinate
of Shropshire, whose father was supposedly the Architect of the castle at Gisors (a further part of the Rennes-le-Chteau/Priory of Sion roleplay) and whose mother was
Mabille, the Locust of Belesme, a known sorceress, went to Scotland with Walter FitzAlan, also of the Welsh border country (Chirk, Clun and the Welsh commotes of Cynllaith and Nanheudwy), who became High Steward of Scotland and progenitor of the
great Clan Stewart. Robert was granted lands by King David I of Scotland in Renfrewshire and the manor of Eaglesham became the Clan seat of the Montgomeries for
many centuries.
From 1165 to 1177 the name of Montgomery is mentioned
in many grants and Charters and the Clan territories expanded considerably. Sir John Montgomery, 7th Chief of
the Clan, acquired the baronies of Eglintoun and Androssan
when he married the heiress, daughter of Hugh Eglintoun
of Kilwinning. Their grandson, Alexander, was created Lord
Montgomery in 1449 and was Governor of Kintyre and
Knapdale. Hugh, 3rd Lord Montgomery, was created Earl of
Eglinton in 1507.

Little is known about


the man who gave
his name to the
town of Kilwinning.
St. Winning was a
Christian missionary
from Ireland who at
the end of the 7th C.
travelled through
the west of Scotland,
converting the locals
to Christianity and
establishing
churches for worship. Nothing survives of his small
church at Kilwinning.

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(continued)
Two names within the de Morville family are associated with the founding of the Abbey.
They are Sir Hugh and Sir Richard. Uncertainty arises here, as there are two Sir Richards
within the de Morville family, one, Sir Hughs brother, the other his son, and, as their relationships are often unstated, confusion arises as to which Sir Richard should be accredited.
It is more likely to be Sir Richard son of Hugh who founded the Abbey, as his uncle Sir
Richard was implicated in the murder of Thomas Beckett the Archbishop of Canterbury
and he flew to Rome to seek forgiveness from the Pope. It is believed that he then travelled to the Holy Land where he died at a later date. Sir Richard fitzHugh died in 1189
and was buried in Kilwinning Abbey.
The de Eglintons of Eglintoun, Montgomeries of Eaglesham and Setons of Seton make
up the families of the Earl of Eglinton and Winton. They have a long and often violent
history and for over a century were involved in a feud with the Cunninghames of Glencairne.
Hew is the earliest recorded member of the family to settle in Scotland. He
lived in the time of Malcolm Ceann Mhor at the end of the eleventh century. The name Eglinton probably originated from Aidhghlian, who lived
during the reign of Malcolm IV, 1153 - 65.
It is more likely
to be Sir Richard,
son of Hugh de
Melville, who
founded the
Abbey, as his
uncle Sir Richard
was implicated
in the murder of
Thomas Beckett,
the Archbishop
of Canterbury.

A charter dated 1205 identified Bryce de Eglintoun and the name of Radolphus or Raulf de Eglintoun appears in the Ragman Roll of 1296.
Malcolm IV

Sir Hew de Eglintoun is the first member of the family that we know much about. He was
very involved in politics and in 1361 he was one of the commissioners for a treaty with
England. David II granted him various charters of land. Sir Hew held the offices of Justiciary of Lothian, Chamberlain of Irvine and Bailie of Cunninghame. The latter office was
granted by Robert the Steward in 1367 on a hereditary basis. He was married twice, first
to Agnes More, only child of Godfrey of Ardrossan and they had one daughter, Elizabeth.
When Godfrey died in 1357, Sir Hew succeeded to the Lordship of Ardrossan. His second
wife, Egidia Stewart, was half sister to Robert II. As there were no other children, Elizabeths husband Sir John de Montgomerie of Eaglesham inherited the Lordships of Eglintoun and Ardrossan.
In 1388 the Cunninghames
challenged the Montgomeries over the Bailieship of Cunninghame. The Cunninghames claimed they had been
awarded the office as thanes
of Cunninghame under the
de Morvilles. The Montgomeries tried to compromise
when in 1425, Sir John
granted Sir Richard Cunninghame Bailzery of Conyngham with al the profytis pertinande til it for the term of his
life. Unfortunately when Sir
Richard died in 1446 his heir
was reluctant to give up the
office and the dispute burst into violent conflict.

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(continued)
The first Lord Montgomerie was Alexander. He was presented with a silvergilt cup by
King Henry VI of England in recognition of his part in concluding a nine year truce with
England. In 1443-44 he was again involved in talks with the English and managed to
prolong the truce. The following year he was created a Lord of Parliament by James II.
Alexander, Master of Montgomerie, predeceased his father and it was the first Lords
grandson who succeeded him as Alexander, second Lord Montgomerie. Alexander
married Catherine, daughter of Lord Kennedy and it was their eldest son Hugh who was
to become the 1st Earl of Eglinton.
Like his predecessors, Lord Hugh Montgomerie was very interested in national politics.
He was a member of the Privy Council and in 1506 was created Earl of Eglinton by
James V.
The first Earls family had to take refuge at Ardrossan Castle in 1528 when the Cunninghames attacked Eglinton Castle, burning it to the ground, destroying all the family papers and portraits in the process. When James V went to France in 1536, the Earl of Eglinton was appointed joint governor of Scotland along with the Earl of Huntley. This
was the last and most important office he held. After his death in 1545 his grandson
succeeded him, as his eldest son was killed in a skirmish on Edinburghs High Street (the
famous Brawl called Cleanse the Causeway). John, Master of Eglinton, was another
casualty of the feud. Unfortunately Hugh, 2nd Earl of Eglinton, died suddenly in 1546
and his son, also named Hugh, became the 3rd Earl.
The 5th Earl of Eglinton, Hugh, married his cousin Margaret Montgomerie. As there
were no children, the Earl obtained a Crown Charter naming Sir Alexander Seton of
Foalstruther as his heir. Hugh was a favourite of James VI and was gifted the Abbey of
Kilwinning with all its lands and titles. When Hugh died, the king repossessed the Abbey and gave it to Lord Balfour of Burleigh, who sold it back to the 6th Earl.
Alexander Seton, 6th Earl of Eglinton, was the second surviving son of
Lady Margaret Montgomerie, Countess of Winton and the eldest
daughter of the third Earl of Eglinton. Nicknamed Greysteel because
of the active life he led as a Covenanter, he was a prisoner of war for
ten years at Hull. His wife had to hide at Little Cumbrae Castle while
Cromwellian troops were garrisoned at Eglinton.
One of the 6th Earls grandchildren was the renowned alchemist and Rosicrucian Alexander Seton, the Cosmopolitan, tortured in Dresden to reveal his secrets and delivered
by Sendivogius, another Rosicrucian linked to the Moravian Brethren and who married
Setons wife after Setons death in 1604. Setons daughter married David Lindsay, Lord
Balcarres, another neighbour of Kilwinning and alchemist. Lord Davids sister married
Robert Weir of Craighead, claimed as ancestor by the impostor Nicholas de Vere.
Davids daughter Sophia Amelia married Robert Murray, initiated in 1641 at Newcastle,
as Elias Ashmole tells us, and whose elder brother William was Grand Master of Scotland
1660-1670.
Williams second son, David Murray of Nairne, was St. Andrew Herald and his three children expand considerably this curious dynasty we are following. The eldest, Catherine,
married William Murray, Earl of Dunmore, one of whose daughters, Augusta, married
Augustus of Hanover, Earl of Sussex, whose long Masonic and esoteric career cannot be
detailed here. The second daughter, Maria the Poetess, married the well-known Scottish
Rite theorist Andrew Lord Ramsey, who was waked and buried by Charles Radclyffe, Earl
of Derwentwater, the famous initiator of Francis-Joseph of Lorraine and certainly the
right hand man of the Young Pretender in the expansion of the Scottish Rite in Europe.
Another mourner was Alexander Seton-Montgomerie, 8th Earl.

Like his predecessors, Lord


Hugh Montgomerie was
very interested
in national politics. He was a
member of the
Privy Council
and in 1506 was
created Earl of
Eglinton by
James V.

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(continued)
David of Nairnes son William, Earl of Nairne, married Catherine Murray of Dunmore in
1715 and his son John was forfeit in 1746 and died in 1776. He married Caroline Oliphant of Gask, the leading poetess and songstress of Scotland and their daughter Margaret was restored to Nairn in 1797, being married to Lord Elphinstone. Their daughter
Margaret of Elphinstone and Nairn married firstly Lord Keith and on his death without
heirs she married Auguste de Flahaut, an illegitimate son of Napoleon I, who died in
1870. Their daughter Emily married Henry Marquis of Lansdowne, Grand Master of England.

The Winding Stair


As I try to do in most of my articles, here is a practical application of the ritual lore contained in the Kilwinning and the Brethren of the Orient nexus.
The double-helix spiral is the main form of power base in ritual
W.B. Yeats worked on this spiral power base (the "Gyres"):
http://www.yeatsvision.com/Geometry.html

Robert Wang in
his GD deck
changed the
Four Talismans
of Ireland into
the elemental
weapons, as did
Mathers, Waite,
Crowley and
Case.

The spiral key can also come from another direction. In the Cathedral-building Compagnon tradition, in the centre of the nave there is always a Labyrinth mosaic. One of the
usual interpretations is that it symbolises the path to the underground crypt where was
the Black Virgin statue, often a pre-Christian statuette in wood, sometimes bearing no
relation to any accepted idea of a "Mary" statue. These crypts are mostly also on ancient
Wells ("Lady Wells").
In the authentic Scottish Rites, like that of Swedenborg of 1722, or the Royal Arch of Scotland of the 1750s, this Labyrinth is called the Winding Stair. It is used in the Second Degree (out of Three, plus the Arch) equivalent to the Companion Journeyman Degree. The
notion that to pathwork correctly you need both a Landscape and an Avatar (see my recent article in Hermetic Virtues No. 1) fits this Winding Stair context and is perfect for the
double helix spiral to be "set" correctly.
Robert Wang in his GD deck changed the Four Talismans of Ireland into the elemental
weapons, as did Mathers, Waite, Crowley and Case. This is a GD way of setting out the
transition into the "second phase" or Middle Court. The Four Talismans have such rich
roots in the Landscape and Avatar context that you're drawn to these deeper levels almost willy-nilly once you start "switching them on". Your position would be somewhere
circling around Adeptus Minor at that point, i.e. looking for the door out of the hall to the
cosmos, after descending the Winding Stair (yes, descending, not ascending; the cosmos
comes later, at the Well).
In this conception of the GD universe, the weapons are crutches that are eventually left
behind as you progress. What you are left with or what next you use must be allpowerful. With the Grail Hallows and Four Talismans you do not manipulate them on an
altar but simply possess them as your power base or to merge with your power base. The
power base in this instance is the Crystal Castle. The phrase "merge with your power
base" neatly rounds up what the working of the Crystal Castle "suggests as itself" from the
springboards of actual history and collected Cymric and Gaelic legend.
The astral temple is reached by the Way through the Woods, because the Forest Perillous
is always the place to start and there you get the White Hart which symbolises the universe, or the Aeon and the Chase is the dance. A lot of this Forest and White Hart part of

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

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The Origins of Heredom of Kilwinning


(continued)
the working is epiphanied in a book called "Riddley Walker" by Russell Hoban: "hart of
the wud" = "hart of the wood" = "heart of the wood" = "heart of the would". The Wood is
the Outer Court in the full scheme of things; at first what becomes the Crystal Castle is
just a forest shrine, or wayside chapel, though carrying Templar-style overtones, but the
Crystal element develops to a bridge over water first - Arianrhod's Floating Island. So
you get the edge of the Wood and the Lake and the Crystal Castle over the Lake, to pass
from the Outer Court to the Middle Court.
One can be content to use the Chapel with the First Talisman, the Sword, in a stone of
course, but not the Stone. Some idea of the internal landscape of the Chapel is immediately "visible" but the Scottish Rite information fleshes out this landscape fully. The entry
(from the East) to the Middle Court is of course by the two Pillars, with the extra twist of
the Lions of St Mark from the Ormus legend, with the paw on the Key and the Latin
catch that goes with it. Arch of Venus-Urania over the entry.
Middle Court can have an entirely traditional furnishing, Table of Shewbread to the
North, Menorah to the South, Altar of the 72 Jewels to the West ; but it needs the Labyrinth or Winding Stair in the middle of the "nave". In each corner, i.e. NE, SE, SW, NW,
are elemental St Andrew's crosses, to make up Elias Artist ; a hint of the Inner Court Avatar.
The Winding Stair then goes downward and forward, like as if to say "into the mountain". Sion, Moriah, Carmel, Mount Bego, Schambala, call it what you want. It can even
be Eryri, or Snowdon, where Myrrdin wrestles with the red and white dragons. This fits
the view of the Adeptus Minor "trial by fire" because you're faced with the Veil of the
Cherubim at the bottom of the Stair, and from Riddley Walker's use of alchemy, this curtain is of (Blue) Smoke, (Red) Fire, and (Black/Purple) Chard Coal.
One cannot go through here immediately. One must meet the Green Man, Idris, El
Khidr and find out they are Elias Artist and Enoch. And one needs to "skry", what the
layout is in here, the Inner Court, and what the working is. It is like being in the Vault.
InnerCourt: Enoch's Stone over the Well of Black Isis (like in the cathedral crypts mentioned above); Axis Mundi from the Forest of Ogives (wood of the outer become stone
of the inner) as the Brazen Serpent (Tau Staff of Cagliostro) rises with the Word being
Listened to (sic itur astra); World Egg = Tubal Cain (forge the gold plate of Schemhamphoresch, that's why you need the Chard Coal); "raise" the Stone, i.e. "become" it.
The Dome of the Vault rises to its Capstone and that dissolves so that the cosmos is there
= Pleiades (Seven Sisters). Well to Star, the kurgan of the Ice Queen of the Altai, stars
reflected in the Well, Axis Mundi, the double helix spiral comes in here.

One can be content to use the


Chapel with the
First Talisman, the
Sword, in a stone
of course, but not
the Stone. Some
idea of the internal landscape of
the Chapel is immediately "visible"
but the Scottish
Rite information
fleshes out this
landscape fully.

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Hermetic Virtues

The Origins of Heredom of Kilwinning


(continued
WORKING LAYOUT
The Three Courts of the Seven Sisters
List of sources and some guiding principles:
Overall geography/landscape:
Arthurian (Cymric-Breton/Angevin/Champenois)
Calabria Stregheria/Carbonaria
Burgond/Thuring chard coal/metal work
Riddley Walker
Altai Tengri
Ras Tafar-I
Three Courts layout:
Outer: Royal Arch of Enoch
Middle:
Primitive Misraim of Cagliostro
Inner: Heredom of Kilwinning (Order of the Thistle/Swedenborg 1722)
Outer Court Working:
Forest Mythos (White Hart Hart of the Wud)
Wouivre Lake
Crystal Castle
The way of
working can be
full lodge/grove
ritual, or pathwork/skry. The
objective is, of
course, to accomplish the
Great Work.

(Portal : Lion Pillars of St Mark)


Middle Court Working:
Compagnons du Devoir (Winding Stair/Labyrinth)
72 of Heredom (Breast Plate)
First Movement of the Seven of Ormus (Calabria/Venice)
(Portal : Veil of Three Colours):
Black chard coal, Red fire, Blue smoke, Arduenna/Orval)
Inner Court Working:
Veil of Cherubim Seven of Ormus (second movement)/Knight of Kilwinning
Vault and Stone of Enoch
Well of Black Isis (Chartres crypt)
Capstone of the Vault
Seven Sisters (Pleiades)
Ice Princess of Issyk-Kul (Ys/Isult)
World Tree Axis Mundi (well-sky)
(The working of Odinn, the Hanged Man, is the magicking of the Stone via the becoming
of the Axis Tree, what is above is like unto what is below).
Each element has found its place by trylnerrer, as Riddley says. Some bits only slotted in
quite recently and more will undoubtedly arise. The whole thing needs a kind of compendium or vademecum which one day will be done. Essentially three great traditions
are woven together, the Forest (see Bob Gilberts recent lecture on the Forest and the
R+C), the Crystal Castle, and the Vault. The way of working can be full lodge/grove ritual,
or pathwork/skry. The objective is, of course, to accomplish the Great Work.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

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The Origins of Heredom of Kilwinning


(continued
TABLE OF CONCORDANCES FOR THE 18th CENTURY ROSICRUCIAN
ORDERS, 1722 1818. S.I. = Suprieurs Inconnus
1722 HEREDOM OF
KILWINNING

Craft

Fiery Furnace

Red Cross of Enoch


(Chapter)

Knight of Kilwinning
of the Black Eagle
Rose Cross of Heredom
Knight of the East

Council of the Eastern


Monarch, Sons of the
Valley = S.I.
Kadosch Fathers

CHAPTER OF
CLERMONT
1729 (1762 RITE OF
PERFECTION)
1728

Secret Master, Knight of


Royal Arch, Elect of
Sacred Vault (4 -14)
Knight of the East, Prince
of Jerusalem (15 - 16)
Heredom of the Pelican
(Knights of the East & West)
7 Churches of Asia
Sov. Prince R+C (17-18)
Emperors of the East &
West
(Princes of the Royal Secret)
Prussian Knight of
Bronze Serpent
Scotch of St. Andrew
(Knight Kadosch of
Black Eagle = S.I.)

1747 FAITHFUL SCOTCH


OF TOULOUSE
LA VIEILLE BRU

Secret Master
Templar
Templar Elect

Philadelphe

Kadosch
Chapter of Menatzchim = S.I.

Knight of Kadosch

Prince of the Royal


Secret

Knight of the
Brazen Serpent

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Hermetic Virtues

The Origins of Heredom of Kilwinning


(continued

STRICTE
OBSERVANCE
(1772 REFORMED
SCOTTISH RITE)
1754

1760 ILLUMINATI OF
AVIGNON
(1785 von Ecker,
KNIGHTS OF TRUE
LIGHT)

Craft
4

1773 PHILALETHES
(1818 MEMPHIS)

Elect
Scotch of Sacred Vault of
James VI
(Scots Master)
Scotch of St. Andrew
(Esquire)

Swedenborgian Illuminatus

Scots Master (Knight of


the Royal Arch)

Blue Brother

Templar of the Rose Cross


(Novice)

Red Brother of the


New Jerusalem

Knight of the Saint Empire


(Professed)

(von Ecker)

(Grand Professed
Knight of Kadosch = S.I.)

(von Ecker)

Knight of the East


(Knight of Sacred
Vault)
Rose Cross
(Knight Prince Heredom)
Knight of the Temple
(Knight of Bronze Serpent)
Philosophe
(Knight Kadosch
of St. Andrew = S.I.)

Knight of the Royal


Arch

Scotch of St. Andrew

Knight of New
Jerusalem

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

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The Origins of Heredom of Kilwinning


(continued
1780 ASIAN
BROTHERS

1782 MISRAIM

Craft

1795 TEMPLE/HEREDOM
Palaprat/Dunkerley
Elect

Brother of Light

Secret Master of Sacred


Vault of James VI

Adept of the East

Knight of Asia

Sublime Scotch of St. Andrew of Heredom

Adept of St. John (Templar)

True Royal Priest


of Rose Cross

Melchizedek

Sanhedrin = S.I.

Prussian Knight of
Black Eagle, Sov. Pr.
Heredom of Kilwinning
Knight of Kadosch
(with 4 metalcrafts)

Rose Cross
(Knight of East & West)
Kadosch

CBSC
Sov. Prince
Arcana Arcanorum
(Rose Cross of the East)
S.I.

Asian Brothers
Prussian Knight of
the Black Eagle

Knight of the East and West

Page 66

Hermetic Virtues

The Origins of Heredom of Kilwinning


(continued
1796 SWEDISH RITE
(ZINNENDORF)

1798 FESSLER system


collection

Craft

(Scotch Fellow Craft)

Scots Master

Royal Arch of Holy of Holies

Scots Master St. Andrew


(Elect of St. John)

Justification : Clermont

Knight of the East


(New Jerusalem
Chapter of Elect)
Knight of the West
(Templar Master of Keys)

Celebration :
RC, SOT, FrLucis

7
8

Brother of St. John


(Rose Cross)

Chapter of St. Andrew


= S.I.

Elect Scots Knight of


St. John

True Light :
Swedenborgian
Gnosis of Perfection Logos

Knight of Perfection

Copyright 2008 Ian Cowburn

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

A Cleansing Ritual
by Samuel Scarborough

There are times when you wish to magickally clear a space such as a room or even a
house of old energy. This is especially true for creating a permanent ritual space in a
room that will be used exclusively for a magickal purpose. The following rite will be
helpful for clearing out the old energy in an area.
This ritual is based on Golden Dawn techniques and presumes that the person performing the ritual is at least a Neophyte.
Ritual Preparations:
You will need an Altar, Rose Incense (Either loose or stick works fine), a Red Candle, a
White Candle, Chalice, Water, Salt, and a Paten. The Cross and Triangle (can be used).
A Banishing Dagger or Outer Wand of Double Power. Cup of Lustral Water. Two Censers or Thuribles, one that is for the Altar. A container of pure water and a container of
Salt.
Temple Set-up:
Set up the temple as in the Neophyte Opening, or with just the Altar in the center of the
room. Magician wears the Outer Order regalia or just the Black Tau Robe and Red Socks
or Slippers. If the Cross & Triangle are used, place them in the center of the Altar. Otherwise, place the unlit White Candle in the center of the Altar (if using the Cross & Triangle, then place the Candle between the Triangle and the Cross). On the eastern side of
the Altar place the Rose incense and the censer. On the southern side of the Altar place
the unlit Red Candle. On the western side of the Altar place the Chalice and a vessel
holding the water. On the northern side of the Altar, place the Paten and a small container of Salt. On a side altar in the South have a thurible or censer of burning incense.
On a side altar in the North have a cup of Holy Water.
Enter the temple of space with the Neophyte Signs.
Go to the West of the Altar, face East. Take a few moments to perform the Four-fold
Breath.
Light Candles in Sanctuary or Temple:
Begin in the East, light candles right to left; then circumambulate to the South, light candles right to left, then light the charcoal in the thurible or Incense; circumambulate to
the West, light candles right to left; circumambulate to the North, light candles right to
left; go directly to the East of the Altar, light candles right to left. Return to the West of
Altar.
Go to the North East and say:
Hekas! Hekas! Este Bebeloi!
Return to the West of the Altar, saluting with the Neophyte Signs when passing the
East.
Pick up either the black handled banishing dagger or the Outer Wand of Double Power.
(You can substitute with just using your hand if need be).
Perform the Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram.
Put down the banishing dagger or Outer Wand of Double Power. If using the Outer

Page 67

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Hermetic Virtues

A Cleansing Ritual
(continued)
Wand of Double Power, trace the pentagrams with the black end of the wand. Go to the
north of the temple and pick up the cup of lustral water and go to the East.
In the East trace an equal-armed cross with the cup of lustral water.

Now trace a Triangle over the Cross that you just drew in the East so that the Cross is inside it. Dip your finger into the water and sprinkle three times in the direction of the quarter.

In the East say:


So therefore first
Move to the South, saluting with the Neophyte Signs when passing the East.
In the South, repeat tracing the Cross and Triangle in the South like in the East.
In the South say:
The Priest who would governeth the Works of Fire...
Move to the West, repeat tracing the Cross and Triangle as in the first two Quarters.
In the West say:
Must sprinkle with the Lustral Waters...
Move to the North, repeat tracing of the Cross and Triangle.
In the North say:
Of the loud, resounding Sea.
Return to the East and raise the cup of lustral water on high and say:
I purify this temple with Water.
Return the cup to the North, saluting with the Neophyte Signs when passing the
East.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

A Cleansing Ritual
(continued)
Go to the South, saluting with the Neophyte Signs when passing the East, and
pick up the censer with rose incense burning on it. Go to the East.
In the East trace an equal-armed cross with the censer.

Now trace a Triangle over the Cross that you just drew in the East so that the Cross is
inside it. Swing the censer three times in the direction of the Quarter.

In the East say:


And when after all the phantoms are banished
Move to the South, saluting with the Neophyte Signs when passing the East.
In the South, repeat tracing the Cross and Triangle in the South like in the East.
In the South say:
Thou shalt see that holy and formless fire
Move to the West, repeat tracing the Cross and Triangle as in the first two Quarters.
In the West say:
That fire which darts and flashes through the hidden depths of the
universe
Move to the North, repeat tracing of the Cross and Triangle.
In the North say:
Hear thou the voice of fire!
Return to the East and raise the censer on high and say:
I consecrate this temple with Fire.
Return the censer to the South, saluting with the Neophyte Signs when passing the East.

Page 69

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Hermetic Virtues

A Cleansing Ritual
(continued)
Go to the Northeast and say:
"The visible Sun is the dispenser of Light to the Earth. Let me form therefore a Vortex in this temple, so that the invisible Light of the Spirit shall
shine therein from above."
Circumambulate the temple or sanctuary three times, saluting with the Neophyte
Signs when passing the East.
Return to the West of the Altar. Perform the Adoration to the Lord of the Universe:
Holy art Thou, Lord of the Universe! (Saluting Sign)
Holy art Thou, whom nature hath not formed! (Saluting Sign)
Holy art Thou, the Vast and the Mighty One! (Saluting Sign)
Lord of the Light, and of the Darkness! (Sign of Silence)
Say the following Invocation:
Unto Thee, Sole Wise, Sole Eternal, and Sole Merciful One,
Be the praise and glory forever.
Who hath permitted me, who now standeth humbly before Thee,
to enter thus far into the sanctuary of Thy mysteries.
Not unto me, Adonai, but unto Thy name be the Glory.
Let the influence of Thy Divine Ones descend upon my head,
and teach me the value of self-sacrifice
So that I shrink not in the hour of trial.
But that thus my name may be written on high,
And my Genius stand in the presence of the Holy One.
In that hour when the Son of Man is invoked before the Lord of Spirits
And His Name before the Ancient of Days.
Pause briefly, and then continue:
Glory be unto Thee, O Lord of the Universe,
for Thy Glory flows out rejoicing unto the ends of the Universe.
Come Thou in the Power of the Light!
Come Thou in the Light of Wisdom!
Come Thou in the Mercy of the Light!
The Light hath Healing in its Wings!
Bow your head for a moment before continuing:
I, (state motto), open this temple to perform the Ritual Cleansing of
__________, in the magick of the Light. Look with favour upon this ceremony YHVH. Grant me what I seek, so that through this rite I may obtain greater understanding and thereby advance in the Great Work.
Perform the Fourfold Breath.
Perform the Middle Pillar Exercise with the Circulation of the Body of Light.

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

A Cleansing Ritual
(continued)
Halt briefly to feel the energy generated from the Middle Pillar Exercise.
Raise your arms out to your sides so that you form a cross, and say:
Have mercy upon me, O Lord, blot out my transgressions. Wash me
thoroughly from my iniquities and cleanse me from my sins. Asperge
me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; Wash me, and I shall be whiter
than snow. Create in me a clean heart, O Lord, and renew a right
spirit within me.
Lower your arms to your sides and stand in silence for a few moments.
Facing the White Candle on the center of the Altar begin to formulate clearly and concisely the purpose for which the candle is lit.
Stand before the candle, slowly and with much feeling perform the Qabalistic Cross.
Stand in silence for a few moments, and then give four knocks upon your Altar.
Light the White Candle and say:
I (motto) do, in the Divine Name YHVH, light this candle, that it may
be a focus of the True Light for the purpose of cleansing my (House,
room, space, etc.)
Trace the Sign of the Cross and Circle over the Candle with the unlit Incense while vibrating the name, YEHESUAH. On the last syllable, thrust through the center of the circled cross.
Give the Projection Sign three times towards the candle. At the end of the third time,
give the Sign of Silence.
Close your eyes visualize and see clearly the purpose for which you have sought help.
Go to the East, and raise your right hand to your front and point with your index finger
to the east. Circumambulate deosil around the room or area to be cleansed projecting
a circle of purifying fire from your finger as you go. Do not lower your hand during this
circumambulation.
Return to the East, face the quarter and strongly visualize this circle of purifying fire surrounding the outer walls of your room, house, or area to be cleansed.
Circumambulate deosil three times, saluting the East as you pass.
Return to the west of the Altar and perform the Adoration to the Lord of the Universe.
Knock three times and say:
By the powers of the four elements, the space within this circle of art
will be cleansed and purified.
Pick up the incense stick or the charcoal and light it with the flame of the White Candle.
(Watch the smoke rise and be aware of its fragrance). If using charcoal, let it burn for a
bit before placing on it the Rose incense.

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Hermetic Virtues

A Cleansing Ritual
(continued)

Go to the East. Facing east, trace a large banishing pentagram with the incense, and say:
By the power of Air, I banish the region of the East.
Trace a white cross of equal arms within the center of the pentagram from top to bottom,
left to right, and wave the incense three times through the center of the pentagram.
Thrust the incense through the center of the pentagram and cross, and vibrate:
SHADDAI EL CHAI
Return the incense to the Altar. Go deosil to the South side of the Altar and take up the
Red Candle. Light it from the flame of the White Candle. Face the South and trace the
banishing pentagram with the Candle, and say:
By the power of Fire, I banish the region of the South.
Trace a white cross of equal arms within the center of the pentagram from top to bottom,
left to right, and wave the candle three times through the center of the pentagram.
Thrust the candle through the center of the pentagram and cross, and vibrate:
YHVH TZABOATH
Replace the Red Candle upon the Altar. Go to the West side of the Altar and carefully
pour water into the Chalice. Facing West, draw the banishing pentagram with the Chalice, and say:
By the power of Water, I banish the region of the West.
Trace a white cross of equal arms within the center of the pentagram from top to bottom,
left to right, and wave the Chalice three times through the center of the pentagram.
Thrust the Chalice through the center of the pentagram and cross, and vibrate:
ELOHIM TZABOATH
Replace the Water Chalice upon the Altar. Go deosil to the North side of the Altar, and
pour Salt on the Paten. Facing North, draw the banishing pentagram with the Paten of
Salt, and say:
By the power of Earth, I banish the region of the North.
Trace a white cross of equal arms within the center of the pentagram from top to bottom,
left to right, and take a pinch of Salt, waving it three times, each time releasing a small
amount, through the center of the pentagram. Thrust the Paten through the center of
the pentagram and cross, and vibrate:
ADONAI HA-ARETZ
Replace the dish of Salt on the northern side of the Altar.
Move to the West side of the Altar, saluting the East as you pass.
Face East, and perform the Sign of Projection at the lit White Candle, and say:

Volume 2 , I s s u e 3

A Cleansing Ritual
(continued)

By the power of the four elements, the space within this circle of art
has been cleansed and purified.
Give the Sign of Silence.
Knock three times.
Purify and Consecrate the temple as in the opening of the ritual.
Perform the Reverse Circumambulation, Saluting in the East.
Perform the Adoration to the Lord of the Universe, then say:
I now release any spirits that may have been imprisoned by this ceremony. Depart in peace to your abodes and habitations. Go with the
blessings of YEHESHUAH YEHOVASHAH.
Perform the LBRP, and then say:
I now declare this temple duly closed. So Mote It Be!
Extinguish Lights in the Sanctuary or Temple:
Begin at the East side of Altar, extinguish candles left to right; go directly to the North,
extinguish candles left to right; reverse circumambulate to the West, extinguish candles
left to right; circumambulate to the South, extinguish candles left to right; circumambulate to the East, extinguish candles left to right. Go to the West of Altar facing East.
Exit the space or temple in the Neophyte Signs.
Copyright 2008 Samuel Scarborough

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Hermetic Virtues

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A final word in your ear ...


The Hermetic Virtues magazine is published quarterly by a team of volunteers. Special thanks are due to the contributing authors for their generous gift of time and effort and to Anita Hoener for the design and layout of the magazine and
for additional artwork. Neither the authors nor the publishers receive any kind of remuneration and the purpose of this
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