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| D O C UM ENTS
OF THE

CITY OF

B O S T ON,

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*
*

FOR

THE

YEAR

VOL.

1868.

I.

CONTAINING DOCUMENTS FROM No. 1 TO No. 40, INCLUSIVE.

publishth by Orbtr of the stfitral Separtments of the City 606trument.

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B O ST O N:
ALFRED MUDGE & SON, CITY PRINTERS, 34 SCHOOL STREET,
1869.

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I N D EX .

DOCUMENT NO. 1.

Mayor's Address to the City Council.

January 6, 1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 2.

Municipal Register.
DOCUMENT NO. 3.

City Hospital, Fourth Annual Report of the Trustees.

January 1, 1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 4.

Auditor's Exhibit, on January 6, 1868.


DOCUMENT NO. 5.

Rules and Orders for the government of the City Council.

1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 6.

Public Buildings, Superintendent's Annual Report. January 13, 1868.


DOCUMENT NO. 7.

Police, Annual Report of the Chief. January 13, 1868.


DOCUMENT NO. 8.

Health, Superintendent's Annual Report. January 6, 1868.


DOCUMENT NO. 9.

Streets, Superintendent's Annual Report. January 13, 1868.


DOCUMENT No. 10.

Lands, Superintendent's Annual Report. January 13, 1868.

iv.

INDEX.

DOCUMENT NO. 11.

Weights and Measures, Annual Report of the Sealer for the Southern Dis
trict. January 13, 1868.
DOCUMENT NO. 12.

Weights and Measures, Annual Report of Sealer for the Northern District.
January 13, 1868.
DOCUMENT NO. 13.

Sewers, Superintendent's Annual Report. January 13, 1868.


DOCUMENT NO. 14.

City Charter, Report on amending of

February 13, 1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 15.

Water, Request for an additional Appropriation for. January 23, 1868.


DOCUMENT NO. 16.

Births, Deaths and Marriages, City Registrar's Quarterly Report.


ruary 3, 1868.

Feb

DOCUMENT NO. 17.

Auditor's Exhtbit, on February 4, 1868.


DOCUMENT NO. 18.

East Boston Ferry, Annual Report of the Company for 1867.

February 3,

1868.
DOCUMENT NO. 19.

City Physician, Annual Report of

February 3, 1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 20.

Fire Department, Thirtieth Annual Report of, for 1867. January 1, 1868.
DOCUMENT NO. 21.

Hamilton Street, Special Appropriation for Widening and Grading of.


February 17, 1868.
DOCUMENT NO. 22.

City Engineer and City Surveyor, Annual Reports of

January 30, 1868.

INDEX.

DOCUMENT NO. 23.

Salaries, Report of Committee on.

February 20, 1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 24.

Public Buildings, Request for an additional Appropriation.

February 20,

1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 25.

Fire Department, Request for an additional Appropriation.

February 24,

1868.
DOCUMENT NO. 26.

Fire Alarms, Request for an additional Appropriation. March 2, 1868.


DOCUMENT No. 27.

Water, Additional Appropriation for.

February 24, 1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 28.

Dorchester and Winthrop, Report of the Commissioners on Annexation of


to Boston. February 24, 1868.
DOCUMENT No. 29.

Health, Request for an additional Appropriation for. March 2, 1868.


DOCUMENT NO. 30.

Police, Amendment of Ordinances on. March 2, 1868.


DOCUMENT NO. 31.

Auditor's Exhibit, on March 4, 1868.


DOCUMENT No. 32.

Paving, Request for an additional Appropriation.

March 9, 1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 33.

Streets, Request for an additional Appropriation for Laying out and


Widening of March 9, 1868.
DOCUMENT NO. 34.

Engineering and Surveying, Request for an additional Appropriation for


the department of

March 9, 1868.

Wi

INDEX.

DOCUMENT No. 35.

City Hospital, Report on Fees for Medical Treatment at.

March 12, 1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 36.

Auditor's Estimates for the financial year 1868-9.

February 26, 1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 37.

Schools, Report on Vocal and Physical Culture, and Military Drill. March
10, 1868.
DOCUMENT NO. 38.

Devonshire Street, Report on Laying out and Widening of, between Milk
and State streets. April 6, 1868.
DOCUMENT NO. 39.

City Hall, City Solicitor's Opinion as to the control of

March 23, 1868.

DOCUMENT NO. 40.

Schools, Estimates of the Appropriations asked for by the School Com


mittee. February 14, 1868.

DOC U M ENTS.

T II E

IN AUGURAL

ADDRESS

OF

NATHANIEL B. SHURTLEFF,
MAY OR

OF

B O ST ON,

To

T H E CITY CO U N C I L,

January 6, 1868.

3%:T',
*

B O ST O N:
ALFRED MUDGE & SON, CITY PRINTERS, 34 SCHOOL STREET.
1868.

CITY

OF

BOST ON .

In Common Council, Jan. 6, 1868.

ORDERED: That His Honor the Mayor be requested to furnish


a copy of his address, that the same may be printed.
Sent up for concurrence.
CHAS. H. ALLEN, President.

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 6, 1868.


Concurred.

G. W. MESSINGER, Chairman.

A D D R E S S.

GENTLEMEN OF THE CITY CouncIL :

We are here, at the commencement of a new

municipal year, to enter upon the duties for the


performance of which we have been severally elected
by our fellow-citizens; and we cannot be too sen
sible of the honor conferred upon us, nor too
grateful to our Heavenly Father for continuing, by
his kind providence to us, and to the community
over whose important interests we have been called
to watch, the full enjoyment of that civil and reli
gious liberty, which our fathers won by their valor
and patriotism, and for vouchsafing to us so emi
nently the inheritance of the great social and moral
privileges which they achieved for us as the richest
birthrights, and the greatest of all paternal bless
ings.
We have met under somewhat extraordinary cir
cumstances this day, to occupy these seats of trust.
Two distinct municipalities, that independently have

T H E

MAYOR'S

A D D RESS .

existed side by side for more than two and a third


centuries, have, by the will of the legislature of our
ancient commonwealth, and by their own mutual
consent, become united, and have placed under one
common corporation their individual rights and des
tinies; and it is for us to inaugurate this union in a
manner, that will most conduce to the happiness,
comfort and prosperity of the united communities.
In 1822, nearly forty-six years ago, when Boston
adopted the charter by which it became a city, it
contained scarcely forty-five thousand inhabitants,
sparsely settled upon what was then known as the
peninsula lying north of the old Roxbury line,
and their support depended upon what commerce
and the fisheries could supply to a limited region of
neighboring country, in exchange
and scanty mechanical products.

for agricultural
Now, with its

natural growth, and in consequence of the augmen


tation of its bounds by legislative enactments, it has
increased in population about six-fold, to near a quarter
of a million of souls, and in extent of territory, by
annexation and reclaims from the water, more than

treble its original number of acres; and, with its


population and territory, have arisen new interests,

the foundations of wealth and prosperity.

From a

town, with small wants and few requirements, has

THE

M A Y O R'S

AD I) RESS.

arisen a large metropolis with many and diversified


interests; so that the small cares of the old town

officers have

become

multiplied

into the gravest

official responsibilities. In entering, therefore, upon


our municipal duties, it behooves us to keep in view
the weight with which the suffrages of our fellow
citizens have seen fit to burden us; and while we

shall rely upon each other for mutual support and


assistance in our labors, we must also seek for good

counsel and hearty co-operation from those whose


interests we have in charge. Let us never forget,
that in the performance of our duties, we are only
returning to our city a portion of that dest which
every citizen owes to the community of which he
forms a part.
We enter upon office at a time when our country,
weighed down by the heavy expenses of a costly war
from which no class of persons can claim exemption,
is necessarily oppressed with burdensome taxes, and
is in imminent danger of a great financial crisis.
Let us, therefore, resolve that our administration of

the affairs of the city shall be distinguished by a


marked determination to adhere to the most rigid
economy in all our business transactions; and, while
we carry out most sacredly the engagements which
our

redecessors have made, let us be careful not

T HE

M A YOR'S

AD ID RESS.

to enter into any new obligations that will require


large pecuniary appropriations.

Cases may, and most

assuredly will, happen, where judicious expenditures


will be demanded; let these occur as seldom as

possible, and let us manfully resist all attempts to


draw upon the treasury, except where obligations
compel, and necessities are emphatically apparent. .
Let a judicious economy be strictly observed in all
the departments of government in all matters.
As our city increases in population and business,
there will, of necessity, be many calls for general
improvements, which, if complied with by the govern
ment, will require large outlays of money. In view
of the great pecuniary burdens of our citizens and
the large and constantly increasing debt of the city,
we cannot, during the present year, too strongly
resist all such projects which involve expense that can
possibly be deferred without detriment to the public
welfare. Among the projects which must be man
fully met are those made obligatory in consequence

of the city of Roxbury becoming a part of our


domain: For water pipes must be laid in our newly
acquired territory where absolutely needed, the fire
alarm and police telegraphs must be extended to a
few points of communication, and certain avenues
must be opened, so as to form continuous streets

THE

from

the

MAY OR'S

Eleventh Ward

A D D R E S S.

to

the

avenues

of the

new acquisition. Perhaps, also, there may be occa


sions when the business interests of the city may
be greatly benefited by a judicious expenditure; if
so, it must not be forgotten that these take prece
dence of individual demands.

In our earnest endeavors to prevent unwarrantable


extravagance in large matters, we must not be drawn
into the common error of parsimony and meanness

in small things. The poor, disabled soldier, who has


faithfully served his country in the days of its extreme
danger, must not in his adversity be hindered by
unnecessary impediments from obtaining the humble
pittance which frugality can dole out to him; nor
must the widows and the fatherless children of the

defenders of our liberties be compelled, in

prolonging

their disheartened existence, to submit to vexatious

formalities, and niggardly, cold and hardened inatten


tion to their necessities. We must not forget that
the laborer is worthy of his hire, and that the humble
workman has rights, as well as the more affluent citi
zen; that he has need of rest and refreshment, and

that his mind is as capable of culture as that of the


more favored. A just discrimination between parsi
mony and frugality, as well as between extravagance
2

10

THE

M A YOR'S

A DD RESS.

and liberality, should never be lost sight of in managing


the affairs of a large muncipality like ours.
Will the citizens of Boston be content with our

stewardship, if we do not insist, on every occasion,


to promote the interests of our business community?
Shall we sit tamely in these seats, and, inattentive
to their needs, notice, day after day, their facilities
for trade and commerce neglected, their shipping
quitting our ports for more liberal emporiums, our
docks deserted, and the grass growing upon our
wharves? This state of things must not be. Every
inducement must be advanced to restore our city to
its ancient prestige and once honored position among
the great marts of the world. Boston is favorably
situated to be the great depot of the North and
West; it is easily, and at comparatively small cost,
accessible by rail or by water from all points; its
harbor is capable of being unsurpassed by any other
on the continent; its capitalists are numerous and
enterprising, and its inhabitants are industrious, ener
getic and capable. Then, why, by our efforts and
liberal acts, may we not again enjoy the good
will of the producers and consumers of the country,
and why may not our city, by liberal legislation, and
a decent regard for the comforts and privileges of all
concerned, once more become, as it has been, a great

TH E

M A Y O R. S. A. D. D. R. E. S.S.

emporium of the country?

11

It undoubtedly can ; and it

is our duty as members of its City Council to give the


aid of the government towards its accomplishment.

The annexation of the Highlands of Boston, the


large enterprises already undertaken, and the growth

of the city in population, have much augmented the

cares and responsibilities of municipal officers. The


Aldermen, in their capacity of County Commissioners
alone, have more arduous duties to perform, than are
required of similar officers in any of the other cities
of the Union. These official requirements are far
more exacting than individuals should bear, or it is
desirable for the public interest that they should be
burdened with, and the duration in office of an

elected member of the government is extremely uncer


tain.

Under these circumstances, would it not be

advisable that the most important of the onerous and


weighty duties of office be intrusted to bureaus, or
commissioners appointed for a term of years, like the
various boards of trustees and directors, who, acting
under the supervision of appropriate committees of
the City Council, would possess some degree of per
manency; and who, not being entirely subject to the
changes of political influences or control of deeply
calculating speculators, would be able to manage the
affairs intrusted to them with a more consistent and

12

THE

M A YOR'S AD ID RESS.

uniform policy, with a more positive power, and with


a great saving to the treasury?

For many reasons

equally urgent, and because strongly demanded by the


tax-payers upon whom our treasury relies, a similar
bureau of abatement and appeals might be appointed,
to which any person when thought to be overtaxed
could apply and obtain redress, without the necessity
of publicly submitting his case for the action of the
Board of Aldermen, and consuming, as is frequently
the case, much time in searching out the assistant
assessor who was instrumental in unwarrantable doom

ing. If these suggestions should be deemed worthy of


being carried out by the City Council, undoubtedly
much time would be saved for legitimate business,
and much vexation and unnecessary detention of the
members of both branches would be avoided. Unques

tionably, the uncertain and hasty estimates, which so


frequently deceive the City Council, and cause the
occurrence of so much distrust and dissatisfaction in

carrying out the excellent and much needed projects


of the government, would never be made, and a much
greater reliance could be placed in the reports, upon
which the action of the City Council is often based.
The universal practice of my predecessors in office
having become a custom, it devolves upon me to
invite your attention to a survey, very general indeed,

THE

MAY OR'S

A D DRESS.

13

of the condition of the various departments of the


government that have been intrusted to our care and

oversight.

But it must not be expected, however,

just entering as I do upon official duties new to me,


that on this occasion anything more than a brief
allusion will be made to some of these great trusts,
as they have been transmitted to us, reserving for
future and more appropriate occasions the privilege
of communicating to you, as enjoined by the city
charter, such information, and recommending such
measures, as may, in my judgment, tend to the
improvement of the finances of the city, as well as
of its police, health, security, cleanliness, comfort and
ornament. A more thorough knowledge of the work
ing of the several departments, than can be given
at this time, will be obtained from the annual reports,
which will hereafter be presented for your considera
tion by the proper officers.
FINANCES.

The financial condition of the city is a matter


of the deepest importance and interest to our fel
low-citizens, and is one which should never be lost

sight of by the city government.

Its present con

dition should be well understood, as we commence

our official career.

The following facts, in a con

14

T H E

MAYOR'S

AD ID RESS.

densed form, will suffice for the present occasion ;


but, for the convenience of reference, the full re

port of the Committee on the Reduction of the


City Debt will be appended to this address, after
the manner of my predecessors in office.
The outstanding funded and unfunded debt of the
city, of all kinds, December 31, 1867, as reported to
the City Council at its closing sessions by the Com
mittee on the Reduction of the City Debt, amounted
to $13,645,336.24; to which is to be added a loan,

passed by the City Council since that date, of $65,000;


also the debt of the city of Roxbury, which we have
assumed by the act of annexation, namely, $991,456,
making a total of $14,701,792.24.
If from this amount of $14,701,792.24, we deduct

$712,500, gold bearing bonds, which became due


January 1, 1868, and were drawn for by the Audi
tor of Accounts, and charged off on his books, and
which have nearly all been paid by the Treasurer,
we shall have the total funded and unfunded debt
of the

City

of Boston with its annexed territory of

Roxbury, on January 6, 1868, of $13,989,292.24.


There is in the treasury a Sinking Fund for the
redemption of this debt, in charge of the Com
mittee on the Reduction of the City Debt, which
amounts to $3,986,780.73.

Deducting this amount

T HE

M A Y OR'S

AD ID R. E. S.S.

15

from the total outstanding debt, leaves the net debt,


$10,002,511.51.

During the present financial year $886,700.00 of


the city debt fell due, all of it payable in gold,
and nearly all bearing six per cent, interest. Pro
vision was made at the commencement of this finan

cial year, for the payment of this large amount of


debt which became due by taxing for the premium
to purchase the gold, and drawing on the Sinking

Fund for the amount required over that taxed for


said fund, viz: $400,000.

The only six per cent.

bonds, payable in gold, now outstanding, are those


held by the Trustees of the Public Library, amount
ing to $92,000. The Committee on the Reduc
tion of the City Debt have also purchased, during
the year, $60,500 bonds in anticipation of the time
they were payable.
No large amount of the debt of the city will fall
due until the financial year 187071, when there will

be $891,200 to be paid, and in 187273, $1,955,711.11.


The Sinking Fund, it is confidently believed, can be
relied upon to pay off these large amounts, without
recourse to renewals of these loans.

The credit of our city never stood higher in all


the money centres of the world, than it does at this

16

T HE

present moment.

MAY OR'S

A D D RESS.

We have not been obliged to bor

row any money in the market since October 10, 1866,


as the Committee on the Reduction of the City Debt
have invested a portion of the Sinking Fund" in
the bonds of the city, as issued by the Treasurer,
and have made temporary loans to that officer when
required.
The credit of the city is sustained, in a great degree,
by the fact well known in financial circles that
the amount required annually, to defray the current
expenses of the government, and the interest and pre
mium on the debt, is raised by taxation, and that we
only borrow money for extraordinary and permanent
undertakings. It should be borne in mind, however,
when borrowing money, that every $1,000,000 increase
of the debt, adds to the amount of taxes each year
$60,000, the amount necessary to meet the interest
thereon; and that the amount now required to be
taxed annually to meet the interest and premium
account is over $1,000,000.

The balances of appropriations and the Reserved


Fund remaining on hand, will, we are assured by the
Auditor of Accounts, be sufficient to meet the ordinary
expenses of the government for the balance of this
financial year, terminating April 30, 1868, without

being compelled to borrow, for the purpose.

THE

MAY OR'S

ASSESSORS

A D DRESS.

17

DEPARTMENT.

The accompanying facts in relation to this depart


ment, which supplies means to the treasury

for

the general expenses of government, will be found


worthy of your attention.
LEGAL DECISIONs. During the past year two im
portant decisions of the Supreme Judicial Court were
given in
a point
munity;
of the

favor of the city. The first of these settled


of great interest to the mercantile com
and was to the effect, that, under the laws
commonwealth, members of a firm doing

business in Boston, and also in other States, are tax

able by the city for their property held out of the


State, although it may have been taxed by the State
in which it is employed. The second decision main
tained the right of the city to tax shares of the
national banks situated in Boston held by the resi
dents of the city.

An appeal from the assessors, by

citizens who hold stock of this character in banks out

of the State, has, within a few weeks, been decided

in favor of the assessors by the Board of Aldermen,


acting as county commissioners; the courts, however,
will probably be called upon to adjudicate this new
issue.
3

18

TH E

MAYOR'S AD DRESS.

ABATEMENT of TAxEs.

The taxes abated at this

time represent a valuation of $6,300,000, equal to


1.42 per cent of the whole valuation of the city; at
the corresponding date last year the abatement was
1.27 per cent.

A similar increase of abatement has

been noticed in some of our neighboring municipali


ties, and might fairly have been expected from the
depressed condition of business at this time.
NEw LAw.

Since the year 1860, the common

wealth, in selling its land west of the public garden,


has given the purchaser the option of taking a deed
of conveyance, or a bond for a deed; and in most
instances the bonds have been taken in preference to
the deeds.

The

land

thus held could not be taxed

by the city, as the fee was in the commonwealth.


Although the bonds were for the term of three years,
nevertheless, on various pretexts, the deeds of some
of the lots had not been taken when twice that time

had passed since the selling of the land. A great


inequality of taxation among the owners of lots, and
the loss of a large amount of property to the city
valuation, was the result of this. To remedy this evil,
the legislature has provided (chap. 101 of 1867) that
land sold in this manner shall be free from taxation

for the space of three years, but after that time shall
be taxable whether deeds are taken

or not.

Under

THE

M A YOR'S

19

A D D R E S S.

this law the assessors have, during the year just past,
been able to assess upward of $700,000 upon real
estate that otherwise would have escaped taxation;
and they will, in the future, be able to tax this prop
erty upon a basis that will put all purchasers of the
commonwealth's land upon an equal footing.
RATE of TAXATION.

The rate of taxation for the

year 1867 was $15.50 on each $1,000, being an


increase over that of 1866 of $2.50 on each one
thousand dollars.

Of this rate $3.94 was on account

of the State, and $11.56 on account of the city and


county. In 1866 the rate for the State was $2.45,
and for the city $10.55. The rate of taxation in the
city of Roxbury, which has now become a part of
Boston, was for the year 1867 $19.00 on each one
thousand dollars; and in 1866 $16.00.

Of the rate

for the year just passed, $4.28 was for the State tax,
and $14.72 for city and county purposes.
VALUATION of BosToN AND RoxBURY.

The valuation

of the two cities for 1867 was as follows:


Boston,

Real estate,

$250,587,700

Personal estate, $194,358,400


Roxbury, Real estate,
Personal estate,

Total, $444,946,100

$18,265,400

$8,286,300

Total,

Total value, real and personal,

26,551,700

$471,197,800

20

TH E

M A Y O R'S

A D DRESS.

In 1866 the valuation of the two cities was :

Boston,

Real estate

$225,767,215

Personal estate, $189,595,130

Roxbury, Real estate,


Personal estate,

Total, $415,362,345

$17,769,000
$7,759,600

Total,

Total value, real and personal,

25,528,600
$440,890,945

In Boston the increase of valuation of 1866 over

1865 was at the rate of 11% per cent on real estate,


and 114 per cent. on personal estate; that of 1867 over
that of 1866 was 11 per cent on real estate, and 23 per
cent. on personal estate. The increase of valuation in
New York for the purpose of taxation of 1866 over
1865 was at the rate of 11% per cent. on real estate,
and 42 on personal estate; that of 1867 over that of
1866 was at the rate of 15 per cent on real estate,
and 7 per cent. on personal estate.

These figures

would seem to indicate that real estate, which rose

but slowly under the derangement of the currency to


its present high value, shows but little tendency to
recede; while personal property, which responded so
quickly to the issue of paper money in augmentation
of prices, recedes rapidly as the currency approaches
the specie basis, or as business becomes depressed.
The annexation of Roxbury has added to our
population about 30,000, and an area more than

THE

MAY OR'S A D D RESS.

21

one-third larger than Boston proper, and two-thirds


the extent of the twelve wards that existed before

annexation.

The method of assessment, which has

heretofore existed substantially unaltered for many

years, was materially changed by the City Council


of the last year in their closing session. The city
had unquestionably outgrown the system under which
it had been acting. Each year made it more dif
ficult to bring the work to a close within the time
required by the ordinance. The Board of Assessors
and Assistants under the old town organization, and
for many years under the city charter, consisted of
twenty-seven members. By the addition of the Rox
bury Assessors, it would have consisted of about
fifty members. The Board had become too cum
bersome to successfully cope with a work of great
magnitude, which, from the nature of the case, must
be performed with expedition and within a limited
time. Without venturing an opinion upon the merits
of the new ordinance, it may be proper still to
inquire if the change accomplishes all that now is,
or soon will be, needed to make the administration

of the affairs of this important department as effi


cient and economical as possible.
In the year 1867, Boston and Roxbury combined
paid $1,807,850 of the five millions tax levied by

22

THE

M A Y OR'S AD DRESS.

the commonwealth.

We are assured by the Governor

of the commonwealth, in his annual message to the


legislature on the third instant, that it can hardly
be possible that the State expenditures of the cur
rent year will require a State tax exceeding two
millions of dollars. In the ratio of the last year,
the portion falling to Boston would, therefore, only
amount to $723,140.

PUBLIC

LANDS.

The public lands belonging to the city are under


the care and management of a joint standing com
mittee, composed of three Aldermen and five mem
bers of the Common Council, and in the special
charge of a Superintendent. During the year just
passed the sales have been as follows:
South of Dover Street

113,822 sq. feet for $97,713.31.

At South Boston .

76,762 sq. feet for $42,225.72.

The total sales during the year amounted to 190,584


feet for the sum of $139,939.03. The expenditures
of the department for the same time, including the
setting of edgestones and paving of sidewalks, have
been $9,495.25.

Most of the sales of land at the

south part of the city, have been upon South Bay,


and for mechanical purposes, a portion of this ter

THE

23

MAY OR 'S A D DRESS.

ritory having been set aside for such uses; and the
price per foot was largely in advance of that obtained
in previous years. The sales at South Boston have
been larger than during any previous year, and
better prices have also been obtained for the land.
The land at City Point has come into demand, and
it is predicted that not many years will pass before
the public lands situated there will be covered with
handsome dwellings.
The land in charge of the committee at the
present time is as follows;
South of Dover Street
South Boston
East Boston

Making a total of

830,646 square feet.


770,041

*@

46

&

**

5,000

1,605,687

square feet.

The city has, also, at the south part of the neck,


and upon the Back Bay, six reserved lots, containing
135,087 square feet.
WATER WORKS.

The enterprise of supplying pure water for the ben


efit of its citizens is the most important one that the
city ever entered into, both as regards the universal
benefit derived therefrom, and the debt created thereby,
amounting to $7,114,709.14 on the first of May last,

24

T H E

MAYOR'S

AD D RESS.

and which will be largely increased the present year;

as you will be called upon for a further appropria


tion of five hundred thousand dollars to complete the
Chestnut Hill Reservoir. This work, although managed
in an able manner, will far exceed the estimated cost ;

but when completed, the benefit resulting therefrom,


will fully compensate for the large outlay. During
the past year considerable progress has been made
towards the completion of this reservoir; and with
the same continued energy, another year will nearly
complete this vast work, which is in progress of
execution in a manner highly creditable to the city,
as well as to those who have it in charge.

The annexation of Roxbury will require that portion


of our city to be supplied with water at as early a day
as it can properly be done, and is absolutely demanded;
and you will be called upon for an appropriation to
defray the expense of laying the pipes, and the erection
of a distributing reservoir for this locality.
The income from this department has not been
sufficient to meet the interest on the cost of the works

and the running expenses; but, as the interest on the


cost of the works is now payable in gold, it is fair to
presume that on the return to specie payments, the
income will be ample for this purpose.
The total number of water takers, now entered at

TH E

M A Y OR'S AD ID RESS.

25

the office of the water registrar during the year, is


28,429, being an increase, since Jan. 1, 1867, of 745;
the estimated amount of income

from the sales of

water for the year 1867 was $500,000; the total


income received to date is $521,006.37; the estimated

income from the sales of water for the year 1868 is


$550,000.
POLICE.

This department is rightly considered as of the


utmost importance in managing the affairs of the city.
To arrest criminals, recover stolen property, and bring
offenders to justice, is only a small part of the duty
of a good and efficient officer. The prevention of
crime by the preservation of peace, and the protection
of property by constant vigilance, are among his first
duties. Through the Police Department the laws
should be enforced, and order enjoined. In order to
secure the accomplishment of these, the force should
correspond with the magnitude of the objects to be
attained and the work to be accomplished. To pre
serve order, officers should themselves be orderly.
Decency and decorum should always be observable,
and always is in a good patrolman.

Boston is for

tunate in her police arrangement, and has the reputa


tion of standing in this respect as high as any of the
cities in the union.
4

26

T HE

MAYOR'S

A D D RESS.

The police force now consists of three hundred and


forty-four men, having been largely reduced from that
of the previous year. This has made the duty of the
patrolmen more onerous, although it has saved some
expense to the city.
On our accession to office, we find nine police dis
tricts with three hundred and forty-four men, or
-

one police officer to about five hundred and eighty


inhabitants. Roxbury, as it comes to us, has a force
of thirty men, or about one officer for one thousand
inhabitants, and a very large territory for each patrol
man to visit in the discharge of his duty. Other cities
have many more police officers, proportionally, than
does ours. The size of the Highlands is such, that
the territory should, for convenience, be divided into
two districts, perhaps by a line running through Shaw
mut Avenue, and the force should be enlarged to con
form with that of the old nine districts.

If this should

be done, it will be necessary to provide another station


house near the Dorchester line, for the accommodation

of the eastern district, the western being pretty well


provided for by the present station house in the base

ment of the city hall on Dudley Street. The surplus


appropriation of last year will probably be sufficient
to provide for the erection of a new station house, if
in your judgment a separate building is required for
the easterly district.

THE

MAY OR'S

AD DRESS.

27

During the year 1867, there have been 19,120


arrests, an increase in number of 1,165 over that of

the previous year.

The aggregate amount of im

prisonment has been 1,424.75 years; and the amount


of property reported as recovered, $124,020.
PUBLIC

HEALTH.

During the year that has just passed, no unusual

sickness has prevailed, the city having been most


remarkably spared the unwelcome visit from any of the
ordinary epidemics or malignant diseases in any degree
to cause alarm. The streets have been kept clean, and
the usual nuisances, which produce the common annoy
ances to the citizens, have been promptly abated when
made known to the department. The free baths, under
their admirable and judicious management, have proved,
as in the first year of their establishment, of incalcula
ble benefit; and have undoubtedly produced much good
influence in preserving health by securing cleanliness.
The baths were free for public use during the four
months preceding the 28th of last September, and in
that time were used 807,201 times. The experiment
of public bathing, as tried during the last two years,
has been eminently successful as a sanitary measure,
and has met the approval of all who have given
attention to the subject.

28

T H E

MAY OR 'S

A DDRESS.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

The public schools have ever been the pride of


Bostonians. From our earliest history our fathers
have felt a deep interest in their welfare. The first
record in our archives relating to the free schools
bears date as early as the year 1635, when Mr. Phile
mon Pormort was entreated to become schoolmaster
for the

teaching

and nurturing of the children.

Since

that time, the records abound in orders for the well

being of the schools, and nothing has been left


undone that could advance their standing or increase
their usefulness.

Tuition commences with the first

elements of instruction, carries the pupil through all


the stages of schooling, and finally leaves the boy fit
for the counting room or college, and the girl to be
a teacher. There are five high schools, twenty-one
grammar schools, and two hundred and fifty-nine
primary schools, making two hundred and eighty
three in all. These are managed by sixty-seven male,
and five hundred and sixty-three female, teachers.
The whole number of school-houses owned by the
city is about seventy-two, and many schools are kept
in hired apartments. During the past year there
were, of all grades of pupils, about 28,126. Two
large school-houses are now in progress of erection;

THE

MAYOR'S A D D R. E. S. S.

29

and others undoubtedly would be urged as needed,


were the finances of the city, and the monetary pros
pects of the country, in a condition to warrant the
outlay of large sums of money. As much as these
buildings seem to be needed, it is hoped that the City
Council will pause before it launches forth again into any
new enterprises involving large expenditures of money.
In consequence of the annexation of the Highlands,
there have been added to our list of schools, one

high school for boys and girls, one grammar school


for boys, another for girls, and two for boys and
girls, and one other small school for both SeXeS.
There are about fifty primary schools in the newly

acquired territory.

The number of pupils attending

these schools is not far from five thousand.

Within

a short time the city government of Roxbury, almost


the last official act of that municipality, authorized
the building of another grammar school-house; and

it will be incumbent upon us to see that the engage


ments of that city, now that its corporate powers
have terminated, are fully carried out.
Owing to the ill consequences of the emulation
caused by the medal system in the grammar schools

for girls, the awarding of the city medals for girls


was discontinued last year, and diplomas of gradu
ation given to all the girls on their faithful com

30

TH E

MAY OR'S AD DRESS.

pletion of their school course.


no more

Franklin

medals

For the same reason

for the boys of the

grammar schools will be given out ; but, to indus


trious, well behaved and meritorious graduates, will
be awarded, in their stead, proper certificates. The
income

of the

Franklin

fund

for medals, which

yields only fifty dollars a year, will, however, under


the direction of the standing committees on the
Latin and the English High Schools, be awarded
to the meritorious scholars of their respective schools,
it having been determined by the school committee
that the medals

could not well be discontinued, and

that the influences would have very little effect upon


the maturer class of pupils attending these schools.
During the past year two schools for licensed
minors were established under the supervision of
the school committee.

These contain about one hun

dred and forty pupils, who are required to attend


school, at least two hours each day, during the
school year. These boys ply their various voca
tions during a portion of the remainder of the day,
such as blacking boots, selling newspapers, and
pursuing other callings in the streets. Much good
has already resulted from this provision of the city
government; and, undoubtedly, as the system of
teaching the boys of the street is more generally
enforced, more beneficial results will be apparent.

THE

31

MAY OR'S AD D R E S S .

PUBLIC LIBRARY.

The Public Library necessarily stands at the


head of our educational institutions.

It furnishes the

material whereby all classes of our community may


be entertained and instructed.

as well as his pupil.


learned, that

he

It teaches the master

No person is so wise or

cannot find

there books

which

will make him wiser and more learned; and none

so

ignorant,

that

he

cannot

obtain

there

the

elementary knowledge suited to his first beginnings.


The popular portion of its collections continues to
be largely used, and the reading room increases in
public favor.
From its foundation to

the

present time, the

Library has been greatly indebted for its support


to the liberality of the appropriations made by the
City Government.

It is proper to say, that, in my

judgment, this money has been well bestowed. The


value of such an institution is not to be measured

by any money standard.

It stands as a monument

of the civilization of Boston.

When the Library was opened in Mason Street,


in the year 1854, it contained 22,617 volumes. By
the last numeration, it had 135,981 volumes, being
an increase in fourteen years of 113,364 volumes.

32

T HE

MAY OR'S

A D DRESS .

During the last year it circulated 208,963 volumes.


An institution which, since its foundation, has loaned

over 1,900,000 volumes, may well be said to have


more than fulfilled the reasonable expectations of its
friends. Having been officially connected with it
from the laying of its foundation stone to the present
time, it has been a recurring source of gratification
that it was placed in the midst of a community
which so readily appreciated its worth.
STREETS.

FoRT HILL.

Oliver Street has been widened and

graded during the past year, from Milk Street


to Broad Street; the whole expense of which, with
the cutting down of the street, is to be assessed
under the special act of 1865. Hamilton Street
was widened and graded by a Resolve passed Jan
uary 5, 1867; but nothing has been done to the
street by the city, on account of there being no
place as yet provided for the deposit of the earth;
and it is sufficiently apparent that the whole im
provement of cutting down the Hill has not been
carried forward on that account. The other portion
of the

improvement

besides Oliver Street, will have

to be done under the general betterment law;


by which the city can assess one half only of the

T H E

M A Y O R'S

33

A D D R. E. S.S.

benefit that will accrue from the improvement to


any abutting estate.

It is estimated that the whole

improvement will cost the city, after making the


assessments under the betterment law, about $500,000.

HANovER STREET.

A Report was submitted to the

Board of Aldermen, in

November

last, in reference

to the widening of this street. The project was con


sidered as of much importance by the committee,
who came to the conclusion that the street should

be widened throughout its whole length ; but while


they expressed themselves as unanimously in favor
of the proposed improvement, they recommended the
subject to the early attention of their successors.
FEDERAL STREET.

An order has passed the Board

of Aldermen for widening this street between the


foot of Summer Street and

First Street, in

South

Boston, to seventy feet; but it has not as yet passed


the Common Council.

TREMONT STREET. The proposition to widen this


street in its extent between Boylston Street and the
Boston and Albany Railroad Bridge to sixty feet, at
an estimated cost of half a million of dollars, including

the raising of the grade of a portion of the street,


5

34

T HE

M A YOR S

A D DRESS.

was delayed in consequence of the City Solicitor having


given the opinion that this street should not be
widened until after the property on the Church Street
district has been taken by the city; for the reason
that the property on that portion of the street, south
of Pleasant Street, had better first come into - the

possession of the city, under the Church Street act


approved by the Governor on the first day of June,
1867.

BROADwAY.

The Board of Aldermen of the past

year passed an order for the extension of Broadway


to Albany Street, at an estimated expense of $800,000.
In this the Common Council non-concurred with the

Board, and referred the subject to the present city


government.

These projects will, in their natural course, come


before you for action; and it behooves you to give
them your most patient attention, and unbiassed con
sideration.

PAVING.

The amount of work done by the department during


the past year has been unusually large, owing to the
necessity of replacing a large amount of worn-out
round-stone pavement with new and superior material;

THE

MAY OR'S ADDRESS.

35

of repaving a large number of streets where the same


kind of pavement had become defective and unsafe for
travel; in consequence of requirements caused by the
growth of the city in South Boston, in the southerly
wards, and upon the Back Bay, and the acceptance
of streets upon the last-mentioned territory, which
required a considerable outlay of money; and also
owing to the necessity of keeping in thorough repair
and safe condition for travel, the streets in other por
tions of the city. It has always been a source of
just pride to the City Government, as well as to the

citizens at large, that the public highways of Boston


have been maintained in better condition than those

of any other large city of the Union; and it has


been necessary to keep up this high standard in order
to compensate to a certain extent for the many disad
vantages occasioned by our crooked, narrow, and
over-crowded thoroughfares, that the natural courses
of traffic and business should not be impeded.
Under the proper head of paving, the following
amount of work has been done, viz.:

45,000 feet of

edgestones have been set, and 27,571 yards of round


stone have been repaved; 10,440 yards of new round
stone, 9,918 yards of new blockstone, 19,750 yards of
sidewalk, and 2,100 yards of new crossings have been
laid.

A force of twenty men has also been employed

36

THE

M A YOR'S

AD DRESS.

during the summer months repairing defective places


in the streets.

Of important work performed, it will only be


necessary to particularize the paving with new small
granite-block pavement, Exchange Street and por
tions of Oak, Kingston, Washington and Commercial
streets; the repaving of portions of Commercial,
Congress, Second and Orange streets; the work done
on Brookline, Pembroke and Canton streets, west of
Tremont Street, and that on Warren Avenue and

Appleton and Clarendon streets; and the widening


and grading of Richmond Street between Hanover
and Salem streets.

In addition to the business coming particularly


under the head of paving, the department has also

carried on the following work for which special


appropriations were made, viz: the raising and grad
ing of Dedham Street; the extension of Albany
Street from Troy Street to the Dover Street Bridge;

the building of a new bridge over the tracks of the


Boston and Worcester Railroad at Albany Street, and

the grading of Oliver Street, Washington Square and


Belmont Street.

In fulfilment of an agreement made between the


city and the abutters on Dedham Street, between
Shawmut Avenue and Tremont Street, that street

T HE

M A YOR'S

AD ID RESS.

37

has been raised to the high grade; in the accom


plishment of which, the houses have been either torn
down, raised, or rebuilt by the owners, they receiving
a certain sum in compensation for damages, and the
streets, cellars and lots filled up by the city. The
cost of this work amounted to $20,712.

The extension of Albany Street, from Troy Street


to the Dover Street Bridge, authorized by the Board
of Aldermen, on the tenth of September, 1866, is
nearly completed. This work included the building
of a sea-wall, two hundred and seventy-one feet in

length, and the filling up and grading of the same


length of street eighty feet in width, and about six
teen feet in depth. The cost of the wall, which
was completed in July, amounted to $33,005, and

the cost of the filling and grading (nearly completed)


to $10,397. In July the Committee made a contract
for the erection of the stone abutments and retain

ing walls, containing about twenty-six hundred cubic


yards of stone work, for the Albany Street Bridge.
These abutments are completed, and Messrs. McKay
and Aldus, of East Boston, are now erecting upon
them a new wrought iron lattice bridge.

The abut

ments and bridge are of superior workmanship, and


will compare favorably with any work of the kind
erected in Boston and its vicinity.

38

TH E

M A YOR'S AD DRESS.

The grading of Oliver Street, Washington Square,


and Belmont Street, which was authorized by a spe
cial act of the Legislature passed in 1865, has been
prosecuted as rapidly as circumstances would allow.
The grading of the streets was completed on the
twenty-fourth of December, and the earth removed,
amounting to about 68,000 cubic yards, was used
principally for the extension of Albany Street, and
the filling in of the flats lying between Albany Street
and Harrison Avenue, Troy Street, and the Dover
Street Bridge. A strip of land lying on the southerly
side of the bridge, and owned by the city, has also
been raised from the same source. The cost of the
grading of Oliver Street, Washington Square, and
Belmont Street, has amounted to about $49,000.

The duties of the Superintendent of Streets, as


defined by the City Ordinances, are to superintend

the general state of the streets, to attend to the lay


ing out, widening, elevation, and repairs of the
same, etc. He acts under the general direction
and control of the Committee on Paving, and to this
Committee are referred all matters relating to the
names and numbers of streets.

There are in the

City of Boston five hundred and seven streets, and


four hundred and eighty-nine courts and places. In
addition to these, there are in the newly acquired

T HE

M A YOR'S

A D D R E S S.

39

property on the highlands, one hundred and seventy


seven streets and one hundred and one courts and

places.

Of this number, eighty streets, and forty

courts and places, bear the same names as those of


Boston proper. This duplication of names will cause
hereafter no inconsiderable annoyance and inconven
ience, and it is respectfully suggested that a careful
revision of the same be made, with an alteration,

perhaps, of a portion in each locality.

The changing

of the names of streets is a matter, however, not to

be acted upon hastily, nor without good and sufficient


reasons. In the older portions of the city the names
of the streets have, to a certain

extent, historical

interest, and cannot be changed without destroying


associations connected with the past. Of the streets
in existence in 1722, very few retain at the present
day their original names; and the memory of many
of the prominent benefactors of this anciept metrop
olis have been sacrificed by the inordinate desires of
unthoughtful and ungrateful persons.
SEWERS.

The only portion of the city which suffers from


defective drainage is that formerly lying on the borders
of the Back Bay, the larger part of which is known
as the Church Street District, and which has been

40

THE

MAY OR 'S A D DRESS.

under the consideration of successive City Govern

ments for some years. It is expected that under the


powers given by the Legislature, or by other means,
that measures can soon be taken to raise the grade
of that portion lying north of Tremont Street. When
this has been successfully performed, the grade should
be generally raised as far south as Dover Street.
The Commonwealth and the Boston Water Power

Company, who are the owners of the new territory


upon the Back Bay, have carried out expensive and
satisfactory works for the drainage of their respec
tive lands, as had been previously agreed upon
with a committee of the City Government.
The city of Roxbury, for the last two or three
years, has spent large sums annually for drainage
purposes, and probably much work of this character
will not be required, until after the introduction of
water, for that part of the city.
LAMP DEPARTMENT.

The Lamp Department of the city, is one of

great importance to the community, the lighting of


the streets being not only a convenience to the

public, but a great protection to persons and prop


erty. The fact that many of the large cities in
this country, cause their streets to be lighted every

THE

MAYOR'S A D D R E. S.S.

41

night during the year, has brought out many


unfavorable comments upon the system of this city,
and the present government have so far taken the
subject into consideration, as to cause the system of
lighting all night, to be adopted during the win
ter months, say from October 15th to April 15th.
This change in the system has added to the expense
of maintenance of the department some thirty thou
sand dollars, but has given universal satisfaction to
the public, so far as the Superintendent can learn.
The expenses of this department are very large, the
appropriation for the present financial year, ending
on the 30th of April next, amounting to two hundred
and fifty thousand five hundred dollars, an amount
which it is believed will be ample for the year.
The largest portion of this large sum is expended
for material consumed and for labor.

The estimate

for 1867 1868, being as follows: For gas,


$16,690.42; for fluid, $23,719.94; lighting and
care, $38,053.99; Total $223,464.35.

FIRE DEPARTMENT.

During the past year the usual number of fires


and alarms have occurred in the city; and yet no
serious conflagration has taken place involving great
losses of property. This may be attributed to the
6

42

TH E

M A Y O R'S AD DRESS.

promptness and efficiency of the officers and mem

bers of the department. The losses have been much


below the average.

The department exhibits strong

evidence of improvement during the past year, both


in its fire apparatus and also in its houses. The
men connected with it feel much pride in keeping
everything in good condition, and the emulation that
exists is healthy and commendable. The excellent
accommodations of the house on Mount Vernon Street,

and the new building on Salem Street, have excited

a strong desire on the part of the men connected


with some of the engines to have better accommo

dations, and more comfortable quarters for them


selves.

Especially to be condemned are the present

quarters of the steam-fire engine in Scollay's build


ing; its stable and apartments are contracted, un
comfortable and prejudicial to the health both of .
man and beast.

When

it

is considered that

this

company are noted for their promptness, and that


they have their apparatus in the most thickly built
part of the city, where the buildings are the most
costly, it would seem proper that their necessities
should be relieved at the earliest possible time that
funds can be spared for the purpose. The report

of the Chief Engineer will soon be placed before


you, and to the statements to be made therein, your

THE

M A Y O R'S

AD DRESS.

43

attention is particularly called. The increase of our


territory, by the annexation of the late city of Rox
bury, will require your immediate attention, in making
at least some provisional arrangement by which the
department may be continued, until some proper

arrangement

can be matured.

FIRE

ALARM

TELEGRAPII.

This is regarded as one of the most useful depart


ments of the city. The system has been improved
during the past year by the renewal of wires, and the
addition of several signal boxes and bells.

Ours was

the first city in the world to adopt the Fire Alarm


Telegraph, and the original system has been largely
extended and improved; there are, however, still other
desirable changes to be made, suggested by our own
experience and that of other cities, which it is hoped
will have your careful consideration.

The Highlands

comprise the only portion of the city destitute of the


Fire Alarm Telegraph; and, consequently, will have,
at the earliest convenience, to be furnished with the
proper apparatus.
PUBLIC

BUILDINGS.

The usual number of buildings have been com

menced during the past year.

The work of the

44

TH E

MAY OR'S AD DRESS.

department has been about the same as in previous

years. The building requirements of a growing city,

like ours, are always numerous. A school-house in


Richmond Street, for primary school purposes, has
been completed during the past year.
fourteen rooms, and cost $60,000.

This contains
Its accommoda.

tions are very satisfactory. Contracts were made


also for the erection of a grammar school-house in
Ward 7, containing twelve rooms and a hall. This
will be ready for occupancy on the first of next
March, and will cost, including the necessary fur
niture, about $75,000.

Two estates contiguous to the Wells school-house


lot have been purchased, and contracts made for
the erection of a new school-house, which will
contain twelve rooms and a hall; and which will be

finished about the first of September, and will cost,


including land and furniture, about $106,000. Land
has been purchased on Salem Street, and contracts

made, for building a new house for Hose Company


No. 1. This will be ready for use about March
1st, and will cost $22,000. A building is in
progress in Ward 12, containing accommodations for

Engine No. 1, an armory for Co. E, 1st Regiment,


a schoolroom and a wardroom for Ward

12.

This

TH E

MAY OR'S

45

AD ID RESS.

will be ready on the first of April next, and will


cost,

including

land, about $38,000.

"A lot of land has been purchased on Paris


Street, East Boston, for a new grammar

school

house, to take the place of the Lyman school-house,


a portion of which will be occupied for a wardroom.
In 1865 a lot of land, situated on the corner of

Hawkins and Sudbury streets, was purchased at a


cost of $66,211.50, and, during the past year, con
tracts have been made for the erection thereon of a

building for a Central Charity Bureau and Temporary


Home for the Destitute." The building will be com
pleted about the first of October, and will cost,
including furniture, about $125,000.

A portion of

this amount has been contributed by citizens.


PUBLIC

INSTITUTIONS.

The city has, from time immemorial, been noted


for the excellent care it has taken of its poor, and
for its humanity towards those whose errors have
led them into crime. The public institutions at Deer
Islandthe Almshouse, the house of Industry, the
two Houses of Reformation, one for boys and the
other for girls have, under the able management of
their Boards of Directors, been conducted prosper
ously during the past year.

It is a source of deep

46

TH E

MAY OR 'S A D DRESS.

regret, however, to those interested in the welfare of


their inmates, that the worthy poor are obliged to

be cared for under the same roof with the vicious


and dissolute.
The

House

of

Correction at South

Boston con

tinues to be a standard institution, and is now


earning two-thirds of its annual cost of maintenance.
The introduction of a new business, the manufacture
of shoes, will undoubtedly be of pecuniary benefit to

the institution, and do much toward making it self


sustaining.
As unpleasant as the subject may be, it is impos
sible to refrain from expressing an opinion, founded
on personal knowledge, that the Hospital for the
Insane, at South Boston, is far below the standard

of what should be expected of such an enlightened


community as ours. The building is inconvenient;
its inmates, who are not responsible for their actions,
are huddled together for want of separate apart
ments, the system of classification rendered impossi
ble, and the danger from fire imminent.

Indeed,

the construction of the internal arrangements of the


building is such, that, in case of fire, a most fearful
mortality would certainly be the result. Your care
ful attention is called to these facts; and it is your
duty to see what can be done to free the city from

THE

MAYOR'S AD ID RESS.

47

the imputation that would follow any such calamity,


which the excellent Superintendent and his assistants
would be unable to avert, and for which they should
not be held responsible. The condition of the times
will not warrant our entering into any costly enter
prise for the required relief, but our character as a
philanthropic people should never allow us to neglect
the worthy poor, bereft of reason.
OVERSEERS OF

THE

POOR.

Although much larger sums are disbursed oy


other departments of the government, there are none
which demand a more considerate attention than the

boards which administer the charities of the city.


The institutions at Deer Island and South Boston have

already been spoken of

By our system, the admin

istration of out door relief is in the charge of the


Overseers of the Poor.

" An important change, as you are aware, was made


in 1864. In the year 1862, it was found that the
expenditure had largely exceeded the appropriation for
1862-3, amounting to more than $90,000. The subject
was brought to the attention of your predecessors. The
next year the appropriation was reduced to $39,000.
In July 1864, pursuant to an Act passed in the pre
ceding April, a new board was organized, the opera

48

THE

M A YOR'S

AD ID RESS.

tion of which had proved in a high degree satis


factory.
Under the present system, all applications for

relief are carefully investigated, and the information


obtained is preserved for reference.

No relief is

afforded without such investigation, and it is believed


that this caution tends both to discourage impostors,
and to secure to the deserving poor as large a
measure

of

relief

as

the

law allows.

From an

examination of a carefully prepared table of the


statistics of the action of the board since its re-organ
ization, (and I am not aware of any complaint that
the obligations which a liberal construction of the
powers of the board impose in the administration of
charity are neglected,) it appears that, notwithstanding
the increase in the cost of the necessaries of life,

the expenditures for this

purpose

are still much less

than they were previous to 1862.


The new board have recommended the adoption,
of a system by which private and public charity
may be combined, and made to co-operate, so that the
one may supplement the other without interference.
The

administration

of

the

latter

is

limited

and

controlled by law, and cases often arise which are


not thus provided for. But, if that class of cases
can be referred to other sources, it is hoped that,

T HE

M A YOR'S

A D D R ES S .

49

without passing beyond the limits of our legal powers

in the administration of funds collected by taxation, no


persons who ought on the broadest grounds of benev
olence to be assisted, will be unprovided for.
With a view to this purpose, it was proposed that
a building should be provided, in which overseers
of the poor, together with such charitable associations
as the City Council should designate, might be accom
modated, and act together by mutual consultation
and aid.

Private contributions to the amount of nearly $17,000,


have been made for this purpose; and by an order
passed on the twelfth of July last, the City Council
authorized the erection of a building to be used for
this purpose, as well as for the Temporary Home
heretofore established in Charles Street, which it was

thought advisable to unite with this Central Charity


Bureau.

Plans have been adopted, contracts made,

and the construction of the building commenced;


and before the present municipal year closes, it will
be completed.
The annexation

of Roxbury will increase the

business and expenditure of this department; and, in


connection with this change, it has been suggested
that it may be advisable to separate the Almshouse
properdesigned for the accommodation of the poor
7

50

THE

MAY OR'S

A D D RESS .

- in situation amd government, as it is already in other


respects, from the institution designed for the criminal
classes.

The reluctance of many, who would be far better

provided

for in the almshouse than in the wretched

dwellings which their narrow means allow them, to


accept the comforts it affords, is increased by the
unfounded impression that they are to be associated
with criminals, while this feeling is shared to some
extent by their friends, and those who assist them.

It

is worthy of consideration, whether it is not advisable


to prevent even the suspicion of such association,
and to do all in our power, without discouraging the
honorable pride which keeps many from becoming
applicants for public charity, to remove the fancied
stigma which interferes with the administration of

our system of charity, and may prevent many from


enjoying the relief it affords. Having no specific
recommendation to offer in reference to this subject,
it must suffice, for the present, that it has thus been
brought to your notice. It has already engaged the
attention of directors of public institutions, and of the
Overseers; and any recommendations from these boards

should receive your careful consideration.


The number of new cases examined in 1867 is

903, and that of new and old aided is 1,961.

During

THE

MAY OR'S A D DRESS.

51

the year 1867, there has been expended for relief to


the first day of December, by cash, $11,569.13; for

fuel, $5,989.88; for groceries, $8,780; paid to other


cities and towns, $1,907.09; paid to Temporary Home,
$6,856.11; for burials, $1,404.42; for transportation,
$106.47.

The total amount of trust funds at the

close of the year amounted to $198,280.19; to which


may be added the amount expended on the Searston
Charter House, $29,332.46, making a total of $228,
612.65. The number of persons employed by the
overseers, are one secretary, two clerks, and three
visitors.
STATE AID.

Under the provisions of the acts of the Legisla


ture, approved April 23, 1866, and April 11, 1867,
the payments of State aid are still continued at the
relief office to disabled soldiers and sailors, and to
the families of those killed in battle, or who have
died of wounds, or disease contracted in the service.

The amount of money paid out since the office was


opened in 1861 is nearly fifteen hundred thousand

dollars. The number on the rolls, on the first of


January, 1868, of those entitled to receive State aid,
is 1,232. By the annexation of Roxbury will be
added about two hundred more, making in all about

52

THE

MAY OR'S A D D RESS.

1,432. The amount of money required then, during


the present year, will be about $116,000, provided
no alteration is made in the State aid act.

CITY

IIOSPITAL.

This institution has extended its benefits to a


large number of the deserving poor of our city.
The number of patients in the Hospital on the first
of January, 1867, was 163, and there were admitted

during the year 1,534, making in all 1,697. During


the year, 1,407 were discharged, and 149 died, in

all, 1,556, leaving 141 remaining in the Hospital on

the first of January, 1868.


In addition to the above, 7,015 persons have been
treated as out-patients showing an increase in this
particular of more than one hundred per cent. over
the previous year. The whole number of persons
treated by the medical staff since the opening of the
Hospital in June, 1864, is 16,360.

The new building

recently

erected in

connection

with the Lodge, is designed for the treatment of


out-patients, and will add greatly to the convenience
of the Hospital; while the rooms, thus vacated in
the medical pavilion, will furnish accommodations
for the increased number of patients, that may be
expected to seek admission from the Highlands of

T HE

M A Y O R'S

A D D R E S S.

53

Boston just annexed to the city. During the term


of the Medical School of Harvard College, lectures are
delivered at the Hospital twice in each week. These
have been fully attended by the students; and, in
connection with the clinical instruction given, have
proved to be valuable aids towards their advance
ment in medical and surgical knowledge.
CHURCH STREET TERRITORY.

A bill, prepared by Hon. B. R. Curtis, authorizing


the city to purchase or otherwise take the land and
buildings on the Church Street territory, so called,
was passed by the last legislature of the common
wealth Estimates of the cost of taking the property
were reported to the City Council, and a resolve was
passed, to the effect, that, in the opinion of the City
Council, the land and buildings should be taken
under the provisions of the bill, the manner of lay
ing it out to be determined hereafter. A description
of the property to be taken has been nearly com
pleted by the City Surveyor; and it is for the present
City Council to determine whether the orders neces

sary for the taking shall be adopted, or an amicable


arrangement made with the owners for raising the
territory in its present condition to grade.

54

T HE

M A YOR'S

A D D R E S.S.

STATE LEGISLATION.

Under an order of the last City Council, applica


tion has been made to the legislature for an act to
authorize the city to purchase or otherwise take the

territory and buildings below grade, lying between


Washington Street and Tremont Street. Petitions
have also been presented to the legislature for the
passage of acts to authorize the city to manufacture
illuminating gas, and to give power to boards of
health to regulate the construction of tenement
houses. It certainly is very desirable that the city
authorities should possess these powers; but when
possessed, particular care should be had that they
are judiciously used, so that no class of persons nor
individuals should be oppressed, or put to unwarrant
able annoyance.
MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY.

The annual report of the Trustees of Mount Hope


Cemetery, presented at the close of the last official
year, shows that this important interest is in good
condition.

Much care

of

late has been

bestowed

upon the grounds, and it may be regarded as one of


the most attractive cemeteries in the vicinity of
Boston.

The annual appropriations seem to have

THE

MAY OR'S AD ID RESS.

been discreetly expended.

55

With the annexation of

Roxbury to Boston, the proprietors of Forest Hill


Cemetery (belonging to that city), were induced to
ask of the present legislature an act of incorporation
as a private institution, Boston having already one
public cemetery. To this, Roxbury actively, and
Boston tacitly, has assented. This fact imposes
greater necessity upon our city for care in the man

agement of Mount Hope, as there will be a larger


demand for lots by those whose choice it will be
to be buried, at their decease, in this cemetery.
It has been noticed that it is now quite the custom

for charitable institutions to ask of the city a gratuitous


assignment of lots in the cemetery, for the burial of

their dead; and it is a question how far this favor can


be yielded without seriously trenching upon the space
which should be reserved for the growing, and now
largely augmented, needs of the city. It is the opinion
of many that it would be far better for the Trustees,
as in a recent case of application of this character,
to charge even a nominal sum for lots, rather than to
invite, by free tender, overtures from all the charities
of the city, some of which have large funds, for the

burial of their dead.


In this connection I desire to add, that an enlarge
ment of this cemetery must soon be made to accom

56

T HE

M A YOR'S AD D R E S S .

modate the wants of the city.

An offer of land

adjoining the same, on the west, has already been


made by its owner.

By its purchase, the cemetery

would be nearly bounded by streets a most desirable

consummationwhile the possibility of the land in


question being divided into small house-lots, and sold
to settlers who must inevitably be dispossessed ere
many years, would be at once obviated. These sug
gestions are submitted for your careful consideration.
HARBOR.

One of the greatest interests of Boston is in the


preservation of its excellent harbor. The encroach

ments upon its channels, which have been going on


so rapidly during the present century, are in a fair
way of being stopped, through the agency of the
United States government, and that of our common
wealth.

Work upon the harbor was commenced by Major


General J. G. Foster in June last, an appropriation
of $300,000 having been obtained for the fiscal year,
terminating on the 30th of June next. The work
laid out by him consisted of building sea-walls for the

preservation of the North Head of Long Island, for


Gallop's Island, and for Point Allerton; the dredging
of Lovell's Island Spit, Great Brewster Spit, and Upper

TH E

MAY OR'S

A D D R E S S.

57

Middle Bar; and the removal of Tower and Corwin

Rocks. So far, no work has been done on any of .


the sea-walls at either Lovell's Island, Gallop's Island,
or Point Allerton, on account of the delay and diffi

culty in procuring legal possession of the land. The


title to the first-named point has not yet been secured;
in the case of the two last named, possession has,
after much delay, been secured, and contracts will be
made during the winter for the commencement of the
work early in the ensuing spring.
No work was done at the Upper Middle Bar in
consequence of the refusal of the contractor to comply
with the terms of his contract.

At only two points has any considerable progress


been made during the past working season, namely,
at the dredging of the southwest point of Lovell's
Island, where the contractor, Mr. A. Boschke,

pushed

forward the work very energetically; and at the rocks,


where Mr. George W. Townsend carried on the work
quite successfully, by entirely removing Tower Rock
and about one half of Corwin Rock, until the recent

severe weather compelled him to suspend operations


for the season.

At Deer Island, during the past two seasons, the


work upon the sea-walls has progressed vigorously,
under the direction of Maj.-Gen. H. W. Benham, and
8

58

THE

to the complete

MAYOR'S AD DRESS.

rebuilding,

as far as required, of the

walls protecting Middle Bluff and South Bluff of


that island. In place of the former dry stone wall,
a strong mortar wall with concrete backing, sixteen
to seventeen feet high, by eight feet in thickness, has
been substituted to the extent of five hundred and

forty feet at the middle bluff, and four

hundred

and forty feet, on the south bluff, making nearly


one thousand feet of wall rebuilt in the past two
years. And this, it is expected, will afford ample
security against any further drift of gravel or
bowlders, from

these the nearest and most

dan

gerous bluffs, which prolong the Deer Island spit, .


and reduce

the

the inner harbor.

width of the

main

entrance

into

The wall at North Bluff of this

island, about 1,740 feet long, upon which some

repairs

for 300 feet were made in 1865 and 1866,

by the late Col. Graham, will, it is expected, be


rebuilt next year, as far as the funds available
will permit.
At Lovell's Island, a contract has been made, and

the greater portion of the stone delivered, for the


facing of a wall, eight to ten feet high, and about
seven hundred and fifty feet long, required to pro
tect Southeast Bluff, the drift gravel from which
runs towards the Narrows of the main channel north

T H E M A. Y. O'R'S A D D, R. E. S.S.

59

of Fort Warren; and for the construction of this


wall and the work above referred to on Deer Island,
the sum of about $55,000 still remains available, and
some $36,000 additional have been asked for.

At Great Brewster Island, the main wall as originally

planned, (which was commenced by Gen. Benham in


1849) is now completed, for the protection of both the
heads or bluffs of that island, though the funds
did not quite suffice for the entire filling and the
paving in rear of the wall of the north head.
These sea-walls comprise about 2,740 linear feet of
wall, from eighteen to twenty feet in height, and
eight or nine feet wide, and appear to give a per

fect protection to these bluffs, and a security against


a further extension of Brewster Spit, very dangerous,
and now about one and a quarter miles long, running
directly upon the narrow channel at the eastward of
Fort Warren.

For the small amount of work needed

to complete the wall of the north head, and for a


short wall of two hundred and fifty feet to connect

the walls of the two bluffs, and also to prevent


the very possible rush of the sea between, and the
division

of the island in two, a further and final

sum of about $50,000 has been asked for, which


will finish and close the whole work on this island;

when, as it is believed, with the completion of the


*

60

THE

MAY OR'S

AD DRESS.

other walls previously referred to, all the most dan

gerous spits or shoals, making from any of the


islands towards the main channel (except perhaps
the spit of Gallop's Island) will be secured against
any future increase; and the safety of the channel
against further detriment be assured.
Under chapter 354 of the acts of the late session
of the legislature of the commonwealth, the State
Harbor Commissioners were

authorized

to

build

sea-wall to enclose the South Boston flats as far as

Slate Ledge.

Proposals for building the wall upon a

plan and location designated by an engineer appointed


by the Governor have been received; but as the cost
greatly exceeds the amount appropriated by the legis
lature ($200,000), no contract has yet been made.
The present legislature will probably be asked to

take such action as will enable the commissioners


to build a wall upon a modified line, so as to admit
of the construction of wharves and docks, payment
over the amount of the appropriation to be made by
the conveyance of flats.
Under chapter 93 of the resolves of 1867, a com
mittee was appointed from members of the two
branches of the legislature, and authorized to make
contracts for filling the flats enclosed by the sea-wall.
As the plan for the construction of the wall could

THE

MAY OR'S

61

A D D R. E. S.S.

not be carried out without further legislation, the


committee have not been able to make any contract

for the filling. The specifications on which they have


received proposals, provide that a portion at least of
the filling shall be made with material dredged from
the main

ship-channel

in front of the wall, to the

depth of twenty-three feet below low water.

This

scheme of compensation, for tide-water displaced, will


be satisfactory if the legislature pledges the State
to remedy any injuries which may hereafter result to
the harbor from the occupation of the flats.
It is the duty of the city government to use all
proper means to prevent the adoption of any plan
for filling up a portion of the harbor, which does not
include a comprehensive system of compensation for
any injuries which may accrue therefrom, without
entailing expense upon the city.
Growing out of the proposed occupation of the flats
are numerous schemes for uniting the various railroad
lines entering the city, so that freight for export can
be carried directly in cars to deep water on the South
Boston shore.

Any scheme which shall afford encouragement for


the transportation of freight from the West, especially
from the Eastern terminus of the Pacific Railroad,

should be heartily favored by the city government.

62

THE

M A YOR'S

ADDRESS.

EAST BOSTON FERRIES.

The accommodations for travel between East Boston

and the city proper are not so satisfactory as the


citizens desire and have a right to expect. A large
sum amounting to $49,000has been expended by
the city in repairing the slips and landings formerly
occupied by the People's Ferry Company, upon the
understanding that they were to be leased, under
certain conditions, for a nominal sum, to the East

Boston Ferry Company.

The repairs have been com

pleted, and the Ferry Company have expressed their


willingness to run boats between the slips whenever
the city will grant them a lease. Certain restrictions,
however, attaching to the landings on the East Boston
side, have, up to this time, prevented the city from
leasing them for ferry purposes. I am informed that
there is a fair prospect of obtaining the releases at
an early day.
The suggestion has also been made by gentlemen
of standing and influence among our mercantile com

munity, that, in view of the purchase of the Grand


Junction

property

Railroad as

by the Boston

terminus for western

and Worcester
and

northern

freight, and the organization of the Marginal Freight

Railway, and especially in view of recent great ad

THE

MAYOR'S

AD DRESS.

63

vancements in civil engineering, the facilities for the


transaction and growth of business and the general
accommodation of the public travel, will soon, if they
do not already, require the construction of a bridge,
or some other substantial and reliable means of com

munication, between the city proper and the large


ward of East Boston. It is a question involving
greater interests than we sometimes, perhaps, acknowl
edge to ourselves; and this whole matter is, in my
judgment, a subject well worthy of your most careful
and attentive consideration; and we may be assured
that any action in that behalf, which shall at the
same time satisfy the reasonable wants of the public,
and give the needed room for our expanding com
merce, will meet the cheerful support of the com
munity.
Your attention is urgently called to consider how

these reasonable desires of business and the public


can best be subserved, and to take some decisive

action whereby the most speedy and permanent relief


can be afforded.
ANNEXATION

OF

ROXBURY.

It may not be out of place, on this occasion of


consummating the union of the two old municipal
ities, to revert to a few commonplace facts. It
will be remembered, that the act of the legislature

64

THE

MAY OR'S ADDRESS.

of the Commonwealth, by which the annexation of


the Highlands was brought before the legal voters
of Boston and Roxbury, was approved by the Gov
ernor on the first of June, 1867; that it was accepted
by the legal voters of the two cities by their decisive
action on the ninth of September last, the vote in Boston
standing 4,633 yeas against 1,059 nays, in Roxbury,
1,832 yeas against 592 nays. Although the union

commences this day, nevertheless, one week is al


lowed the City Treasurer of Roxbury, under direction
of the Mayor and Aldermen of that city, to hold their
offices over, in order to transfer the property of their
late city to our government.

The act of annexation

provides, by section eight, that the several police officers


and watchmen that may be in office in the city of
Roxbury, when this act shall take effect, shall there
after continue in the discharge of their respective
duties, in the same manner as if they were police
officers and watchmen of the city of Boston, until
others shall be appointed in their stead.

By an omission in preparing the act, no provision


exists in relation to the Fire Department; I shall,
therefore, at the earliest possible opportunity, present
to the Aldermen for confirmation, certain appoint
ments of special importance, connected with this
department.
-

THE

MAY OR'S

AD DRESS.

65

GENTLEMEN: Having, in a somewhat succinct and


summary manner, reviewed the present condition of
some of the most important departments and great
interests, over which we have been called to watch

during the coming year, let me ask you to pledge


with me your best endeavors to earnestly and faith

fully perform the duties of the several stations, upon


which, under the solemnity of oaths, we are now
entering. Let our resolves be firm, that no effort of
ours needful for promoting the good of our city, the
successful management of its prudential affairs, and
the well-being of its citizens, shall be spared. Let
us strive to carry on the municipal government of this
renowned metropolis with honor to ourselves and
advantage to our constituents, constantly remembering
our great obligations, and keeping in view our weighty
responsibilities. Let our intercourse with each other
be courteous and harmonious, and let us avoid any
hasty steps that may incite distrust of each other, and
mar our intercourse and comfort. On my part, I as
sure you, nothing shall be left undone to make your
labors easy, and render your official intercourse with
me pleasant and agreeable. Upon me, as far as shall
depend upon my humble abilities to perform, you may
confidently rely; and you may rest assured that my
most earnest desire will ever be, during the brief
9

66

THE

MAYOR'S

A D DRESS.

space of time our lots are cast together, to co-operate


with you in all things that may conduce to your indi
vidual happiness and the prosperity of our beloved
city.

A EP EP E N ID IX.

REPORT
ON

THE REDUCTION OF THE

CITY

DEBT.

CITY OF BOSTON.

In Common Council, Thursday, Jan. 2, 1868.


The Committee on the Reduction of the City Debt, for the
year 1867, have the honor to
RE PORT:

That the following exhibit, made up from the books of the


Treasurer and Auditor of Accounts, presents the indebtedness
of the City at the close of business, Dec. 31, 1867:
At the commencement of the present financial
year, May 1, 1867, we find that the consoli
dated funded debt on that date, as will be
seen by the Auditor of Accounts printed

report, No. 55, page 165, was


Since that time, loans have been negotiated on

$12,998,550 91

various orders of the City Council, to the


amount of

Making total funded debt of

770,000 00

$13,768,550 91

Deducting from this amount all the debt which


has become due and been paid this financial
year, including $60,500 purchased by the
Committee on the Reduction of the City
Debt, before maturity, viz.
We have left a funded debt, Dec. 31, 1867

234,700 00
$13,533,850 91

70

A PP E N DIX.

$13,533,850 91

Amount brought forward


To which is to be added, for a loan authorized,

but not negotiated, and the amount advanced


on account of Oliver Street loans .

111,485 33

Making a total funded and unfunded debt, Dec.


$13,645,336 24

31, 1867, of .

This debt the Auditor of Accounts classifies as follows:

$7,611,709 14
4,128,127 10

Water debt (net cost of the works) .


City Debt, proper
War account * .

1,905,500 00
$13,645,336 24

$13,645,336 24
13,020,375 91

Total debt December 31, 1867 .


Total debt December 31, 1866.
Increase of the debt in 1867

$624,960 33

Which increase of debt is accounted for as follows:


Water Debt, Dec. 31, 1867
do.
Dec. 31, 1866

$7,611,709 14
6,992,975 11

Increase of Water Debt in 1867

City Debt, proper, Dec. 31, 67

$4,128,127 10

Dec. 31, '66

4,020,900 80

do.

Increase of City Debt proper in 1867


Total increase of the Water and City Debt,
proper, 1867
War Debt, Dec. 31, 1866,
do.
Dec. 31, 1867,

$618,734 03

107,226 30
$725,960 33

$2,006,500 00
1,905,500 00

Decrease of War Debt in 1867 by purchase of


loan certificates before maturity
Net increase of the debt as stated above .

101,000 00

$624,960 33

* Outstanding war loans. The real debt incurred by the Southern war is amount of
expenses over receipts on the same account, viz: $2,511,387.50.

71

A PP E N DIX.

MEANS OF

PAYING OFF THE DEBT.

The books of the Treasurer and Auditor of Accounts show

that the means for paying the debt of the city consist of the
following items, all of which are by ordinance specially appro
priated for that object, viz:
Cash balance in the City Treasury May 1, 1867,
to the credit of the Committee on the Reduc

tion of the City Debt, and six per cent cur


rency bonds of the city of Boston, held by the
Treasurer, belonging to said committee, as
stated in the Auditor of Accounts printed
Report No. 55, page 149
Cash received since that date, being payments
made into the City Treasury on bonds and
mortgages on Public Lands .
-

$3,998,744 62

71,719 09

Cash received from sales and rents of Public


Lands not included in above item .

3,008 89

Cash received from the annual city tax for 1867,


being the amount appropriated by the City
Council for this object, as required by ordi
nance on Finance .

Deduct payments on debt since May 1, 1867

400,000 00
$4,473,472 60
234,700 00
$4,238,772 60

Add bonds and mortgages on Public Lands now

in the City Treasury, all of which are consid


ered good

460,508 13

Total means on hand for the redemption of the


debt December 31, 1867

$4,699,280 73
-

72

A PP E N DIX.

THE

DEBT AND MEANS OF

PAYING IT OFF.

The consolidated debt of the city, funded and


wn funded,

December

31, 1866, amounted

to .
$13,020,375 91
Less the means on hand for
-

paying the same Dec. 31,


1866

3,368,526 00

Net debt December 31, 1866

$9,651,849 91

The consolidated debt of the city funded and


unfunded
to

December
-

31, 1867, amounted


. $13,645,336 24

Less the means on hand for pay


ing the same Dec. 31, 1867 .

4,699,280 73

Net debt December 31, 1867

8,946,055 51

Net decrease of the debt during 1867 by the in


crease of the means on hand for the redemp
tion of the same

$705,794 40

The preceding statement shows that although the gross debt


of the city during the year 1867 increased $624,960.33, the
means for its redemption increased $1,330,754.73 over the
amount on hand for that purpose at the close of 1866, and that
consequently there has been a net decrease of the debt by the
increase of the means for redeeming the same, of $705,794.40.
Respectfully submitted,
OTIS NORCROSS,
Mayor.
WESTON LEWIS,

President of the Common Council.


CHAS. R. TRAIN,

Chairman Com. on Finance on the part of the Common Council.

CONTENTS.
Page
ADDRESS

The Union of two ancient Municipalities .


Economical Administration recommended

General Improvements obligatory .


Parsimony and Meanness to be avoided
Care of the Soldier and Laborer

Bureaus recommended

Finances .

Outstanding Debt .
Sinking Fund
.
Provision for Payment of Debt .
Credit of the City
Ordinary Expenses provided for .
Assessors Department .
Legal Decisions
.

Abatement of Taxes
New Law

Valuation of Boston and Roxbury


Increase of Valuation

IPublic Lands

Water Works .

Chestnut Hill Reservoir

Demands of the Highlands


Income of Department .
Statistics
IPolice .

.
-

Public Health .

25
26

.
-

24
24

24
24

22
23

20
21

19
20

18

19 |

18

17

17

Force of Department and Requirements .


Statistics

|-

16

15
15

14
14

13
13

11

10

Increased Population by Annexation


State Tax

..

Rate of Taxation

Business of the City to be encouraged


REVIEW OF THE DEPARTMENTS

27
27

iV

C O N T E N T S.

Page.

Public Schools

Statistics

Schools added by Annexation


.
Discontinuance of City and Franklin Medals
-

Statistics

Fort Hill .

Hanover Street

Streets Paved

29

32
32

33

34
35

36

Raising and Grading of Streets

36

37
-

37

Grading of Streets
.
Number of Streets in Boston and in the Highlands
Duplication of Names of Streets
-

Sewers

38
-

39
40
-

|-

41
-

House of Correction at South Boston

45

45

46

47

46

Organization of New Board in 1864


Present System of Relief .
Central Charity Bureau .
Increase of Expenditure in consequence of Annexation .
-

43
44

Hospital for the Insane at South Boston


Overseers of the Poor
.

Central Charity Bureau and Temporary Home


.

43

Land for new School-house in East Boston

Institutions at Deer Island

40

40

Lamp Department
Fire Department
.
Fire Alarm Telegraph
Public Buildings .
New School-houses, Engine-houses, etc.

Statistics

39

Drainage of Church Street District .


Drainage of Back Bay Territory .
Drainage of Roxbury.

Public Institutions

33
34

Extension of Albany Street


Albany Street Bridge .

Work Performed

Tremont Street

Federal Street

Broadway
Paving .

28

31

Public Library
.

Two Schools for Licensed Minors established

Streets

28

47
48
49
49
50

C O N T E N T S.

Page.

State Aid

City Hospital
Statistics

.
.

New Building .
Church Street Territory .
State Legislation
Mount Hope Cemetery .
-

Removal of Tower and Corwin Rocks .

Work at Great Brewster Island.


Sea-Wall at South Boston Flats

55
56

56

57

58

54

57

57

54

.
-

Work by Maj.-Gen. H. W. Benham at Deer Island .


Work at Lovells Island

59

Union of Railroads and Eastern Terminus of Pacific Railroad


East Boston Ferries

Better Accommodations required


Annexation of Roxbury
.
-

Facts in Reference to .

Union of the Cities, 6 January, 1868

No Provision made in Relation to Fire Department


CONCLUSION .

62

63

62

63

.
-

60
61

52
53

52
52

51

Work by Maj.-Gen. J. G. Foster .


Work by Mr. Boschke at Lovell's Island .

Enlargement Necessary.
Harbor

64
64

65

APPENDIX.

REPORT ON THE REDUCTION OF THE CITY DEBT .

69

MUNICIPAL REGISTER,
I868.

MUNICIPAL REGISTER:

THE CITY CHARTER,

RULES AND ORDERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL,


AND

A LIST OF OFFICERS OF THE CITY OF BOSTON,

FOR THE YEAR 1868.

conniTAAD**
&

os:

B O STON :
ALFRED MUDGE & SON, CITY PRINTERS, 34 SCHOOL STREET.
1868.

THE CITY CHARTER,

SECTION 1.

The inhabitants of the City of Bos

ton, for all the purposes for which towns and cities c.
are by law incorporated in this commonwealth, shall 1.
continue to be one body politic, in fact and in name,
under the style and denomination of the City of Bos
ton; and, as such, shall have, exercise, and enjoy all
the rights, immunities, powers, and privileges, and
shall be subject to all the duties and obligations now
incumbent upon and appertaining to said city, as a
municipal corporation.
SECT. 2.

The administration of all the fiscal,

prudential, and municipal concerns of said city, with c.o.


the conduct and government thereof, shall be vested 1.
in one principal officer, to be styled the Mayor, one
council of twelve persons, to be called the Board of
Aldermen, and one council of forty-eight persons, to
be called the Common Council, which boards, in

their joint capacity, shall be denominated the City


Council, and also in such other boards of officers as

are hereinafter specified.

[SECT. 3. It shall be the duty of the City Council,


and they are empowered during the year 1860, and p".

whenever thereafterwards they may deem it expe-'"


1821, 110, $2.

* By the annexation of Roxbury, this number is increased to sixty.

1850, 167, $1.

MUNICIPAL

1850, 167.

Amended
1865, 7.

REGISTER.

dient, not oftener than once in ten years, to cause a


new division of the city to be made into twelve
wards, in such manner as to include an equal num
ber of voters in each ward, as nearly as conveniently
may be, consistently with well-defined limits to each
ward; and, until such division be made, the bound

ary lines of the wards shall remain as now estab


lished."]
Annual
SECT. 4. The annual meeting of citizens, for the
meeting for
the election
election of municipal officers hereinafter mentioned,
of city offi
shall be held on the second Monday of December,
and the citizens of said city qualified to vote in city
affairs shall for the purpose of such election then
meet together within the wards in which they respec
1851, ch. 167.
tively
reside, at such hour and place as the Board of
1854, ch. 39.
Aldermen may by their warrant direct and appoint;
and the person receiving the highest number of votes
for any office shall be deemed and declared to be
elected to such office; and, whenever two or more
persons are to be elected to the same office, the
several persons, to the number required to be chosen,
having the highest number of votes, shall be declared
cers.

elected.
Certificate
of

election

to

be

fur

SECT. 5. Every person so chosen in any ward


shall, within forty-eight hours of his election, be fur

nished.

nished by the clerk with a certificate thereof, signed


by the warden, clerk, and a majority of the inspec
tors, which certificate shall be presumptive evidence
of the title of such person to the office therein
mentioned.
'By the annexation of Roxbury to Boston, the number of wards was
increased to fifteen. See 1867, 359, 7.

CITY

CHARTER.

SECT. 6. The municipal officers to be chosen m'


ent of mu
at the annual election shall enter upon the duties
of their respective offices on the first Monday of
January.

SECT. 7. The qualified voters of said city shall, "


at the annual meeting, choose by ballot one warden cers.
and one clerk and five inspectors of elections for
each ward, who shall be resident in said ward, and

who shall hold their offices for one year, and until
others shall be chosen and qualified in their stead.

SECT. 8. The ward officers mentioned in the pre-'


ceding section shall respectively make oath faithfully ios.
and impartially to discharge their several duties,
which oath may be administered by the clerk of such
ward to the warden, and by the latter to the clerk
and inspectors, or to all of said officers by any

justice of the peace for the county of Suffolk; and


a certificate thereof shall be entered in the record,

to be kept by the clerk of the ward.

Sect. 9. In case of the non-election of any ward'.


officer at the annual meeting, adjournments may be officers.
had for the purpose of effecting such election, in the
same manner as is hereinafter provided with regard
to the election of members of the Common Council.

SECT. 10. In case of the absence of any ward ward


A'or
offi
officer, at any ward meeting, such officer may be cers.
1821, 110, $3.

chosen pro tempore, by hand vote, and shall have allisi, ii,8.
the powers, and be subject to all the duties of the
regular officer at such meeting.
SECT. 11.

It shall be the duty of the warden

to preside at all ward meetings, with the powers den.


of moderators of town meetings.

In case of his

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

absence, the clerk, and, in case of the absence of


the clerk, any inspector, shall preside, according to

seniority, until a warden shall be chosen as provided


in the preceding section.

''.

Sect. 12.

It shall be the duty of the clerk to

is 1,110,43, make a fair and true record, and to keep an exact

journal of all the acts and votes of citizens at the


ward meetings, and to deliver over such records and
journals, together with other documents and papers

held by him in his said capacity, to his successor in


office.

Sect. 13. It shall be the duty of the warden and

inspectors inspectors of each ward to receive, sort, and count,


" and of the warden to declare, all votes at any elec
tion within such ward.

SECT. 14. It shall be the duty of all ward officers,


W.' authorized to preside and act at elections of city
Duties of

, officers, to attend and perform their respective duties


at the times and places appointed for elections of any
officer, whether of the United States, State, city, or
wards, and to make and sign the regular returns of
the same.

: of

SECT. 15. The qualified voters of said city, shall,


issi,110,55, at the annual meeting, be called upon to give in
their votes for one able and discreet person, being
an inhabitant of the city, to be Mayor of said city
for the term of one year. All the ballots so given
in, in each ward, being sorted, counted, and declared,
shall be recorded at large by the clerk in open ward
meeting; and, in making such declaration and record,
the whole number of votes or ballots given in shall
ch. 7, $14.
be distinctly stated, together with the name of every
-

- -

CITY

CHARTER.

person voted for, and the number of votes given

for each person respectively, such numbers to be


expressed in words at length; and a transcript of such
record, certified and authenticated by the warden,
clerk, and a majority of the inspectors of elections
for each ward, shall forthwith be transmitted or de
livered by such ward clerk to the clerk of the city.
It shall be the duty of the city clerk forthwith to en
ter such returns, or a plain and intelligible abstract
of them, as they are successively received, upon the

journal of the proceedings of the Board of Aldermen,


or some other book to be kept for that purpose.
SECT. 16.

The Board of Aldermen shall, as soon Aldermen


**

as conveniently may be, within three days of such to examine


election, meet together and examine all the said re- :

turns, and they shall cause the person who may have 1.
been elected Mayor to be notified in writing of his :*:
election; but, if it shall appear by said returns that
no person has been elected, or if the person elected
shall refuse to accept the office, the Board shall issue
their warrants for a new election, and the same pro
ceedings shall be had as are provided in the preced
ing section for the choice of a Mayor, and repeated
from time to time until a Mayor shall be chosen.
SECT. 17. Whenever, on examination by the ings
Proceed.
in case
Board of Aldermen of the returns of votes given for of no choice
Mayor at the meetings of the wards, holden for the
purpose of electing that officer, last preceding the
first Monday of January in each year, no person "P"
shall appear to be chosen, the Board of Aldermen, 1.
by whom such examination is made, shall make a
record of that fact, an attested copy of which record
2

10

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

it shall be the duty of the city clerk to produce and


read, on the first Monday in January, in the presence
of the members returned to serve as Aldermen and

Common Councilmen; and the oaths prescribed by


law may be administered to the members elect. The
members of the Board of Aldermen shall thereupon
proceed to elect a Chairman, and the Common Coun
cil, a President, in their respective chambers; and be
ing respectively organized, they shall proceed to
business in the manner hereinafter provided, in case
of the absence of the Mayor: and the Board of
Aldermen shall forthwith issue their warrants for

meetings of the citizens of the respective wards, for


the choice of a Mayor, at such time and place as they
shall judge most convenient; and the same proceed
ing shall be had in all respects as are hereinbefore
directed, and shall be repeated from time to time, un
til a Mayor shall be duly chosen.
Proceedings
SECT. 18. Whenever it shall appear, by the regu
in case no
lar
returns of the elections of city officers, that a
Mayor is
chosen, or a
Mayor has not been chosen, or that a full Board of
full Board
of Alder
men is not
elected.

1845,217, $1.

Aldermen has not been elected, such of the Board of

Aldermen, whether they constitute a quorum or not,


as may have been chosen, shall issue their warrant,
in the usual form for the election of a Mayor, or
such members of the Board of Aldermen as may be
necessary; and the same proceedings shall be had
and repeated, until the election of a Mayor and Al
dermen shall be completed, and all vacancies shall
be filled in the said Board : and, in case neither a

Mayor nor any Alderman shall be elected at the


usual time for electing the same, and after the powers

CITY

11

CHARTER.

of the former Mayor and Aldermen shall have ceased,


it shall be the duty of the President of the Common
Council to issue his warrant, in the same manner as

the Board of Aldermen would have done, if elected,


and the same proceedings shall be had and repeated,
until a Mayor or one or more Aldermen shall be
elected.

SECT. 19. The qualified voters of said city shall,


at the annual meeting, be called upon to give in 1821,110,36.
their votes for twelve persons, being inhabitants of
said city, to constitute the Board of Aldermen for the
ensuing year, and all the votes so given, being sorted,
counted, and declared by the warden and inspectors,
shall be recorded at large by the clerk in open ward
meeting; and, in making such declaration and record, : ".
the whole number of votes or ballots given in shall
be particularly stated, together with the name of
every person voted for, and the number of votes
given for each person; and a transcript of such re
cord, certified by the warden and clerk and a major
ity of the inspectors of each ward, shall forthwith be
transmitted to the city clerk, whereupon the same
proceedings shall be had to ascertain and determine
the persons chosen as Aldermen, as are hereinbefore
directed in regard to the choice of Mayor, and for a
new election in case of the whole number required
not being chosen at the first election. And each
Alderman so chosen shall be duly notified in writing

of his election, by the Mayor and Aldermen for the


time being.
SECT. 20. The qualified voters of each ward shall, :of
-

at the annual election, be called upon to give in council.


their votes for four able and discreet men, being in- 1821, 110, $7.
Inen.

12

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

habitants of the ward, to be members of the Com

mon Council for the ensuing year; and all the bal
lots so given in, in each ward, being sorted, counted,
and declared, a public declaration of the result shall
be made by the warden in open ward meeting; and
a record of such proceedings shall be kept by the
clerk in his journal, stating particularly the whole
. number of ballots given in, the number necessary to
make a choice, the number actually given for each
person, the whole to be written in words at length.
ProceedSECT. 21. In case four persons are not chosen at
the first balloting in any ward, the meeting of such
ward shall be adjourned by the presiding officer, for
'" the purpose of filling such vacancies, to a period not
less than twenty-four nor more than seventy-two
hours distant from the hour when the polls were
opened at the first balloting, the time of adjournment
within such limits to be determined by the warden,
with the consent of a majority of the inspectors who
may be present when such adjournment is had ; and
such notice shall be given of the time of such adjourn
*

" ment, and the time the polls will be kept open, as
the warden may direct; and at such adjourned meet
ing a balloting shall be opened for a number of Com
mon Councilmen sufficient to complete the number
of four, which shall be conducted, and its results be
declared and recorded, in the same manner as before

prescribed for the first balloting.

"

SECt. 22. In case there shall still be vacancies in the


number of Common Councilmen in any ward, adjourn
ments of the meetings of the citizens thereof, for the
purpose of filling the same, shall continue to be had

CITY

CHARTER.

13

in the same manner, to periods not less than twenty


four nor more than seventy-two hours distant from
each other, at all of which, the balloting shall be con
ducted, and the result be declared and recorded in

the same manner as before prescribed, until the


number of four shall be duly chosen. And at all
such adjournments the polls shall be kept open the
same number of hours as are required by the original
Warrant.

SECT. 23. If, at the close of the last legally ad-same


sub
ject.
journed meeting of any ward as aforesaid, preceding
the first Monday in January, there shall still be va
cancies in the number of Common Councilmen for any
ward, no further adjournment shall be had; but a
record of the fact, and of the number of such vacan

cies, shall be made by the clerk of the ward in his


journal, signed therein by the warden, clerk, and a
majority of the inspectors, an attested copy of which
record shall forthwith be delivered by the clerk of the
ward to the city clerk, who shall lay the same before
the Common Council at their first meeting in January.
SECT. 24.

The Board of Aldermen, the Common Board of

Council, and the School Committee, shall have author-"


judge of

ity to decide upon all questions relative to the quali elections.


fications, elections, and returns of their respective""
members.

SECT. 25. Whenever it shall appear to the Board invacancies


city or
of Aldermen that there is a vacancy, by removal from ward
offices.
the city, or by death, resignation, or otherwise, in the 1845,217, $7.
Board of Aldermen, the Common Council, the School

Committee, or in any of the city and ward offices, it


* Wide Statute of May 30, 1857, respecting the mode of filling va
cancies in School Committee.

14

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

shall be the duty of said board to issue their warrant


in due form to fill all such vacancies in each and all

of said boards and offices, at such time and place as:


they may deem advisable; and the same proceedings
shall be had, and adjournments, if necessary, within
the same limits as are herein prescribed for the an
nual meeting for the election of Common Council
men. But, in case of vacancies in the Common Coun
cil and School Committee, such warrant shall not be
issued until the Board of Aldermen receive official
information thereof.

Removal
of SECT. 26. All city and ward officers shall be held
city or ward
officers to discharge the duties of the offices to which they
" have been respectively elected, notwithstanding their

removal after their election out of their respective


wards into any other wards of the city. But they
shall not be so held after they have taken up their

permanent residence out of the city.

SECT. 27. The Mayor, Aldermen, and Common


council.
Councilmen, on the first Monday in January, or before
1821, 110, $6.
issi, o, , entering on the duties of their offices, shall respec
tively be sworn, by taking the oath of allegiance and
oath of office prescribed in the Constitution of this
Commonwealth, and an oath to support the Constitu
tion of the United States. And such oaths may be
administered to the Mayor elect, by any of the jus
tices of the Supreme Judicial Court, or any judge of
any Court of record, commissioned to hold any such
Court within the said city, or by any justice of the
-

'"

peace for the county of Suffolk. And such oaths


shall be administered to the Aldermen and members

of the Common Council by the Mayor, being himself

CITY CHARTER.

15

first sworn as aforesaid, or by either of the persons


authorized to administer said oath to the Mayor;
and a certificate of such oaths having been taken
shall be entered in the journal of the Mayor and
Aldermen and of the Common Council respectively,
by their respective clerks.
SECT. 28.

In case of the unavoidable absence, on Mayor


Absenceelect.
of

account of sickness or otherwise, of the Mayor elect, 1836, 7, $2.


on the first Monday in January, the city government
shall organize itself in the mode hereinafter provided
in cases wherein no person shall have been elected
Mayor at the meeting last preceding the first Monday
in January, and may proceed to business in the same
manner as if the Mayor were present.
SECT. 29. After the organization of the city gov- ,
ernment, and the qualification of a Mayor, and when permanent

a quorum of the Board of Aldermen shall be present,"


said board, the Mayor presiding, shall proceed to
choose a permanent chairman, who shall preside at
all meetings of the board and at conventions of the
two branches, in the absence of the Mayor; and, in
case of any vacancy in the office of Mayor for any
cause, he shall exercise all the powers and perform
all the duties of the office as long as such vacancy
shall continue.

But he shall continue to have a vote

in the board, and shall not have the veto power.


SECT. 30. The Mayor, Aldermen, and Common city clerk.
Council in convention, in the month of January, shall #".
choose a clerk for the term of one year, and until
another person is duly chosen and qualified in his
stead, who shall be sworn to the faithful discharge
of the duties of his office, and shall be removable at

16

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

the pleasure of the Board of Aldermen, the Mayor


thereto consenting. He shall be denominated the
City Clerk, and it shall be his duty to keep a journal
of the acts and proceedings of the Board of Alder
men, to sign all warrants issued by them, and to do
such other acts in his said capacity as may lawfully
and reasonably be required of him ; and to deliver
over all journals, books, papers, and documents in
trusted to him as such clerk to his successor in office,

immediately upon such successor being chosen and


qualified as aforesaid, or whenever he may be there
unto required by the Aldermen. The City Clerk
thus chosen and qualified shall continue to have all

the powers and perform all the duties now by law


belonging to him.
SECT. 31. In case of a vacancy in the office of
k City Clerk, from any cause, the same shall be filled
in the manner provided in the preceding section.

:"

A.

SECT. 32.

In case of the temporary absence of

city clerk the City Clerk, the Mayor, by and with the advice
and consent of the Board of Aldermen, may appoint
a City Clerk pro tempore.
'"
SECT. 33. The administration of police, together
duties
of
with the executive powers of the said corporation
issi, ii, generally, and all the powers formerly vested in
13.
200, the selectmen of the town of Boston, either by the
general laws of this commonwealth, by particular
laws relative to the powers and duties of said select
men, or by the usages, votes, or by-laws of said town,
''. and all the powers subsequently vested in the Mayor
1, #2, and Aldermen of said city as county commissioners
or otherwise, shall be, and hereby are, vested in the
ermen.

17

CITY CHARTER.

Board of Aldermen, as hereby constituted, as fully : 110,


and amply as if the same were herein specially enu
merated. A majority of the members of the board
shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of busi
ness. Their meetings shall be public, and the Mayor,
if present, shall preside, but without a vote.

SECT. 34. The persons so chosen and qualified as '.


members of the Common Council of the said city separate
shall sit and act together as a separate body, distinct no,
from that of the Board of Aldermen, except in those 11
cases in which the two bodies are to meet in conven

tion; and the said Council shall have power from


time to time to choose one of their own members to President.

preside over their deliberations and to preserve order


therein, and also to choose a clerk, who shall be under Clerk.

oath faithfully to discharge the duties of his office,


who shall hold such office during the pleasure of said
Council, and whose duty it shall be to attend said
Council, when the same is in session, to keep a jour
nal of its acts, votes, and proceedings, and to perform
such other services, in said capacity, as said Council
may require. All sittings of the Common Council sittings to

shall be public; and twenty-five members shall con-'


stitute a quorum for the transaction of business.

See 1867.
359.

All other powers heretofore by law

SECT. 35.

vested in the Town of Boston, or in the inhabitants'


1821, 110,

thereof, as a municipal corporation, or in the City .

Council of the City of Boston, shall be and hereby:


are continued to be vested in the Mayor, Aldermen,
and Common Council of the said city, to be exercised
by concurrent vote, each board as hereby constituted
having a negative upon the proceedings of the other,
3

18

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

and the Mayor having a veto power as hereinafter


By-laws.

provided. More especially, they shall have power


to make all such needful and salutary by-laws or
ordinances, not inconsistent with the laws of this

Commonwealth, as towns by the laws of this Com


monwealth have power to make and establish, and
to annex penalties not exceeding fifty dollars for
the breach thereof; which by-laws and ordinances
shall take effect and be in force from and after the

time therein respectively limited, without the sanc


tion or confirmation of any Court or other authority
whatsoever.
Assessment
of taxes.

1821, 110,
$ 15, Stat.
1852, c. 301.
1832, 85.
Rev. Stat.
14, 34.

SECT. 36. The City Council shall also have power


from time to time to lay and assess taxes for all
purposes for which towns are by law required or
authorized to assess and grant money, and also for
all purposes for which county taxes may be levied and
assessed, so long as other towns in the county shall
not be liable to taxation for county purposes. But,
in the assessment and apportionment of all such
taxes upon the polls and estates of all persons liable
to contribute thereto, the same rules and regulations
shall be observed as are now established by the laws
of this Commonwealth, or may be hereafter enacted,
relative to the assessment and apportionment of town
taxes.

Collection
of taxes.

1821, 110,
15.

SECT. 37. The said City Council shall also have


power to provide for the assessment and collection of
such taxes; and to make appropriations of all public
moneys, and provide for the disbursement thereof,
and take suitable measures to insure a just and
prompt account thereof; and for these purposes may

CITY

19

CHARTER.

either elect such assessors and assistant assessors as A"


to be cho

may be needful, or provide for the appointment or sen.


election of the same or any of them by the Mayor
and Aldermen, or by the citizens as in their judg
ment may be most conducive to the public good;
and may also require of all persons entrusted with '"
may be
the collection, custody, or disbursement of public required.
moneys such bonds with such conditions and such

sureties as the case may in their judgment require.


SECT. 38. The City Council may provide for the '.
cil may pro
appointment or election of all necessary officers for. . vide
for the
appoint
the good government of said city, not otherwise pro- ment
ofcity
officers.
vided for, and may prescribe their duties and fix their ,

compensation; and may choose a register of deeds'.


whenever the city shall be one county.

Deeds.

SECT. 39. The City Council shall have the care Care and
and superintendence of the public buildings, and the:

care, custody, and management of all property of "


the city, with power to lease or sell the same, except
the Common and Faneuil Hall. And the said City Power to
Council shall have power to purchase property, real :
or personal, in the name and for the use of the city,
whenever its interest or convenience may in their
judgment require it.
SECT. 40. All the power and authority now by :
law vested in the City Council or in the Board of isol, lio,
Mayor and Aldermen relative to the public health 1.

and the quarantine of vessels shall continue to be ""


vested in the City Council, to be carried into execu
tion by the appointment of one or more health com
missioners; or in such other manner as the health,

cleanliness, comfort, and order of the city may, in

20

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

their judgment, require, subject to such alterations

as the Legislature may from time to time adopt. The


powers and duties above named may be exercised and
carried into effect by the City Council in any manner
which they may prescribe, or through the agency of
any persons to whom they may delegate the same,
notwithstanding a personal exercise of the same, col
lectively or individually, is prescribed by previous
legislation; and the City Council may constitute
either branch, or any committee of their number,
whether joint or separate, the Board of Health, for
all or for particular purposes.
surveyor,

SECT. 41.

The Board of Aldermen shall be sur

'" veyors of highways for said city.


:*
SECT. 42. The City Council shall in the month
: of May meet together in convention and elect a suit
is
R. s. 14,
$47.

able person to be the treasurer of said city, who shall


also be county treasurer; and who shall hold his
office until his successor is chosen and qualified in
his stead.

SECT. 43. No person shall be eligible to any


an ineligi. office, the salary of which is payable out of the City

"Treasury, who at the time of his appointment shall


''. be a member of either the Board of Aldermen or the

1851, 70.

Common Council; and neither the Mayor nor any

ante, 542. Alderman or member of the Common Council shall

at the same time hold any office of emolument under


the City Government.
:
[SECT. 44. In the month of October in each
general year, the City Government shall meet in convention
court. 1821,
2:.." and determine the number of representatives which
-

it may be expedient for the Corporation to send to

CITY

21

CHARTER.

the General Court in the ensuing year, within the :


constitutional limits, and to publish such determina
tion, which shall be conclusive; and the number

thus determined shall be specified in the warrant


calling a meeting for the election of representatives.]

SECT. 45. The Mayor of the city, chosen and


tion of the

qualified as hereinbefore provided, shall be taken ,


and deemed to be the chief executive officer of said $12.

corporation; and he shall be compensated for his


services by a salary, to be fixed by the Board of
Aldermen and Common Council in convention assem

bled, payable at stated periods, which salary shall


not exceed the sum of five thousand dollars annually,
and he shall receive no other compensation or emol
ument whatever; and no regulations enlarging or
diminishing such compensation shall be made, to take
effect until the expiration of the year for which the
Mayor then in office shall have been elected, and
said salary, when fixed, shall continue until changed
by the City Council as aforesaid.

Sect. 46. It shall be the duty of the Mayor to be:


vigilant
and active atofall
causing
the laws isol,
no,
for the government
saidtimes
city in
to be
duly executed
12.
and put in force, to inspect the conduct of all sub
ordinate officers in the government thereof, and, as
far as may be in his power, to cause all negligence,
carelessness, and positive violation of duty to be
duly prosecuted and punished. He shall have power,
whenever in his judgment the good of said city may
require it, to summon meetings of the Board of
Aldermen and Common Council, or either of them,

although the meetings of said boards may stand

22

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

adjourned to a more distant day, and shall cause suit


able notice in writing of such meetings to be given to
the respective members of said Boards. And he shall
from time to time communicate to both branches of

the City Council all such information, and recom


mend all such measures, as may tend to the improve
ment of the finances, the police, health, security,
cleanliness, comfort, and ornament of the said city.
Veto power
SECT. 47. Every ordinance, order, resolution, or
of the

vote to which the concurrence of the Board of Alder


Mayor.

men and of the Common Council may be necessary


(except on a question of convention of the two
branches), and every order of either branch involving
the expenditure of money, shall be presented to the
Mayor: if he approves thereof, he shall signify his
approbation by signing the same; but, if not, he shall
return the same with his objections to the branch in
which it originated, who shall enter the objections of
the Mayor at large on their records, and proceed to
reconsider said ordinance, order, resolution, or vote;
and, if after such reconsideration two-thirds of the
Board of Aldermen or Common Council, notwith

standing such objections, agree to pass the same, it


shall, together with the objections, be sent to the
other branch of the City Council (if it originally
required concurrent action), where it shall also be
reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds of the
members present, it shall be in force; but in all cases
the vote shall be determined by yeas and nays; and
if such ordinance, order, resolution, or vote shall not

be returned by the Mayor within ten days after it


shall have been presented, the same shall be in force.

CITY CHARTER.

23

But the veto power of the Mayor shall not extend to


the election of officers required by any law or ordi
nance to be chosen by the City Council in convention
or by concurrent action, unless expressly so provided
therein.
Same sub

SECT. 48. In all cases where anything is or may ject.


be required or authorized by any law or ordinance
to be done by the Mayor and Aldermen, the Board
of Aldermen shall first act thereon; and any order
resolution, or vote of said Board shall be presented
to the Mayor for his approval, in the manner pro
vided in the preceding section.
SECT. 49. In all cases wherein appointments to :

office are directed to be made by the Mayor and

Aldermen, they shall be made by the Mayor, by and


with the advice and consent of the Aldermen, and : ,

such officers may be removed by the Mayor.


Power of
SECT, 50. In the case of the decease, inability, ' in

absence, or resignation of the Mayor, and whenever "


there is a vacancy in the office from any cause, and """
the same being declared, and a vote passed by the
Aldermen and Common Council respectively declar
ing such cause and the expediency of electing a
Mayor for the time being to supply the vacancy thus
occasioned, the Board of Aldermen shall issue their

warrants in due form for the election of a Mayor, and


the same procedings shall be had as are hereinbefore
provided for the choice of a Mayor.
SECT. 51. All boards and officers acting under
the authority of the said corporation, and entrusted :
with the expenditure of public money, shall be

accountable therefor to the City Council, in such .

24

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Annual

'

manner as they may direct; and it shall be the duty

statement of the City Council to publish and distribute annually,


for the information of the citizens, a particular
statement of the receipts and expenditures of all
public moneys, and a particular statement of all
city property.

[Sect. 52. The qualified voters of each ward

shall at the annual meeting be called upon to give


$19. stat in their votes for one able and discreet person, being
" " an inhabitant of the ward, to be an overseer of the

4:' poor, and thereupon the same proceedings shall be


had as are before directed in the election of mem

bers of the Common Council.

And the persons

'" thus chosen shall together constitute the Board of


. Overseers for said city, and shall continue to have
all the powers and be subject to all the duties now
by law appertaining to the overseers of the poor of
the City of Boston, until the same shall be altered
or qualified by the Legislature.]

Sect. 53. The School Committee shall consist of

1833,128,91, the Mayor of the city, the President of the Common


" " Council, and of the persons hereinafter mentioned.
A majority of the persons duly elected shall consti
tute a quorum for the transaction of business; and
at all meetings of the Board, the Mayor, if present,
shall preside.
same sub- passage
SECT of
54.thisAt
election
afterward
the
ject.
act,thetheannual
qualified
votersnext
of each
-

shall be called upon to give in their ballots for six


inhabitants of the ward to be members of the School

Committee; and the two persons who receive the


highest number of votes, or, in case more than two

CITY

25

CHARTER.

receive an equal number of votes, the two persons


who are senior by age, shall hold their office for
three years from the second Monday in January next
ensuing, and the next two persons who receive the

highest number of votes, or who are senior by age


in the contingency aforesaid, shall hold their office

for two years from said date, and the two other per
sons shall hold their office for one year from said
date; and, at every subsequent annual election, two
persons shall be cho en in each ward, to be mem
bers of the School Committee for the term of three
years.

SECT, 55. The persons so chosen as members of:


the School Committee shall meet and organize on :*
the second Monday of January, at such hour as the "
Mayor may appoint. They may choose a secretary secretary
and such subordinate officers as they may deem ex- :*

pedient, and shall define their duties and fix their "
respective salaries.

SECT 56. The said Committee shall have the care power and

and management of the public schools, and may :


elect all such instructors as they may deem proper, ,
and remove the same whenever they consider it ex- $".

pedient. And generally they shall have all the


powers, in relation to the care and management of
the public schools, which the selectmen of towns or
school committees are authorized by the laws of this
commonwealth to exercise.

SECT. 57.

Every male citizen of twenty-one tions


'*
of

years of age and upwards, excepting paupers and


persons under guardianship, who shall have resided :
., 1821,
-

* - -

within the commonwealth one year, and within the


4

26

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

city six months next preceding any meeting of citi


zens, either in wards or in general meeting, for
See xxth
Amend.
Cons.

municipal purposes, and who shall have paid by


himself or his parent, master or guardian any State
or county tax, which, within two years next preced
ing such meeting, shall have been assessed upon him
in any town or district in this commonwealth, and
also every citizen who shall be by law exempted
from taxation, and who shall be in all other respects
qualified as above mentioned, shall have a right to
vote at such meeting; and no other person shall be
entitled to vote at such meeting.
Board of
SECT. 58. It shall be the duty of the Board of
Aldermen
to make
Aldermen, prior to every election of city officers,
lists of
voters prior or of any officer or officers under the Government
to every
election.

1821, 110,

$24. R. S. 3.

of the United States or of this commonwealth, to

make out lists of all the citizens of each ward qual


ified to vote in such election, in the manner in which

selectmen and assessors of towns are required to


make out similar lists of voters; and for that purpose
they shall have free access to the assessors' books
and lists, and shall be entitled to the aid and assist
ance of all assessors, assistant assessors, and other

officers of said city.

And it shall be the duty of the

Board of Aldermen to deliver such list of the voters

in each ward, so prepared and corrected, to the clerk


of said ward, to be used by the warden and inspect
ors thereof at such elections, and no person shall be
entitled to vote at such elections whose name is not
Inspectors
to allow no

borne on such list. And, to prevent all frauds and


who ename mistakes in such elections, it shall be the duty of the
inspectors in each ward, to take care that no person
one to vote

is not on
the list.

CITY

CHARTER.

27

shall vote at such election whose name is not so borne

on the list of voters, and to cause a mark to be

placed against the name of each voter on such

list at the time of giving in his vote. And the City


Council shall have authority to establish such rules
and regulations as to making out, publishing, and
using such lists of qualified voters as they shall deem
proper, not inconsistent with the constitution and
laws of the commonwealth.

SECT. 59.

All elections for Governor, Lieutenant-

Governor, Senators, Representatives, Representatives state om.

to Congress, and all other officers who are to be ''.


chosen and voted for by the people, shall be held R
. S.6, $9,

at meetings of the citizens qualified to vote in such:... $12


elections, in their respective wards, at the time R.s. 5. $11.
fixed by law for those elections respectively. And, :**

at such meetings, all the votes given in being col-"


lected, sorted, counted, and declared by the inspec
tors of elections in each ward, it shall be the duty
of the clerk of such ward to make a true record of

the same, specifying therein the whole number of ::


ballots given in, the name of each person voted for,
and the number of votes for each, expressed in words
at length. And a transcript of such record, certified
by the warden, clerk, and a majority of the inspec
tors of elections in such ward, shall forthwith be

transmitted or delivered by each ward clerk to the


clerk of the city. And it shall be the duty of the
city clerk forthwith to enter such returns, or a plain
and intelligible abstract of them, as they are suc
cessively received, in the journals of the proceed
ings of the Board of Aldermen, or in some other
-

28

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

book kept for that purpose. And it shall be the Examina:


duty of the Board of Aldermen to meet together :

within two days after every such election, and ex-"


amine and compare all the said returns, and there
upon to make out a certificate of the result of such "
election, to be signed by a majority of the Aldermen,
and also by the city clerk, which shall be transmit
ted, delivered, or returned in the same manner as

similar returns are by law directed to be made


by the selectmen of towns; and such certificates
and returns shall have the same force and effect, in

all respects, as like returns of similar elections

made by the selectmen of towns. At the election'"


of Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, and Senators, it : for
overnor,

shall be the duty of the Board of Aldermen, to etc., to be


make and seal up separate lists of persons voted for :

as Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, and Senators of "


the commonwealth, with the number of votes for *****
each person, written in words at length against his
name; and to transmit said lists to the Secretary of
the commonwealth, or to the sheriff of the county.

The Board of Aldermen shall, within three days '.


next after the day of any election of Electors of ,
President and Vice-President of the United States, :

held by virtue of the laws of this commonwealth',


or of the United States, deliver or cause to be de- :
livered the list of votes therefor, sealed up, to the *",81.
sheriff of the county; and the said sheriff shall,
within four days after receiving said lists, transmit
the same to the office of the Secretary of the com
monwealth; or the said Aldermen may, and when
the office of sheriff is vacant they shall, them

CITY CHARTER.

29

selves transmit the said lists to the said office, with

in seven days after the election; and all votes not

so transmitted shall be rejected. In all elections'


for Representatives to the General Court, in case :
the whole number proposed to be elected shall not :"
be chosen according to law by the votes legally re
turned, the Board of Aldermen shall forthwith issue

their warrant for a new election, agreeably to the


constitution and laws of this commonwealth, and

the same proceedings shall be had in all respects


as are hereinbefore directed; and in case of no proceed.
choice being made of Representatives to Congress
in either district of which the city of Boston com- :

poses a part, or in case of any vacancy happening'.


in said districts or either of them, the Governor R. S. ch. 4,

shall cause precepts for new elections to be directed


to the Board of Aldermen of said city as often as
occasion shall require; and such new elections shall
be held, and all proceedings thereon had, and returns
made, in conformity with the foregoing provisions.
SECT. 60. General meetings of the citizens, meeting
G'" of
qualified to vote in city affairs, may from time to the citizens.
time be held to consult upon the common good, to : 110,
give instructions to their Representatives, and to take
all lawful measures to obtain a redress of any griev
ances, according to the right secured to the people
by the constitution of this commonwealth. And
such meetings shall and may be duly warned by the
Board of Aldermen, upon the requisition of fifty
qualified voters of said city. The Mayor, if present,
shall preside, and the city clerk shall act as the clerk
of such meetings.

30

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Warrants
for meet

ings to be
issued by
the board

SECT. 61. All warrants for the meetings of the


citizens for municipal purposes, to be had either in
general meetings or in wards, shall be issued by the

of alder
men.

1821, 110,
$26.

Board of Aldermen, and in such form, and shall be


served, executed, and returned at such time and in

such manner, as the City Council may by any by-law


or ordinance direct and appoint.
Power of

legislature
to alter the
charter.

1821, 110,

$30.
Repeal of
first char.
ter.

Proviso.

SECT. 62. Nothing in this act contained shall be


so construed as to restrain or prevent the Legislature
from amending or altering the same whenever they
shall deem it expedient.
SECT. 63. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent
with this act are hereby repealed; provided, how
ever, that the repeal of the said acts shall not affect
any act done, or any right accruing or accrued or
established, or any suit or proceeding had or com
menced in any civil case, before the time when such
repeal shall take effect. And that no offence com
mitted, and no penalty or forfeiture incurred, under
the acts hereby repealed, and before the time when
such repeal shall take effect, shall be affected by the
repeal. And that no suit or prosecution pending
at the time of the said repeal for any offence com
mitted, or for the recovery of any penalty or forfeit
ure incurred, under the acts hereby repealed, shall
be affected by such repeal; and provided also, that
all persons, who at the time when the said repeal
shall take effect shall hold any office under the said
acts, shall continue to hold the same according to
the tenure thereof. And provided also, that all the
by-laws and ordinances of the city of Boston, which
shall be in force at the time when the said repeal

CITY

CHARTER.

31

shall take effect, shall continue in force until the same

are repealed by the City Council. And all officers


elected under such by-laws and ordinances shall
continue in office according to the tenure thereof.
SECT. 64. No act which has been heretofore re-Repeal not

pealed shall be revived by the repeal of the acts .


mentioned in the preceding section.

Sect. 65. This act shall be void unless the in-'


habitants of the city of Boston, at a legal meeting to the citi.

called for that purpose, by a written vote determine"


to adopt the same; and the qualified voters of the
city shall be called upon to give in their votes upon
the acceptance of this act, at meetings in the various
wards, duly warned by the Mayor and Aldermen, to
be held on or before the second Monday of Novem
ber; and thereupon the same proceedings shall be
had respecting the sorting, counting, declaring, re
cording, and returns of said votes as are herein pro
vided at the election of Mayor; and the Board of
Mayor and Aldermen shall within three days meet
together and compare the returns of the ward offi
cers; and, if it appear that the citizens have voted
to adopt this act, the Mayor shall make proclama
tion of the fact, and thereupon the act shall take
effect for the purpose of electing municipal officers
at the next annual election; and for all other pur
poses it shall take effect on and after the first Mon
day of January next."
"Accepted November 13, 1854.

Yeas, 9,166; Nays, 990.

RULES AND ORDERS


OF THE

B () A R D

OF

A L DER MEN .

SECTION 1. The Mayor, and in his absence the


Chairman of the Board, shall take the chair at the hour

to which the Board shall have adjourned, and shall call


the members to order, and, a quorum being present,
shall cause the minutes of the preceding regular meet
ing to be read; and, in the absence of the Mayor and
Chairman, the senior member present shall preside as
Chairman pro tempore.
SECT. 2. He shall preserve decorum and order; may
speak to points of order in preference to other members;
and shall decide all questions of order, subject to an
appeal to the Board, by motion regularly seconded; and
no other business shall be in order till the question on

the appeal shall have been decided.


SECT. 3.

He shall declare all votes; but, if any

member rises to doubt a vote, he shall cause a return of

the members voting in the affirmative and in the nega


tive, without debate on the question.
SECT. 4. He may read sitting; but shall rise to state
a motion, or put a question to the Board.
5

34

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

SECT. 5. When the Mayor shall desire to vacate the


Chair, he shall call the Chairman of the Board to take
it, and in his absence the senior member present.
When the Chairman of the Board or the Chairman pro

tempore shall desire to vacate the Chair, he may call any


member to it, but such substitution shall not continue
beyond an adjournment.
SECT. 6. On all questions and motions whatsoever,
the Chair shall take the sense of the Board by yeas and
nays, provided any member shall so require. And every

Ordinance, Resolution or Order (except Orders of


Notice, papers from the Common Council, Orders of
Inquiry, and Orders relating to the Department of
Health), after being read, shall be laid on the table
before its consideration by the Board; and no such
Ordinance, Resolution or Order (except as above) shall
be considered at the same meeting at which it is offered,
except by special vote.
SECT. 7. The Chair shall propound all questions in
the order in which they are moved, unless the subse
quent motion shall be previous in its nature, except that
in the naming sums and fixing times the largest sum
and longest time shall be put first.
SECT. 8. After a motion is stated or read by the
Chair, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the
Board, and shall be disposed of by vote; but the mover
may withdraw it at any time before a decision or amend
ment.

SECT. 9.

When a question is under debate, the Chair

shall receive no motion but to adjourn, to lay on the


table, to postpone to a day certain, to commit, to amend,

35

RULES OF ALDERMEN.

or to postpone indefinitely; which several motions shall

have precedence in the order in which they stand


arranged; and a motion to strike out the enacting clause

of an Ordinance shall be equivalent to a motion to post


pone indefinitely.
SECT. 10.

The Chair shall consider a motion to

adjourn as always in order, except on an immediate


repetition; and that motion, and the motion to lay on

the table or to take up from the table, shall be decided


without debate.

SECT. 11. When a vote has passed, it shall be in


order for any member to move a reconsideration there

of, at the same or the succeeding regular meeting, but


not afterward; and, when a motion for reconsideration
is decided, that vote shall not be reconsidered.

SECT. 12. Every member when about to speak shall


rise, and respectfully address the Chair; shall confine
himself to the question under debate, and avoid per
sonalities.

SECT. 13. No member speaking shall be interrupted


by another, but by rising to a call to order, or for
explanation.

SECT. 14. No member shall be permitted to vote, or


serve on any Committee, on any question where his

private right is immediately concerned, distinct from


the public interest.
SECT. 15. Every member, who shall be present
when a question is put where he is not excluded by
-

interest, shall give his vote, unless the Board for special
reasons, shall excuse him. Application to be so excused
on any question must be made before the Board is

36

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

divided, or before the calling of the yeas and nays; and


such application shall be accompanied by a brief state
ment of the reasons, and shall

be decided without

debate.

SECT. 16.

Every motion shall be reduced to writing,

if the Chair shall so direct.

SECT. 17. Any member may require the division of


a question, when the sense will admit of it. A motion
to strike out and insert, shall be deemed indivisible; but

a motion to strike out being lost, shall not preclude


amendment, or a motion to strike out and insert.

SECT. 18.

No motion or proposition of a subject

different from that under consideration, shall be admitted


under color of amendment.

SECT. 19. Motions and reports may be committed or


recommitted at the pleasure of the Board.
SECT. 20.

When a vote is doubted, the members for

and against the question, when called on by the Chair,


shall rise, and stand till they are counted.
SECT. 21. All questions relating to priority of busi
ness to be acted upon shall be decided without debate.
SECT. 22. When a motion is made to refer any sub

ject, and different committees are proposed, the question


shall be taken in the following order:
1.

To a Standing Committee of the Board.

2.

To a Select Committee of the Board.

3. To a Joint Standing Committee.


4.

To a Joint Select Committee.

SECT. 23. The following Standing Committees of


the Board, to consist of three members each, and the

RULES

OF

ALDERMEN.

37

members of the Joint Standing Committees on the part

of this Board (named in the Joint Rules and Orders of


the City Council) shall be appointed by the Mayor in
consultation with the Chairman of the Board.

Committee on Armories and Military Affairs Asses


sors' DepartmentBridges Cemeteries, Common
and Public Squares County AccountsFaneuil Hall
(to be composed of the Committee on Public Buildings
on the part of this Board)Fire Department-Ferries
- Health Lamps, Bells, and Clocks Laying out
and Widening Streets Licenses Jail Market, and
Weights and Measures Paving and Repairs of Streets
- Police Sewers and DrainsSteam Engines and
Furnaces. All other Committees, unless otherwise pro
vided for, or specially directed by the Board shall be
appointed by the Chair.

SECT. 24. At every regular meeting of the Board,


the order of business shall be as follows: -

1. Communications from His Honor the Mayor.


2. Presentation of petitions, memorials and remon
Strances.

3. Papers from the Common Council.


4. Reports of City Officers.
5. Reports of Committees.
6. Motions, Orders and Resolutions.

And the above order of business shall not be departed


from, but by the votes of a majority of the members of
the Board present.
SECT. 25. Each Committee elected on the part of
this Board shall organize at its first meeting by the

38

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

choice of a Chairman, and shall report the same to this


Board; and in all cases where the Chair appoints a
Committee, unless otherwise provided for, the member
first named shall be Chairman, and in his absence, the
member next in order who shall be present, shall be
Chairman pro tempore.
SECT. 26.

Committees of the Board to whom any

matter is specially referred, may be required to report


within four weeks, or ask for further time.

SECT. 27. Any Standing or Special Committee of


the Board of Aldermen may contract or expend from
the appropriations provided by the City Council to an
amount not exceeding five hundred dollars, unless other
wise provided in the Ordinances of the City, or by
express vote of the Board, or unless authority for such
contract or expenditure be first had and obtained from
the Mayor and Aldermen.
SECT. 28. No Committee shall draw any moneys
from the City Treasury for the purpose of paying the
expense of said Committee, or any portion of the same,
while absent from the City of Boston, unless authorized
by special vote of the Board.
SECT. 29. The foregoing Rules shall not be altered,
amended, suspended or repealed at any time, except by
the vote of two-thirds of the members of the Board

present at the time.

JOINT RULES AND ORDERS

OF THE

CITY

CO U N C ITL .

SECTION 1. At the commencement of the Municipal


Year, the following Joint Standing Committees shall be
constituted, viz:
A Committee on Finance, to consist of seven members

of the Common Council, to be chosen by ballot; and the


Mayor, and the Chairman of the Board of Aldermen, ev
officiis.
A Committee on Accounts, to consist of three Alder
men, and five members of the Common Council, all to be

chosen by ballot.
And the following Committees shall be appointed, viz:
A Committee on Public Lands, to consist of three

Aldermen and five members of the Common Council.


A Committee on Public Buildings, to consist of three
Aldermen and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Public Instruction, to consist of three


Aldermen, and the President and four members of the
Common Council.

40

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

A Committee on Institutions at South Boston and Deer

Island, to consist of three Aldermen and five members


of the Common Council.

A Committee on the Assessors' Department, to consist


of three Aldermen and five members of the Common
Council.

A Committee on the City Hospital, to consist of two


Aldermen and three members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Fuel, to consist of two Aldermen and


three members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Water, to consist of three Aldermen


and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on the Treasury Department, to consist


of two Aldermen and three members of the Common
Council.

A Committee on the City Engineer's Department, to


consist of two Aldermen and three members of the Com
mon Council.

A Committee on the Harbor, to consist of two Alder


men and three members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Printing, to consist of one Alderman


and two members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Public Library, to consist of three


Aldermen and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on the Overseers of the Poor and the


Temporary Home, to consist of two Aldermen and three
members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Ordinances, to consist of three Alder


men and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Fire Alarms, to consist of two Alder


men and three members of the Common Council.

RULES OF THE CITY COUNCIL.

41

A Committee on Public Baths, to consist of three


Aldermen and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Claims, to consist of three Aldermen


and five members of the Common Council, who shall have

full power and authority to investigate all claims against


the city, and to take any measures for the defence of
such claims that they may deem expedient; and also,
under the advice of the Mayor, to adjust and settle all
claims not exceeding the sum of $500.
The members of the Board of Aldermen and of the

Common Council, who shall constitute the Joint Stand

ing Committees shall be chosen or appointed by their


respective Boards.

The Mayor, the President of the Common Council,


and the Chairman of the Committee on Finance, on the

part of the Common Council, shall, according to the ordi


nance, constitute the Committee on the Reduction of the

City Debt.
The member of the Board of Aldermen first named

on every Joint Committee, of which the Mayor is not a


member, shall be its Chairman; and, in case of his

resignation or inability, the other members of the same


Board in the order in which they are named, and after
them the member of the Common Council first in order,

shall call meetings of the Committee, and act as Chair


Imall.

SECT. 2. In every case of disagreement between the


two branches of the City Council, if either Board shall
request a conference, and appoint a Committee of Con
ference, and the other Board shall also appoint a Com
mittee to confer, such Committees shall, at a convenient
6

i.

42

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

hour, to be agreed upon by their Chairman, meet and


state to each other, verbally or in writing, as either shall
choose, the reasons of their respective Boards for and
against the matter in controversy, confer freely thereon,
and report to their respective branches. .
SECT. 3. When either Board shall not concur in any
action of the other, notice of such non-concurrence shall

be given by written message.


SECT. 4. Either Board may propose to the other, for
its concurrence, a time to which both Boards shall ad

journ.
SECT. 5. All By-Laws passed by the City Council
shall be termed Ordinances, and the enacting style
shall be: Be it ordained by the Aldermen and Common
Council of the City of Boston in City Council assem
bled.

SECT. 6.

In all votes, when either or both branches

of the City Council express, anything by way of com


mand, the form of expression shall be Ordered; and

whenever either or both branches express opinions, prin


ciples, facts or purposes the form shall be Resolved.
SECT. 7. In the present and every future financial
year, the specific appropriations for the several objects
enumerated in the general appropriation bill shall be
deemed and taken to be the maximum amount to be

expended, by the several Committees having the charge


thereof, for the entire financial year, and shall be
expended with a proper regard thereto; and, after the
annual order of appropriations shall have been passed,
no subsequent expenditures shall be authorized for any
object, unless provision for the same shall be made by

RULES

OF

THE

CITY

COUNCIL,

43

special transfer from some of the appropriations con


tained in such annual order, or by expressly creating
therefor a city debt, in either of which cases the order
shall not be passed unless two-thirds of the whole num
ber of each branch of the City Council shall vote in the
affirmative, by vote taken by yea and nay.
And any Joint Standing or Special Committees may
expend from the appropriations provided by the City
Council an amount not exceeding two hundred dollars.
SECT. 8. In all contracts or expenditures to be made
under the authority of the City Council, whenever the
estimates shall exceed the appropriations specially made
therefor, or whenever any Committee shall have ex
pended the sum specially appropriated for its use in the
order of appropriation for the year, and in either. case
shall require a further sum, it shall be the duty of such
Committee, having such matter in charge, to submit the
fact to the City Council for instructions, accompanied
with a detailed statement, in print, of the cause or
causes which have created the necessity for such appli
cation, and the object for which the same is needed.
And no contract shall be made or expenditure author
ized in either case, unless by a specific vote of the City
Council, first making the necessary provision for the
payment resulting therefrom ; and no debt shall be
* Committees not only have not the right to make expenditures for any

purpose beyond the amount which has been previously appropriated for it;
but they have not the right to expend the appropriation, or any part of it
even, unless that right is first conferred upon them by the body from which
they are appointed.
JOHN P. HEALY, City Solicitor.
December 1858.

44

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

created, or transfer from one special appropriation to


another be made, until such report or statement shall
have been submitted to the City Council, by the Com
mittee requiring the same.
SECT. 9. Joint Standing Committees shall cause rec
ords to be kept of their proceedings in books provided
by the city for that purpose. The Committee from nei
ther branch of the City Council shall act by separate

consultations; and no report shall be received unless


agreed to in committee actually assembled.
SECT. 10. It shall be the duty of every Joint Com
mittee, to whom any subject may be specially referred,
to report thereon within four weeks, or to ask for fur
ther time.

SECT. 11. All reports and other papers submitted to


the City Council shall be written in a fair hand, and no
report or indorsement of any kind shall be made on the
reports, memorials or other papers referred to the Com
mittee of either branch. All reports shall be signed by the
writers thereof, unless otherwise directed by the Com
mittee; and the Clerk of Committees shall make copies
of any papers to be reported by Committees, at the re
quest of the respective Chairmen thereof.
SECT. 12. No Chairman of any Committee shall au
dit or approve any bill or account against the city for
any supplies or services which shall not have been or
dered or authorized by the Committee, nor shall he ap
prove for payment any bill or account, except by vote of
the Committee.

SECT. 13. No bill shall be approved by the Commit


tee on Accounts for refreshments or carriage hire fur

RULES

OF THE

CITY COUNCIL,

45

nished to any member of the City Government, unless


said bills are approved by the Chairman of a Standing
or Special Committee of the City Council, or either
branch thereof, duly authorized by vote of such Commit
tee; in which cases, said bills shall be paid from the
appropriation to which they are incident: and the Com
mittee on Accounts shall not pass any bill, unless it is
approved, as provided in this and the preceding section.
SECT. 14. All bills for refreshments or carriage hire,
incurred more than three months previous to the date of
their presentation, shall go before the City Council for
approval.

RULES

AND

ORDERS

OF THE

C O M M ON

DUTIES

AND

POWERS

CO UN C III.

OF THE

PRESIDENT.

SECTION 1. The President shall take the chair pre


cisely at the hour to which the Council shall have
adjourned; shall call the members to order; and, on
the appearance of a quorum, he shall cause the minutes

of the preceding meeting to be read, and proceed to


business.

SECT. 2. He shall preserve decorum and order;


may speak to points of order in preference to other
members; and shall decide all questions of order, sub
ject to an appeal to the Council, by motion regularly
seconded, and no other business shall be in order till the

question on the appeal shall have been decided.


SECT. 3. He shall declare all votes; but, if any
member rises to doubt a vote, the President shall cause

a return of the members voting in the affirmative and in


the negative, without further debate on the question.
SECT. 4.

He shall rise to address the Council, or to

put a question; but may read sitting.

RULES

OF

COMMON

47

COUNCIL.

SECT. 5. In all cases the President may vote.


SECT. 6. When the Council shall determine to go
into a Committee of the Whole, the President shall

appoint the member who shall take the Chair. The


President may at any other time call any member to the
Chair, but said substitution shall not continue beyond
an adjournment.
SECT. 7. On all questions and motions whatsoever,

the President shall take the sense of the Council by


yeas and nays, provided one-fifth of the members pre
sent shall so require.
SECT. 8. The President shall propound all questions
in the order in which they are moved, unless the sub
sequent motion shall be previous in its nature, except
that, in the naming sums and fixing times, the largest
sum and longest time shall be put first.

SECT. 9. After a motion is stated or read by the


President, it shall be deemed to be in possession of the
Council, and shall be disposed of by vote; but the
mover may withdraw it at any time before a decision
or amendment.

SECT. 10. When a question is under debate, the


President shall receive no motion, but to adjourn, to
lay on the table, for the previous question, to postpone
to a day certain, to commit, to amend, or to postpone
indefinitely, which several motions shall have prece
dence in the order in which they stand arranged; and

a motion to strike out the enacting clause of an Ordi


nance shall be equivalent to a motion to postpone in
definitely.
-

SECT. 11.

The President shall consider a motion to

48

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

adjourn as always in order, except upon an immediate


repetition; and that motion, and the motion to lay on
the table, or to take up from the table, or to take the
previous question, shall be decided without debate.
SECT. 12. He shall put the previous question in the
following form: Shall the main question be now put 2"
and all debate upon the main question shall be sus
pended until the previous question shall be decided.
After the adoption of the previous question, the sense
of the Council shall forthwith be taken upon amend
ments reported by a Committee, upon all pending
amendments, and then upon the main question.
SECT. 13. All incidental questions of order, arising
after a motion is made for the previous question, shall
be decided without debate, except on an appeal; and
on such an appeal, no member shall be allowed to speak
more than once without leave of the Council.

SECT. 14.

When two or more members happen to

rise at once, the President shall name the member who

is first to speak.
SECT. 15. All Committees shall be appointed and
announced by the President, unless otherwise provided
for, or especially directed by the Council.
RIGHTS, DUTIES, AND DECORUM of MEMBERs.

SECT. 16.

In the absence of the President the senior

member present shall call the Council to order, and


preside until a President pro tempore shall be chosen by
ballot; and, if an election is not effected on the first

trial, on a second ballot a plurality of votes shall elect.


SECT. 17. Every member, when about to speak,

RULES

OF

COMMON

49

COUNCIL.

shall rise and respectfully address the President; shall


confine himself to the question under debate, and avoid
personalities; and shall sit down when he has finished.
No member shall speak or vote out of his place without
leave of the President.

SECT. 18. No member speaking shall be interrupted


by another, but by rising to call to order, or for expla
nation.

SECT. 19. When a vote has passed, it shall be in


order, for any member who voted in the majority, to
move a reconsideration thereof, at the same or the

succeeding meeting, but not afterwards; and, when a


motion for reconsideration is decided, that vote shall not
be reconsidered.

SECT. 20.

No member shall be obliged to be on

more than two Committees at the same time, nor Chair


man of more than one.

SECT. 21.

No member shall be permitted to stand

up to the interruption of another, while any member is


speaking; or to pass unnecessarily between the Presi
dent and the person speaking.
SECT. 22. When any member shall be guilty of a
breach of either of the Rules and Orders of the Council,
he may be required by the President to make satisfac
tion therefor; and, in such a case, he shall not be

allowed to vote or speak, except by way of excuse till


he has done so, unless otherwise ordered by the Council.
SECT. 23. No member shall be permitted to vote or

serve on any Committee, on any question where his


private right is immediately concerned, distinct from the
public interest.
-

50

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

SECT. 24. Every member who shall be present when


a question is put, where he is not excluded by interest,
shall give his vote, unless the Council, for special

reasons, shall excuse him; application to be so excused


on any question, must be made before the Council is

divided, or before the calling of the yeas and nays, and


such application shall be accompanied by a brief state
ment of the reasons, and shall be decided without
debate.

SECT. 25.

Every motion shall be reduced to writing,

if the President shall so direct.

SECT. 26.

Any member may require the division of

a question, when the sense will admit of it.

A motion

to strike out and insert shall be deemed indivisible;

but a motion to strike out, being lost, shall not preclude


amendment or a motion to strike out and insert.

SECT. 27.

No motion or proposition of a subject dif

ferent from that under consideration shall be admitted


under color of amendment.

SECT. 28. Motions and reports may be committed or


recommitted at the pleasure of the Council.
SECT. 29. At every regular meeting of the Council,
the order of business shall be as follows :

1. Papers from the Board of Aldermen.


2. Unfinished business of preceding meetings.
3. Communications and reports from City Officers,
Presentation of Petitions, Remonstrances, and Memo
rials.

4. Reports of Committees.
5.

Motions, Orders or Resolutions.

RULES

SECT. 30.

OF

COMMON

COUNCIL.

51

When a vote is doubted, the members for

and against the question, when called on by the Presi


dent, shall rise and stand till they are counted.
SECT. 31. All questions relating to priority of busi
ness to be acted upon shall be decided without debate.
SECT. 32. When a motion is made to refer any sub
ject, and different Committees are proposed, the question
shall be taken in the following order:
A Standing Committee of the Council.
A Select Committee of the Council.

A Joint Standing Committee.


A Joint Select Committee.

SECT. 33.

The seats of the members of the Council

shall be numbered, and shall be determined, in the

presence of the Council, by drawing the names of


members, and the numbers of the seats, simultaneously;
and each member shall be entitled for the year to the
seat bearing the number so drawn against his name,
and shall not change it, except by permission of the
President.

SECT. 34. No member shall call another member by


his name in debate, but may allude to him by any
intelligible and respectful designation.
SECT. 35. If the reading of any paper is called for

and any member objects thereto, it shall be decided by


the Council.

SECT. 36.

No rule or order of the Council shall be

dispensed with, altered or repealed, unless two-thirds of


the members present consent thereto.

52

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

PETITIONS, MEMORIALs, ETC.

SECT. 37. All papers addressed to the Council shall


be presented by the President, or a member in his place;
and shall be read by the President, Clerk, or such other
person as the President may request; and shall be taken
up in the order in which they are presented, except
when the Council shall otherwise determine.

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES,

SECT. 38.

ETC.

The rules of proceeding in the Council

shall be observed in Committee of the Whole, so far as

they are applicable. A motion to rise, report progress,


and ask leave to sit again, shall be first in order, and
shall be decided without debate, and the previous ques
tion shall not be moved.

SECT. 39. A Standing Committee on Elections and .


Returns, and Standing Committees on Streets, Police,
Internal Health, Ferries, Fire Department, and Common
and Squares, shall be appointed at the commencement
of the municipal year, and shall consist of five members
each.

SECT. 40. No Committee shall sit during the sessions


of the Council without special leave.
SECT. 41. All Committees of the Council, chosen by
ballot, or consisting of one or more from each ward,
shall be notified of their first meeting by the Clerk, by
the direction of the President; they shall organize at
their first meeting, by the choice of a Chairman, and
shall report the same to the Council; and members, on
the part of the Council, of Joint Committees, chosen as
* March 26, 1868.

RULES

OF

COMMON

53

COUNCIL.

aforesaid, shall choose a Chairman at their first meeting,


and report to the Council in like manner.
In all cases where the President appoints a Commit
tee, unless otherwise provided for, the member first
named shall be Chairman, and in his absence, the mem
ber next in order who shall be present shall be Chair
man pro tempore.
SECT. 42.

All

shall consist of

Select Committees of

the Council

three members, unless

otherwise

ordered.

SECT. 43. No Report of any Committee shall be


entitled to be received, unless agreed to in Committee
assembled.

SECT. 44. No meeting of any Committee shall be


called, upon less notice than twenty-four hours.
SECT. 45. It shall be the duty of all Standing Com
mittees to keep a record of their doings in books pro
vided by the city for that purpose.
SECT. 46. Committees of the Council, to whom any
matter is specially referred, may be required to report
within four weeks, or ask for further time,
ORDINANCES, ORDERs, ETC.

SECT. 47. All Ordinances, Orders and Resolutions


shall have two several readings before they are finally
passed; and no Ordinance, Order or Resolution impos
ing penalties, or authorizing the expenditure of money,
whether the same may have been appropriated or
not, - and no Order or Resolution authorizing a loan
shall have more than one reading on the same day;
provided, however, that nothing herein contained shall

54

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

prevent the passage of an order at any meeting of the

Council, to authorize the printing of any document


relating to the affairs of the city.

ELECTIONS, ETC.

SECT. 48.

In all elections by ballot on the part of

the Council, the number of blanks and ballots for inel

igible persons shall be reported, but shall not be


counted in the returns.

SECT. 49.

All salaried officers shall be voted for by

written ballots.

DUTIES OF CLERK, ETC.

SECT. 50. The Clerk shall keep minutes of the votes


and proceedings of the Council; enter thereon such
orders and resolutions as are adopted, by their title or
otherwise; shall notice Reports, Petitions, Memorials,
and other papers which are presented; and shall enter
all accepted Reports of Select Committees of the Coun
cil, at length, in a separate journal to be kept for that
purpose, and provided with an index; shall draw up
all messages to the Board of Aldermen, and send them

by the Messenger; and shall attend the meetings of


Committees of the Council, and make their records

when required.
SECT, 51.

The members of the Council shall not

leave their places on adjournment, until the President


shall declare the Council adjourned.

Q
PE, AN

A 1. D E R M E)
B0STON |

G O V E RN M E N T
of The

CITY

OF

B O S T ON .

1868.

MAYOR,

NATHANIEL BRADSTREET SHURTLEFF,


2 BEACON STREET.

[Salary, $5,000.

Charter, 15, 45.]

A LD E R MEN .
GEORGE W. MESSINGER, Chairman.
BENJAMIN JAMES, Thomas St., corner Linden.
CHARLES TODD WOODMAN, 33 North Bennet Street.
GEORGE WASHINGTON MESSINGER, Tremont House.
JOSEPH FROST PAUL, 588 Tremont Street.
FRANCIS RICHARDS, 21 Marion Street.
ALBERT STEVENSPRATT, 195 Salem Street.
JARVIS DWIGHT BRAMAN, 38 Charles Street.
EDWARD AUGUSTUS WHITE, 226 Tremont Street.
NEWTON TALBOT, Adams House.
NATHANIEL SEAVER, 11 Henry Street.

SAMUEL CROCKER COBB, Highland, near Cedar Street.


MOSES FAIRBANKS, 23 Lynde Street.

56

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

COMMON COUNCIL.

CHARLES HASTINGS ALLEN, President.


Ward 1.

79 Princeton Street.

William Woolley
George E. Young

26 White Street.

J. Byron Nason

19 Border Street.

Joshua Weston.

38 Saratoga Street.
Ward 2.

98 Prince Street. .

Michael Carney
Matthew Keaney

2 Sun Court Street.


. 141 Salem Street.

Thomas Dinsmore

5 North Bennet Place.

Edward Malone

Ward 3.

1 Lynde Street.
65 Poplar Street.

Charles R. Train

Michael F. Wells
Thomas L. Jenks

10 Allen Street.

Lyman A. Belknap

36 Allen Street.
Ward 4.

Alexander Wadsworth
Lewis Rice

53 Bowdoin Street.

American House.
-

Edward E. Batchelder

American House.

Zimri B. Heywood

Marlboro Hotel.
Ward 5.

Michael J. Driscoll

William M. Flanders

22 Purchase Street.

9 Edinboro' Street.
United States Hotel.

Francis W. Jacobs

United States Hotel.

Sereno T. Thayer
Ward 6.

Benjamin F. Stevens .
William H. Emerson.

Francis A. Osborn
Horace G. Tucker

91 Pinckney Street.
. 131 Charles Street.

54 Pinckney Street.
10 Myrtle Street.

PLAN OF

C O M M! O N C C) U.N (
BOSTON, 1868

CITY

GOVERNMENT.

57

Ward 7.

James J. Flynn.

32 Broadway.

Robert Bishop .

. 191 Third Street.

Michael G. Minon

. 135 Seventh Street.

John White

. 124 Albany Street.


Ward 8.
9 Warren Street.

George P. Darrow

. 137 Harrison Avenue.

Lucius W. Knight
William R. Bryden
Sidney Squires.

. 160 Tyler Street.


51 Kneeland Street.
Ward 9.

Jeremiah L. Newton .

48 Clarendon Street.

John W. Leighton

14 St. James Street.

Samuel Rice

4 Florence Street.

Ebenezer Nelson

39 Carver Street.
Ward 10.

Charles S. Butler

George P. Denny

. 141 West Canton Street.

31 Upton Street.

Horace T. Rockwell.

29 Dover Street.

Samuel B. Hopkins

.1284 Washington Street.


Ward 11.

Charles H. Allen

94 Worcester Street.
. 676 Tremont Street.

Ivory Bean
William G. Harris
Samuel T. Snow

35 Worcester Street.
. 672 Tremont Street.
Ward 12.

Hollis R. Gray .

. 318 Silver Street.

Henry W. Wilson
Albert J. Wright

. 380 Broadway.

William T. Wan Nostrand .


8

Dorchester, opp. Seventh.


56 G Street.

58

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Ward 13.
Thomas Dolan .

Benjamin Franklin

L. Foster Morse

Joseph T. Ryan

45 Adams Street, Roxbury.

.
.

36 Union Street,
69 Zeigler Street,

13 Eaton Street,

44

44

Ward 14.

William Hobbs, Jr. .

Augustus Parker
.
Henry B. Phelps
.
Henry W. Pickering .

..

10 State Street.

. 47 Shawmut Av., Roxbury.

Grove Hall Avenue.

48 State Street.

Ward 15.

James M. Keith

Everett C. Kingsbury
J. Austin Rogers
Horace H. White

42 Court Street.

13 Sudbury Street, Roxbury.

Eliot Square,

Bellevue, opp. Austin St.

City Clerk.
SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, 220 Warren Avenue.

Salary, $4,000, and for Assistant Clerks, $4,600. [Chosen


by City Council, in Convention, in January. Charter, $30.]
Clerk of Common Council.
WASHINGTON P. GREGG, 18 Leverett Street.

Salary, $1,400, and for Assistant Clerk, $500.


Common Council, in January.

[Chosen by

Charter, 34.]

Clerk of Committees.
JAMES M. BUGBEE, 84 Pinckney Street.
Salary, $2,200. [Chosen by City Council. Ord. p. 421.]
Mayor's Clerk.
CHARLES E. DAVIS, JR., Fourth, near L Street.

Salary, $1,300.

[Appointed by the Mayor.]

CITY

GOVERNMENT.

59

Messenger.
OLIVER H. SPURR, 497 Tremont, cor. Berkeley Street.
Salary, $1,600. [Chosen by City Council. Ord. p. 408.]
Assistant Messenger.
ALVAH. H. PETERS, 41 Howard Street.

Salary, $400. [Appointed by Messenger, and confirmed by


City Council. Ord. p. 408.]

C () MMITTEES.

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN.

[Mun. Reg. p. 37.]


ARMORIES

AND

MILITARY

AFFAIRS.

Aldermen Braman, Paul and White.


ASSESSORS

DEPARTMENT.

Aldermen Talbot, Fairbanks and Pratt.


BRIDGES.

Aldermen Seaver, Richards and James.


COUNTY ACCOUNTS.

Aldermen Pratt, Cobb and Talbot.


CEMETERIES.

Aldermen Pratt, Woodman and White.


COMMON AND PUBLIC SQUARES.

Aldermen James, Richards and Braman.


FANEUIL HALL.

Aldermen Richards, James and Seaver.


FERRIES.

Aldermen Seaver, Talbot and Pratt.

CITY GoverNMENT.

FIRE

DEPARTMENT.

Aldermen Richards, White and Seaver.


HEALTH.

Aldermen Messinger, Cobb and James.


JAIL.

Aldermen Talbot, Woodman and Braman.


LAMPS, BELLS AND CLOCKS.

Aldermen Braman, Seaver and Pratt.


LICENSES.

Aldermen White, Fairbanks and Messinger.


MARKET, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Aldermen Woodman, Pratt and Seaver.


PAVING, ETC.

Aldermen James, Paul and Cobb.


POLICE.

Aldermen Cobb, White and Seaver.


SEWERS.

Aldermen Paul, Talbot and Fairbanks.


STEAM-ENGINES.

Aldermen Fairbanks, Woodman and Paul.


STREETS.

Aldermen Talbot, Paul and White.

61

62

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE CITY COUNCIL.


REDUCTION OF THE CITY DEBT.

[Ord. p. 198.]

The Mayor, President of the Common Council, and the Chair


man of the Committee on Finance on the part of the Com
mon Council.
ACCOUNTS.

[Ord.

p.

196.]

Aldermen.

Common Council.

Benjamin F. Stevens,

Benjamin James,
Edward A. White,

Albert J. Wright,
Henry W. Pickering,
Wm. M. Flanders,

Samuel C. Cobb.

Edward E. Batchelder.
ASSESSORS DEPARTMENT.

[Ord. Jan. 3, 1868.]


Aldermen.

Common Council.

Newton Talbot,

Michael Carney,
John W. Leighton,
Hollis R. Gray,
George P. Darrow,

Samuel C. Cobb,
Joseph F. Paul.

Samuel B. Hopkins.
BATHING.

[Mun. Reg. p. 41.]


Aldermen.

Jarvis D. Braman,
Moses Fairbanks,
Albert S. Pratt.

Common Council,
William Woolley,
Horace T. Rockwell,
Michael J. Driscoll,
Augustus Parker,
Wm. T. Van Nostrand.

CITY GOVERNMENT.

63

CLAIMS.

[Mun. Reg. p. 41.]


Aldermen.

Common Council.

Samuel C. Cobb,

Jeremiah L. Newton,

Edward A. White,

Alexander Wadsworth,
Michael Carney,

Newton Talbot.

Francis W. Jacobs,
Charles S. Butler.
ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT.

[Ord. p. 162.]

Aldermen.

Common Council,

Albert S. Pratt,

Henry W. Wilson,
Alexander Wadsworth,

Nath'l Seaver.

Edward Malone.

FINANCE.

[Ord.

p.

198.]
Common Council.

Charles R. Train,

The Mayor, ex officio.


The

Chairman

of

the

Board of Aldermen, ex
officio.

Francis A. Osborn,

J. Byron Nason,
Alexander Wadsworth,
George P. Denny,
Samuel T. Snow,
Horace H. White. ,

FIRE ALARMS.

[Ord. p. 225.]
Aldermen.

Common Council.

Charles T. Woodman,

George P. Darrow,

Francis Richards.

Lyman A. Belknap,
John White.

64

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

FUEL.

[Ord. p. 228.]
Aldermen.

Common Council.

Moses Fairbanks,

Sereno T. Thayer,

Albert S. Pratt.

Henry W. Pickering,
Samuel Rice.

HARBOR.

[Ord. p. 277.]
Aldermen.

Common Council.

Jarvis D. Braman,

Charles R. Train,

Samuel C. Cobb.

Henry W. Wilson,
George E. Young.
CITY HOSPITAL.

[Ord. p. 325.]

Common Council.

Aldermen.

George W. Messinger,

Thos. L. Jenks,
J. Austin Rogers,

Newton Talbot.

Thos. Dolan.

INSTITUTIONS AT SOUTH BOSTON AND DEER ISLAND.

[Mun. Reg. p. 40.]


Aldermen.

, Common Council.

George W. Messinger,

Wm. G. Harris,

Francis Richards,

William Woolley,

Samuel C. Cobb.

Matthew Keaney,
Wm. R. Bryden,
James M. Keith.

CITY

GOVERNMENT.

ORDINANCES.

[Ord. p. 426.]
Aldermen.

Common Council.

Joseph F.

Paul,
Moses Fairbanks,

Charles R. Train,
Francis A. Osborn,

Newton Talbot.

James M. Keith,

George P. Denny,
Francis W. Jacobs.
OVERSEERS OF POOR, AND TEMPORARY HOME.
[Mun. Reg. p. 40.]
Aldermen.

Common Council."

Edward A. White,

Benjamin Franklin,

Jarvis D. Braman.

Ebenezer Nelson,

Zimri B. Heywood.
PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

[Ord. p. 476.]
Aldermen.

Common Council.

Francis Richards,

Benjamin James,
Nath'l Seaver.

Ivory Bean,
William H. Emerson,
Michael F. Wells,

John W. Leighton,
Lucius W. Knight.
PUBLIC INSTRUCTION.
[Mun. Reg. p. 39.]
Aldermen.

Common Council.

Edward A. White,
Nath'l Seaver,

President of Common

Albert S. Pratt.

Francis A. Osborn,
Samuel T. Snow,
Albert J. Wright,
Wm. Hobbs, Jr.

Council, ex officio.

65

66

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

PUBLIC LANDS.

[Ord. p. 480.]

Common Council.

Aldermen.

Benjamin James,
Charles T. Woodman,
Jarvis D. Braman.

Ivory Bean,
Michael F. Wells,
Sereno T. Thayer,

Henry B. Phelps,
Sidney Squires.
PRINTING.

[Ord. p. 473.]
Alderman.

Common Council.

Lewis Rice,

Newton Talbot.

Albert J. Wright.

PUBLIC LIBRARY.

[Ord. p. 396.]
Aldermen.

Common Council.

Samuel C. Cobb,
Newton Talbot,

Jeremiah L. Newton,
Horace T. Rockwell,

Edward A. White.

Lyman A. Belknap,
Robert Bishop,
L. Foster Morse.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT.

[Ord. p. 201.]
Aldermen.

Common Council.

George W. Messinger,

Hollis R. Gray,

Saml. C. Cobb.

Horace H. White,

Robert Bishop.

CITY

67

GOVERNMENT.

WATER.

[Ord. p. 794.]

Aldermen.

Common Council.

Joseph F. Paul,

Lewis Rice,
George E. Young,
Henry W. Wilson,

Newton Talbot,
Samuel C. Cobb.

Wm. H. Emerson,
Horace H. White,

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL.


[Mun. Reg. p. 52.]
COMMON AND SQUARES.

James J. Flynn,

Augustus Parker,

Sidney Squires,

Francis W. Jacobs.

Wm. T. Van Nostrand,


ELECTIONS.

J. Byron Nason,
Zimri B. Heywood.

Francis A. Osborn,
Wm. Hobbs, Jr.,
James J. Flynn,
FERRIES.

Jeremiah L. Newton,
Lewis Rice,
Joshua Weston,

Thomas Dinsmore,
Joseph T. Ryan.

FIRE DEPARTMENT.

Geo. P. Darrow,
Horace G. Tucker,
Wm. M. Flanders,

Thomas Dinsmore,

E. C. Kingsbury.

68

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

INTERNAL HEALTH.

Edward E. Batchelder,

Samuel B. Hopkins,
Joseph T. Ryan.

James J. Flynn,
Samuel Rice,
POLICE.

Sidney Squires,
Everett C. Kingsbury,
Michael G. Minon,

L. Foster Morse,
Edward Malone.

STREETS.

Benjamin F. Stevens,

James J. Flynn,
Augustus Parker.

William R. Bryden,
Michael Carney,

SOLDIERS

RELIEF

COMMITTEE.

[Ord. p. 666.]

GEORGE W. MESSINGER, Chairman.


Ward 1.
Alderman Seaver and Joshua Weston.
Ward 2.

Alderman Woodman and Matthew Keaney.


Ward 3.

Alderman Fairbanks and Thomas L. Jenks.


Ward 4.

Alderman Messinger and Lewis Rice.

CITY

GOVERNMENT.

Ward 5.
Alderman Talbot and Michael J. Driscoll.
Ward 6.
Alderman Braman and Horace G. Tucker.
Ward 7.
Alderman Pratt and John White.
Ward 8.

Alderman White and Lucius W. Knight.


Ward 9.
Alderman Richards and Ebenezer Nelson.
Ward 10.
Alderman Paul and Charles S. Butler.
Ward 11.
Alderman Paul and William G. Harris.
Ward 12.
Alderman James and William T. Wan Nostrand.

Wards 13, 14 and 15.


Alderman Cobb and Thomas Dolan,

Henry B. Phelps, and J. Austin Rogers.


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

[Chosen by the whole Committee.]


Aldermen.

Common Council.

Benjamin James,

Lewis Rice,

Jarvis D. Braman,

Lucius W. Knight,
William G. Harris,
Matthew Keaney,
Henry B. Phelps.

Joseph F. Paul.

69

70

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Paymaster.
REUBEN PETERSON, JR.

Salary, $1,700. [Chosen by the whole Committee.]


Clerk.
HoRATIO N. CRANE.

Salary, $ 1,500.

[Chosen by the whole Committee.]


Assistant Clerk.
LUCIEN B. FIFIELD.

Salary, $100 per month.

[Appointed by Executive Committee.]

AssEssoRs' DEPARTMENT.

71

ASSESSORS DEPARTMENT.
ASSESSORS.

[Chosen by concurrent vote in February or March.


January 3, 1868.]

Ord.

Thomas Hills,
Thomas J. Bancroft,
Benjamin Cushing,
George A. Simmons.
Horace Smith,
Salary, $2,500 each, per annum.
FIRST ASSISTANTS.

Elbridge E. Fletcher,
Benjamin F. Palmer,

Joseph L. Drew,
Joseph F. Huntress,

Abel B. Munroe,
George D. Ricker,
Artemas R. Holden,
John Brown,
Otis Rich,

James Dennie,

Edward F. Robinson,
George F. Williams,
Francis James,
Charles E. Grant,

Christopher A. Connor,
Joseph W. Dudley.
Salary, six dollars per day.
SECOND ASSISTANTS.

Ward 1 Daniel J. Sweeny,


John Noble,
Ward 2 James Healy,
John F. Flynn,

Ward
Ward
Ward
Ward

Ward 3 Theophilus Burr,

Ward

Ward 4 F. S. Carruth,
E. Stone Goodwin,
Ward 5 John A. Daly,
John M. Maguire,
Ward 6 Oliver P. Bowman,

Ward
Ward
Ward

7 Jeremiah Sullivan,
8 Cadis B. Boyce,
9Fred'k. A. Wilkins,
10Ed. A. Hunting,
11 Geo. W. Skinner,
12 E. B. Spinney,
13 Frank M. Howe,
14Wm. H. McIntosh,

Ward 15 S. P. Blake.

Salary, five dollars per day.

Benjamin Cushing, Secretary to Board of Assessors, and to


Board of Assistant Assessors.

72

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

BRIDGES.
[Ord. p. 86.]

CHELSEA STREET BRIDGE. Edward T. Stowers, Superintendent


Salary, $300. [Chosen by concurrent vote.]
Dover STREET BRIDGE. Nathan Brown, Superintendent. Sal
ary, $900, and the use of house on bridge. [Chosen by
concurrent vote.]

FEDERAL STREET BRIDGE. Jacob Norris, Superintendent. Sal


ary, $1,500, and the use of the building on the bridge, and a
horse, at the city's expense, to open and close the draw.
[Chosen by concurrent vote.]
MERIDIAN STREET BRIDGE. Abner Knight, Superintendent.
Salary, $700. [Chosen by concurrent vote.]
MoUNT WASHINGTON AVENUE BRIDGE. George H. Davis,
Superintendent. Salary, $1,800. [Chosen by concurrent
vote.]

FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT.
TREASURER.

Frederic U. Tracy, City and County Treasurer and Collector.


Salary, $4,500, and $9,000 for permanent assistant clerks.
[Chosen by the City Council in convention, in May. City
Charter, $42.]
DEPUTY COLLECTORs.

Alexander Hopkins.
Eben F. Gay.

Thomas P. Wilson.
Isaac F. Nelson.

Augustus M. Rice.

Joseph Pierce.

Francis W. Bulfinch.

Richard J. Fennelly.

FIRE

73

DEPARTMENT.

[Appointed by Treasurer. Statutes 1821, ch. 110, 11, 13.


City Ordinances, p. 767.] They are also appointed Constables
by the Mayor and Aldermen.
AUDITOR.

Alfred T. Turner, City Auditor. Salary, $4,000, and $4,500 for


clerk hire. [Chosen by concurrent vote of the City Council,
in May. City Ordinances, p. 196.]
[The first day of each month is pay-day. Bills presented to the several
departments on or before the 15th of one month, are ready for payment at
this office on the first of the next month, if properly approved. The Audi
tor desires parties who have claims against the city, which have been duly
allowed, to be prompt in their calls to receive payment.]

FIRE DEPARTMENT.
[Ord. Jan. 31, 1868.]

Chief Engineer.
John S. Damrell, 60 Temple Street. Salary, $2,000, and the
use of a horse and vehicle.

Assistant Engineers. Salary, $450.


John S. Jacobs,
John W. Regan,
David Chamberlin,
Zenas E. Smith,
George Brown,
Joseph Dunbar,
William A. Green,
Elijah B. Hine,
Phineas D. Allen,
James Munroe,
John Culligan,
Rufus B. Farrar,
10

5 Snowhill Place,
56 South Street,
7 Tyler Street,
601 Tremont Street,

Dist. No. 8.

Silver, near D. Street,


83 Princeton Street,
5 Alden Street,
30 Grove Street,
28 Magazine Street,
9 Regent Street,
43 Shawmut Avenue,

No. 6.

No. 2.

NO. 3.

No. 5.

No. 1.

No. 4.

No. 7.

No. 10.

No. 9.

No. 11.

W. Cedar, cor. Cambridge St., No. 12.

74

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Henry W. Longley, Secretary, 61 Clarendon Street. Salary,


$1,000.

[Nominated by Board of Engineers, and chosen by concur


rent vote.]
STEAM FIRE ENGINES.

No. 1. Broadway, near Dorchester Street, South Boston.


Built by Boston Locomotive Works. Weight, 9,900 lbs. Cost,
$2,500.

No. 2. Fourth, near K Street, South Boston. Built by the


Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, Manchester, N. H. Weight,
6,500 lbs.

Cost, 2,750.

No. 3. Washington, near Dover Street. Built by Amoskeag


Manufacturing Company, Manchester, N. H. Weight, 7,030 lbs.
Cost, $4,250.

No. 4. Court Street. Built by Amoskeag Manufacturing


Company, Manchester, N. H. Weight 7,100 lbs. Cost, $4,250.
No. 5. Marion Street, East Boston. Built by Amoskeag
Manufacturing Company, Manchester, N. H.
Cost, $4,250.

Weight 7,000 lbs.

No. 6. Wall Street. Built by Amoskeag Manufacturing


Company, Manchester, N. H. Weight, 10,045 lbs. Cost,
$3,500.

No. 7. Purchase Street. Built by Amoskeag Manufacturing


Company, Manchester, N. H. Weight. 9,760 lbs. Cost, $3,000.
No. 8. North Bennet Street. Built by Amoskeag Manufac
turing Company, Manchester, N. H. Weight, 9,978 lbs. Cost,
$3,000.

No. 9. Paris Street, East Boston. Built by Amoskeag


Manufacturing Company, Manchester, N. H. Weight, 9,740 lbs.
Cost, $3,000.

No. 10. River, foot of Mount Vernon Street. Built by


Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, Manchester, N. H. The
weight of this engine, without any of its supplies, is 4,200 lbs.

FIRE

75

DEPARTMENT.

With everything ready to run out for service, including a supply


of fuel and of water in the boiler, its weight is about 5,000 lbs.
Cost, $2,750.

No. 11. Sumner Street, East Boston. Built by Amoskeag


Manufacturing Company, Manchester, N. H. Weight, 5,500 lbs.
Cost, $4,000.

No. 12. Corner Warren and Dudley Streets, Southen Dis


trict. Built by S. Button, Waterford, N. Y. Weight, 7,190 lbs.
Cost, $3.500.

No. 13. Cabot Street, South District. Built by Campbell


& Whittier. Weight, 7,500 lbs. Cost, $3,500.
No. 14. Center Street, South District. Built by J. M. Stone,
Weight, 7,742 lbs. Cost, $3,500.
The weight, as given above, is as the engines are drawn to fires,
including hose carriages, and three members of the Company
permanently employed.

HOOK AND LADDER COMPANIES.

No. 1.

Friend Street. John S. Stevens, Cotting Street,

Foreman.

No. 2. Paris Street, East Boston. Charles Simmons, 13


Liverpool Street, Foreman.
No. 3. Harrison Avenue. James F. Marston, 34 Shawmut
Avenue, Foreman.

No. 4.

Eustis Street, South District.

Adams Street, Foreman.

William Farry, 31

HORSE HOSE COMPANIES.

Hose No. 1. Salem Street.

Benj. C. Brownell, Foreman.

Hudson Street. Thomas Merritt,


Fruit Street. Geo. W. Clark,

Northampton Street.

44

44

Geo. L. Pike,

76

MUNICIPAL

Hose No. 5.

REGISTER.

Shawmut Avenue.

Wm. Lovell, Foreman.

44

6. Meridian Street. Joseph Barnes,

s:

7.

Cabot Street, So. Dis. Thos. A. Scott,

8.
9.

Warren Street. Charles H. Prince,


B St. S. Boston. Thomas C. Byrnes,

10. Washington Village. Joseph Frye,

There are attached to the Department 14 enginemen of


Steam Engines, at $3.00 per day; 14 firemen, at $80 per
month; 28 drivers of apparatus, at $75 per month; 262
officers, axe and rakemen, hosemen, members, etc., at $200 per
annum; 28 foremen, at $2.25 per annum.

FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH.

[Ord. p. 225.]

Office, City Hall.


Superintendent, John F. Kennard. Salary, $2,000 per annum.
[Chosen by concurrent vote.] He has also the care and
charge of all the public Bells and Clocks.
Operators, Charles A. Stearns, James N. George, Cyrus A.
George, Granville S. Mendell, $4 per day.
Repairers, George S. Thom, Adam McAfee, Uzziel Putnam, $4
per day. Charles M. Chaplin, General Assistant, $2 per day.
A constant watch is kept at the office, City Hall, night and
day, by the operators. Each operator serves two alternate

terms, of three hours each, as principal, and the same as assist


ant operator; so that twelve hours' service at the office, out

of every twenty-four, is required from each operator. No


operator is permitted to sleep during his watch, unless expressly
, relieved by some one else, and by consent of the Superintendent.
Each operator is accountable to the Superintendent for
any mistakes that may occur at the office during his hours of
duty.

FIRE

DEPARTMENT.

77

An accurate account is kept of the time of giving each alarm,


and of the station from which it originates, and all other neces
sary information.
Alarms are transmitted to the Central Office, from the Signal

Stations or Boxes, by turning a crank in the Box. The police


officers, and one other person resident near each station, have
keys to the Boxes.

The ringing of the bells and the tapping of the Boxes, each
denotes the number of the Station from which the alarm origin

ated: thus, one blow, a pause, three blows, another pause,


and two blows (132) indicates that the alarm came from
Box. No. 132.

Alarms are usually given in less than a minute from the time
the crank is turned in any Box.

DIRECTIONS TO THOSE WHO HOLD SIGNAL KEYS.

1.
Box.

2.

If a fire is discovered in your vicinity, go to the nearest


-

Turn the crank twenty-five times, slowly and steadily.

Wait at the Box, and direct the firemen to the fire.

3. If you hear no reply at the Box, or on the bells, turn


again. If still no reply, go to another Box.
4. The Police, upon hearing the bells, will spring their rat
tles and call the number of the station.

CAUTIONS.

1. Be sure your Box is locked before leaving it.

2. Never open the Box, except in cases of fire.


3. Never let the key go out of your possession, unless called
for by the Superintendent.
There are 73 Signal Stations distributed and located in ac

cordance with the following plan:

78

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

LIST OF NUMBERS AND LOCALITIES OF THE BOXES.

. Corner Charter Street and Phipps Place.


. Corner Hull and Snowhill Streets.

. Causeway Street (Boston and Maine Freight Depot).


. Corner Causeway and Lowell Streets.
. Corner Leverett and Vernon Streets.

. Corner Poplar and Spring Streets.


. Merrimac House, Merrimac Street.
. Constitution Wharf.

. Corner Cooper and Endicott Streets.


. Corner Hanover and Richmond Streets.
. Corner Commercial Street and Eastern Avenue.
. Corner of Commercial and Richmond Streets.
. East end of Faneuil Hall.
. Corner Hanover and Marshall Streets.

. Brattle Square Church.


. Haymarket Square (Boston and Maine Depot).
. Corner Sudbury and Hawkins Streets.
. Corner Cambridge and Bowdoin Streets.

. North Russell Street (Church).


. Fruit Street (Hose House No. 3).
. Corner Cambridge and West Cedar Streets.

. River Street (Steamer House No. 10).


. Corner Beacon and Spruce Streets.
. Corner Beacon and Beaver Streets.

. Corner Pinckney and Anderson Streets.


. Corner Hancock and Myrtle Streets.
. Beacon Street, opposite Somerset.

. Court Square (Police Station No. 2).


. Corner India Street and Central Wharf.

. Corner Washington and Milk Streets.


. Corner Winter Street and Central Place.

. Corner Washington and Bedford Streets.

FIRE

DEPARTMENT.

. Federal Street, opposite Channing.


. Corner Milk and Oliver Streets.
. Corner Broad Street and Rowe's Wharf.

. Purchase Street (Steamer House No. 7).


. Corner Bedford and Lincoln Streets.

. Corner Washington and Boylston Streets.


. Corner Beach and Hudson Streets.

.
.
.
.
.
.

Corner Kneeland and South Streets (O. C. Depot).


Hudson Street (Hose House No. 2).
Warren Street (Hose House No. 8).
Pleasant Street (Providence Depot).
Berkeley Street near Commonwealth Avenue.
Indiana Place (Church).

. Corner Harrison Avenue and Seneca Street.

. Corner Washington and Common Streets.


. Corner Harrison Avenue and Wareham Street.

. Corner Tremont and Berkeley Streets.


. Washington Street (Steamer House No. 3).
. Corner Shawmut Avenue and Waltham Street.

. Dedham Street (Police Station No. 5).


. Shawmut Avenue (Hose House No 5).
. Corner Tremont and Rutland Streets.

. Corner Washington and Northampton Streets.


. Corner Tremont and Camden Streets.

. Post Office (Roxbury).


SOUTH BOSTON.

121. Corner A and First Streets.


123.
124.

Corner Broadway and Federal Street.


Broadway, near C. Street (Police Station No. 6).

125.

Norway Iron Works, Federal Street.

126. Corner Second and E. Streets.


127.

Corner Goddard and E Streets.

79

80
128.

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Washington Willage (Hose House No. 10).

129. Corner Sixth and B Streets.


131.

Corner G. and Eighth Streets.

132.

Broadway (Steamer House No. 1).


Corner Fifth and I Streets (in J. B. Stearns' house).
Corner Eighth and K Streets.

134.
135.

136. Corner First and K Streets.

137.

Fourth St. between K and L (Steamer House No. 2).

138.

House of Correction (Gate).


Corner P and Fourth Streets.

145.

EAST BOSTON.

152. Corner Sumner and Lamson Streets.


153. Corner Webster and Orleans Streets.
154. Corner Maverick and Meridian Streets.
156. Corner Sumner and Border Streets.
157. Corner Border and Maverick Streets.
162.

Corner Bennington Street and Central Square.

163. Corner Chelsea and Marion Streets.


165. Corner Marion and Trenton Streets.
174.
175.

Corner Brooks and Saratoga Streets.


Corner Chelsea and Saratoga Streets.

THE MERIDIAN BELLS. Forty-five bells, at their various


locations on churches and school-houses, and in engine-houses

and police stations, are struck from the Fire-alarm Office


precisely at noon every day. Care is taken to secure the utmost
accuracy in the time, for which purpose a chronometer is used,

and compared with the time of Cambridge Observatory as often


as necessary.

HARBOR.

81

HARBOR DEPARTMENT.
John T. Gardner, Harbor Master, Office Eastern Depot Wharf.

Salary, $1,500. [Chosen by concurrent vote annually, if


expedient. Ordinances, p. 273.] Franklin Winchester,
Assistant, to take charge of the Roxbury Canal.
UNITED STATES HARBOR COMMISSION.

At the suggestion of His Honor, Frederic W. Lincoln, Jr.,


Mayor of the City, in 1859, the City Council ordered a scientific
survey of Boston Harbor to be made; and, in accordance with
the unanimous vote of the City Council, Gen. Joseph G. Totten,
of the U. S. Corps of Engineers, Prof. A. D. Bache, t of the
U. S. Coast Survey, and Commander Charles H. Davis, of the
U.S. Navy, were specially detailed by the U. S. Government
as a Commission to make the proposed survey of said harbor.
The results of these surveys will be found in City Doc. 97, for
1860; City Doc. 12, for 1861; City Doc. 62, for 1862; City
Doc. 35, for 1863; City Doc. 33, for 1864; City Doc. 28, for
1865; and City Doc. 50, for 1866.
STATE HARBOR COMMISSION.

By statutes of 1866, ch. 149, the Governor was authorized to


appoint before the first day of July, 1866, five competent per
sons, to hold their offices for terms of one, two, three, four and

five years respectively, from July 1, 1866, to have the general


care and supervision of all the harbors, tide-waters and flats in
the Commonwealth, (except the Back Bay lands), and to
prescribe Harbor lines, etc. This Commission was duly ap
pointed, and consists of the following persons:
*Upon the decease of Gen. Totten, in 1864, Gen. Richard Delafield of
the U. S. Corps of Engineers, was selected in his place.
+ Died in 1867.
11

82

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

F. W. Lincoln, Jr., of Boston, for five years.


Josiah Quincy, of Boston, Chairman, four years.
Samuel E. Sewall, Melrose, three years.
William Mixter, Hardwick, two years.
Darwin E. Ware, Marblehead, one year.
J. C. Delano, of New Bedford, for two years.
Office, City Hall, School Street.

HEALTH.
EXTERNAL DEPARTMENT.

The Quarantine Grounds comprise those portions of Boston


Harbor lying between Deer Island and Gallop's Island; and
hospitals are located on both islands.

Samuel H. Durgin, Port Physician, resident at Deer Island.


Salary, $400. [Chosen by concurrent vote. City Ordi
nances, p. 315.] Edmund H. Stevens, Assistant, resident at
Gallop's Island. Nominated by Port Physician, and approved
by Board of Aldermen.
INTERNAL DEPARTMENT.

Ezra Forristall, Superintendent of Health.

Salary, $2,500.

[Chosen by concurrent vote.]


Daniel B. Curtis, Assistant Supt. Salary, $2,000. [Appointed
by Superintendent, and confirmed by the Board of Aldermen.
Ord. p. 307.]
William Read, City Physician. Salary, $2,000. [Chosen by
concurrent vote.

City Ordinances, p. 313.]

John Jeffries, Winslow Lewis, Henry G. Clark, Charles E. Buck


ingham, D. Humphreys Storer, Consulting Physicians. [Chosen
by concurrent vote. City Ordinances, p. 261.]
Nicholas A. Apollonio, City Registrar. Salary, $2,200, and
$1,500 for clerk hire.

City Council.

[Chosen by concurrent vote of the

City ordinances, p. 624.]

83

HEALTH.

The City Registrar has the superintendence of the burial


grounds and funerals. He records the births, deaths, and
marriages, and grants certificates of all intentions of mar
riage.

Henry Faxon, Inspector of Milk. Salary, $1,200. [Appointed,


and salary fixed, by Mayor and Aldermen. City Ordinances,
p.409.]
MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY.

[Ord. p. 412.]

This Cemetery, containing 84% acres, and situated in the


towns of West Roxbury and Dorchester, was purchased by the
city from the original proprietors, in 1857, for the sum of $35,
000; and is under the care and control of the following Board
of Trustees: [Dec. 30, 1864.]
Alderman.

Common Council.

Edward A. White, Chairman.

Henry W. Wilson.
William G. Harris.

At large.
Joseph P. Paine (1 year).

Solomon B. Stebbins (2 years).

The City Registrar is Clerk of this Board, ex officio. Super


intendent of the Cemetery, Samuel A. B. Bragg. Residence at
the Cemetery.

The price of lots and graves has been fixed as follows:


Full-sized lots
Half lots

Single graves in Cypress Vale

$125
75

An application to the Superintendent, Mr. Samuel A. B. Bragg,


(post-office address, Mattapan), will insure a prompt attention
to, and proper care of individual lots, at an annual charge of
five dollars.

84

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

UNDERTAKERS.

[Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen, City Ordinances,


p. 310.]
190 Federal Street.
Caleb I. Pratt
Franklin Smith

251 Tremont Street.

Richard Dillon

15 Oliver Place.

John Peak

72 Green Street.

Constant T. Benson

82 Prince Street.

William Cooley

26 Elliot Street.

Lewis Jones

122 Court Street.

David Marden

365 Hanover Street.

John W. Pierce .

190 Federal Street.

Nahum P. Whitney
David Gugenheimer
Job T. Cole
William H. Brown

Benjamin F. Smith
Hiram Stearns

48 Poplar Street.
99 Warren Street.

111 Broadway.

11 Bennington Street.
251 Tremont Street.
3 Newburn Place.

Owen Faxon .

57 Dover Street.

Philip E. Field

93B Street.

John H. Peak

146 Friend Street.

Daniel O'Sullivan .

84 Havre Street.

William E. Brown .

11 Bennington Street.

James Haynes

2 Providence Street.

Jeremiah Tinkman .

20 Howard Street.

Robert S. G. Marden

365 Hanover Street.

James Cotter

91 South Street.

Daniel Ellard

180 Federal Street.

Hugh Taylor .

44 Temple Street.

Louis Adam

36 Oneida Street.

Wm. D. Rockwood .
Dennis Sullivan

Philip Kennedy

George W. Field .

157 Broadway.
87 Brighton Street.
5 Rochester Street.

PUBLIC

John C. Seaver .

John Heintz

PUBLIC

134 Washington Street,

3 Davis Street,
138 Tremont Street,
17 Washington Place,

John Haynes .
Martin Lynch .

Winslow Street, Roxbury.

Joseph S. Waterman .

William Manning

85

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.

{{

44

44

Northampton Street.

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.
[Ord. p. 369.]

The House of Industry and the Houses of Reformation, at


Deer Island, for Boys and Girls; the House of Correction for
the County of Suffolk; and the Boston Lunatic Hospital, at
South Boston, and the Almshouse, in Roxbury, are under the
care and government of a Board of Twelve Directors, one-half of
whom are chosen annually, by concurrent vote of the City
Council, in January or February.
This Board is composed of the following persons, and is en
titled
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS.
Alderman.

Edward A. White.

Common Council.
Lewis Rice.

Wm. M. Flanders.

For one year.


Moses Kimball, President.
Sylvanus A. Denio.

Increase E. Noyes.

For two years.


J. Putnam Bradlee.

Francis C. Manning.
Henry A. Drake.

For three years.


George W. Parmenter.
Patrick Donahoe.
Nathl. McKay.

William Willett, Clerk of Directors. William H. Hodgkins


and Charles M. Hanson. Office Clerks.

86

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

The steamer Henry Morrison, which is under the direction

of this Board, runs daily from the city to Deer Island; Elisha
Baker, Captain, who is appointed by the Board.
dock is at the Eastern Depot Wharf.

The steamer's

HOUSE OF INDUSTRY.

Thomas E. Payson, Superintendent; Salary, $1,200, and board


in the house. Samuel H. Durgin, Resident Physician; Salary,
$600, and board in the house. [Appointed by Directors, in
month of April or May.]
H. P. Peirce, Assistant Superintendent. [Appointed by the Supt.]
There is paid to the Board by the Trustees of the Mason Fund,
toward the support of a Chaplain, $470.
HOUSE OF REFORMATION.

Thomas E. Payson, Superintendent; Salary, $300 per annum.


[Appointed by Directors, in month of April or May.] This
Institution is for the employment and reformation of Juvenile
Offenders, both male and female.
HOUSE OF CORRECTION AT SOUTH BOSTON.

Charles Robbins, Master; Salary, $1,500, and board in house.


[Chosen by Directors, in April or May. Ordinances, p. 347.]
Deputy-Master, Guy C. Underwood; Salary, $1,400, and board
in house.

Clerk to Master, E. M. Stanford; Salary, $600, and board in


house.

Chaplain, Rev. Joseph H. Clinch; Salary, $1,300.


There are also 9 male Assistants, Salary from $300 to $800

each, and board; and 6 female Assistants, Salary from $250


to $350, and board.

[The Deputy-Master and other officers are appointed by the


Master.]

PUBLIC

CHARITABLE

INSTITUTIONS.

87

BOSTON LUNATIC HOSPITAL.

Clement A. Walker, M. D., Superintendent and also Physician


to the above Institution and House of Correction.

$1,800, and board in the house.

Salary,

[Chosen by the Directors,

in the month of February.]


Theo. W. Fisher, M. D., Assistant

Superintendent. Salary,
$1,000, and board in the house. [Appointed by Superintend
ent.]

Rev. Joseph H. Clinch, Chaplain.

[Appointed by the Board.]

There are also attached to this Institution one male and one

female Supervisor, nine male attendants, and nine female


attendants.
CITY HOSPITAL.

THE CITY HOSPITAL is situated on Harrison Avenue, between

Springfield and Concord Streets, and was commenced in 1851;

and consists of two pavilions connected with a central structure.


This Hospital is intended for the use and comfort of poor
patients, to whom medical care will be provided at the expense
of the city; and it is also intended to provide accommodations

and medical treatment to others who do not wish to be regarded


as dependent on public charity.
The Hospital was suggested many years ago by Elisha Good
now, who, by his will, dated July 12, 1849, gave property to
the city, valued at $25,000, for establishment of a Free City
Hospital in Wards Eleven or Twelve.
Another benefactor to the Hospital was the late Lawrence

Nichols, who bequeathed to the city, for the use of the City
Hospital, the sum of $1000.
Applications for admission of patients must be made at the
Hospital on each day of the week, Sundays excepted, between
9 and 11 o'clock, A. M.

Whenever able, the patient should apply in person. When


not able to appear in person, application may be made by a

88

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

friend, and the patient will be visited by one of the resident


graduates, or by some physician designated by the Trustees.
Persons accidentally wounded, or otherwise disabled or in

jured, shall be received at all hours.


On each day of the week, Sundays, excepted, from 2 to 3
o'clock, P. M., friends may be permitted to visit patients; though
no patient shall receive more than one visitor on the same
day.

No visitor shall be allowed to give any article of food or


drink to a patient, unless by permission of the nurse; and
any article sent to the patients shall be left with the Superin
tendent.

TRUSTEES.

[Elected by concurrent vote, in January.


Alderman.

Ord. Dec. 15, 1866.]


Councilmen.

Newton Talbot.

Samuel T. Snow.
Samuel Rice.

For one year.

For two years.

Theodore Metcalf.

Nathaniel C. Nash.

Jonas Ball.

Joel Richards.

For three years.


John T. Bradlee, President.

James Guild.

Superintendent, Lucius A. Cutler; residence and office in the


Hospital. Salary, $1,800, and board at the Hospital. [Chosen
by Trustees.]

Consulting Physicians and Surgeons.


S. D. Townsend, M. D.
Edward Reynolds, M. D.
Winslow Lewis, M. D.

John Jeffries, M. D.
Silas Durkee, M. D.

John Homans, M. D.

PUBLIC CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.

89

Visiting Physicians.
Wm. W. Moreland, M. D.
J. N. Borland, M. D.
Fitch Ed. Oliver, M. D.
J. G. Blake, M. D.
J. Baxter Upham, M. D.
John P. Reynolds, M. D.
Visiting Surgeons.
C. E. Buckingham, M. D.
David W. Cheever, M. D.
D. McB. Thaxter, M. D.
W. H. Thorndike, M. D.
Charles D. Homans, M. D.
George Derby, M. D.
Admitting Physician, H. F. Damon, M.D.
Ophthalmic Surgeon, Henry W. Williams, M. D.
Pathologist, Charles W. Swan, M. D.
House Physicians.
R. H. Fitz,

W. E. Boardman.

House Surgeons.
|
G. F. Jelly.

George Gay,

L. D. Gunter.

Ophthalmic Externe, M. F. Gavin.

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR.

[Statute 1864, Chapter 128.]

[One-third of the Board is chosen annually by the City Council.]


For one year.
James L. Little,

Martin Griffin,

Francis E. Parker,

Thomas Blasland.

For two years.


F. W. Lincoln, Jr., Chairman,
Joseph Buckley,
Loring Lothrop,
Charles R. McLean.
12

90

MUNICIPAL REGISTER,

For three years.


Thomas C. Amory,
Joseph T. Bailey,
George S. Hale,
Ira Allen.
John Pratt, Secretary.
-

Otis Norcross, Treasurer.

The Board meet on the first Monday of every month at their


office, City Hall.
The Overseers of the Poor are likewise incorporated as a
Board of Trustees of John Boylston's and other charitable funds,
left for the assistance of persons of good character and advanced
age, who have been reduced by misfortune to indigence and
want.

The meetings of the Board of Trustees are held in April


and October.

LAMPS.

George H. Allen, Superintendent of Lamps. Salary, $2,000


per annum, and the use of a horse and vehicle. [Appointed by
the Mayor and Aldermen. City Ordinances, p. 360.]
Number of Gas Lamps in the City proper,
2,948
44

44

4s

&

East Boston,

350

South Boston,

439

Roxbury District,

567

44

Total,

4,304

An increase of 736 lamps during the year 1867, including those


located in the Roxbury district. There are in the City proper,
East Boston, South Boston, and Washington Willage, 1270
Fluid lamps, being a decrease of 136 during the year. The
number of fluid lamps located in the Roxbury district is 73,
making a total at present of 1343.

PUBLIC LANDS.

91

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.
[Ord. p. 478.]

The Public Buildings of the city and county comprise the


City Hall, the Registry of Deeds, the Court house, Faneuil Hall
and Faneuil Hall Market House, the New Stone Jail and Dead
House, the Institutions at South Boston and Deer Island, the

Old State House, the Public Library, the City Hospital, the City
Building (so called), all the Grammar and Primary School
houses, and all the Engine, Hydrant, and Hook and Ladder
Houses in the city, including Roxbury, besides other buildings
used for public purposes.
James C. Tucker, Superintendent of Public Buildings. Residence,
4 Seaver Place. Salary, $2,200. [Chosen by concurrent
vote. Ord. p. 478.]
Henry Taylor, Superintendent of Faneuil Hall. Salary, $500.
[Appointed by Mayor and Aldermen. Ord. p. 163.]

PUBLIC LANDS.
[Ord. May 3, 1864.]

Robert W. Hall, Superintendent of Public Lands.


$1,800.

Salary,

[Chosen by concurrent vote.]

The Superintendent has the care and custody of all the Public
Lands belonging to the city, except the common, the lands
west of Charles Street, Deer Island, the lands connected with
the Public Institutions at South Boston, or any other lands
held for specific purposes.
Lyman Davenport Superintendent of the Common, Malls, and
Public Squares. [Appointed by Mayor and Aldermen,
Order of Feb. 4, 1867.]

92

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

PUBLIC LIBRARY.

[Ord. July 11, 1865, and December 31, 1866.]


Instituted A. D. 1852.
TRUSTEES.

Common Council.

Alderman.
Jarvis D. Braman.

Albert J. Wright.
James M. Keith.

For two years.

For one year.


John P. Bigelow.

Edwin P. Whipple.

W. W. Greenough, President,

Samuel A. Green.

For three years.


George Putnam.

Superintendent. Justin Winsor.

Weston Lewis.

Salary, $3,000.

Assistant

Superintendent.Wm. E. Jillson. Salary, $2,500. Librarian.


Edward Capen.

Salary, 2,200.

[Elected by Trustees.]

Although the need of a public library had been for a consider


able time felt and acknowledged, and a small number of volumes

of a miscellaneous character had been sent to the City Hall with


a view to the future formation of such an institution, nothing
definite in relation thereto was done until the fifth of August

1850, when HoN. JoHN P. BIGELow, then Mayor of the city, con
tributed the sum of one thousand dollars for the purpose of
establishing the Public Library. This donation, being the first
money that was given for the object, was received joyfully and
funded by the City Council; and the Committee on the Library
were directed to proceed with as little delay as possible to
cary into effect the establishment of a free Public Library.
JoSHUA BATES, ESQ., of London, whose early life was passed
in Boston, having offered to this city the munificent sum of fifty
thousand dollars towards the purchase of books for the Public

PUBLIC

LIBRARY.

93

Library of the city, if the city would erect a suitable building


for that purpose, on the 24th of February, 1853, an order
was passed by the City Council, authorizing the Committee on
the Library, in conference with the Board of Trustees, to pur
chase a suitable site for the erection of a building which should

be fully adapted for the purpose of the Library, including Mr.


Bates's donation. Accordingly, said Committee purchased
23,380 feet of land on Boylston Street, opposite the Common,
upon which an elegant and commodious edifice has been erected,
at a cost to the city, for land and building, amounting to about
$365,000.

This building was finished and delivered into the custody of


the City Council, and by the City Council was transmitted to
the care of the Trustees of the Public Library, with appropriate
ceremonies, on January 1, 1858.
Besides the above mentioned donations in money, the sum of
ten thousand dollars was subsequently given by HON, JONATHAN
PHILLIPs, who, by his will, bequeathed an additional sum of
twenty thousand dollars for the maintenance of the Library.
Another sum of ten thousand dollars was bequeathed by the
late HoN. ABBOTT LAWRENCE.

All of these sums have been

funded by the City Council, and the annual proceeds are


expended for the purchase of books of permanent value.
The sum of one thousand dollars was given by the late SAMUEL
APPLETON, ESQ., and the same amount by MRS. SALLY I. K.

SHEPARD, for the purpose of procuring books for the immediate


use of the public.

Very valuable donations of books have also been made by the


late REV. THEODORE PARKER, the heirs of HON. NATHANIEL
BowDITCH, GEORGETICKNOR, and others.

The Library is open every day, with the exception of Sun


days and the legal holidays, for the delivery of books for home
use, from 10, A. M., to 8 o'clock, P. M.; and the Reading Rooms
connected therewith are opened from 6, A. M., to 10 o'clock,

94

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

P. M.; both which privileges are enjoyed freely by all of suitable


ages who agree to conform to the regulations of the Public
Library.

MARKET.
[Ord. p. 168 and May 18, 1866.]

Charles B. Rice, Superintendent of Faneuil Hall Market. Salary

$2,000. [Appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen.]


Amos Dodge, Deputy Superintendent. Salary $1,200 per annum.
[Nominated by the Superintendent and approved by the
Mayor.]
Charles O. Fox, Weigher. Salary $35 per month.
ORDINANCE.

SECTION 1.

The limits of Faneuil Hall Market shall include

the lower floor, porches, and cellars of the building called Fan
euil Hall Market, the basement story and cellars under Faneuil
Hall, and the following described portions of the adjacent

streets, viz: so much of Commercial Street as lies westerly


of the sidewalk on the easterly side thereof, and between the
outer lines of the sidewalks on the northerly side of North
Market Street and the southerly side of South Market Street ex
tended eastwardly; all of North and South Market Streets except
the northerly sidewalk of the former, and the southerly sidewalk
of the latter; all that portion of Merchants Row included be
tween the outer lines of the aforesaid northerly and southerly
sidewalks extended westwardly across said Merchants Row and

all of Faneuil Hall Square, except the sidewalks on the northerly,


southerly, and westerly sides thereof, the above described
limits being delineated on a plan made by N. Henry Crafts, City
Engineer, dated March twelfth, eighteen hundred and sixty-six.
*An Ordinance to amend an Ordinance in relation to Faneuil Hall Mar

ket, passed May 18, 1866.

Published in Journal and Traveller, June 6, 1866.

POLICE

SECT. 2.

DEPARTMENT.

95

Section four of the Ordinance in relation to Faneuil

Hall Market, passed June third, eighteen hundred and fifty-nine,


is hereby repealed.

POLICE DEPARTMENT.
[Ord. p. 468.]

This department is under the immediate direction of the


Mayor, by whom its officers and members are nominated, and

appointed, subject to the approval of the Board of Aldermen.


It is employed in the detection of criminals, and has the super
intendence of places of public amusement, carriages, wagons,
trucks, pawnbrokers, junk-shops, intelligence offices, etc.
Under the present organization, the Police are divided into
day and night police; the night police performing the duties
formerly devolving on watchmen.
John Kurtz, Chief of Police. Salary, $2,500. Edward H.
Savage, Deputy. Salary, $1,800.
George W. Holmes, Clerk of Police. Salary, $1,200.

George H. Mears, Assistant Clerk.


Rufus C. Marsh, Superintendent of Coaches, Carriages, etc.
Timothy R. Page, Superintendent of Trucks, Wagons, etc.
Ebenezer Shute, Superintendent of Pawn Brokers, etc.
The pay of the Captains of Police is $4.00 per day. Lieuten
ants, $3.50 per day; of Sergeants, $3.25 per day; of Detect
ives, $3.50; of Members of the Department, $3.00 per day.
There are eight Police Stations, the locations and officers of
which are as follows:
STATION No. 1.

Old Hancock School-house, Hanover Street.

Henry J. W. Myers, Captain.


Nathaniel Emerson, Alfred H. Porter, Lieutenants.

96

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

STATION No. 2.

Court Square.
(Vacancy.)
Paul J. Winal. Joseph M. Coombs, Lieutenants.
STATION NO. 3.

Joy Street.
Asa Morrill, Captain.
Moses Briggs, Isaac Hines, Lieutenants.
STATION No. 4.

La Grange Street.
Samuel G. Adams, Captain.
Augustus Clark, Daniel W. Childs, Lieutenants.
STATION No. 5.
East Dedham Street.

Cyrus Small, Captain.


Lyford W. Graves, William Chadbourne, Lieutenants.
STATION No. 6.

Broadway, South Boston.


Henry T. Dyer, Captain.
George N. Morse, Mark Fernald, Lieutenants.
STATION No. 7.

Paris Street,

above Materick Square.

Romanzo H. Wilkins, Captain.


James Adams, Edwin J. Osgood, Lieutenants.
STATION NO. 8.

(Harbor Police), cor. Commercial and Salutation Sts.


William E. Hough, Captain.
Edwin R. Smyth, Elijah H. Goodwin, Lieutenants.

CONSTABLES.

97

CONSTABLES.

[Ord. p. 115.]

Appointed and Qualified.


Francis M. Adams,
Wm. C. Allen,
Arthur F. Anderson,
fRhineas Bates,
Morrill P. Berry,
William W. Blake,
Samuel Brackett,
*Francis W. Bulfinch,
|Asa O. Butman,

Derastus Clapp,
Lemuel Clark,

Joseph D. Coburn,
tChase Cole,

|Daniel B. Curtis,
James Curtis,

Elisha M. Davis,
Albert G. Dawes,
Albion P. Dearborn,
David M. R. Dow,
Alvin S. Drew,

William E. Easterbrook,
Caleb S. Emery,
+Geo. M. Felch,
*Richard J. Fennelly,
|Thomas Folger,
*Eben F. Gay,
William T. Gibbons,

Thomas Hall,

John C. Harrington,

George M. Atwood,
Zaccheus Holmes,
Merrill S. Holway,

*Alexander Hopkins,
|Samuel N. Howe,
John Huston,
Frederick P. Ingalls,

|Pliny D. Ladd,
John T. Lawton,
Thomas J. Loud,
William McCarthy,
William D. Martin,
+Edward F. Mecuen,
tSamuel McIntosh,
Chas. J. Merrill,
Jotham E. Monroe,
William Monroe,
John B. Neale,
*Isaac F. Nelson,

James O'Leary,
David Patterson,

Ephraim S. Phelps,
*Joseph Pierce,
*Augustus M. Rice,
Edwin Rice,

tEdward G. Richardson,
John W. Rose,

* Treasurer's Deputy Collectors.


# Truant Officers.
| Health Department.
13

98

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

Burnham Royce,
Charles Smith,
Thomas M. Smith,
Asa Southworth,
James E. Spear,
Oliver H. Spurr,
Henry C. Stratton,
Henry Taylor,
Geo. W. Tuckerman,
tCharles E. Turner,
Wm. G. Tyler,

Samuel S. Vialle,
John C. Warren,
Johnson Warren,
|James B. Weeks,
William Whitwell,
John Williams,

Wright W. Williams,
John Wilson,
*Thomas P. Wilson,
|Isaac Worsley.

The following Constables attend the Ward Meetings of the


citizens on Election Days.
Ward.

Ward.

1 William Munroe.
2Alvan S. Drew.

9 D. M. R. Dow.
10 Wm. E. Easterbrook.

3 John Huston.

11 Wm. G. Tyler.

4-Jotham E. Munroe.

12 John T. Lawton.

5 John Williams.

13 Samuel McIntsoh.

6 William Whitwell,

14Morrill P. Berry.

7 Lemuel Clark.

15 Edward F. Mecuen.

8 Charles Smith.

PRINTING AND ADWERTISING.

Messrs. Alfred Mudge & Son, 34 School Street. City Printers.


Work done by contract. [City Ordinances, p. 473.]
The newspapers in which the City Ordinances, Advertisements,
etc., are published, comprise all the daily papers except the Herald.
[Selected by the City Council, usually in the month of April.]
* Treasurer's Deputy Collectors.
# Truant Officer.

| Health Department.

SEWERS. - SOLICITOR. - STREETS. - WATER.

99

SEWERS.
[Ord. p.658.]

William H. Bradley, Superintendent of Common Sewers. Salary,


$2,200.

[Chosen by concurrent vote.]

SOLICITOR.
[Ord. April 11, 1868.]

John P. Healy, City Solicitor.

Office 2 Pemberton Square.

Salary, $5,000. "[Chosen by concurrent vote.]


Assistant Solicitors, Clement H. Hill, Salary, $2,500. Charles
. . [Nominated by Mayor and
F. Kittredge, Salary, $
confirmed by Committee on Ordinances.]
Fisher Ames, Clerk. Salary $1,000. [Appdinted by City Soli
citor.]
STREETS.

Charles Harris, Superintendent of Streets. Salary, $3,000.


[Chosen by concurrent vote. City Ordinances, p. 707.]
The Board of Aldermen are Surveyors of Highways. [Charter
$41.]

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. Salary, $2,800.


concurrent vote.

[Chosen by

Ord. Dec. 8, 1866.]

Thomas W. Davis, City Surveyor. Salary, $2,500.


concurrent vote. Ord. Dec. 8, 1866.]

[Chosen by

WATER DEPARTMENT.
COCHITUATE WATER BOARD.

[Chosen by concurrent vote.


Alderman.

Benjamin James.

Ord. p. 794.]
Common Council.

Benj. F. Stevens.
Charles R. Train.

100

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

For one year.


Nathaniel J. Bradlee, Pres.

For two years.


Joseph M. Wightman,

Alexander Wadsworth.

George Lewis.

Samuel N. Dyer, Clerk.

Ezekiel R. Jones, Superintendent Eastern Division of Water


Works, 221 Federal Street, Boston.
Albert Stanwood, Superintendent Western Division of Water
Works, Natick, Mass. [Appointed by Cochituate Water
Board.]
William F. Davis, Water Rgistrar. Salary, $2,500. Office
City Hall. Water rates are payable at this office.
-

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Sealers, John D. Cadogan, Wm. F. Reed. Salaries, $1,500 each


per annum. Daniel Hunt, Assistant. Salary, $600 per
annum. Office City Hall, Court Square. [The Sealers are
appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen in March or April,
and the Assistants are appointed by the Sealers, subject to
the approval of Board of Aldermen. Ord. pp. 817, 818.]

The following City Officers are paid by FEE, and are annually
appointed by the City Council. [Ord. pp, 330, 346.]
Inspector of Lime.Andrew Abbot.
Fence Viewers. Joshua B. Emerson, Wm. T. Hight, Moses
Gragg and John Dove. (Elected by ballot.)
Culler of Hoops and Staves. Lewis Beck, Benj. Abbot.
Field Drivers and Pound Keepers. Gilbert J. Gallup, Maurice
B. Rowe, Charles A Snell, William D. Cook, William E. Hicks,

S. E. Partridge, James Ball, Arthur F. Anderson, Henry


Morse, Thomas M. Cotton, Samuel McIntosh, Edward F.
Mecuen, E. B. Rumrill, E. T. Hitchcock, Matthew R. Clark,

COUNTY OFFICERS.

101

James Culligan, E. M. Davis, Luke Vila, C. D. Bickford,


Isaac M. Mellen, Hawley Folsom, J. M. Swett.
Weighers, and Inspectors of Lighters and other Vessels. Edward
Hatch, Inspector in Chief, William F. Clark, John Kenny,
Peter Conroy. [Elected in March or April. Ordinances,
p. 48.]
The following are appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen:
Surveyor of Marble, Freestone, and Soapstone. Thomas J.
Bayley.
Weighers of Hay, &c.North Scales. Josiah Livermore.
-

South Scales. Maurice B. Rowe.


John M. Johnson.

South Boston Scales.

East Boston Scales. John W. Kimball.

Highlands. Andrew W. Newman. [Ordinances, p. 237.]


Measurers of Upper Leather. William Bragdon, William Pow
ers, George W. Bragdon.

[Ordinances, p. 321]

Measurers of Wood and Bark. Timothy Abbott, B. G. Pres


cott, William Keith, Josiah Livermore, Joseph Allen. [Or
dinances, p. 825.]

Measurer of Grain. George P. Ray. [Statutes, April 26,


1855, May 21, 1855.]
Inspectors and Weighers of Bundle Hay. Israel M. Barnes,
Samuel B. Livermore, Henry Emerson, Jasper H. Eaton, Wil
liam R. Inman, E. G. Dudley, William S. Holmes, Walter C.
Bryant. [Ordinances, p. 235.]

COUNTY OFFICERS.
SUPERIOR COURT FOR CRIMINAL BUSINESS.

[Ord. p. 119.]

The duties of Judges of this Court are performed by the Justices

of the Superior Court, or some one of them. [Act 1859,


Chap. 196: Gen. Stat. chap. 114.]

102

MUNICIPAL REGISTER,

District Attorney George P. Sanger, Salary, $3,000. [Chosen


in 1865, for three years from the first Wednesday of January,
1866. Gen. Stat. chap. 10, 2.]

Francis H. Underwood, Clerk. Salary, $2,000, and one-half of


the excess of fees above that sum. [Elected by the people in
1866 for five years.

Gen. Stat. chap. 10, $3.]


SHERIFF.

John M. Clark, Sheriff and Jailor. Salary, $2,500. Elected


by the people in 1865, for three
10, 5.]

years.

[Gen. Stat. chap.

Deputy Sheriffs.
Benjamin F. Bayley,

George W. Loud,
Wm. D. Martin,

Harum Merrill.

John B. Dearborn,
CORONERS.

Duncan M. Thaxter,
Charles Smith,
Edwin Rice,
Jacob Herrick,
William Andrews,
David Thayer,
Edward B. Moore,

A. P. Richardson,

Jasper H. York,
J. S. H. Fogg,
Sewell F. Parcher,
W. E. Underwood,
Hamlett Bates, Chelsea,

Edward Floyd, Winthrop.


MUNICIPAL COURT.

[Statutes of 1866, chap. 279.]

John W. Bacon, Chief Justice. Mellen Chamberlain, Francis W.


Hurd, Associate Justices. Salaries, $3,000 each.
by the Governor.]

[Appointed

Terms of the Court.


FoR CIVIL BUSINESS.Every Saturday at 9 A.M., for trial of
civil causes not exceeding $300.

COUNTY OFFICERS.

Wm. T. Connolly, Clerk.

103

[Elected in November, 1866, for five

years..]

FoR CRIMINAL BUSINESS.Every day in the week, (Sundays,


legal holidays, and Saturday afternoons excepted,) at 9, A. M.,
and, 3, P. M., for the trial of criminal causes.

John C. Leighton, Clerk. Salary, $2,500. [Elected in Nov.


1866, for five years.]
Jacob Homer, First Assistant Clerk. Salary, $2,000.
Otis W. Waterman, Second Assistant Clerk. Salary, $1,800.
Charles A. Barnard, Third Assistant Clerk. Salary, $1,500
[Gen. Stat. chap. 116, 4.]

MUNICIPAL COURT, SOUTHERN DISTRICT, BOSTON.

Peter S. Wheelock, Justice. Salary, $1,500 per annum.


Ira Allen and Solomon A. Bolster, Special Justices.
Alfred Williams, Clerk. Salary, $500 per annum.
The Court sits for the transaction of criminal business every
week day except the legal holidays, commencing at nine
o'clock, A. M.

For the return and entry of civil actions every Saturday at ten
o'clock, A. M.

For the trial of civil actions every Tuesday, at two o'clock, P. M.

COURT OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY.

Office, Court Square.


Isaac Ames, Judge. Salary, $3,000.
William C. Brown, Register. Salary, $3,000.
Samuel L. Thorndike, Assistant Register. Salary, $1,500.
The Judge of Probate is appointed by the Executive. The
Register was elected by the people in 1863, for five years.
[Gen. Stat. chap. 10, 4.]

104

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

REGISTRY OF DEEDs, OFFICE COURT SQUARE.

James Rice, Register of Deeds. Elected by the people in 1864,


for three years. [Gen. Stat. chap. 10, $9.]
COURT HOUSE.

The Court House for Suffolk County is located in Court Square.


William Easterbrook, Keeper. [Appointed by Committee on
Public Buildings on part of the Board of Aldermen, and

salary is determined by them. City Records, vol. 43, page


167.] Samuel Canning, Assistant Keeper.
Stephen Curtis, Alexander Wilson, Keepers of the Lockups under
the Court House. [Detailed for this duty from the Police
Department, by the Chief of Police.]

SCHO O L

C O M M ITT E E

F OR

1868,

NATHANIEL B. SHURTLEFF, MAYOR, Ex Officio.


CHARLES H. ALLEN, PRESIDENT OF THE COMMON COUNCIL, Ex Officio.
TERM ExPIRES JAN. 1870.

TERM ExPIRES JAN. 1871.

1. - Albert Huse.
Thomas C. Marsh.

Richard Beeching.
Warren H. Cudworth.

Henry S. Wasburn.
Washington B. Trull.

2. George F. Haskins.

George D. Ricker.
John F. Flynn.

John Ryan.

3. - Orin T. Walker.
Zachariah Jellison.

Samuel H. Winkley.
William A. Rust.

John F. Jarvis.
John A. Stevens.

4.- John A. Lamson.

S. Arthur Bent.
Ezra Palmer.

Edward D. G. Palmer.
Orrin S. Sanders.

Patrick A. O'Connell.

John P. Ordway.

TERM ExPIRES JAN, 1869.


WARDs.

Adino B. Hall.

Dexter S. King.
5. Thomas C. Amory.
Patrick Riley.

George W. Close.

George F. Bigelow.

William H. Page.

Henry Burroughs, Jr.


Loring Lothrop.

J. Baxter Upham.

7. William A. Blenkinsop.
William W. Doherty.

Alvan Simonds.
W. H. Westcott.

Christopher A. Connor.

8.- Samuel A. Green.

John P. Reynolds.
Henry C. Hunt.

Frank E. Bundy.

John Parkman.
Charles Hutchins.

J. Coffin Jones Brown.


Charles C. Shackford.

Alden Speare.

Charles L. Flint.

Samuel G. Bowdlear.
William T. Brigham.

11. Wm. H. Learnard, Jr.


Stephen G. Deblois.

Richard H. Stearns.
William B. Merrill.

Robert C. Waterston.
George H. Nichols.

12. - Choate Burnham.


Joseph B. Stearns.

Edwin Briggs.
Liberty D. Packard.

Francis H. Underwood.

13. - William H. Hutchinson.


James Morse.

James E.

Allen Putnam.

Joseph A. Tucker.
George W. Adams.

14. - Joseph H. Streeter.

John Kneeland.
Ira Allen.

Moody Merrill.
George H. Monroe.

Cyrus C. Emery.

George M. Hobbs.
George Morrill.

6. Samuel K. Lothrop.
Linus M. Child.

Henry W. Harrington.
9. - Charles W. Storey.
Samuel E. Floyd.
10. - Edmund T. Eastman.

Lyman Mason.

John O. Means.

15. Joseph N. Brewer.


Benjamin H. Greene.

Marsh.

Charles K. Dillaway.

Calvin G. Page.
Richard Walsh.

Henry P. Shattuck.

JoHN D. PHILBRICK, Superintendent of Public Schools,


762 Washington Street.
BARNARD CAPEN, Secretary of the School Committee,
310 Broadway, South Boston.
GEORGE A. SMITH, Auditing Clerk, 15 Pleasant Street.
Offices at the Rooms of the School Committee, City Hall.
14

ORGANIZATION
of The

BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE.

STANDING

COMMITTEES.

COMMITTEE ON ELECTIONS.

Linus M. Child, 27 Tremont Row.

Choate Burnham, 284 Broadway.


J. Coffin Jones Brown, 337 Tremont Street.

Henry W. Harrington, 3 Corey Avenue.


George W. Close, 21 Sheafe Street.
Richard Walsh, 86 South Street.

William H. Hutchinson, 70 Washington St. Roxbury.


COMMITTEE ON RULES AND REGULATIONS.

William H. Learnard, Jr., 10 Marshall Sreet.

George F. Haskins, 2 North Square.


Edward D. G. Palmer, 3 Montgomery Place.
George H. Nichols, 52 Chester Park.
Adino B. Hall, 89 Salem Street.

George M. Hobbs, 14 Edinboro Street, Roxbury.


(Vacancy.)
COMMITTEE ON SALARIES.

Edmund T. Eastman, 75 Shawmut Avenue.

Alden Speare, 15 East Brookline Street.


Calvin G. Page, 69 Myrtle Street.
J. Coffin Jones Brown, 337 Tremont Street.

Ira Allen, 61 Cabot Street, Roxbury.


Henry S. Washburn, 125 Webster Street.
(Vacancy.)

BOARD OF

SCHOOL COMMITTEE.

107

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS.

Alvan Simonds, 713 Federal Street.

Patrick Riley, 10 Lincoln Street.


Thomas C. Amory, 5 Joy Street.
William B. Merrill, 108 Water Street.
Christopher A. Connor, 349 Fourth Street.
George Morrill, Centre Street, cor. Centre Place, Roxbury.
William H. Learnard, Jr., 10 Marshall Street.
COMMITTEE ON TEXT-BOOKS.

S. K. Lothrop, 12 Chestnut Street.


Henry Burroughs, Jr., 82 Mt. Vernon Street.
John F. Jarvis, 22 Leverett Street.
John A. Lamson, 1 Staniford Street.

Charles Hutchins, 34 Clarendon Street.


Moody Merrill, 10 Pemberton Square.
Thomas C. Marsh, 47 Chelsea Street.
COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL-HOUSES.

Edwin Briggs, 67 Dorchester Street.


Zachariah Jellison, 18 Central Wharf.

Richard Beeching, 95 Princeton Street.


John A. Stevens, 15 Cambridge Street.
William H. Page, 48 Beach Street.
Samuel A. Green, 25 Kneeland Street.
COMMITTEE ON MUSIC.

J. Baxter Upham, 31 Chestnut Street.


John P. Ordway, 42 Bedford Street.
Francis H. Underwood, Fourth Street, between L and M
StreetS.

Robert C. Waterston, 71 Chester Square.


Warren H. Cudworth, 1 Meridian Street.

Benjamin H. Greene, 13 Porter Street, Roxbury.


Thomas C. Amory, 5 Joy Street.

108

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

COMMITTEE ON PRINTING.

Henry W. Harrington, 113 Washington Street.


Dexter S. King, 34 Bowdoin Street.
John Parkman, 8 Park Square.

Samuel G. Bowdlear, 22 Upton Street.


George W. Close, 21 Sheafe Street.
George F. Bigelow, 33 Essex Street.
Joseph A. Tucker, 13 Doane Street.

COMMITTEE ON WOCAL AND PHYSICAL CULTURE AND MILITARY DRILL.

Calvin G. Page, 69 Myrtle Street.


J. Baxter Upham, 31 Chestnut Street.
Samuel A. Green, 25 Kneeland Street.
Henry C. Hunt, 15 Ash Street.
Ezra Palmer, 1 Tremont Place.
Linus M. Child, 27 Tremont Row.

Cyrus C. Emery, 17 Clark Street, Roxbury.

LATIN AND HIGH SCHOOLS.

PUBLIC LATIN SCHOOL,

Bedford Street.
COMMITTEE.

Edward D. G. Palmer, Chairman, 3 Montgomery Place.


Edmund T. Eastman, Secretary, 75 Shawmut Avenue.
Henry S. Washburn, 125 Webster Street.
George F. Haskins, 2 North Square.
Samuel H. Winkley, 5 Chambers Street.
Thomas C. Amory, 5 Joy Street.
Calvin G. Page, 69 Myrtle Street.
William A. Blenkinsop, 35 Broadway.
Samuel A. Green, 25 Kneeland Street.
Charles C. Shackford, 59 Clarendon Street.

George H. Nichols, 52 Chester Park.


Francis H. Underwood, Fourth Street, between L and M streets.

Allen Putnam, 176 Eustis Street, Roxbury.


John O. Means, 31 Elm Street, Roxbury.
Charles K. Dillaway, Eliot Square, Roxbury.
TEACHERS.

Francis Gardner, Head Master.


William R. Dimmock, Master.

Augustine M. Gay, Master.


SUB-MASTERS.

Charles J. Capen.
Moses Merrill.

Joseph W. Chadwick.
William F. Davis.
Francis A. Harris.
Mons. P. Morand, Instructor in French.

Capt. Hobart Moore, Instructor in Military Drill.

110

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL.

Bedford Street.
COMMITTEE.

S. K. Lothrop, Chairman, 12 Chestnut Street.


George F. Bigelow, Secretary, 33 Essex Street.
Richard Beeching, 95 Princeton Street.
Adino B. Hall, 89 Salem Street.
Orin T. Walker, 20 Leverett Street.

Dexter S. King, 34 Bowdoin Street.


William W. Doherty, Niles Building, School Street.
Frank E. Bundy, 49 Harrison Avenue.
John Parkman, 8 Park Square.
Lyman Mason, 28 Court Street.
Robert C. Waterston, 71 Chester Square.
(Vacancy.)
James Morse, 19 Commercial Street.

John Kneeland, 31 Winthrop Street, Roxbury.


Joseph N. Brewer, 37 Centre Street, Roxbury.
TEACHERS.

Thomas Sherwin, Head Master.


Charles M. Cumston, Master.
Luther W. Anderson, Master.

Ephraim Hunt, Master.


SUB-MASTERS.

William Nichols, Jr.


Robert E. Babson.
Albert Hale.
Moses Woolson.

William N. Bartholomew, Teacher of Drawing.


Charles De Lagarliere, Teacher of French.
Capt. Hobart Moore, Teacher of Military Drill.

GIRLs HIGH AND NORMAL SCHOOL.

111

GIRLS HIGH AND NORMAL SCHOOL.


Mason Street.
COMMITTEE.

Henry Burroughs, Jr., Chairman, 82 Mt. Vernon Street.


Henry C. Hunt, Secretary, 15 Ash Street.
Warren H. Cudworth, 1 Meridian Street.
George
D. Ricker, 166 Salem Street.
John F. Jarvis, 22 Leverett Street.
A.

Ezra Palmer, 1 Tremont Place.

Wm. H. Page, 48 Beach Street.


Alvan Simonds, 713 Federal Street.

Charles W. Storey, 8 Florence Street.


Alden Speare, 15 East Brookline Street.
Stephen G. Deblois, 80 Concord Street.
Edwin Briggs, 67 Dorchester Street.
James E. Marsh, 4 Guild Building, Roxbury.
George H. Monroe, Walnut, corner of Rockland Street, Roxbury.
George Morrill, Centre Street, corner of Centre Place, Roxbury.
*

TEACHERS.

William H. Seavey, Head Master.


Harriet E. Caryl, Head Assistant.

ASSISTANTS.

Maria A. Bacon.

Mary E. Scates.

Margaret A. Badger.
Helen W. Avery.

Adeline L. Sylvester.
Frances A. Poole.

Emma A. Temple.

Elizabeth C. Light.

Catharine Knapp.
William N.

Bartholomew,

Bessie T. Capen.
Teacher of Drawing.

Julius Eichberg, Teacher of Music.


E. C. F. Krauss, Teacher of German.

Prospre Morand, Teacher of French.

112

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

TRAINING DEPARTMENT.

Jane H. Stickney, Superintendent.


Sarah D. Duganne, Assistant.
PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Somerset Street.

Ellen R. Crosby.
C. Eliza Wason.

Adeline I. Baker.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Burroughs, Hunt and Palmer.

ROXBURY HIGH SCHOOL.


Renilworth Street.

COMMITTEE.

Moody Merrill, Chairman, 2 Warren Place, Roxbury.


George M. Hobbs, Secretary, Edinboro Street, Roxbury.
Joseph H. Streeter, 175 Washington Street, Roxbury.
Ira Allen, 61 Cabot Street, Roxbury.
Benjamin H. Greene, 13 Porter Street, Roxbury.
James E. Marsh, 4 Guild Building, Roxbury.
TEACHERS,

Samuel M. Weston, Master.

Mary F. Gragg, Assistant.


Maria L. Tincker, Assistant.

Sarah A. M. Cushing, Assistant.


Mlle De Maltchyce, Teacher of French.
Benjamin F. Nutting, Teacher of Drawing.
Moses T. Brown, Teacher of Elocution.

Henry W. Alexander, Teacher of Music.

VOCAL AND

PHYSICAL

DEPARTMENT OF VOCAL AND

CULTURE.

113

PHYSICAL CULTURE

AND VOCAL MUSIC.

Lewis B. Monroe, Director of Vocal and Physical Culture.


A. E. Sloane, Assistant in Vocal and Physical Culture.
Joseph B. Sharland, Instructor in Vocal Music in the Grammar
Schools.

Luther W. Mason, Instructor in Vocal Music in the Primary


Schools.

15

THE SCHOOL DISTRICTS,


ARRANGED

IN

AL PHABETICAL

ORDER.

ADAMS SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Warren H. Cudworth, Chairman, 1 Meridian Street.

Henry S. Washburn, Secretary, 125 Webster Street.


Thomas C. Marsh, 47 Chelsea Street.
Albert Huse, 56 Princeton Street.

Richard Beeching, 95 Princeton Street.


Washington B. Trull, 70 Webster Street.

John F. Flynn, rear 60 Endicott Street.

ADAMS SCHOOL, BELMONT SQUARE.

Robert C. Metcalf, Master,


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 18, 5th Story.
Frank F. Preble, Sub-Master,

Cl. I., Div. 2, Room 17, 5th Story.


Jane S. Tower, Master's Head-Assistant,

Louisa E. Harris, Head-Assistant,


C1. II., Div. 1, Room 8, 2d Story.
Lucy A. Wiggin, Head-Assistant,
Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 14, 4th Story.
Martha E. Webb, Head-Assistant,
Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 12, 3d Story.

Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 18, 5th Story.

Assistants.

Sarah M. Boyd,
Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 9, 3d Story.
Juliette J. Pierce,
Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 10,3d Story.
Ellen L. Bingham,
Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 15, 4th
Story.
Almira G. Smith,
Cl. III., Div.2, Room 13,4th Story.

Mary M. Morse,
Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 11, 3d Story.
Sarah J. DArcy,
Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 5, 2d Story.
Ellen M. Robbins,
Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 6, 2d Story.
Lucy H. Cobb, Sewing Teacher.

SCHOOL

115

DISTRICTS.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS

Sumner Street.

Emily C. Morse,
Rosa L. Morse.
Sub-Commitee, Messrs. Washburn and Trull.
Adams School-House.

Esther L. Morse,
Clara Robbins.
Eliza A. Wiggin,
Sub-Committee, Messrs. Cudworth and Flynn.
Webster Street.

Susan D. Wilde,
Clara J. Doane.
Mary H. Allen,
Sub-Committee, Messrs. Cudworth and Flynn.

BIGELOW SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Edwin Briggs, Chairman, 67 Dorchester Street.


Liberty D. Packard, Secretary, Dorchester Street, corner of Broad
way.

Francis H. Underwood, Fourth Street, between L and M Streets.


Choate Burnham, 284 Broadway.
William A. Blenkinsop, 35 Broadway.
Alvan Simonds, 713 Federal Street.

Joseph B. Stearns, Fifth, near I Street.


Christopher A. Connor, 349 Fourth Street.
BIGELow SCHOOL, CORNER OF E AND FOURTH STREETS.

Henry C. Hardon, Master.


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1, 4th Story.
Thomas H. Barnes, Sub-Master.
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 9, Boys, 2d
Story.
Lucinda P. Works, 1st Head-Ass't.
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1, Girls, 4th
Story.

Celinda Seaver, Head-Assistant.


Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 11, Boys, 1st
Story.
Sarah E. Fisher, Head-Assistant.
Cl. 1., Div. 2, Room 2, Boys, 4th
Story.
-

116

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

Assistants.
Lavina B. Pendleton.

Mary Nichols,
Cl. I., Div. 2, Room 3, Girls, 3d
Story.
Martha E. Morse.

Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 4, Girls, 3d


Story.
Ellen E. Morse,

Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 5, Boys, 3d

Clara E. Farrington.
Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 10, Boys, 2d
Story.
Julia Clapp.
Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 12, Girls, 1st
Story.
Henrietta L. Dwyer.
Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 13, Boys,
1st Story.

Story.
Clara F. Currier.

Cl. IV., Div. 1, Girls, Wait's


Building.

Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 7, Girls, 2d

D. Ellen Barnes.

Story.
Susan M. Wadsworth.

Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 6, Boys, 3d


Story.

Cl. IV., Div. 2, Girls, Wait's


Building.
Mary E. Frye.
Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 14, Boys
1st Story.
-

Roxanna N. Blanchard.

Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 8, Girls, 2d


Story.

Washington

Village Branch.

Fred. O. Ellis, Usher.


Cl. II., Div. 1, 3d Story.

Cl. II., Div. 2, 3d Story.

Assistants.
Harriet S. Howes,

Cl. III., Div. 1, 2d Story.


Emeline L. Tolman,

Mary L. Lufkin,
Cl. IV., Div. 1, 3d Story.
Mary L. Kinne,
Cl. IV., Div. 2, 3d Story.

Cl. III., Div. 2, 2d Story.


Henrietta W. Whiton, Sewing Teacher.
Christopher Jones, Janitor.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

IIAWES SCHOOL.

Broadway.
Abigail B. Kent.
Lucy E. T. Tinkham.

Ann J. Lyon.
Lucy C. Bartlett.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Packard, Connor and Simonds.


Harriet A. Clapp, Special Instruction. Sub-Committee, Messrs.
Underwood.

and

SCHOOL

117

DISTRICTS.

LYCEUM HALL.

Broadway.
Josephine B. Cherrington.

Sarah A. Graham.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Packard, Connor and Simonds.


TICKNOR SCHOOL,

Washington Village.
Margaret E. Sharp.

Clara G. Dickson.

Eliza F. Blacker.

Sarah B. Packard.

Margaret T. Pease.

Marion W. Rundlett.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Briggs, Blenkinsop and Stearns.

BOWDITCH SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

George F. Bigelow, Chairman, 33 Essex Street.


Frank E. Bundy, Secretary, 49 Harrison Avenue.

Thomas C. Amory, 5 Joy Street.


Patrick Riley, 10 Lincoln Street.
John P. Ordway, 42 Bedford Street.
William H. Page, 48 Beach Street.
John P. Reynolds, 170 Tremont Street.
Richard Walsh, 86 South Street.
Patrick A. OConnell, 21 Harrison Avenue.

William W. Doherty, 17 Niles Building, School Street.


BowdITCH scHOOL, SOUTH STREET.

Alfred Hewins, Master,


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1, 4th Story.
-

Caroline L. G. Badger, Head-Assistant, Masters Room.


Frances R. Honey, Head-Assistant.
Cl. I., Div. 1, Hall, 4th Story.

Sarah E. Daley, Head-Assistant,


Cl. I., Div. 3, Room 11, 1st Story.
Susan H. Thaxter, Head-Assistant,
Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 7, 2d Story.
-

Assistants.

Edith Adams,
Cl. I., Div. 2, Room 2, 4th Story.
Sarah Fuller,
Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 3, 3d Story.

Ellen McKendry,

Cl. II., Div. 3, Room 4, 3d Story.


Georgiana M. L. Evert,

Cl. II., Div. 4, Room 5, 3d Story.

118

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

Caroline W. Marshall,
Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 6,3d Story.
Mary E. Nichols,
Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 10, 2d Story.
Ellen M. S. Treadwell,
Cl. III., Div. 3, Room 8, 2d Story.

Ann Nowell,
Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room13, 1st Story.
Anna B. Thompson,
Cl. IV., Div.2, Room 12, 1st Story.
Carolyn E. Jennison,
Cl. IV., Div.3, Room 14, 1st Story.

Mary M. T. Foley,
Cl. III., Div. 4, Room 9, 2d Story

Branch, in East Street.


Clarinda R. F. Treadwell, Head-Assistant, Cl. IV., Div. 4, Room 4, 2d Story.

Assistants.

Margaret E. Sheehan,
Sarah A. Pope,
Cl. IV., Div. 7, Room 1, 3d Story.
Cl. IV., Div. 5, Room 3, 3d Story.
H. Isabella Hopkins,
Eliza M. L. Evert,
Cl. IV., Div. 8.
Cl. IV., Div. 6, Room 2, 3d Story.
Eliza A. Baxter, Sewing Teacher.
Henry Farmer, Janitor.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

High Street Place.


Octavia C. Heard. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bigelow.
Ruth H. Clapp, Sub-Committee, Mr. Page.
Hannah E. G. Gleason. Sub-Committee, Mr. O'Connell.
Maria J. Coburn. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bundy.
Angelia M. Newmarch. Sub-Committee, Mr. Amory.
Julia F. Gould. Sub-Committee, Mr. Ordway.

IEast Street.

Adeline Stockbridge. Sub-Committee, Mr. Amory.


Hannah A. Lawrence. Sub-Committee, Mr. Reynolds.
Sophronia N. Herrick. Sub-Committee, Mr. Walsh.
Marian A. Flynn. Sub-Committee, Mr. Riley.
Matilda Mitchell. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bigelow.

school DisrRICTs.

119

BOWDOIN SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

John A. Lamson, Chairman, 1 Staniford Street.

Calvin G. Page, Secretary, 69 Myrtle Street.


J. Baxter Upham, 31 Chestnut Street.
Ezra Palmer, 1 Tremont Place.
Orrin S. Sanders, 11 Bowdoin Street.
Adino B. Hall, 89 Salem Street.
Orin T. Walker, 20 Leverett Street.

S. K. Lothrop, 12 Chestnut Street.


John A. Stevens, 15 Cambridge Street.
S. Arthur Bent, 7, Barristers' Hall, Court Square.
Bowdon SCHOOL, MYRTLE STREET.

Daniel C. Brown, Master,

Mary Young, 2d Head-Assistant,

Cl. I., Div. 1, West Room, 3d

Story.
Sarah J. Mills, 1st Head-Assistant,

Cl. I., Div. 2, East Room, 3d Story.


Deborah Norton, 3d Head-Assistant,

Cl. I., Div. 3, East Room, 3d Story.

Cl. I., Div. 1, West Room, 3d

Story.
Assistants.

Emily G. Wetherbee,
Cl. II. Div 1, East Room,
Story.
Sophia B. Horr,
Cl. II. Div. 2, East Room,
Story.
Eliza A. Fay,
Cl. III. Div. 1, West Room,
Story.
Irene W. Wentworth,
C1. III. Div. 2, West Room,
Story.

2d

2d

2d
*

Martha A. Palmer,
Cl. III. Div. 3, West Room, 1st
Story.
Lucy C. Gould,
Cl. IV. Div. 1, West Room, 1st
Story.
Mary F. Grant,
Cl. IV. Div. 2, East Room, 1st
Story.
Cl. IV. Div. 3,
East Room, 1st Story.
-

2d

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Elossom Street.

Olive Ruggles. Sub-Committee, Mr. Walker.


Julia T. Jellison. Sub-Committee, Mr. Sanders.
Anna S. Balcom. Sub-Committee, Mr. Sanders.
Lydia A. Isbell. Sub-Committee, Mr. Stevens.

120

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

Cor. of Anderson and Pinckney Streets.

Marianne Stephens. Sub-Committee, Mr. Lothrop.


Caroline F. Reed. Sub-Committee, Mr. Walker.
Lucy J. Calef. Sub-Committee, Mr. Page.
26 Charles Street.

Annie M. Heustis.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Lamson.


Joy Street.

Mary E. Ames.

Special Instruction.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Lamson.

BOYLSTON SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

John P. Reynolds, Chairman, 170 Tremont Street.


George F. Bigelow, Secretary, 33 Essex Street.
Patrick Riley, 10 Lincoln Street.
John P. Ordway, 42 Bedford Street.
Thomas C. Amory, 5 Joy Street.
Frank E. Bundy, 49 Harrison Avenue.
Christopher A. Conner, 349 Fourth Street.
Patrick OConnell, 21 Harrison Avenue.

Henry P. Shattuck, 645 Washington Street.


Richard Walsh, 86 South Street.

BOYLSTON SCHOOL, WASHINGTON SQUARE.

John Jameson, Master,


Cl. I. Div. 1, Room 12, 3d Story.
Henry H. Kimball, Sub-Master,

C1, I. Div. 2, Room 7, 2d Story.

James E. Parker, Usher,

Cl. II. Div. 1, Room 3, 1st Story.


Mary A. Davis, Head-Assistant,

Cl. I. Div. 1, Room 12, 3d Story.

Assistants.

Mary L. Holland,
Cl. II. Div. 2, Room 11, 3d Story.
Josephine M. Hanna,
Cl. III. Div. 1, Room 10, 2d Story.

Jane M. Bullard,
Cl. III. Div. 2, Room 8, 2d Story.
Mary H. Cashman,
Cl. IV. Div. 1, Room 9, 2d Story.

SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

Emily S. Hutchins,
Cl. IV. Div. 2, Room 5, 1st Story.
Maria B. Clapp,
Cl. IV. Div. 3, Room 4, 1st Story.

Susan J. Turner,
Cl. IV. Div. 4, Room 6, 1st Story.
Bridget A. Foley,
Cl. IV. Div. 5, Room 1, basement.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.
MACRINTOSH PRIMARY SCHOOL,

Lane Place.

Mary E. Sawyer.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Reynolds.

Margaret F. Tappan. Sub-Committee, Mr. Amory.


Adelia E. Edwards. Sub-Committee, Mr. Ordway.
Clara A. Clark. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bigelow.
Ellen L. Collins. Sub-Committee, Mr. O'Connell.
Julia M. Driscoll, Sub-Committee, Mr. Bundy.
MAY PRIMARY SCHOOL,

Washington Square.
Amelia E. N. Treadwell. Sub-Committee, Mr. Amory.
Mary L. G. Hanley. Sub-Committee, Mr. Riley.
Maria J. Mahoney. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bigelow.
Julia A. O'Hara. Sub-Committee, Mr. Ordway.
Anna M. Lecain. Sub-Committee, Mr. Shattuck.
Lydia B. Felt. Sub-Committee, Mr. Walsh.
Belcher Lane.

Harriette B. Cutler.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Connor.

BRIMMER SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

J. Coffin Jones Brown, Chairman, 337 Tremont Street.


P. A. OConnell, Secretary, 21 Harrison Avenue.
Henry W. Harrington, 3 Corey Avenue.
Charles W. Storey, 8 Florence Street.
Charles Hutchins, 34 Clarendon Street.
John Parkman, 8 Park Square.
Henry C. Hunt, 15 Ash Street.
Frank E. Bundy, 49 Harrison Avenue.
Henry P. Shattuck, 645 Washington Street.
16

121

122

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

BRIMMER SCHOOL, COMMON STREET.


Joshua Bates, Master.
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 15, 4th Story.
William L. P. Boardman, Sub-Mas
ter.

Rebecca L. Duncan, Head-Assistant.


Master's Room.

Anna M. Penniman, Head-Assistant.


Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 10, 3d Story.

Cl. I., Div. 2, Room 7, 2d Story.


E. Bentley Young, Usher.
Cl. I., Div. 3, Room 1, 1st Story

Assistants.
Kate C. Martin.

Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 9, 3d Story.


Mercy T. Snow.
Cl. II., Div. 3, Room 11, 3d Story.
Luthera W. Bird.

Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 12, 3d Story.


Amanda Snow.

Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 8, 2d Story.


Anna P. James.

Cl. III., Div. 3, Room 3, 1st Story.


Harriet N. Lane.

Mercy A. Davie.
Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 5, 2d Story.
Sarah J. March.

Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 14,4th Story.


Helen L. Bodge.
Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room 13,4th Story.
Annie E. English.
Cl. IV., Div. 4, Room 2, 1st Story.
Susan P. Cunningham.
Cl. IV., Div. 5, Room 4, 1st Story.
George H. Lee, Janitor.

Cl. III., Div. 4, Room 6, 2d Story.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Newbern Place.
Catharine M. E. Richardson.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Hutchins.


Sub-Committee, Mr. Bundy.
Malvina R. Brigham. Sub-Committee, Mr. Parkman.
Dorcas B. Baldwin.

Indiana Place.

Lucy H. Symonds. Sub-Committee, Mr. Storey.


Eliza F. Moriarty.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Storey.

Massau Hall.

Helen M. Dexter.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Harrington.

SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

123

Warren Street.

Sarah R. Bowles. Sub-Committee, Mr. Hutchins.


Rebecca J. Weston. Sub-Committee, Mr. Parkman.
Mary C. Willard. Sub-Committee, Mr. Brown.
Sarah Farley. Sub-Committee, Mr. O'Connell.
Emma F. Burrill. Sub- Committee, Mr. Harrington.
Deborah K. Burgess. Sub-Committee, Mr. Hunt.
Eliza E. Foster. Sub-Committee, Mr. Shattuck.

CHAPMAN SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Albert Huse, Chairman, 56 Princeton Street.

Richard Beeching, Secretary, 138 Princeton Street.


Warren H. Cudworth, 1 Meridian Street.

Thomas C. Marsh, 47 Chelsea Street.

Henry S. Washburn, 125 Webster Street.


Washington B. Trull, 3, Meridian Street.
John Ryan, 363 Hanover Street.
CHAPMAN SCHOOL, EUTAW STREET.

George R. Marble, Master, Cl. I.


Div. 1 and 2, Room 5, 3d Story.
Silas C. Stone, Sub-Master, Cl. I.
Div. 1 and 2, Room 10, 3d Story.
Lucy O. Fessenden, Head-Assistant,
Cl. I., Div. 1 and 2, Room 5, 3d
Story.
Philura Wright, Head-Assistant, Cl.
IV. Div. 1 and 2, Room 2, 1st
Story.

Maria D. Kimball, Head-Assistant,


Cl. IV., Div. 1 and 2, Room 7, 1st
Story.

Sarah F. Tenney, Head-Assistant,


Cl. I. and II., Div. 1 and 3, Room
4, 2d Story.

Assistants.

Emeline A. Briggs,
Cl. I. and II., Div. 1 and 3, Room
8, 2d Story. .

Sarah A. Henshaw,

Cl. II. and III., Div. 1 and 2,


Room 9, 2d Story.

124

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

Jane F. Reid,
Adeline A. Spencer,
Cl. II. and III., Div. 1 and 2
Cl. III., Div. 2 and 3, Room 6,
Room 3, 2d Story.
1st Story.
Abby A. Cook,
Cl. III., Div. 2 and 3, Room 1,
1st Story.
Frances C. Close, Teacher of Sewing.
PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Lexington Street.
Harriet C. Bates.

Marietta Duncan.

Mary C. Hall.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Huse.

IPOrter Street.

Abby D. Beale.

M. Jane Peaslee.
Hulda H. Mitchell.

Sarah A. Pratt.

Caroline S. Litchfield.

Caroline A. Littlefield.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Beeching and Ryan.


Monmouth Street.
Hannah F. Crafts.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Huse.

COMINS AND FRANCIS STREET SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

George M. Hobbs, 14 Edinboro Street, Roxbury.


Geo. Morrill, Centre Street, cor. of Centre Place, Roxbury.
John Kneeland, 31 Winthrop Street, Roxbury.
Allen Putnam, 176 Eustis Street, Roxbury.
Charles K. Dillaway, 230 Washington Street, Roxbury.
Geo. H. Monroe, Walnut, cor. of Rockland Street, Roxbury.
Jos. N. Brewer, 37 Centre Street, Roxbury.
James Morse, Dudley Street, Roxbury.
Cyrus C. Emery, 17 Clark Street, Roxbury.

SCHOOL

DISTRICTS.

COMINS SCHOOL, GORE AVENUE, ROXBURY.

Daniel W. Jones, Principal, Div. 1, 2d Story.


Assistants.

Anne H. Shurtleff,
Div. 1, 2d Story.
Elizabeth W. Young,
Div. 2, 3d Story.
Eliza C. Fisher,
Div. 2, 3d Story,
Almira W. Chamberlin,
Div. 3, 1st Story.
Adeline May,
Div. 3, 3d Story.
Charlotte P. Williams,
Div. 4, 3d Story.
Florence E. Tilton,
Div. 4, 2d Story.

Sarah A. V. Fernald,
Div. 5, 2d Story.
Caroline K. Nickerson,
Div. 5, 3d Story.
Sarah R. Bonney,
Div. 6, 1st Story.
Dora O. Wait,
Div. 6, 1st Story.
Emily B. Eliot,
Div. 7, 1st Story.
E. Josephine Page,
Div. 7, Smith Street.

FRANCIS STREET SCHOOL,

Sophronia F. Norton, Principal.


PRIMARY SCHOOLS.
Avon Place.
Adeline L. Reed.

Abby E. Ford.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Emery.
Heath Street.

Jane B. LaWrence.

Edna C. Jewett.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Morrill.


Centre Street.
Henrietta M. Wood.

Mary Ann Morse.


Sub-Committee, Mr. Monroe.
Francis Street.

Elizabeth M. Hall.

Anna M. Eaton.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Putnam.

125

126

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Phillips Street.
Lydia E. Davis.

Sarah E. Haskins.

sub-Committee, Mr. Kneeland.


Kate M. Murphy.

Anna E. Clark.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Dillaway.


Caroline E. Bicknell.

Amelia F. Boston.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Hobbs.


Cottage Place.
Emma L. Culligan.

Josephine Maxflld.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Brewer.

Adeline Beal.

Elizabeth F. Johnson.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Morse.


Mill-dam.

Ellen Calkins. Sub-Committee, Mr. Emery.

DEARBORN SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Moody Merrill, Chairman, 2 Warren Place, Roxbury.


William H. Hutchinson, Secretary, 48 Warren Street, Roxbury.
James Morse, Dudley Street, Roxbury.
Allen Putnam, 176 Eustis Street, Roxbury.
George W. Adams, 2 Reed's Court, Roxbury.
John O. Means, 31 Elm Street, Roxbury.
Benjamin H. Greene, 13 Porter Street, Roxbury.
Joseph A. Tucker, 29 Orchard Street, Roxbury.
Ira Allen, 61 Cabot Street, Roxbury.
DEARBORN SCHOOL, DEARBORN PLACE, ROxBURY.

William
Cl. I.,
L. Anna
Cl. I.,

H. Long, Master,
Div. 1, Room 1.
Dudley, Head-Assistant.
Div. 1, Room 1.

Philena W. Rounseville, Head-As


sistant, Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 3.
Harriet E. Burrell, Head-Assistant.
Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 9.

SCHOOL

DISTRICTS.

Assistants.

Sarah S. Adams,
Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 5.
Mary A. Spinney,
Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 10.
Sarah H. Hosmer,

Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 7.


Elizabeth A. Morse,
Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 11.
Frances L. Bredeen,

Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 6.


Henrietta M. Young,
Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 12.

Anne M. Backup,
Cl., IV., Div. 1, Room 8.
Margaret E. Davis,
Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 4.
Helen F. Crawford,
Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 13.
Mary C. Bartlett,
Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 2.
Elizabeth M. Wood,
Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room 14.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

George Street, Roxbury.


Mary M. Sherwin, Cl. I.
Clara L. Davis, Cl. II.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Putnam.
Clara L. Hewes, Cl. III.
Emily M. Pevear, Cl. IV.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Tucker.
Flora J. Cutter, Cl. V.
Phebe H. Simpson, Cl. VI.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Greene.
Yeoman Street, Roxbury.
Susan F. Rowe, Cl. I.

Anna M. Balch, Cl. II.


Sub-Committee, Mr. Adams.
Ellen M. Oliver, Cl. III.
Elizabeth D. Ladd, Class. IV.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Allen.
Eustis Street, Roxbury.
Emma C. Wales, Cl. II.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Morse.
Mary L. Walker, Cl. III.
Clara H. Balch, Cl. IV.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Hutchinson.

Mary F. Neale, Cl. I.

Elm Street, Roxbury.


Anna E. Boynton, Cl. I.

Frances H. C. Bradley, Cl. II.


Sub-Committee, Mr. Means.
Winthrop Street, Roxbury.

Frances N. Brooks, Cl. I.


Eliza J. Goss, Cl. II.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Merrill.

127

128

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

DWIGHT SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

William H. Learnard, Jr., Chairman, 61 Rutland Street.


Stephen G. Deblois, Secretary, 80 Concord Street.
Alden Speare, 15 East Brookline Street.

Robert C. Waterston, 71 Chester Square.

Edmund T. Eastman, 75 Shawmut Avenue.


Richard H. Stearns, 668 Tremont Street.
William B. Merrill, 145 Concord Street.
Charles C. Shackford, 59 Clarendon Street.

George H. Nichols, 52 Chester Park.


Lyman Mason, 20 Court Street.
DWIGHT SCHOOL, SPRINGFIELD STREET.

James A. Page, Master, Cl. I., Div.


1, Room 6, 3d Story.
Rodney G. Chase, Sub-Master, Cl.
I., Div. 2, Room 7, 2d Story.

Edward Southworth, Usher, Cl. II.,


Div. 1, Room 11, 1st Story.
Martha E. Pritchard, Head-Assist
ant, Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 6,3d Story.

Assistants.

Mary C. Browne, Cl. II., Div. 2,


Room 3, 3d Story.

Clara B. Gould, Cl. IV., Div. 1,


Room 9, 2d Story.

Julia M. Browne, Cl. III., Div. 1,

Sarah B. Abbott, Cl. IV., Div. 2,

Room 5, 3d Story.
Mary E. Trow, Cl. III., Div. 2,
Room 4, 3d Story.

Room 12, 1st Story.


Lydia A. Arnold, Cl. IV., Div. 3,
Room 13, 1st Story.

Eva M. Keller, Cl. III., Div. 3,

Amelia M. Hinckley, Cl. IV., Div.

Room 8, 2d Story.
Mary C. R. Towle, Cl. III., Div. 4,
Room 10, 2d Story.

4, Room 14, 1st Story.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

I'utland Street.

Augusta A. Davis. Sub-Committee, Mr. Waterston.


Martha B. Lucas. Sub-Committee, Mr. Stearns.
Sarah E. Crocker. Sub-Committee, Mr. Deblois.
Henrietta Draper. Sub-Committee, Mr. Nichols.
. Sub-Committee, Mr. Speare.
Jane P. Titcomb. Sub-Committee, Mr. Merrill.

129

SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

ELIOT SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Edward D. G. Palmer, Chairman, 3 Montgomery Place.


George D. Ricker, Secretary, 166 Salem Street.
Adino B. Hall, 89 Salem Street.

George F. Haskins, 2 North Square.


John F. Flynn, Rear of 30 Endicott Street.
Orrin S. Sanders, 11 Bowdoin Street.
William A. Rust, 9 Allen Street.

John Ryan, 363 Hanover Street.


George W. Close, 21 Sheafe Street.
S. Arthur Bent, 7 Court Square.

ELIOT SCHOOL, NORTH BENNET STREET.

Samuel W. Mason, Master,


Cl. I. Div. 1, Room 13, 4th Story.
Walter H. Newell, Sub-Master,
Cl. I. Div. 2, Room 9, 3d Story.
Geo. K. Daniell, Jr., Usher,
Cl. II. Div. 1, Room 1, 1st Story.

Frances M. Bodge, Head-Assistant.


Cl. I. Div. 1, Room 13, 4th Story.
Adolin M. Steele, Head-Assistant,
Cl. II. Div. 2, Room 5, 2d Story.

Assistants.

M. Turner,
Cl. II., Div. 3, Room 10, 3d Story.
O. Augusta Welch,
Cl. II., Div. 4, Room 11, 3d Story.
Kate L. Dodge,
Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 12, 3d Story.
Georgianna Wilkinson,
Cl. III., Div.2, Room 14, 4th Story.
Clara Winning,
Cl. III., Div, 3, Room 8, 2d Story.
Elizabeth

Georgianna D. Russell,
Cl. III., Div. 4, Room 6, 2d Story.
Hannah M. Pembroke,

Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 7, 2d Story.


Emily F. Marshall,
Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 3, 1st Story.
Mary A. E. Sargent,
Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room 2, 1st Story,
Lydia K. Potter,
Cl. IV., Div. 4, Room 4, 1st Story.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

snelling Place.
Sarah A. WinSOr.

Clarissa Davis.

Sophia Shepard.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Flynn.
Cleone G. Tewksbury.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Sanders.

130

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Antonia Harvey. Sub-Committee, Mr. Ricker.


Harriet S. Boody.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Close.


22 Charter Street.

Eliza Brintnall. Sub-Committee, Mr. Close.


Eliza J. Cosgrave. Sub-Committee, Mr. Palmer.
Ida Munroe.

Juliette Davis.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Ryan.

Rear, 22 Charter Street.


Julia A. Cutts. Sub-Committee, Mr. Ricker.
Sarah Ripley. Sub-Committee, Mr. Palmer.
Josephine O. Paine. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bent.
North Bennet Street.

Frances E. Harrod. Sub-Committee, Mr. Hall.


Kate S. Sawyer. Sub-Committee, Mr. Rust.
Mary E. Barrett. Sub-Committee, Mr. Haskins.
Sarah F. Chipman. Sub-Committee, Mr. Hall.

EVERETT SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Robert C. Waterston Chairman, 71 Chester Square.


Stephen G. Deblois, Secretary, 80 Concord Street.
Alden Speare, 15 East Brookline Street.
William H. Learnard, Jr., 61 Rutland Street.
Edmund T. Eastman, 75 Shawmut Avenue.
Richard H. Stearns, 668 Tremont Street.
William B. Merrill, 145 Concord Street.
John Parkman, 8 Park Square.

George H. Nichols, 52 Chester Park.


Lyman Mason, 20 Court Street.

SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

131

EVERETT scHool, wesT NORTHAMPTON STREET.


George B. Hyde, Master.
Cl. I. Div. 1, Room 14, 4th Story.
Margaret E. Johnson, Head-Assist
ant, Cl. I. Div. 1, Room 14, 4th
Story.
Anna B. Thompson, Head-Assistant.
Cl. I. Div. 2, Room 12, 3d Story.

Janet M. Bullard, Head Assistant.


Cl. I. Div. 3, Room 8, 2d Story.
Louisa Tucker, Head Assistant.
Cl. II. Div. 1, Room 4, 1st Story.

Assistants.

Abby C. Haslet,
Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 13, 4th Story.
Anna C. Ellis,
Cl. II., Div. 3, Room 10, 3d Story.
Emily L. Tolman,
Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 11, 3d Story.
Florence W. Stetson,
Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 1, 1st Story.
Mary A. Gavett,
Cl. III., Div. 3, Room 6, 2d Story.

Louise M. Alline,
Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 2, 1st Story.
Clara Nelson,
Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 9, 3d Story.
Mary F. Bunton,
Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room 5, 2d Story.
Sarah W. Pollard,

Cl. IV., Div. 4, Room 3, 1st Story.


Martha A. Sargent,
Teacher of Sewing.

Julia H. Kimball,

Cl. III., Div. 4, Room 7, 2d Story.


PRIMARY

SCHOOLS.

Concord Street.

Eliza C. Gould. Sub-Committee, Mr. Nichols.


Laura A. Farnsworth. Sub-Committee, Mr. Speare.
Mary A. Crocker. Sub-Committee, Mr. Merrill.
Anna R. Frost. Sub-Committee, Mr. Eastman.
Caroline S. Lamb. Sub-Committee, Mr. Learnard.
Lydia A. Sawyer. Sub-Committee, Mr. Parkman.
Ann J. Bolden. Sub-Committee, Mr. Waterston.
Hannah M. Coolidge. Sub-Committee, Mr. Stearns.
Emma Halstrick. Sub-Committee, Mr. Deblois.

Lydia F. Blanchard. Sub-Committee, Mr. Waterston.

FRANKLIN SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

R. H. Stearns, Chairman, 668 Tremont Street.

Wm. T. Brigham, Secretary, 1279 Washington Street.

132

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

Alden Speare, 15 East Brookline Street.


Wm. H. Learnard, Jr., 61 Rutland Street.
Edmund T. Eastman, 75 Shawmut Avenue.
Charles Hutchins, 34 Clarendon Street.
Charles L. Flint, 53 Union Park.

Henry C. Hunt, 15 Ash Street.


Samuel G. Bowdlear, 22 Upton Street.
Samuel E. Floyd, 19 Marion Street.
Lyman Mason, 20 Court Street.
FRANKLIN SCHOOL, RINGGOLD STREET.

Granville B. Putnam, Master.


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 14, 4th Story.
Amelia B. Hopkins, 1st Head Asst.
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 14, 4th Story.
Sarah P. Mitchell, Head-Assistant.
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 14, 4th Story.

Sarah A. Gale, Head-Assistant.


Cl. III., Div. 4, Room 8, 2d Story.
Catharine T. Simonds, Head-Asst.
Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 4, 1st Story.

Assistants.

L. Isabel Barry,
Cl. I., Div. 2, Room 13, 4th Story.

Abby D. Tucker,

Elizabeth J. Brown,

P. Catharine Bradford,

Cl. I., Div. 3, Room 11, 3d Story.


Mary S. Russell,
Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 12, 3d Story.
Mary J. Leach,
Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 9, 3d Story.

Cl. III., Div.2, Room 5, 2d Story.


Cl. III., Div. 3, Room 6, 2d Story.
Caroline A. Mason,

Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 1, 1st Story.


Mary A. Mitchell,

Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room 2, 1st Story.


Annie E. Parker,

Isabella M. Harmon,

Cl. II., Div. 3, Room 10, 3d Story.

Cl. IV., Div. 4, Room 3, 1st Story.


Elizabeth D. Cutter,

Esther M. Nickerson,

Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 7, 2d Story.


PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Genesee Street.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Hutchins.
Harriet M. Bolman. Sub-Committee, Mr. Eastman.
Anna T. Corliss. Sub-Committee, Mr. Floyd.
Susan H. Chaffee.

Groton Street.
Harriet M. Faxon.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Speare.

Georgianna E. Abbott. Sub-Committee, Mr. Flint.

Teacher of Sewing.

SCHOOL,

DISTRICTS.

133

Frances J. Crocker. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bowdlear.


Ellen M. Hughes. Sub-Committee, Mr. Brigham.
Lucy A. Cate. Sub-Committee, Mr. Hunt.
Caroline A. Miller. Sub-Committee, Mr. Learnard.

HANCOCK SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Adino B. Hall, Chairman, 89 Salem Street.

George W. Close, Secretary, 21 Sheafe Street.


Edward D. G. Palmer, 3 Montgomery Place.
George F. Haskins, 2 North Square.
Dexter S. King, Winthrop House, Bowdoin Street.

John A. Lamson, 1 Staniford Street.


Orrin S. Sanders, 11 Bowdoin Street.
George D. Ricker, 166 Salem Street.
John F. Flynn, rear 60 Endicott Street.
John Ryan, 363 Hanover Street.
S. Arthur Bent, 7 Court Square.
HANCOCK SCHOOL, RICHMOND STREET,

McLaurin F. Cooke, Master.


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 15, 4th Story.
Mary C. Nichols, 1st Head-Assist
ant, Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 15, 4th
Story.
Alicia H. Gilley, Head-Assistant,
Cl. I., Div. 3, Room 13, 3d Story.
Emily F. Fessenden, Head-Assist

ant, Cl. II., Div. 3, Room 9, 2d


Story.
Martha F. Winning, Head-Assistant,
Cl. III., Div. 3, Room 5, 1st Story.
Marie L. Macomber, Head-Assistant,
Cl. IV., Div. 3, New Building,
Room 12, 3d Story.

Assistants.

Ellen C. Sawtelle, Cl. I., Div. 2,


Room 14, 4th Story.
Amy E. Bradford, Cl. I., Div. 4,
Room 12, 3d Story.
Helen M. Hitchings, Cl. II., Div. 1,

Room 11, 3d Story.

Josephine M. Robertson, Cl. II.,


Div. 2, Room 10, 3d Story.
Ellen A. Hunt,
Cl. II., Div. 4, Room 8, 2d Story.

134

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

Mary Carleton,
Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 7, 2d Story.
Mary E. Skinner,
Cl III., Div. 2. Room 6, 2d Story.
Helen H. Cheney,
Cl. III., Div. 4, Room 4, 1st Story.
Emilie A. Siesbttel,
Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 3, 1st Story.
Henrietta L. Pierce,
Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 2, 1st Story.

Achsah Barnes,
Cl. IV., Div. 4, New Building,
Room 11, 3d Story.
Olive M. E. Rowe,
Cl. IV., Div. 5, New Building,
Room 10, 3d Story.
(Vacancy).
Cl. IV., Div. 6, New Building,
Room 9, 3d Story.

S. O. Somerby, Teacher of Sewing.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Richmond Street.

Marcella C. Halliday. Sub-Committee, Mr. Haskins.


Sarah E. White. Sub-Committee, Mr. Hall.
Augusta H. Barrett. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bent.
Mary J. Clark. Sub-Committee, Mr. Palmer.
Adeline S. Bodge. Sub-Committee, Mr. King.
Maria A. Gibbs. Sub-Committee, Mr. Haskins.
Harriet B. Wose. sub-Committee, Mr Sanders.
Sarah F. Ellis. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bent.
Mary S. Gale. Sub-Committee, Mr. King.
Lucy A. Pike. Sub-Committee, Mr. Flynn.

Hanover Street.

Grace M. Harkin. Sub-Committee, Mr. Ryan.


Emily A. Tewksbury, Sub-Committee, Mr. Lamson.
Sarah E. Ward, Sub-Committee, Mr. Ricker.

Sheafe Street.

Esther W. Mansfield. Sub-Committee, Mr. Close.


Eunice F. Linsley. Sub-Committee, Mr. Hall.
Martha F. Boody. Sub-Committee, Mr. Ryan.

Thacher Street.

Sarah J. Copp. Sub-Committee, Mr. Flynn.


M. Alice Mansfield.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Ricker.

Sarah L. Shepard. Sub-Committee, Mr. Close.

SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

135

LAWRENCE SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Choate Burnham, Chairman, 284 Broadway.

Christopher A. Connor, Secretary, 349 Fourth Street.


W. H. Wescott, 115 Third Street.

Edwin Briggs, 67 Dorchester Street.


Francis H. Underwood, 758 Fourth Street.

William A. Blenkinsop, 35 Broadway.


Alvan Simonds, 713 Federal Street.

Liberty D. Packard, cor. of Broadway and Dorchester Street.


Joseph B. Stearns, Fifth, Near I Street.
William W. Doherty, 17 Niles Block.
(Vacancy.)
*

LAWRENCE SCHOOL, B STREET, COR. OF THIRD.

Larkin Dunton, Master,


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1, 4th Story.
, Sub-Master,
Cl. I., Div 2, Room 3, 3d Story.
Clarence C. Buck, Usher,
Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 11, 1st Story.

Alice Cooper, Master's Head-Asst,


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1,4th Story.
Mehitable M. Nelson, Head-Asst,
Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 7, 2d Story.

Assistants.

Ellen A. Bragdon,
Cl. II., Div. 3, Room 2, 4th Story.
Martha S. Damon,
Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 5, 3d Story.
Frances A. Porter,

Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 6,3d Story.


Margaret Holmes,
Cl. III., Div. 3, Room 8, 2d Story.
Margaret A. Gleason,
Cl. III., Div. 4, Room 14, 1st Story.
Margaret A. Moody,
Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 10, 2d Story.
Ada L. Cushman,
Cl. IV., Div.2, Room 13, 1st Story.

Catherine M. Lynch,
Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room 9, 2d Story.
Emma P. Hall,
Cl. IV., Div. 4, Jenkins Block, 2d
Story.
Mary E. Stubbs,
Cl. IV., Div. 5, Room 4, 3d Story.
Filena Hurlbutt,
Cl. IV., Div. 6, Jenkins Block, 3d
Story.
Mary J. Fennelly,
Cl. IV., Div. 7, Room 12, 1st Story.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Silver Street.

Mary A. Montague. Sub-Committee, Mr. Connor.


Sarah S. Blake. Sub-Committee, Mr. Packard.

136

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Lucy M. Cragin. Sub-Committee, Mr. Doherty.


Anna M. Elwell. Sub-Committee, Mr. Briggs.
Mary F. Peeler. Sub-Committee, Mr. Stearns.
Lucinda Smith. Sub-Committee, Mr. Wescott.
Church, corner of B Street and Broadway.
Jane A. Malcom. Sub-Committee, Mr. Wescott.
Malvina S. Whipple. Sub-Committee, Mr. Briggs.
Vestry, corner of B Street and Broadway.
Abby C. Nickerson. Sub-Committee, Mr. Stearns.
Sarah M. Dawson. Sub-Committee, Mr. Doherty.

LINCOLN SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Francis H. Underwood, Chairman, 758 Fourth Street.


Liberty D. Packard, Secretary, Dorchester Street, cor. of
Broadway.
Edwin Briggs, 67 Dorchester Street.
Choate Burnham, 284 Broadway.
Thomas C. Amory, 5 Joy Street.
Joseph B. Stearns, Fifth, near I Street.
W. H. Wescott, 115 Third Street.

(Vacancy.)
LINCOLN SCHOOL, BROADWAY, NEAR K STREET.

C. Goodwin Clark, Master,


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 14, 4th Story.
Alonzo G. Ham, Sub-Master,
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1, 1st Story.

Harriet A. Rice, 1st Head-Assistant,

Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 14, 4th Story.


Ariadne B. Jewell,2d Head-Assistant,

Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 10, 3d Story.

Assistants.

Eliza H. . Merrill, Cl. II., Div. 2,


Room 13, 4th Story.

Susan Carty, Cl. IV., Div. 1 and 2,

Myra S. Butterfield, Cl. III., Div. 1,

Isabel M. Kelren.

Room 2, 1st Story.

Room 11, 3d Story.

Abby M. Holder, Cl. III., Div. 2


and 3, Room 6, 2d Story.
BOYS' CLASSES.

Mary E. Balch, Head-Assistant, Cl.


I., Div, 2, Room 9, 3d Story.

Margaret J. Stewart, Head-Assist


ant, Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 5, 2d
Story.

scHool, DISTRICTs.

137

Assistants.

Cynthia H. Sears, Cl. III., Div. 1,


Room 12, 3d Story.
Ellen L. Pendleton, Cl. III., Div. 2
and 3, Room 7, 2d Story.
Anna M. Brown, Cl. III., Div. 2
and 3, Room 8, 2d Story.

Mary S. Degen, Cl. IV., Div. 1 and


2, Room 4, 1st Story.
Ellen R. Wyman, Cl. IV., Div. 1
and 2, Room 3, 1st Story.
Elizabeth Bedlington,
Sewing Teacher.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

City Point.
Laura J. Gerry.

Catharine Burnham.

Elizabeth M. Easton.

Bertha W. Hintz.

Tiley A. Bolkcom.

S. Isabella Stevens.

Sub-CommitteeMessrs. Stearns, Underwood and Briggs.


Hawes Building, Broadway.
Mary P. Colburn.

Annie C. Gill.
Alice Danforth.

Sub-Committee-Messrs. Packard,

and Burnham.

Rear of Hawes Building.


Mary L. Howard.
Sarah E. Warney.
Sub-CommitteeMessrs. Packard,
and Burnham.

Martha C. Jenks.

Baptist Church, cor. of Fourth and L Streets.


Mary H. Faxon.

Special Instruction.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Underwood.

LYMAN SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Henry S. Washburn, Chairman, 125 Webster Street.


Thos. C. Marsh, Secretary, 47 Chelsea Street.
Richard Beeching, 95 Princeton Street.
Albert Huse, 56 Princeton Street.

Washington B. Trull, 3 Meridian Street.


Warren H. Cudworth, 1 Meridian Street.
Geo. D. Ricker, 166 Salem Street.
17

138

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

LYMAN SCHOOL, MERIDIAN STREET.

Hosea H. Lincoln, Master,

Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1, 3d Story.


Josiah G. Dearborn, Sub-Master,
Cl. II., Div. 1 and 2, Room 3,
2d Story.
Cordelia Lothrop, Master's Assistant,
Cl. II., Div. 1 and 2, Room 2,
3d Story.

Eliza F. Russell, Head-Assistant,


Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 4, 2d Story.
Matilda A. Turner, Head-Assistant,

Cl. III., Div. 1 and 2, Room 5,


1st Story.

Assistants.

Amelia H. Pittman,
Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 3, 1st Story.
Mary P. E. Tewksbury,
Cl. III., Div. II., Primary School

Lucy J. Lothrop,
Cl. IV., Div. II., Primary School
House, Webster Street.
Ellen P. Nichols,

Cl. IV., Div. 2, Engine House,

House, Webster Street.

Harriet N. Webster,
Cl. IV., Div. I., Primary School
House, Webster Street.

Paris Street.

Frances C. Close, Teacher of Sewing.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.
JParis Street.

Susan H. M. SWan.

Abby M. Allen.
Anna I. Duncan.
Harriet N. Tyler.
Elizabeth A. Turner.
Angeline M. Cudworth.
Sub-Committee, Messrs. Washburn and Ricker.
Bremen Street.

Mary E. Morse.

Special Instruction.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Cudworth.

MAYHEW SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Orrin S. Sanders, Chairman, 11 Bowdoin Street.


Zachariah Jellison, Secretary, 94 Shawmut Av.
Samuel H. Winkley, 5 Chambers Street.
Dexter S. King, 34 Bowdoin Street.
John A. Lamson, 1 Staniford Street.

William A. Rust, 9 Allen Street.


John A. Stevens, 15 Cambridge Street.

SCHOOL

DISTRICTS.

139

MAYHEW SGHOOL, HAWKINS STREET.

Samuel Swan, Master,


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 12, 3d Story.
Quincy A. Dickerman, Sub-Master,
Cl. I., Div. 2, Room 6, 2d Story.

L. Hall Grandgent, Usher,


C1. I., Div. 3, Room 1, 1st Story.
Emily A. Moulton, Head-Assistant,
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 12, 3d Story.

Assistants.

Elizabeth P. Hopkins,
Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 2, 1st Story.
Adeline F. Cutter,
Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 5, 2d Story.
Sarah W. I. Copeland, Cl. III., Div.
1, Room 8, 2d Story.
Eliza R. Munroe, Cl. III., Div. 2,
Room 7, 2d Story.
Elizabeth L. West, Cl. III., Div. 3,
Room 10, 3d Story.

Judith A. Folger, Cl. IV., Div. 1,


Room 9, 3d Story.
, Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room
3, 1st Story.
Luciette A. Wentworth, Cl. IV.,
Div. 3, Room 4, 1st Story.
Elizabeth G. Hunt, Cl. IV., Div. 4,
Grant Place, Primary building,
Room 2.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Chardon Street.

Sarah E. Copeland. Sub-Committee, Mr. Stevens.


Maria L. Cummings. Sub-Committee, Mr. Lamson.
Emma C. Reed. Sub-Committee, Mr. Jellison.
Abby A. Scates. Special Instruction. Sub-Committee, Mr. Stevens.
Permelia Stevens. Special Instruction. Nub-Committee, Mr. Lawson.
Mo. 67 Merrimack Street.
Ruth E. ROWe.

Lois M. Rea.

sub-Committee, Mr. Winkley.


South Margin Street.
Sub-Committee, Mr. Winkley.

Old Hancock School-House, Hanover Street.


Delia F. Linsley. Sub-Committee, Mr. Lamson.
Harriet S. Lothrop. Sub-Committee, Mr. Jellison.
Harriet A. Farrow, Sub-Committee, Mr. King.

NORCROSS SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Alvan

Simonds, Chairman,

713 Federal Street.

Christopher A. Connor, Secretary, 710 Federal Street.


William A. Blenkinsop, 35 Broadway.

140

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

William H. Wescott, 115 Third Street.


Choate Burnham, 284 Broadway.

Edwin Briggs, 67 Dorchester Street.

William T. Brigham, 1279 Washington Street.


William W. Doherty, 17 Niles' Block.
(Vacancy.)
NoRCRoss scHool, FoR GIRLs, D STREET, CORNER OF FIFTH STREET.
Josiah A. Stearns, Master.
Martha A. Thompson, Master's As-

Caroline Blanchard, Head-Assistant,


Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 10.

sistant, Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1.


Jane P. Thompson, Head-Assistant,
Cl. I., Div. 2, Room 5.
Assistants.

Mary N. Moses, Cl. II., Div. 2,

Mary W. Conant, Cl. IV., Div. 1,

Room 2.

Room 8.

Elizabeth E. Iredale, Cl. II., Div. 3,

Frances L. Greene,
Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 9.

Room 3.

Sarah A. Gallagher, Cl. III., Div. 1,


Room 4.

Miranda A. Bolkcom, Cl. III., Div.


2, Room 6.

Elizabeth Bradfield,
Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room 11.
Juliette Wyman,
Cl. IV., Div. 4, Room 12.

Henrietta L. Jones, Cl. III., Div. 2,

Sarah J. Bliss, Teacher of Sewing.

Room 7.
PRIMARY

SCHOOLS

MATHER PRIMARY SCHOOL-HOUSE.

Broadway.
Laura A. Read.

Mary A. Mills.

Mary Kyle.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Doherty, Westcott and Brigham.


Mary H. Palmer.

Garafelia M. Morse.

Mary K Davis.
Sub-Committee, Messrs. Connor and Simonds.
Mary E. Fox.

Ann E. Newell, Special Instruction.

Sarah M. Brown.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Briggs, Blenkinsop and Burnham.


Sarah W. Cunningham, Special Instruction.
Sub-Committee, Messrs. Connor and Simonds.
Ophelia S. Newell, Special Instruction.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Doherty, Wescott and Brigham.

SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

141

PHILLIPS SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Loring Lothrop, Chairman, Chambers Street Chapel.


William A. Rust, Secretary, 9 Allen Street.
J. Baxter Upham, 31 Chestnut Street.

S. K. Lothrop, 12 Chestnut Street.


John F. Jarvis, 22 Leverett Street.

Dexter S. King, 34 Bowdoin Street.


Henry Burroughs, Jr., 82 Mount Vernon Street.
Linus M. Child, 54 West Cedar Street.
Orin T. Walker, 20 Leverett Street.
PHILLIPs scHOOL, PHILLIPs STREET.

James Hovey, Master,


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 13, 4th Story.
Amphion Gates, Sub-Master,
Cl. I., Div. 2, Room 6, 2d Story.

Elias H. Marston, Usher,

Cl. I., Div. 3, Room 2, 1st Story.


Pleasantine Cushman, Master's Asst,
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 14,4th Story.

Assistants.
Laura M. Porter,

Elvira M. Harrington,

Cl. II., Div. 1, Room9, 3d Story.


Lucy S. Nevins,
Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 10, 3d Story.

Anna E. Davis,

Hannah M. Sutton,

Ellen S. Pomeroy,

Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 11, 3d Story.


Georgiana H. Moore,
Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room 12, 3d Story.

Elizabeth R. Hodges,

Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 7, 2d Story.


Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 5, 2d Story.
Cl. IV., Div. 4, Room 1, 1st Story.
Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room 8, 2d Story.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Anderson Street.

Eliza A. Corthell, Sub-Committee, Mr. Jarvis.


Sarah Ingalls, Sub-Committee, Mr. Child.
Emeline D. Fish.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Child.


Joy Street.

Harriet H. King. Special Instruction.

Sub-Committee, Mr. King.

Phillips Street.
Caroline P. Eastman.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Upham.

Sarah A. M. Turner. sub-Committee,


Sub-Committee, Mr.
Mr. Walker.
King.

Caroline A. Morrill.

142

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Phillips School House.


Adelaide L. Jepson.

Special Instruction.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Lothrop.

PRESCOTT SCHOOL DISTRICT.


CoMMITTEE.

Thomas C. Marsh, Chairman, 47 Chelsea Street.


Washington B. Trull, Secretary, 3 Meridian Street.
Warren H. Cudworth, 1 Meridian Street.

Henry S. Washburn, 125 Webster Street.


Richard Beeching, 95 Princeton Street.
Albert Huse, 56 Princeton Street.
Orin T. Walker, 20 Leverett Street.

John F. Jarvis, 22 Leverett Street.

PRESCOTT SCHOOL, PRESCOTT STREET, EAST BOSTON.

James F. Blackinton, Master.


James W. Webster, Sub-Master,
Cl. I., Div. 1 and 2, Room 9, 3d
Story.
Roxellana Howard, Master's Assistant, Cl. I., Div. 1 and 2, Room 16,

Louisa S. Hotchkiss, Head-Assist


ant, Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 2, 1st
Story.
H. Elizabeth Deering, Head-Assist

ant, Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 10, 3d


Story.

3d Story.
Louisa M. Collyer, Head-Assistant,
Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 15, 3d Story.
Assistants.

Sarah E. Batcheller, Cl. II., Div. 2,


Room 12, 1st Story.
Ellenette Pillsbury, Cl. III., Div. 1
and 2, Room 14. 2d Story.

Harriet N. Weed, Cl. III., Div. 1 and


2, Room 6, 2d Story.
Frances H. Turner, Cl. IV., Div. 1
and 2, Room 5, 2d Story.

Mary D. Day, Cl. IV., Div. 1 and 2,

Ellen F. James, Sewing Teacher.

Room 13, 2d Story.


Anna G. De Silva, Cl. IV., Div. 3
and 4, Room 8, 2d Story.
PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

JPrescott School-House.
Hannah L. Manson.

Margaret A. Bartlett.

Mary A. Ford.

Caroline Ditson.

Isabel McCrillis.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Marsh, Trull, Walker, and Jarvis.

SCHOOL

143

DISTRICTS.

Chapel, Bennington Street.


Adelaide M. Googins.
Lucy E. Ring.
Sub-Committee, Messrs. Marsh and Walker.
Rice Block, Saratoga Street.
Almaretta J. Critchett.

Mary E. Gray.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Beeching and Jarvis.

QUINCY SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

William H. Page, Chairman, 48 Beach Street.


William T. Brigham, Secretary, 1279 Washington Street.
Henry C. Hunt, 15 Ash Street.
-

Samuel A. Green, 25 Kneeland Street.

Henry W., Harrington, 3 Corey Avenue.


Patrick Riley, 10 Lincoln Street.
John P. Reynolds, 170 Tremont Street.
W. H. Wescott, 115 Third Street.
John P. Ordway, 42 Bedford Street.
Samuel G. Bowdlear, 22 Upton Street.
H. P. Shattuck, 645 Washington Street.
QUINCY SCHOOL, TYLER STREET.

Chas. E. Valentine, Master.


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 13, 4th Story.
E. Frank Wood, Sub-Master.
Cl. I., Div. 2, Room 9, 3d Story.
Henry C. Bullard, Usher.

Annie M. Lund, 1st Head-Assistant.

Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 13, 4th Story.


Olive M. Page, 2d Head-Assistant.

Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 2, 1st Story.

Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 5, 2d Story.


Assistants.
Jane B. Furber.

Cl. II., Div. 3, Room 14, 4th Story.


Louisa B. Monroe.

Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 10, 3d Story.


Emily J. Tucker.
Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 12, 3d Story.
Mary E. Fogarty.
Cl. III., Div. 3, Room 11, 3d Story.
Delia A. Varney.
Cl. III., Div. 4, Room 6, 2d Story.

Maria C. Weeks.

Cl. IV., Div., 1, Room 8, 2d Story.


Ellen J. Frost.

Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 7, 2d Story.


Charlotte L. Wheelwright.
Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room 4, 1st Story.
Emily B. Peck.

Cl. IV., Div. 4, Room 1, 1st Story.


Ellen G. O'Leary.
Cl. IV., Div. 5, Room 3, 1st Story.

144

MUNICIPAL

PRIMARY

REGISTER.

SCHOOLS.

IEast Street.

Susan Frizzell. Sub-Committee, Mr. Riley.


Louisa Bowker. Sub-Committee, Mr. Harrington.
Mary L. Richards. Sub-Committee, Mr. Brigham.
Caroline D. Pollard. Sub-Committee, Mr. Page.
Lavonne E. Walbridge. Sub-Committee, Mr. Wescott.
Ellen E. Leach. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bowdlear.
Catharine R. Greenwood. Sub-Committee, Mr. Green.
Emily E. Maynard. Sub-Committee, Mr. Hunt.
Harriette A. Bettis. Sub-Committee, Mr. Shattuck.
Priscilla Johnson.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Reynolds.

Sarah E. Lewis. Sub-Committee, Mr. Ordway.


Elizabeth C. Frink. Sub-Committee, Mr. Ordway.

RICE SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Charles L. Flint, Chairman, 53 Union Park.

William B. Merrill, Secretary, 145 Concord Street.


Zachariah Jellison, 94 Shawmut Avenue.

Alden Speare, 15 East Brookline Street.


J. Coffin Jones Brown, 337 Tremont Street.

Samuel E. Floyd, 11 Davis Street.


Henry C. Hunt, 15 Ash Street.
Charles Hutchins, 34 Clarendon Street.

Samuel G. Bowdlear, 22 Upton Street.

RICE SCHOOL, WASHINGTON STREET, NEAR DOVER.

Lucius A. Wheelock, Master, Cl. I.,


Div. 1., Room 1, 3d Story.

Harriet D. Hinckley, Cl. II., Div.


2, Room 2, 3d Story.

David A. Caldwell, Sub-Master, Cl.

Clara M. Simonds, Cl. III., Div. 2

I., Div. 2, Room 3, 2d Story.

Amos M. Leonard, Usher, Cl. II.,


Div. 1, Room 7, 1st Story.

Florena Gray, 1st Head-Assistant,


Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1, 3d Story.

E. Maria Simonds, Head-Assistant,


Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 4, 2d Story.

Room 8, Basement.

Florence Marshall, Cl. III., Div. 3


Room 6, 1st Story.

Sarah Gavett, Cl. IV., Div. 1, Room


4, 2d Story.

Henrietta Jenkins, Cl. IV., Div. 2.


Room 2, 3d Story.

SCHOOL

Ella T. Gould, Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room


3, 2d Story.
Harriet W. Leatherbee, Cl. IV.,
Div. 4, Room 5, 1st Story.

DISTRICTS.

145

, Cl. IV., Div. 5, Room


9, Basement.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Suffolk Street.
Josephine G. Whipple. Sub-Committee, Mr. Merrill.
Georgiana A. Ballard. Sub-Committee, Mr. Floyd.
Francis M. Sylvester. Sub-Committee, Mr. Hunt.
Hannah E. Perry. Sub-Committee, Mr. Hutchins.
Maria Jenkins. Sub-Committee, Mr. Jellison.
Jane E. Haskell. Sub-Committee, Mr. Speare.
Way Street.
Mary Beal. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bowdlear.
Charlotte L. Young. Sub-Committee, Mr. Brown.
Anna L. Peirce. Sub-Committee, Mr. Jellison.

WASHINGTON AND DUDLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Ira Allen, Chairman, 61 Cabot Street, Roxbury.


George W. Adams, Secretary, 10 Read's Court.
James E. Marsh, 4 Guild's Building.
Benjamin H. Greene, 13 Porter Street.
George H. Monroe, Walnut, corner Rockland Street.
Cyrus C. Emery, 17 Clark Street.
Wm. H. Hutchinson, 70 Washington Street.
Joseph H. Streeter, 175 Washington Street.
John O. Means, 31 Elm Street.
WASHINGTON SCHOOL, wASHINGTON STREET.

Leverett M. Chase, Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1, 3d Story.


Assistants.

Anna M. Williams,

Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 1, 3d Story.


Harriet E. Davenport,

Cl. I. and II., Div. 2, Room 2, 3d


Story.

Mary E. Johnson,

Cl. I. and II., Div. 3, Room 3, 2d


Story.
Maria S. Whitney,

Cl. 1. and II., Div. 4, Room 4, 2d


Story.

146

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

Louisa J. Hovey,
Cl. I. and II., Div. 5, Room 5, 2d
Story.
Mira W. Pond,

Cl. I. and II., Div. 6, Room 6, 1st


Story.

Harriet A. Lewis,
Cl. I. and II., Div. 7, Room 7, 1st
Story.
Lydia H. Bowman,
Cl. I., Div. 8, in Gun-house, 1st
Story.

DUDLEY SCHOOL, BARTLETT STREET.

Sarah J. Baker, Principal, Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 1, 3d Story.


Assistants.

Julia P. Brooks,

Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 1, 3d Story.


Jane Leavitt,
Cl. I. and II., Div. 2, Room 2, 3d
Story.
Mary C. Whippey,
Cl. I. and II., Div. 3, Room 3, 2d
Story.

Helen J. Otis,
Cl. I. and II., Div. 4, Room 4, 2d
Story.
Eliza Brown,
Cl. I. and II., Div. 5, Room 5, 1st
Story.
Susan H. Blaisdell,
Cl. I. and II., Div. 7, in Gun-house.
Mary L. Gore,
Div. 6, Room 6, 1st Story.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Vernon Street.

Anna M. Stone,
Susannah Durant,

Catharine F. Mayall,
Abby S. Oliver.

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Streeter, Means and Hutchinson.


Sudbury Street.
Anna G. Fillebrown,
Cornelia J. Bills,
Mary E. Gardner,
Martha E. Page.
Sub-Committee, Messrs. Emery, Hutchinson and Adams.
Franklin Place.

Eunice Atwood,

Emma Parker.

Sarah J. Davis,

Sub-Committee, Messrs. Allen and March.


Edinboro' Street.

Emily L. Wilson,

Josephine Mansfield.
ub-Committee, Mr. Greene.
Munroe Street.

Martha Gerry,

Almira B. Russell.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Monroe.

SCHOOL

DISTRICTS.

147

WELLS SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

John F. Jarvis, Chairman, 22 Leverett Street.


Orin T. Walker, Secretary, 20 Leverett Street.
Loring Lothrop, Norfolk House.

S. H. Winkley, 5 Chambers Street.


Zachariah Jellison, 94 Shawmut Avenue.
William T. Rust, 9 Allen Street.
John A. Lamson, 1 Staniford Street.

John A. Stevens, 15 Cambridge Street.


S. Arthur Bent, 7 Court Square.
WELLS SCHOOL, CHAMBERS STREET CHAPEL.

Reuben Swan, Master,

Juliana Sparrell, Head-Assistant,


Cl. I., Div. 2.

Cl. I., Div. 1.

Mary S. Carter, Master's Head Asst.,


Cl. I., Div. 1.

Ella A. Baker, Head-Assistant,


Cl. I., Div. 3.

Assistants.

Elvira S. Smith,
Cl. II., Div. 1.

Mary T. Locke,
Cl. II., Div. 2.
Harriet A. Johnson,
Cl. III., Div. 1.

Elizabeth P. Winning,
Cl. IV., Div. 1.
Ellen M. Brown,
Cl. IV., Div. 2.
Matilda A. Gerry,
Cl. IV., Div. 3.

Mary M. Perry,
Cl. III., Div. 2.
PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

Poplar Street.
Lucy M. A. Redding. Sub-Committee, Mr. Winkley.
Maria W. Turner. Sub-Committee, Mr. Jellison.
Elizabeth W. Snow. Sub-Committee, Mr. Winkley.
Sarah C. Chevaillier. Sub-Committee, Mr. Lamson.
Elizabeth S. Foster. Sub-Committee, Mr. Jellison.
Mary S. Watts. Sub-Committee, Mr. Stevens.
Wall Street.

Adelaide A. Rea.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Walker.

Elizabeth D. McClure.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Bent.

Anna A. James. Sub-Committee, Mr. Walker.


Sarah A. Randall. Special Instruction. Sub-Committee, Mr. Rust.
Harriet O. Brown. Special Instruction. Sub-Committee, Mr. Rust.
Mary L. Bailey. Sub-Committee, Mr. Lothrop.

148

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

WINTHROP SCHOOL DISTRICT.


COMMITTEE.

Ezra Palmer, Chairman, 1 Tremont Place.

Henry P. Shattuck, Secretary, 645 Washington Street.


William H. Page, 48 Beach Street.
Samuel A. Green, 25 Kneeland Street.

Charles W. Storey, 8 Florence Street.


J. Coffin Jones Brown, 337 Tremont Street.

John P. Reynolds, 170 Tremont Street.


Charles C. Shackford, 59 Clarendon Street.

George F. Bigelow, 33 Essex Street.


John P. Ordway, 42 Bedford Street.
Samuel E. Floyd, 11 Davis Street.
WINTHROP SCHOOL, TREMONT, NEAR ELIOT STREET.
Robert Swan, Master,
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 14, 4th Story.
Susan A. W. Loring, Head-Assistant,
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 14, 4th Story.
May Gertrude Ladd, Head-Ass't,
Cl. I., Div. 2, Room 13, 4th Story.

Julia A. Jellison, Head-Assistant,


Cl. I., Div. 3, Room 1, 1st Story.
Almira Seymour, Head-Assistant,
Cl. II., Div. 1, Room 5, 2d Story.
Maria L. S. Ogden, Head-Assistant,

Cl. II., Div. 2, Room 9, 3d Story.

Assistants.

Elizabeth B. Swan,
Cl. I., Div. 1, Room 14, 4th Story.

Emma K. Valentine,
Cl. III., Div. 4, Room 6, 2d Story.

Elizabeth S. Emmons,

Caroline Nolen,

Cl. II., Div. 2, Tyler St., 3d Story.


Hannah H. Hosmer,

Cl. II., Div. 3, Room 10, 3d Story.


Ellen M. Dennie,

Cl. II., Div 4, Room 12, 3d Story.


Mary E. Davis,
Cl. III., Div. 1, Room 11, 3d Story.
Helen B. Walker,

Cl. III., Div. 2, Room 8, 2d Story.


Mary J. Danforth,
Cl. III., Div. 3, Room 7, 2d Story.

Cl. IV., Div. 1, Tyler St., 3d Story.


Maria L. Barney,

Cl. IV., Div. 2, Room 4, 1st Story.


Mary E. Holt,
Cl. IV., Div. 3, Room 3, 1st Story.
Rebecca R. Joslin,
Cl. IV., Div. 4, Room 2, 1st Story.
Hannah A. Rolfe, Teacher of Sewing.

SCHOOL

DISTRICTS.

PRIMARY SCHOOLS.
IHarrison Avenue.

Rebecca R. Thayer. Sub-Committee, Mr. Palmer.


Mary B. Brown. Sub-Committee, Mr. Ordway.
Tyler Street.
Frances Torrey.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Page.

Abby M. Mills. Sub-Committee, Mr. Brown.


Harrison Avenue.

Mary A. B. Gore. Sub-Committee, Mr. Reynolds.


Ella M. Seaverns. Sub-Committee, Mr. Shattuck.
Hudson Street.

Mary T. Farnham.

Sub-Committee, Mr. Palmer.


Tyler Street.

Henrietta Madigan. Sub-Committee, Mr. Floyd.


Abby J. Glover. Sub-Committee, Mr. Green.
Hudson Street.

Emma I. Baker. Sub-Committee, Mr. Shackford.


Mary F. Light. Sub-Committee, Mr. Bigelow.
Elizabeth A. Riley. Sub-Committee, Mr. Storey.

149

150

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

TRUANT

OFFICERS.

The City is divided into eight Truant Districts, to which the


officers are assigned as follows:

OFFICERS.

DISTRICTS.

SCHOOL DISTRICTS BELONGING.

Chase Cole.

North.

Eliot, Hancock.

Charles E. Turner.

East Boston.

Adams, Chapman, Lyman, Prescott.

Geo. M. Felch.

Central.

Bowdoin, Boylston, Mayhew, Phil


lips, Wells.

E. G. Richardson.

Southern.

Brimmer, Bowditch, Quincy, Win


throp.

Phineas Bates.

South Boston.

Bigelow, Lawrence, Lincoln, Nor


CrOSS.

A. M. Leavitt.

South.

Samuel McIntosh.

Roxbury,

Dwight, Everett, Franklin, Rice.


East

Dearborn and Dudley, and Wash


ington, East of Shawmut Avenue.

Roxbury, West

Comins, Francis Street, and Dud


ley and Washington, West of

District.
Edward F.Mecuen.

District.

Shawmut Avenue.

Each officer has order boxes at certain convenient places in

his district, where teachers may send notes when they desire
to report cases of truancy to him.
These boxes are located as follows:

O R D ER

B O X E S.

North.

Hancock School-house.

Police Station No. 1, Hanover Street.


East Boston.

Adams, Chapman and Prescott School-houses.


Police Station No. 7, Meridian Street.

TRUANT

151

OFFICERS.

Central.
Boylston and Mayhew School-houses.
Police Station No. 3, Joy Street.

Southern.

Brimmer and Quincy School-houses.


Police Station No. 4, La Grange Street.
south Boston.

Bigelow and Lincoln School-houses.


Police Station No. 6, Broadway, near C Street.
south.

Dwight and Rice School-houses.


Police Station No. 5, East Dedham Street.

Roxbury East.
Dearborn School-house.

Roxbury West.

Franklin Place, Washington and Comins School-houses.

The Truant Officers meet every Monday morning, at 103


o'clock, at the Truant Court Room,

in the Court

House.

Also, at 12 o'clock, on the first Monday of each month, at


the Room of the Superintendent of Schools.

WARD

OF FIC E R S.
1 86 8.

WARD No. 1.

Warden, Charles W. McClellan. Clerk, George H. Brackett.


Inspectors, Coleman Cook, Chas. E. Pearson, John M. Brooks,
Moses W. Daggett, W. H. Mosher.
WARD NO. 2.

Warden, James O. Fallon. Clerk, William J. Porter.


Inspectors, George Doherty, Thomas Boles, Patrick Doherty,
James Lee, Patrick Norton.
WARD NO. 3.

Warden, Thomas J. Gargan. Clerk, Cyrus H. Bates.


Inspectors, Wm. T. Leggett, Thomas B. Wells, Patrick Kier
nan, George W. Foster, Jr., George E. Littlefield.
WARD NO. 4.

Warden, Joseph L. Ross. Clerk, S. Frank Crockett.


Inspectors, Richard W. Sears, Frederick H. Adams, Charles A.
Whiting, Orrin S. Currier, Warren G. Fellows.
WARD NO. 5.

Warden, Francis Green. Clerk, Dennis J. Gorman.


Inspectors, Patrick Hayes, Barry Sullivan, Wm. F. Watson,
James Carney, John D. Mahar.

WARDS.

153

WARD No. 6.

Warden, G. T. W. Braman. Clerk, Clark Gifford.


Inspectors, Rufus B. Farrar, Chas. L. Fuller, John A. Grimes,
Charles H. Davies, Henry W. Johnson.
WARD No. 7.

Warden, M. J. Downey. Clerk, Wm. G. Bird.


Inspectors, James Flynn, Michael Corcoran, Jeremiah O'Dono
van, Cornelius Driscoll, Daniel T. Sullivan.
WARD NO. 8.

Warden, Eben R. Frost. Clerk, John H. Comer.


Inspectors, James F. Sayer, George Perley, George G. Elder,
Asa Lowe, Charles J. Hayden.
WARD NO. 9.

Warden, Laban L. Gardner. Clerk, William H. Tyler.


Inspectors, William M. Wise, Charles K. Darling, Charles H.
Prince, Daniel G. Spier, Calvin R. Page.
WARD NO. 10.

Warden, Jonathan A. Lane.

Clerk, Irving O. Whiting.

Inspectors, Henry F. Coe, Wm. C. Page, Edward F. Leland,


Giles M. Pease, Edward A. Hunting. .
WARD No. 11.

Warden, William F. Nichols. Clerk, Otis H. Pierce.


Inspectors, Sterne Morse, Levi C. Barney, Isaac D. Blodgett,
Elisha James, Ebed L. Ripley, George H. Drew.
WARD No. 12.

Warden, U. L. Pettingill.

Clerk, J. R. Grose.

Inspectors, Francis James, Joseph Frye, Winslow Nickerson,


Melvin Adams, James E. Miller.
18

154

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

WARD No. 13.

Warden, William H. Allen. Clerk, Francis M. Howe.


Inspectors, Henry A. Jones, Bartholomew Dolan, Geo. F.
Seaver, R. G. Southack, Charles H. Mitchell.
WARD No. 14.

Warden, Francis Freeman.

Clerk, Herbert Wiswall.

Inspectors, Giles H. Rich, E. D. Downes, S. H. Hunneman, Jr.


Daniel Wheeler, Anthony B. Shaw.
WARD No. 15.

Warden, James W. Ruth. Clerk, Geo. M. Hobbs.


Inspectors, Wm. W. Mayall, Geo. W. Decatur, J. H. Curley,
Henry Reinhardt, Michael H. Murray.

WARDS.

No. 1. All that part of the city called East Boston, and
all the Islands in the harbor.

No. 2. Beginning at the water at Warren Bridge; thence


by the centre of the Avenue leading from Warren Bridge to
Causeway Street; thence by the centre of Causeway Street to
Haverhill Street; thence through the centre of Haverhill

Street to Haymarket Square; thence across Haymarket Square


to the centre of Blackstone Street; thence by the centre of
Blackstone Street to Clinton Street; thence by the centre of
Clinton Street, and by a line in the same direction with Clinton

Street to the water; thence by the water to the point of


beginning.

No. 3. Beginning at the water at the easterly end of


Cambridge Bridge; thence by the centre of Cambridge Street
to Staniford Street; thence by the centre of Staniford Street to

WARDS.

155

Green Street; thence by the centre of Green Street to Leverett


Street; thence by the centre of Leverett Street to Causeway
Street; thence by the centre of Causeway Street to a line on
the northerly side of the Fitchburg depot to the water, and
thence by the water to the point of beginning.
No. 4.Beginning at the water at the end of Clinton Street;
thence by the centre of Clinton Street to Blackstone Street;
thence by the centre of Blackstone Street to Haymarket
Square; thence across Haymarket Square to Haverhill Street;
thence by the centre of Haverhill Street to Causeway Street;
thence by the centre of Causeway Street to Leverett Street;
thence by the centre of Leverett Street to Green Street; .
thence by the centre of Green Street to Staniford Street;
thence by the centre of Staniford Street to Cambridge Street;
thence by the centre of Cambridge Street to Temple Street;
thence by the centre of Temple Street and Mount Vernon Street
to Park Street; thence by the centre of Park Street to Tre
mont Street; thence by the centre of Tremont Street to Win
ter Street; thence by the centre of Winter Street to Washing
ton Street; thence by the centre of Washington Street to Milk
Street; thence by the centre of Milk Street to India Street;
thence across India Street by a straight line to the water on the

south side of Central Wharf; thence by the water to the point


of beginning.

No. 5. Beginning at the water on the south side of Cen


tral Wharf, thence across India Street by a straight line to Milk
Street; thence by the centre of Milk Street to Washington
Street; thence by the centre of Washington Street to Winter
Street; thence by the centre of Winter Street to Tremont
Street; thence by the centre of Tremont Street to Boylston
Street; thence by the centre of Boylston Street to Washington
Street; thence by the centre of Washington Street to Beach
Street; thence by the centre of Beach Street to Federal Street;
thence by the centre of Federal Street to Mount Washington

156

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

Avenue; thence by the northerly side of Mount Washington


Avenue to the water, thence by the water to the point of
beginning.
No. 6. Beginning at the water, at the easterly end of
Cambridge Bridge, thence by the centre of Cambridge Street
to Temple Street; thence by the centre of Temple and Mount
Vernon Streets to Park Street; thence by the centre of Park
Street to Tremont Street; thence by the centre of Tremont
Street to Boylston Street; thence by the centre of Boylston

Street to Arlington Street; thence by the centre of Arlington


Street to Commonwealth Avenue; thence by the centre of Com
monwealth Avenue to the boundary line between Boston and
Roxbury; thence by said boundary line in a northerly direction
to the water; thence by the water to the point of beginning.
No. 7.Beginning at the northerly side of Mount Washing
ton Avenue; thence by the northerly side of Mount Washington
Avenue to the centre of Federal Street; thence by the centre of
Federal Street to Beach Street; thence by the centre of Beach

Street to Albany Street; thence by the centre of Albany Street


to Curve Street; thence by the centre of Curve Street to Harri
son Avenue; thence by the centre of Harrison Avenue to Dover
Street; thence by the southerly side of Dover Street Bridge to
the water line of South Boston (so called); thence by water
line to the Old Colony and Newport Railroad track at the

crossing in Dorchester Avenue; thence by the track of the Old


Colony and Newport Railroad to E Street; thence by the centre
of E Street to the water, and thence, by the water line, includ
ing the property known as Boston Wharf, to the point of begin
ning.

8.Beginning

at the centre of Boylston Street at its


junction with Carver Street, thence by the centre of Boylston
Street to Washington Street; thence by the centre of Washing
ton Street to Beach Street; thence by the centre of Beach Street
to Albany Street; thence by the centre of Albany. Street to
No.

WARDS.

157

Curve Street; thence by the centre of Curve Street to Harrison


Avenue; thence by the centre of Harrison Avenue to Indiana

Street; thence by the centre of Indiana Street to Washington


Street; thence by the centre of Washington Street to Pleasant
Street; thence by the centre of Pleasant Street to Carver

Street; thence by the centre of Carver Street to the point of


beginning.

No. 9.Beginning at the centre of Carver Street at its


junction with Boylston Street, thence by the centre of Carver
Street to Pleasant Street; thence by the centre of Pleasant

Street to Washington Street; thence by the centre of Washing


ton Street to Indiana Street; thence by the centre of Indiana
Street to Harrison Avenue; thence by the centre of Harrison
Avenue to Florence Street; thence by the centre of Florence
Street, crossing Washington Street, to Chapman Street; thence
by the centre of Chapman Street to Tremont Street; thence by
the centre of Tremont Street, crossing Berkeley Street, to
Warren Avenue; thence by the centre of Warren Avenue, cross
ing Columbus Avenue, to Newton Street; thence by the centre
of Newton Street to the track of the Boston and Providence

Railroad; thence by the track of the Boston and Providence

Railroad to the boundary line between Boston and Roxbury;


thence by the boundary line between Boston and Roxbury to its
junction with Commonwealth Avenue; thence by the centre of
Commonwealth Avenue to Arlington Street; thence by the cen
tre of Arlington Street to Boylston Street; and thence by the
centre of Boylston Street to the point of beginning.
No. 10.Beginning at the junction of Florence Street with

Harrison Avenue; thence by the centre of Florence Street,


crossing Washington Street, to Chapman Street; thence by the
centre of Chapman Street to Tremont Street; thence by the
centre of Tremont Street, crossing Berkeley Street, to Warren
avenue; thence by the centre of Warren Avenue to Brookline

Street; thence by the centre of Brookline Street, crossing


Albany Street in a direct line to the water; thence by the water

158

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

line to the northerly side of Dover Street Bridge; thence by the


centre of Harrison Avenue to the point of beginning.
No. 11.Beginning at the boundary line between Boston
and Roxbury on the Boston and Providence Railroad; thence by
the centre of the track of the Boston and Providence Railroad

to Newton Street; thence by the centre of Newton Street, cross


ing Columbus Avenue, to Warren Avenue; thence by the centre
of Warren Avenue to Brookline Street; thence by the centre of

Brookline Street, crossing Albany Street in a direct line to the


water; thence by the water to the boundary line between Boston
and Roxbury; thence by said boundary line to the point of
beginning.

No. 12. All that section of the city now known as South
Boston, lying south of the centre of E Street and south and
southwest of the track of the Old Colony and Newport Railroad
from its crossing at Dorchester Avenue.

No. 13. Beginning at the centre of Washington Street at


the line heretofore existing between Boston and Roxbury;
thence by the centre of said street to Guild Row; thence by the
centre of Guild Row to Dudley Street; thence by the centre of

Dudley Street to Eustis [now Dudley] Street; thence by the


centre of Eustis [now Dudley] Street to the boundary line
between Roxbury and Dorchester; thence on said boundary
line to the boundary line heretofore existing between Boston

and Roxbury; thence on said boundary line between Boston


and Roxbury to the point of beginning.
No. 14. Beginning at the centre of Washington Street at
the boundary line heretofore existing between Boston and Rox

bury; thence by the centre of said street to Guild Row; thence


by the centre of Guild Row to Dudley Street; thence by the
centre of Dudley Street to Eustis [now Dudley] Street; thence
by the centre of Eustis [now Dudley] Street to the boundary
line between Roxbury and Dorchester; thence on said boundary

line to the boundary line between West Roxbury and Roxbury;


thence on said boundary line between West Roxbury and Rox

WARD

159

ROOMS.

bury to the centre of Shawmut Avenue, at the point where it


crosses said line; thence by the centre of Shawmut Avenue to
Bartlett Street; thence by the centre of Bartlett Street to Dud

ley Street; thence by the centre of Dudley Street to Putnam


Street; thence by the centre of Putnam Street to Shailer Avenue,
so called; thence by the centre of Shailer Avenue, so called, to
Cabot Street; thence by the centre of Cabot Street to Culvert
Street; thence by the centre of Culvert Street to Tremont

Street; thence by the centre of Tremont Street, to the boundary


line heretofore existing between Boston and Roxbury; thence

by said boundary line between Boston and Roxbury to the


point of beginning.
-

No. 15. Beginning at the centre of Tremont Street, at the

boundary line heretofore existing between Boston and Roxbury;


thence by the centre of Tremont Street to Culvert Street;
thence by the centre of Culvert Street to Cabot Street; thence

by the centre of Cabot Street to Shailer Avenue, so called;


thence by the centre of Shailer Avenue, so called, to Putnam
Street; thence by the centre of Putnam Street to Dudley Street;
thence by the centre of Dudley Street to Bartlett Street; thence

by the centre of Bartlett Street to Shawmut Avenue; thence by


the centre of Shawmut Avenue to the boundary line between
West Roxbury and Roxbury; thence on said line between
West Roxbury and Roxbury to the boundary line between
Brookline and Roxbury; thence on said boundary line between
Brookline and Roxbury to the boundary line heretofore
existing between Boston and Roxbury; thence on said boundary
line between Boston and Roxbury to the point of beginning.

WARD ROOMS.

Lyman School House, Meridian Street.

2
3

Ward Room, North Bennet Street.


Methodist Church, North Russell Street.

160

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Faneuil Hall.

Harrison Avenue, near Essex Street.


Phillips School-house, Anderson Street.
Mather School-house, Broadway.
School-room, Warren Street.
Westry of Church, on Church Street.
10 Rice School-house, Washington Street.
11 School-house, Concord Street.
12 Dorchester Street, near Broadway.
13
14

Hook and Ladder House, Eustis Street.


Old Gun-house, Putnam Street.

15

Engine-house, Centre Street.

CITY DEBT AT DIFFERENT PERIODS.

1858 Jan'y 1, $3,421,038 66 | 1861 Jan'y 1, $3,149,199 77


1859

3,007,097 72 | 1862

1860

3,504,558 65
1863 exclusive of Water Debt and War Loans,
1864

&

44

1865

44

44

4&

1866

44

40

44

1867

44

44

44

(Boston,)
(Roxbury,)

1868

Total,

3,003,099 77
2,158,093
3,134,035
3,331,182
3,572,920
4,020,900

45
80
94
38
80

4,128,127,10
991,456,00
5,119,583,10

POPULATION AT DIFFERENT PERIODS.

1810 .
.
.
33,787 | 1855
1820
.
.
. . 43,298 | 1860
1830 .
.
.
61,392 | 1864
1840
.
.
. 85,000 | 1865

1845 .
1850

. . .
-

114,366

1866

. 138,788

1868

.
.

.
.

.
.

.
.

.
.
.

.
-

160,508
177,002
182,000
192,324

200,000
.

240,000

APPOINTMENT OF WARIOUS CITY OFFICERS.

161

MODES AND TIMES OF APPOINTMENT OF THE VARI


OUS CITY OFFICERS.

By virtue of an Ordinance which passed the City Council of


Boston, June 14, 1863, all City Officers required by the City

Ordinances to be elected or appointed by the concurrent vote of


the City Council, or to be appointed by the Mayor, by and with
the advice and consent of the Board of Aldermen, excepting
those officers the time of whose election or appointment is other
wise prescribed by the statutes of the Commonwealth; also
excepting the Treasurer, Auditor and Assessors, shall be elected

or appointed, as the case may be, on the first Monday of February


in each year. or within sixty days thereafter, and shall enter on the

duties of their respective offices on the first Monday of April


following.
The officers comprised in the above exceptions are elected at
the times and in the modes following:

Trustees of Public Library Concurrent


Vote

January.

Trustees of City Hospital Concurrent


Vote .
. January or February.

Directors for Public Institutions Con


Current Vote

. January or February.
February.

Trustees of Mount Hope Cemetery

Assessors and Assistant Assessors Con


current Vote

. February or March.

Sealers of Weights and Measures and

Charcoal Baskets Mayor and Alder


Inen

March or April.

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters


Concurrent vote

March or April.

Measurers of Leather Mayor and Al


dermen

City Crier Mayor and Aldermen

April.

May.

162

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

City and County Treasurer In Con


vention

Auditor of Accounts Concurrent vote

Joint Special Committee to examine


Bonds of City Officers

Constables Mayor and Aldermen

May.
May.
June.

September.

ORATOR'S OF BOSTON.
APPOINTED BY THE PUBLIC AUTHORITIES.

On the Anniversary of the Boston Massacre, March 5, 1770.


1771 James Lowell, A. M.

1778 Jonathan Williams Austin.

1772 Gen. Joseph Warren.

1779 Hon. William Tudor.

1773 Benjamin Church, M. D.

1780 Hon. Jonathan Mason.

1774 Hon. John Hancock.

1781 Hon. Thomas Dawes,

1775 Gen. Joseph Warren.

1782 Hon. Geo. Richards Minot.

1776 Rev. Peter Thacher.

1783 Thomas Welsh, M. D.

1777 Benjamin Hichborn.


On the Anniversary of the National Independence, July 4, 1776.
1783 John Warren, M. D.

1799 Hon. John Lowell.

1784 Benjamin Hichborn.

1800 Hon. Joseph Hall.

1785 John Gardiner.

1801 Charles Paine.

1786 Jonathan Loring Austin.

1802 Rev. William Emerson.

1787 Hon. Thomas Dawes.

1803 Hon. William Sullivan.

1788 Hon. Harrison Gray Otis,

1804 Thomas Danforth, M. D.

1789 Samuel Stillman, D. D.

1805 Warren Dutton.

1790 Edward Gray.

1806 Francis Dana Channing.

1791 Thomas Crafts.

1807 Hon. Peter O. Thacher.

1792 Joseph Blake.


1793 Hon. John Q. Adams.
1794 Hon. John Phillips.

1808 Andrew Ritchie, Jr.


1809 William Tudor, Jr.

1795 Hon. George Blake.

1811 Hon. James Savage.

1796 John Lothrop, Jr.

1812 Benjamin Pollard.

1797 John Callender.


1798 Hon. Josiah Quincy.

1814 Benjamin Whitwell.

1810 Alexander Townsend.

1813 Hon. E. St. Loe Livermore.

ORATOR'S

OF

BOSTON.

163

1815 Hon. Lemuel Shaw.

1842 Hon. Horace Mann.

1816

1843 Hon. Chas. F. Adams.

1817
1818

George Sullivan.
Prof. E. Tyrrell Channing.
Hon. F. Calley Gray.

1844
1845

Hon. Peleg W. Chandler.


Hon. Charles Sumner.

1819 Hon. Franklin Dexter.

1846 Fletcher Webster.

1820
1821

Hon. Theodore Lyman, Jr.


Hon. C. Greely Loring.

1847

1822

Hon. John Chipman Gray.

1849

Hon. T. Greaves Cary.

1848 Hon. Joel Giles.

Wm. Whitwell Greenough.


Edwin Percy Whipple.

1823 Charles Pelham Curtis.

1850

1824 Francis Bassett.

1851 Hon. C. Theodore Russell.

1825
1826

Charles Sprague.
Hon. Josiah Quincy.

1852
1853

Rev. Thomas Starr King.


Timothy Bigelow.

1827 William Powell Mason.

1854 Rev. Andrew L. Stone.

1828 Bradford Sumner.

1855 Rev. Alonzo A. Miner.

1829 Hon. J. Trecothick Austin.

1856

1830 Hon. Alex. H. Everett.

1857

1831

1858 John Somers Holmes.

Hon. E. Griffin Parker.


Rev. W. Rounsville Alger.

1833

Hon. J. Gorham Palfrey.


Hon. Josiah Quincy, Jr.
E. Goldsborough Prescott.

1834

Richard Sullivan Fay.

1861

1835

Hon. G. Stillman Hillard.

1862 Hon. Geo. Ticknor Curtis.

1836

Henry Willis Kinsman.


Hon. Jonathan Chapman.

1863

1832

1837

1859

Hon. Theophilus Parsons.


O. Wendell Holmes, M.D.

1864 Hon. Thomas Russell.

1838 Rev. Hubbard Winslow.

1865

1839 Ivers James Austin.

1866

1840 Thomas Power.

1867

1841

George Sumner.

1860 Hon. Edward Everett.

Rev. Jacob M. Manning.


Rev. S. K. Lothrop, D. D.
Rev. Geo. H. Hepworth.

George Ticknor Curtis.

N. B. All the above orations have been printed at the request

of the City Council, with the exception of those delivered by .


Benjamin Pollard, Francis Dana Channing, and Thomas Starr
King. The oration of Rev. Mr. Alger was printed by order of
the City Council in 1864.

164

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

SELECTMEN.

Terms of Service of the Members of the Board of Selectmen.of the


Town of Boston, from 1799 to 1821 inclusive.

Charles Bulfinch, 1799 to 1817.*

Joseph Austin, 1813 to 1819.

David Tilden, 1799 to 1808.

Robert Williams, 1813 to 1816.


Edmund Hart, 1815.

Russell Sturgis, 1799 to 1803.


Joseph Howard, 1799 to 1803.
Ebenezer Hancock,1799 to 1800.
William Porter, 1799 to 1811.

Wm. Sherburne, 1789 to 1803.


Joseph May, 1799.
Samuel Cobb, 1799.
John Tileston, 1800 to 1806.

Ebenezer Oliver, 1800 to 1819.


Jonathan Hunnewell, 1802 to

George G. Lee, 1816.


Turner Phillips, 1816 to 1819.

Henry Bass, 1817 to 1819.


Samuel Dorr, 1817 to 1819.

Enoch Silsby, 1817 to 1819.


Henry Farnham, 1818.
Lemuel Shaw, 1819.
Benjamin Austin, 1820.
Daniel Baxter, 1820, 1821.

John May, 1804 to 1812.

Jonathan Loring, 1820, 1821.


Benjamin T. Wells, 1820.

Francis Wright, 1804 to 1812.


Jonathan Chapman,1804 to1808.
John Bray, 1806 to 1816.

Eliphalet Williams, 1820, 1821.


George Brinley, 1820.

1819.

Samuel Billings, 1820, 1821.

Jeremiah Fitch, 1820, 1821.


Abraham Babcock, 1820, 1821.
David W. Child, 1821.

Joseph Kettle, 1807 to 1808.


Nathan Webb, 1809 to 1814.
Joseph Foster, 1809 to 1815.
Benjamin Weld, 1809 to 1815.

Robert Fennely, 1821.

Joseph Lovering, 1812 to 1819.

Samuel A Wells, 1821.

* Vote of thanks given for 22 years of service, in 19 of which he filled the office of Chair
man of the Board.

C A. T A L O G U E
OF THE

. GOVERNMENT OF THE CITY OF BOSTON,


IN CHRONoLogICAL ORDER OF THEIR SERVICE,
FROM ITS

INSTITUTION, MAY 1, 1822, To JANUARY 1, 1868.


WITH

AN

IN DE X.

CITY GOVERNMENT.

MAYORS.

Names and Terms of Service of the several Mayors of the CITY OF


BoSTON, from 1822 to the present time.
NAME.

1 *John Phillips,

Place and Date of Birth.

Died.

. . . . . . Boston . . . . Nov. 26, 1770 May

2 *Josiah Quincy . . . . . .

or'".

29, 1823

1822 . . . 1

1, 1864

182328 . . 6

8, 1765 | Oct. 28, 1848

182931. .. 3

. . . . Feb.

4, 1772

July

3 *Harrison Gray Otis . . . .

. . . . Oct.

4 *Charles Wells

. . . . Dec. 30, 1786 June 3, 1866 | 183233. .. 1


. . . . Feb. 19, 1792 July 17, 1849 | 1834-35. . 2

. . . . . .

5 *Theodore Lyman, Jr., .

st

6 *Samuel T. Armstrong . . . Dorchester . . Apr. 29, 1784 March 26, 1850 | 1836 . . . 1
7 *Samuel A. Eliot . . . . . Boston . . . . Mar. 5, 1798 || Jan.
8 *Jonathan Chapman . . . .

29, 1862 | 183739. .3

. . . . Jan. 23, 1807 May 25, 1848

1840-42. .. 3

9 *Martin Brimmer . . . . . Roxbury . . . June 8, 1793 April 25, 1847 | 184344. .. 2


10 *Thomas A. Davis . . . . Brookline . . Dec. 11, 1798 || Nov. 22, 1845

1845 . . . 1

11

Josiah Quincy, Jr. . . . . Boston . . . . Jan. 17, 1802 . . . . . . . . .

184648. .3

12

John P. Bigelow . . . . . Groton . . . . Aug. 25, 1797 . . . . . . . .

1849-51 . .3

13 *Benjamin Seaver . . . . . Roxbury . . . Apr. 12, 1795 | Feb. 14, 1856

1852-53. .. 2

14

Jerome V. C. Smith . . . Conway, N.H., July 20, 1800 | . . . . . . . .

185455 . .2

15

Alexander H. Rice . . . . Newton

. . . Aug. 30, 1818 . . . . . . . .

1856-57 . .2

16
17

Frederic W. Lincoln, Jr. Boston . . . . Feb. 27, 1817 | . . . . . . . .


Joseph M. Wightman . .
st
. . . . Oct. 19, 1812 | . . . . . . . .

1861-62 . . 2

185860. .. 3

18

Frederic W. Lincoln, Jr.

. . . . Feb. 27, 1817 | . . . . . . . .

1863-66 . . 4

19

Otis Norcross . . . . . .

ts

. . . . Nov. 2, 1811 | . . . . . . . .

1867 . . . 1

20

Nathaniel B. Shurtleff .

. . . . June 29, 1810 | . . . . . . . .

1868

The asterisk denotes the deceased.

The election of Mayor for 1845 was more warmly contested


than in any former year. There were not less than eight sev

168

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

eral ballotings by the citizens. At the eighth trial, on the


twenty-first of February, Thomas A. Davis was elected.
In the mean time, from January to February 27, 1845, Wil
liam Parker, one of the aldermen, having been elected Chair
man of the Board of Aldermen, performed the duties of Mayor.
On the sixth of October, Thomas A. Davis, being in declin
ing health, resigned the office of Mayor, which resignation,
however, was not accepted by the City Council; and on the
twenty-second of November he died, being the first Mayor who
has died in office since the organization of the City Government
in 1822.

On the eleventh of December, Josiah Quincy, Jr., was elected


Mayor by the City Council for the unexpired term of 1845.
Benson Leavitt, one of the Board of Aldermen, acted as
Chairman of the Board in the interval between the death of

Mr. Davis and the election of Mr. Quincy.


In 1851, Benjamin Seaver, having already been elected an
Alderman of the City for 1852, was afterwards chosen Mayor
for said year.

At the commencement of the ensuing municipal year, 1852,

he resigned as an Alderman, and accepted the office of Mayor.


The election of Mayor for 1854 was continued through three

ballotings, from December 12, 1853, to January 9, 1854. In


the mean time, the duties of Mayor were performed by Benja
min L. Allen, Chairman of the Board of Aldermen.

ALDERMEN.

Nathaniel P. Russell, Daniel Baxter, Joseph H. Dorr, re

elected; and Thomas B. Wales, and Redford Webster, elected


1825, declined.
George Blake, re-elected for 1826, declined.
John Stevens, elected for 1832, died prior to the organization.
James Savage, elected for 1834, declined.

CITY

169

GOVERNMENT.

In 1845 William Parker resigned.

In 1848 George E. Head resigned, and was afterwards chosen


one of the Principal Assessors.
In 1853 Lyman Perry, Esq., who had been duly elected an
Alderman, died before his qualification.
In 1856 Levi B. Merriam, Esq., died while in office.
In 1858 Rufus B. Bradford resigned, and was afterwards
appointed Measurer of Grain.

In 1859 Timothy A. Sumner, Esq., resigned on account of ill


ness, and soon afterwards died.

At the municipal election in 1852, nine Aldermen had a


majority of ballots; but in accordance with the statute, the
eight who had the highest number of votes were declared
elected.

The Municipal Government for 1855 was the first one that
was organized under the new or revised City Charter, which

provided for the annual election of twelve Aldermen.


For reports of contested seats in the Board of Aldermen, see
City Document No. 7, for 1861, and City Document No. 16, for
1862.
COMMON COUNCIL.

William Bowes Bradford, Ward 3, elected 1822, did not


qualify himself, declining to be sworn, there being then no pro
vision for affirmation, except for Quakers.
Lucius Manlius Sargent, Ward 6, elected for 1827, declined.
Henry D. Gray and Isaac Harris, Ward 1; Eleazer Howard,
Ward 2, and Joseph H. Thayer, Ward 9, elected for 1828; also,
Holmes Hinckley, Ward 11, for 1845, declined prior to the or
ganization.
Samuel Thaxter, Ward 6, elected for 1830, declined.
William Foster, Ward 6, elected for 1831, declined.
John Boles, Ward 3, re-elected for 1838, declined.

The Junior of George Morey, omitted 1829.


19

170

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

Asa Adams, Ward 3, took the intermediate name of Perry,


1830.

The Junior of Joshua Seaver, Ward 6, omitted 1833.

The Junior of Henry Fowle, Ward 2, omitted 1837.


The Junior of Francis Brinley, Ward 10, omitted 1838.
The Junior of Ezra Lincoln, omitted 1851.
The Junior of William B. Fowle, omitted in 1865.
Ezra Forristall, Ward 6, resigned in May, 1853, and was
elected Superintendent of Health.

Daniel J. Coburn, Ward 5, resigned in April, 1855, and was


thereafter appointed Chief of Police.
Edward F. Robinson resigned in May, 1861, and was elected
a Principal Assessor.
Charles J. McCarthy, Ward 7, resigned in March, 1862, and
was appointed Paymaster of Relief Funds to Families of Sol
diers in the United States service from Boston.

There have been eleven successfully contested elections.

The first, February, 22, 1830, vacated the seat of a member


from Ward 6, on the ground that closing the poll before the
hour at which the voters were notified it would be closed, was a
violation of the rights of the voters.
The second, May 7, 1835, vacated the seats of the members

of Ward 3, who were returned as having been elected at an


adjourned meeting, December 11, 1834, on the ground of irreg

ular proceeding, to render the whole number of votes certain by


taking the highest number of votes for candidates on each oppos
ing ticket; adjournment of the meeting by the sole authority of
the Warden, and other irregularities, at the annual election,
December 8.

The third case, March 7, 1830, vacated the seats of three


members of Ward 12, on the ground that a number of illegal
voters, sufficient to affect the choice, voted at the polls.

The fourth, February 9, 1843, vacated the seats of three


members from Ward 1, returned as elected at the adjourned

CITY

GOVERNMENT.

171

meeting, December 14, on the ground that four votes for non
resident candidates, (after having been first thrown out by the
ward officers) were counted at the annual election, December
12, thereby preventing the choice of two other candidates, who,

by excluding the said four votes, were by the decision of the


Council declared elected, leaving one vacancy.
The fifth, February 27, 1851, vacated the seats of two mem
bers from Ward 3, on the ground that they were chosen at an
adjourned meeting, which was illegally held. At the subsequent
trial the same members were again returned to the Common
Council.

The sixth, January 20, 1853, vacated the seats of three


members of Ward 3, on the ground that they were chosen at
an adjourned meeting which was illegally held.
The seventh, in accordance with the Report of the Committee
on Elections, vacated the seats of three members from Ward 11,

on the ground that the Mayor and Aldermen had no right to


issue warrants for election of members of the Common Council,

after the annual election, and before the organization of the


Government elect.

But inasmuch as the elections in question

were conducted bona fide and no other informality was apparent,


and as this custom of supplementary elections had been in
vogue for twenty years, the members thus elected were by the
votes of the Common Council declared entitled to their seats.

The eighth, March 19, 1863, in accordance with the Report


of the Committee on Elections, vacated the seat of a member
from Ward 3, on the ground that at the time of his election he
was not an inhabitant of that ward.

Before a decision was

reached on this point the member in question resigned.


The ninth, April 9, 1863, vacated the seats of the entire dele
gation from Ward 10, on the ground that more votes were

returned than there were persons who voted in that ward at the
* This fact was admitted, though not stated in the Report of the Committee.

172

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

municipal election, occasioned by mistake, probably, in the


counting of the ballots, the variation being so great as to
affect the election of the whole delegation. At the subsequent
trial the same members were again returned to the Common
Council.

The tenth, January 24, 1867, vacated the seat of a member


from Ward 3, who was chosen at an adjourned meeting (held on
account of a tie vote at the regular meeting, Dec. 10, 1866), on

the ground that the Polls, at said adjourned meeting, were not
kept open the same number of hours as were required by the
original warrant.

At a subsequent election the same member

was returned to the Common Council. [See City Doc. 12, for
1867.]
The eleventh, January 16, 1868, vacated the seat of a mem
ber returned for Ward 10, because by the count of the origi
nal ballots cast in said Ward it appeared that another person
was chosen.

CITY

173

GOVERNMENT.

1822.
MAYOR.

* JOHN PHILLIPS.
ALDERMEN.

*Samuel Billings,
*Ephraim Eliot,
*Jacob Hall,

*Joseph Head,
*Nathaniel Pope Russell,
*Joseph Jenkins,
*Bryant Parrott Tilden.
*Joseph Lovering,
*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

COMMON COUNCIL,

Ward 1.

Ward 5.

*Thaddeus Page,
*Charles Wells,

*Thomas Kendall,

Ward 9.
*Jonathan Davis,
*Hawkes Lincoln,

*Horatio Gates Ware,

*William Prescott, President,

*Simon Wilkinson.

*Isaac Winslow.
Ward 6.

*John Wells.
Ward 10.
*Andrew Drake,

*William Barry,

Ward 2.

*Martin Bates,
Benjamin Lamson,
*Henry Orne,
*Joseph Stodder.
Ward 3.
*Theodore Dexter,
*Joshua Emmons,
*Samuel Jones.

(See Notes.)
Ward 4.
*Joseph Cooledge,

George Washington Coffin,

*Samuel Appleton,
*Thomas Motley,
*Jesse Shaw,

*Daniel Lewis Gibbens,


*David Collson Mosely,

*Williain Sullivan.

*Isaac Stevens.

Ward 7.
*Jonathan

*George Watson Brimmer,

Ward 11.

*Patrick Tracy Jackson,


*Augustus Peabody,
*Enoch Silsby.
Ward 8.
*David Watts Bradlee,

*Asa Bullard,

*Barzillai Holmes,
*Winslow Lewis.
Ward 12.

*Samuel Perkins

*Peter Chardon Brooks,

*Cyrus Alger,
*John French,

*Robert Gould shaw,

*James Perkins,
*Benjamin Russell.

*John Howe,
Moses Williams,

Joel Thayer.

*THoMAs CLARK, Clerk.

1823.
MAYOR.

*JosIAH QUINCY. .
ALDERMEN.

*Daniel Baxter,

*Joseph Hawley Dorr,

*Caleb Eddy,

*George Odiorne,

*Ashur Benjamin,
*Enoch Patterson,

*Stephen Hooper,

*David Weld Child,

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

COMMON COUNCIL,

Ward 1.
*Thaddeus Page,

*Simon Wilkinson,
*John Elliot,

*Joseph Wheeler.
Ward 2.

Ward 5.

*Thomas Kendall,
*Isaac Winslow,
*Elias Haskell,
*John Sullivan Perkins.

d gs,

Ward 9.
*Jonathan Davis,
*Hawkes Lincoln,

*John Wells, President,


*Lewis Tappan.
Ward 10.
*Aaron Baldwin,
*David Francis, .

*Martin Bates,
Benjamin Lamson,

Joseph
h Stacy
*Joel
Prouty,

*Joseph Stodder,

*John Stevens,

*Francis Johonnot Oliver,

*John Parker Boyd.

*William Wright.

*Thomas Beale Wales.


Ward 11.
*Asa Bullard,

Ward 3.

*Theodore Dexter,
*Samuel Jones,
*John Richardson Adan,

*John Damarisque Dyer.

*c:
oseph Cooledge
*Samuel Perkins,
*Robert Gould Shaw,
*Henry Farnum,

J.Ward 7.

*Jonathan Amory,
*Enoch Silsby,
*Samuel Swett,
*Charles Pelham Curtis.
Ward 8.

*Benjamin Russell,
James Savage,
*Eliphalet Williams.
Samuel King Williams.
*THOMAS CLARK, Clerk.

*Charles Howard,
*Josiah Stedman,
*Joseph Willett,
Ward 12.

*Samuel Bradlee,
*Noah Brooks,
*Francis Jackson,

Charles Sprague. .

174

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

1824.
MAYOR.

*JOSIAH QUINCY,
ALDERMEN,

*Daniel Baxter,

*Ashur Benjamin,
*Enoch Patterson,
*Caleb Eddy,

*George Odiorne,
*David Weld Child,

*Joseph Hawley Dorr,

*Stephen Hooper, (died Sep


tember,

*Cyrus Alger, (From

No

vember.)

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

COMMON COUNCIL,

Ward 5.
*Elias Haskell,

Ward 1.
*John Elliot,
*Joseph Wheeler,
*Michael Tombs,
Ward 2.

Ward 9.
*Jonathan Davis,
*Eliphalet Porter Hartshorn, *Hawkes Lincoln,
*George Washington Otis,
John Ballard,
*Winslow Wright.
John Chipman Gray.
Ward 10.

*William Little, Jr.,

ose
*Joel

*William Barry,

tac
*s:#"

astings
g8,

*Oliver Reed,

*Joseph Stone,

*William Wright,

*Thaddeus Page.
Ward 3.

*Thomas Wiley.
Ward 7.

*John Richardson Adan,


*John Damarisque Dyer,

*Charles Pelham Curtis,

*Edward Page,

*William Goddard,
*Elijah Morse,

*William Sprague.

*Isaac Parker.

Ward 4.

*Joseph Cooledge,
*Robert Gould Shaw,
*Jeremiah Fitch,
, William Rounsville Pierc
Washburn,
-

Ward 8.
*Benjamin Russell,
*Eliphalet Williams,

Samuel King Williams,


*Benjamin Willis.

*Thomas Beale Wales,

James
*Phineas Upham,

*Francis Johonnot Oliver,


President.
Ward 11.
*Josiah Stedman,
Samuel Frothingham,
*Giles Lodge,
Charles Sprague.
Ward 12.
*Samuel Bradlee,

*Francis Jackson,
*Isaac Thom,
*Charles Bemis.

*THoMA's CLARK, Clerk.

1825.

Mayor

*JOSLAH QUINCY.
ALDERMEN,

*Daniel Carney,
*John Bellows,
*Josiah Marshall,

*John Damarisque Dyer,

*Henry Jackson Oliver,

*Thomas Welsh, Jr.,


*George Blake,

*John Bryant.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.
*William Barry,
*John Elliot,

*Robert Fennelly,
*Lewis Lerow.
Ward 2.
*Oliver Reed,
*Scammel Penniman,

*Benjamin Clark,
*John Fenno.
Ward 3.
*John Richardson Adan.
*Thomas Wells,
*Abraham William Fuller,
*Amos Farnsworth.
Ward 4.
*Joseph Cooledge,
William Rounsville Pierce
Washburn,
*George Hallet,
*Theodore Dexter.

COMMON COUNCIL,
Ward 5.

*John Sullivan Perkins,

Ward 9.

John Chipman Gray,

*Ezra Dyer,
*Charles Tracy,
*William Simonds.
Ward 6.

*Franklin Dexter,
*Jeremiah Smith Boies,
*Levi Meriam,
Ward 10.

Joseph # Hastings,
*Thomas Wiley,

*Francis Johonnot Oliver,

*Isaac Waters,
*Samuel Thaxter.
Ward 7.

James Savage,
*Jonathan Simonds,

*Charles Pelham Curtis,


*William Goddard,
*Elijah Morse,
*Isaac Parker.
JWard 8.

*Eliphalet Williams.
*Benjamin Willis,
Jeffrey Richardson,
*Josiah Bradlee.

President.

John Parker Rice.

Ward 11.

Samuel Frothingham,
*Giles Lodge,

*George Morey, Jr.,


*Joshua Vose.
Ward 12.

*John Stevens,
*Adam Bent,
*Oliver Fisher,

*Ephram Groves Ware.


*Thomas CLARR, Clerk.

CITY

175

GOVERNMENT.

1826.
MAYOR,

*JOSLAEI QUINCY.
ALDERMEM,
*John Bellows,

*Thomas Welsh, Jr.,


*Henry Jackson Oliver,

*Josiah Marshall,

*John Foster Loring,

*Daniel Carney,

*Francis Jackson,
*Edw. Hutchinson Robbins.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.


COMMON COUNCIL,

Ward 5.

Ward 1.

*William Barry,

*Ezra Dyer,

*Lewis Lerow,
*Lemuel P. Grosvenor,
*Samuel Aspinwall.
Ward 2.

*Charles Tracy,
*Jonathan Thaxter,
*William Parker.
Ward 6.
Joseph Stacy Hastings,

*Scammel Penniman,
*Benjamin Clark,

Ward 9.

John Chipman Gray,


*Jeremiah Smith Boies,
*Levi Meriam,
Charles Torrey. Ward 10.
*Aaron Baldwin,
John Parker Rice,
*Solomon Piper,
*Charles Barnard.
Ward 11.
*Giles Lodge,

*Thomas Wiley,

*John Fenno,

*Isaac Waters,
*Samuel Thaxter.
Ward 7.
Ward 3.
*John Richardson Adan, Pres. *Augustus Peabody,
*Charles Pelham Curtis,
*William Sprague,
*Isaac Parker,
*Amos Farnsworth,
*Asa Adams.
Edward Brooks.
Ward 8.
Ward 4.
Francis Bassett,
*George Hallet,
*William Howe
Joseph Helger Thayer,
*John Warren James,
*Joseph Hawley Dorr,
*John Baker.
*Joseph Eveleth.
*Nathaniel Faxon.

*George Morey, Jr.,


*Joshua Vose,
*Thomas Brewer.

Ward 12.

*John Stevens,
*Adam Bent,
*Oliver Fisher,

*Henry Hatch.

*THoMA's CLARK, Clerk,

1827.
MAYOR.

*JOSIAH QUINCY,
ALDERMEN,

*Cyrus Alger,

*John Foster Loring,

*John Bellows,

*Jeremiah Smith Boies,


*Robert Fennelly,

*Thomas Welsh, Jr.,

*Thomas B. Wales,
James Savage.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

COMMON CouncIL,

*Jonathan Thaxter,

*Simon Wilkinson,

*William Parker,

*John Elliot,
*Samuel Aspinwall.
Ward 2.
*Benjamin Clark,
*Scammel Penniman,
*John Warren James,
*John Floyd Truman.
Ward 3.
*John Richardson Adan, Pres.
*John Damarisque Dyer,
*Asa Adams,
*Thomas Gould.
JWard 4.
William Rounsville Pierce

Washburn,
*George Hallt,
*William Howe,

Ward 9.
John
Gray,
*Levi Meriam,

Ward 5.

Ward 1.
*William Barry,

$'.

*Gamaliel Bradford

Lewis Glover Pray,


*George Lane.

John Prescott Bigelow.


Ward 10.

Ward 6.

*Isaac Waters,

*Jonathan Simonds,

*Samuel Thaxter,

*George Brinley,
William Parker,
Charles Sprague.
Ward 11.
*Giles Lodge,

*Jonathan Loring,
*Joseph Warren Lewis.
Ward 7.

*Samuel Dorr,
Samuel Dexter Ward,
*John Arno Bacon,

*George Morey, Jr.,


-

*Thomas Walley Phillips.


Ward 8.

*David Watts Bradlee,

*Joshua Vose,
Josiah Vose.
Ward 12,
*Adam Bent,

*Benjamin Russell,

*William Wright

Williams,
*Joshua Sears.

*William Little, Jr.,

*Joseph Eveleth.
*THOMAS CLARK, Clerk,

*George Gay.

176

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

1828.
MAYor,

*JOSLAH QUINCY,
ALDERMEN,

*John Foster Loring,

*Thomas Kendall,

*Robert Fennelly,
James Savage,

*James Hall,
*Phineas Upham,

*John Pickering,
*Samuel Turell Armstrong.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.


CoMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

Ward 1.

*Samuel Aspinwall,
*Ninian Clark Betton,

*George Washington Otis,


*William Parker,

*Horace Fox,

*Lewis Glover Pray,

*Eleazer Pratt.

*George Lane.
Ward 6.
*Isaac Waters,

Ward 2.

*John Warren James,

Frederick Gould,

*Francis Johonnot Oliver,

*Henry Fowle, Jr.,

*Ebenezer Appleton,
*Geo. Washington Johnson.
*David Moody.
Ward 3.
Ward 7.
*John Richardson Adan, Pres. *John Arno Bacon,
*John D. Dyer, (res. April,) *John Belknap,
*Thomas Gould,
*Geo. W. Adams,(from May,)
*Levi Roberts Lincoln,
*Thos.Wren Ward,(res.July,)
*Jas. L. P. Orrok, (from May.) Waldo Flint, (res. Feb.)
*Benj. T. Pickman, (fr. Aug.)
Ward 4.
Ward 8.
*Joseph Eveleth,
*Benjamin Russell,
Quincy Tufts,
*Eliphalet Williams,
*Andrew Cunningham, Jr.,
*James Means.
Samuel King Williams,

Ward 9.

John Chipman #
John Prescott Bigelow,
*Norman Seaver,
*Daniel Lewis Gibbens.
Ward 10.

*Jonathan Simonds,
William Parker,
*Robt. Treat Paine, (fr. May,)
*John Lowell, Jr.,

*Geo. Bethune, (res. April.)


Ward 11.

*Otis Everett,
*Otis Turner,
*Perez Gill,
*Payson Perrin.
Ward 12.

Alpheus Cary,
Walter Cornell
*Joseph Neale Howe,

*Benjamin Stevens,

Thomas Lamb.

*THoMAs CLARK, Clerk.


1829.
MAYOR,
*HARRISON GRAY OTIS.
ALDERMEN,
*James Hall,
*Samuel Turell Armstrong,
*Benjamin Russell,

*Henry Jackson Oliver,


*John Foster Loring,

*Thomas Kendall,

*Winslow Lewis,
*Charles Wells,

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.

coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

*Ninian Clark Betton,

*Jonathan Thaxter,

*Eleazer Pratt,
*John Wells,

*William Parker,
*George Lane,

*Christopher Gore.

*Joseph Eveleth,

Ward 2.

*John Warren James,


Henry Sewall Kent,
*Samuel Ellis,

*Thos. Reed (died February),


*Daniel Ballard (fr. March).
JWard 3.
*Thomas Gould,
*Levi Roberts Lincoln,
Joseph Bradley,

*Amos Bradley Parker.


Ward 4.
Quincy Tufts,

*Andrew Cunningham,
*John Rayner,

Samuel Davenport Torrey.

Ward 6.
*Isaac Waters,

*Samuel Austin, Jr.,


Jared Lincoln,
*Samuel Goodhue.

Ward 7.

Ward 9.

John Prescott Bigelow,


*Jacob Amee,

*Levi Brigham,
*Daniel Lewis Gibbens,
Ward 10.

*Jonathan Simonds,
*John Lowell, Jr.,
*Samuel Leonard Abbott,
*Charles Casey Starbuck.
Ward 11.

*Geo. W. Adams (died May), *Otis Everett,


*Benjamin Toppan Pickman, *Otis Turner,
*Thomas Wetmore,
*Perez Gill,
*Walter Frost,
*Payson Perrin.
*Isaac Danforth (from May),
Ward 12.
Ward 8.
*Oliver Fisher,
*Eliphalet Williams, Pres,
Walter Cornell,
Samuel King Williams,
*Aaron Willard, Jr.,
*Isaac Parker Townsend.
*Thomas Minns,
James Brackett Richardson,

*THOMAS CLARK, Clerk.

177

CITY GOVERNMENT.

1830.
MAYOR,
*HARRISON GRAY OTIS.

*Henry Jackson Oliver,


*John Foster Loring,
*Samuel Turell Armstrong,

ALDERMEN,
*Benjamin Russell,
*Winslow Lewis,
*Charles Wells,

*John
McCleary,
MosesBurbeck
Williams.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

COMMON councIL,
Ward 1.

Ward 9.

Ward 5.

John Prescott Bigelow,

*Ninian Clark Betton,

*Winslow Wright,

*Eleazer Pratt,
*Christopher Gore,
Simon Wiggin Robinson.
Ward 2.

*Joseph Eveleth

*John Warren James,

*Isaac Waters,

*John Parker Rice,

*Samuel Ellis,
*Daniel Ballard,
*John B. Wells.
Ward 3.
*Thomas Gould,

*Samuel Austin, Jr.,

*John Lowell, Jr.,


*Samuel Leonard Abbott

Levi Boynton

#askell,

Charles Leighton.

*Jacob Amee,
*Levi Brigham,
*Ed. Goldsborough Prescott
Ward 10.

Ward 6.

*Levi Roberts Lincoln,


*Larra Crane,
*Michael Lovell.
Ward 4.
Tufts,
*John Rayner,
Samuel Davenport Torrey,

$:

Washington Parker Gragg.

Jared Lincoln,
*Levi Bliss.
Joshua Seaver,
*Benjamin Parker, (seat vaca
Ward 11.
ted in February.
*Otis Everett,
Ward 7.
*Perez Gill,
Pickman, Pres, *Jabez Ellis,

*Thomas Wetmore,

Joseph Hay.

*Isaac Danforth,

Elias Hasket Derby.


Ward 8.
*Thomas Minns,

Ward 12.

*Henry Hatch,
*Aaron Willard, Jr.

*Thomas Melville Vinson

James Brackett Richardson, *James Wright,


*James Reynolds Newell,
*Leach Harris.

*THOMAS CLARK, Clerk,

1831.

Mayor,
*HARRISON GRAY OTIS.
ALDERMEN,

*Henry Jackson Oliver,

*John Burbeck McCleary,

*John Binney,

*Samuel Turell Armstrong,


*Benjamin Russell,

*Henry Farnum,
*Adam Bent,

*Richard Devens Harris.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.

Simon Wiggin Robinson,


John

Brigden Tremere,

Charles French,
Frederick Gould.
Ward 2.
*John Warren James,
*Daniel Ballard,
*Ephraim Milton,
*Daniel Dickenson,
Ward 3.
*Larra Crane,
*James Clark,
*Asa Swallow,
*Samuel Chessman,
Ward 4.

*Joseph Eveleth,
*John Rayner,

Washington Parker Gragg,


*Joshua Barker Flint,

CoMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

*Winslow Wright,
*William Parker,
Levi Boynton Haskell,
Charles Leighton.

s',6.

Ward 9.

John Prescott Bigelow,


*Jacob Amee,
*Ed. Goldsborough Prescott,
*Ed. Hutchinson Robbins.
Ward 10.

Joseph
h
Stacy Hastin g8,
*Isaac
Waters,

*Samuel Leonard Abbott,

*Ensign Sargent,
Stephen Titcomb.

*Ebenezer Bailey,

*Levi Bliss,

Ward 7.

Josiah Pierce.
Ward 11.

*Benj. Toppan Pickman, Pres *Otis Everett,


*Thomas Wetmore,
*Perez Gill,
*Levi Bartlett,
*Jabez Ellis,
*Abbot Lawrence,
Joseph Hay.
Ward 8,
Ward 12.
*Thomas Minns,
*Henry Hatch,
James Brackett Richardson, *Aaron Willard, Jr.
*Thomas Melville Vinson,
Reynolds Newell,
*Leach Harris.
*John Stevens,
*THOMAS CLARK, Clerk.

'"

178

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

1832.

Mayor,
*CHARLES WELLS.

*Henry Jackson Oliver,


*Benjamin Russell,

*John Burbeck McCleary,


*Henry Farnum,

ALDERMEN,
| *John Binney,

*James Bowdoin

*Richard D. Harris, (res. *John Stevens. (died,)


February,)
*William Tileston, (from
*Jabez Ellis,

February.)

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.

Simon Wiggin Robinson,

COMMON CouncIL,
Ward 5.
*Eliphalet Porter Hartshorn.

Ward 9.

John Prescott Bigelow, Pres.

Charles French,
John Centre,
*Bill Richardson.
Ward 2.

*William Parker,
Levi Boynton Haskell,
Charles Leighton.
Jyard 6.

*Jacob Amee,
*Ed. Goldsborough Prescott
*Ed. Hutchinson Robbins.
Ward 10.

*John Warren James,

*Joseph Stacy Hastings,

*Ebenezer Bailey,

*Ephraim Milton,
*Daniel Dickenson,
John Brigden Tremere.
Ward 3.
*Larra Crane,
*James Clark,
*Asa Swallow,
*Samuel Chessman.
Ward 4.
*George Hallet
*Joseph Eveleth,
*John Rayner,
*Joshua Barker Flint.

*Isaac Waters,
*Jonathan Porter,
*Grenville Temple Winthrop.

Josiah Pierce,
Francis Brinley, Jr.,
John Collamore, Jr..

Ward 7.

Ward 11.

*Isaac Parker,
*Thomas Wetmore,
*Levi Bartlett,
*Henry Rice.
JWard 8.
*Thomas Minns,

Joseph Hay,
*John Lillie Phillips,

*Richard Hildreth,

*Thomas Hunting,
Ebenezer Hayward,

*James Brown,
*John Lewis Dimmock.

*Gilman Prichard,
*Henry Willis Kinsman.
Ward 12.

*Henry Hatch,
Joseph Harris, Jr.

*THOMAS CLARK, Clerk.

1833.

Mayor,
*CHARLES WELLS.
ALDERMEN,

*Henry Farnum,
*John Binney,
*Jabez Ellis,

*William Tileston,
*Thomas Wetmore,
*Samuel Fales,

Joseph Warren Revere,


*Benjamin Fiske,

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.

Simon Wiggin Robinson,


*Bill Richardson,
*Enoch Howes Snelling,
*Thomas Hart Thompson.
Ward 2.

*John Warren James,


*John B. Wells,
*Henry Andrews
*George Priest Thomas.
Ward 3.
*Larra Crane,
*James Clark,
*Samuel Chessman,
*Philip Adams.
Ward 4.

*Robert Gould Shaw,


*Joseph Eveleth,
Edward Blake,
*Silas Pierce Tarbell.

COMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

*Eliphalet Porter Hartshorn,


Charles Leighton,
*Abel Phelps,
*Perez Loring.
Ward 6.

*Joseph Stacy Hastings,

J/grd 9.

John Prescott Bigelow. Pres


*Jacob Amee,

*Ed. Goldsborough Prescott,


*OliverWm.Bourne Peabody
Ward 10.
Josiah Pierce,

*Isaac Waters,
*Daniel Messenger,
*Grenville Temple Winthrop, *Israel Martin,
*Luther Parks.
*Thomas Richards Dascomb.
IPard 11.
Ward 7.

*Levi Bartlett,
*Henry Rice,

William Tappan Eustis,


Josiah Quincy, Jr.
Jpard 8.

*Eliphalet Williams,
*Silas Bullard,
*Francis Osborn Watts,
*Abner Bourne.

RICHARD G. WAITT, Clerk.

Robert Treat Paine,


*John Doggett,

Samuel Gilbert, J.,


*Ruel Baker.

Ward 12.

*Thomas Hunting,
Joseph Harris, Jr.,
*James Blake,
*Josiah Dunham.

CITY GOVERNMENT.

179

1834.
MAYOR,

*THEODORE LYMAN, JR.


ALDERMEN,
Charles
*Josiah Dunham,
*Nathan Gurney,

*Jabez Ellis,
*Thomas Wetmore,
*Samuel Fales,

*Samuel Atkins Eliot,


*Samuel Greele.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.


coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.
*Michael Roulstone,

Ward 1.

Enoch Howes Snelling,


Henry D. Gray,

Ward 9.

*Ed. Goldsborough Prescott,


Nath'l Fellows Cunningham, *QliverWm. Bourne Peabody
*Calvin Washburn,
*Benjamin Apthorp Gould,
*Enoch Hobart.
Isaac McLellan, Jr.

*Robert Keith,

*Henry Jackson Oliver.


Ward 2.

Ward 6.
*Jesse Shaw,

*John Warren James,


John Brigden Tremere,

George Washington Smith,


*Joseph Melcher Leavitt.
Ward 3.

*John Snelling,
*Simon Green Shipley,
*Joshua Sears,

George Washington Bazin.


Ward 7.

*Levi Bartlett,

William Tappan Eustis,


Josiah Quincy, Jr., President
Ward 8.

*Ammi Cutter,

*William Reed.
Ward 11.

Robert Treat Paine,


*Ruel Baker,

*Henry Rice,

*Samuel Chessman.
Ward 4.

Ward 10.

*Daniel Messenger,
*Joseph Stacy Hastings,
*Israel Martin,
*Grenville TempleWinthrop, *Thomas Richards Dascomb,

*Eliphalet Williams,

Elias Bond Thayer,


Philip Marrett.
Ward 12.
*Thomas Hunting,

Joseph Harris, Jr.,


*James Blake,
*Henry Sargent,
*Josiah Lee Currell Amee.
George Worthington Lewis. *Edward Cruft, Jr.
RICHARD G. WAITT, Clerk.

*Ezra Trull,
*Asa Lewis,

James Brackett Richardson,

1835.
MAYOR,

*THEODORE LYMAN, JR.


ALDERMEN,
*Winslow Lewis

Charles Leighton,

*john Burbeck McCleary,


*Thomas Wetmore,

*Josiah Dunham,

*Samuel Atkins Eliot,


*Samuel Greele.

*Nathan Gurney,
*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

COMMON COUNCIL,

Ward 5.
Hen

D . Gray, 1.

.# Keith,
Isaac Harris,

*Caleb Gould Loring.


Ward 2.

*John Warren James,


*Stephen William Olney,

Lewis Josselyn,
Thomas Hollis.
Ward 3,
*John Snelling,

*Simon Green Shipley,


*William Turner Spear,
George Washington Smith.
Ward 4.
*Moses Grant,
George William Gordan,
Henry Lincoln,

*Benajah Brigham.

Ward 9.

*Calvin Washburn,

*Daniel Lewis Gibbens,


*Benjamin Apthorp Gould,
*AbrahamWatersBlanchard, *Zebedee Cook, Jr.,
John Cochran Park.

*Enoch Hobart,

Ward 6.

*Jesse Shaw,

*James Harris.
Ward 10.

*Solomon Piper,

Stephen Titcomb,

*Israel Martin,

*Jonathan Chapman,

*Richard Sullivan Fay,

*Amos Wood.

*Jedediah Tuttle.
Ward 11.
*Ruel Baker,

Ward 7.

William Tappan Eustis,


Josiah Quincy, Jr. President,
*Horatio Masa

Wiiiis,

*James Means.

Ward 8.

Elias Bond Thayer,


Philip Marrett,
*John Thompson.
Ward 12.

*Eliphalet Williams,
*Thomas Hunting,
*Edward Cruft, Jr.,
William Bradlee Dorr,
*Ebenezer Bailey,
*John Greene, Jr.
*Horace Dupee.
*John Bliss Stebbins.
RICHARD G. WAITT, Clerk.

180

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

1836.
MAYOR.

*Winslow Lewis.

* SAMUEL TURELL ARMSTRONG.


ALDERMEN,
*Nathan Gurney,
*Thomas Hunting,
*Samuel Greele.

*John Burbeck McCleary.


*Josiah Dunham,

*Samuel Quincy.

*Joseph Henshaw Hayward,


*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.
CoMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

Ward 1.

Ward 9.

*Abraham Waters Blanchard, *Daniel Lewis Gibbens,


John Cochran Park,
*Benjamin Apthorp Gould,
Geo. Washington Edmands, *James Harris,
Ebenezer Ellis.
*Thomas Coffin Amory.

*Enoch Howes Snelling,


*Joseph Bassett,
Gilbert Nurse,

William Eaton,
Ward 2.

Lewis Josselyn,
*Thatcher Rich Raymond,
Nathan Carruth,
*Thomas Moulton.
Ward 3,
John Boles,

Ward 6.
*Isaac Waters,

Ward 10.
*Solomon Piper,

*Jonathan Chapman,

*Israel Martin, (res. March,)

*Amos Wood,
Henry Upham.

*Jedediah Tuttle,
*Elbridge Gerry Austin,
Benj. Yeaton, (from April.)
Ward 11.

Ward 7.

William Tappan Eustis,

Benjamin Kimball,

JosiahQuincy, Jr., President,


Henry Edwards

Jason Dyer Battles,


*Asa Barker Snow.

James Thomas

Ward 4.

Hobart.

Philip Marrett,
John Thompson,

*Benjamin Marshall Nevers.

Ward 8.

*Moses Grant,

Elias Bond Thayer,

Ward 12.

*Eliphalet Williams,

George William Gordon,


Henry Lincoln,

Alpheus Stetson,
*Stephen Child,

*Horace Dupee,

*William Greene Eaton,


*Aaron Breed.

*Benajah Brigham.

*George Savage,
Solon Jenkins.

RICHARD G. WAITT, Clerk.


1837.
MAYOR,
*SAMUEL ATKINS ELIOT,
ALDERMEN,

*Henry Farnum,
*Thomas Wetmore,
*Nathan Gurney.

*Joseph Henshaw Hayward,


*Thomas Hunting,

*John B. Wells,
Thomas Richardson.

*Samuel Quincy,

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk,

Ward 1.

coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

Ward 9.

*Benjamin Apthorp Gould,


Ebenezer Ellis,
Edmund Trowbridge Has *James Harris,
tings
*Thomas Coffin Amory,
*Erastus Thompson, (d. Aug)
Charles Brooks.
*Philip Greely, Jr.,
*Thomas Hudson,
*Eleazer Pratt,
Isaac Harris,

Samuel Locke Cutter.

Ward 2.

Lewis Josselyn,
*Thacher Rich Raymond,
Nathan Carruth,
*Thomas Moulton,
Ward 3,

John Boles,
Jason

'' Battles,

Francis Brown.
Ward 6.

'
''
eorge
Washington B
Bazin
.#'

Ward 10.
*Solomon Piper,
*Jedediah Tuttle,
*

*Elbridge Gerry Austin,


Benjamin Yeaton.

Henry Edwards.

Ward 11.

Ward 7.

Philip Marrett, President,

*Levi Bartlett,
James Thomas Hobart
Thomas Buckminster

Curtis

*Asa Barker Snow,


William Orne Haskell.
Ward 4.

*Simon Davis Leavens,


Ward 8.

*Moses Grant,
George William Gordon,
Joseph Thornton Adams,
*Lemuel Putnam Grosvenor,

*Eliphalet Williams,
*Horace Dupee,
*William Green Eaton,
*Aaron Breed.

RICHARD G. WAITT, Clerk.

*Lemuel Shattuck,
Calvin Bullard,
*Thomas Wose.

s:

*George Savage 12.


Solon

Jenkins,

Josiah Dunham, Jr.,


John Thomas Dingley,

181

CITY GOVERNMENT,

1838.
MAYoR,

*SAMUEL ATKINS ELIOT,


ALDERMEN,
*Joseph Henshaw Hayward, Isaac Harris,
*Martin Brimmer,
*Thomas Hunting,
Thomas Richardson,

*Henry Farnum,
*Thomas Wetmore,

*Nathan Gurney,

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.


coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.
Francis Brown,

Ward 1.
*Eleazer Pratt,
*Thomas Hudson,
*Benjamin Dodd,

Nathaniel Hammond,
*James McAllaster,

Bradley Newcomb Cumings. *Theophilus Burr.


Ward 2.
*Daniel Ballard,

Ward 6.

*Jonathan Chapman,

Lewis Josselvn

*Ezra Lincoln,

*Thatcher Rich Raymond,

Henry Edwards,
Newell Aldrich Thompson.

*Thomas Moulton.
Ward 3.

Ward 7.
*Isaac Parker,
Henry Rice,

*Asa Barker Snow,

Ward 9.
*James Harris,

*Thomas Coffin Amory,


Charles Brooks,
*John Brooks Russell.
Ward 10.

*Elbridge Gerry Austin;


Benjamin Yeaton,
Jonathan Preston,
Stephen Shelton.
Ward 11.
Philip Marrett, President,

*Lemuel Shattuck,
Thomas Buckminster Curtis, Calvin Bullard,

Rowland Ellis,
William Eaton,
Charles Arnold.
Ward 4.
*Moses Grant,

*Simon Davis Leavens.

*Eliphalet Williams,
Benj. Parker Richardson,

*Thomas Vose.
Ward 12.
Jeremy Drake,
Nehemiah Pitman

John Brooks Parker,


*Thomas Jefferson Shelton.

*Warren White.

Ward 8.

George William Gordon,


*Lemuel Putnam Grosvenor,
*James Morris Whiton.

Samuel Wheeler,

RICHARD G. WAITT, Clerk.

1839.
MAYOR,

*SAMUEL ATKINS ELIOT,


ALDERMEN,

*Joseph
*ThomasHenshaw
Hunting,Hayward
yward,

*Henry Farnum,
*Thomas Wetmore,
*Nathan Gurney,

Ward 1.
*John B. Wells,
*Benjamin Dodd,

coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

Nathaniel Hammond,

Zebina Lee Raymond,

*James McAllaster,
*William Vinal Kent,

William Dillaway.

*Ephraim Larkin Snow.


Ward 6.

Ward 2.

*Thomas Moulton,
Richard Brackett
*Samuel Emmes.

Ward 3.
*John Snelling,

Ward 9.

*Thomas Coffin Amory,


Charles Brooks,
" Jonathan Preston,

Stephen Shelton.
Ward 10.

*Jonathan Chapman,

*Gideon French Thayer,

*Ezra Lincoln,

*Ruel Baker,

*Freeborn Fairfield Raymond, Newell Aldrich Thompson,


Horace Williams.
Ward 7.
*Isaac Parker,

*Simon Green Shipley,

Philip Marrett, President.

*Jacob Stearns,
Ezekiel Bates.
Ward 4.
*Moses Grant,

Ezra C

Hutchins,

Edward Blake.
Ward 8.
*Eliphalet Williams,
Geo. Wm. Gordon (res. May,) John Brooks Parker,
*Thomas Jefferson Shelton,
*Charles Wilkins,
*William Walker Parrott.
*James Haughton,

Alfred A. Wellington, (May.)


RICHARD G. WAITT, Clerk,
f

Isaac Harris,
*James Harris.

Thomas Richardson,
*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Winslow Lewis, Jr.,


*Lemuel Shattuck.
Ward 11.
*Warren White,
Samuel Wheeler,

*Elisha Copeland, Jr.,


*John Stevens.

Ward 12.

*Josiah Lee Currell Amee,


*Nicholas Noyes,
George Page,
Horatio Nelson Crane.

182

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.
1840.
MAYOR,
*JONATHAN CHAPMAN,
ALDERMEN,
*James Clark,
*Charles Wilkins,
Abraham Thompson Lowe,

*Nathaniel Pope Russell,


*Nathan Gurney,
*Thomas Hunting,

William Turell Andrews,


Charles Amory.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.


coMMON council,
JWard 5.
*Philip Greely, Jr.,
Nathaniel Hammond,
*William Vinal Kent,
George Washington Otis, Jr.

Ward 1.

Zebina Lee Raymond,


Henry Leeds,

William Russell Lovejoy,


Peter Dunbar.

Ward 2.
Richard Brackett,

Ward 9.

*Thomas Coffin Amory,


Charles Brooks,
Jonathan Preston,
Stephen Shelton.
Ward 10.

JWard 6.

*Ruel Baker,
*Freeborn Fairfield Raymond, Newell Aldrich Thompson, *Lemuel Shattuck,
George William Phillips,
*John Hubbard Wilkins,
*Samuel Emmes,
Erastus Wilson Sanborn.
Ward 3.
*John Snelling,

*Ezra Lincoln,

Elijah Williams, Jr.


JYard 7.

*Isaac Parker,

*Simon Green Shipley,


*Jacob Stearns,

Phillip Marrett, President,


Ezra Child Hutchins,

*Dexter Follett.
Ward 4.
*Moses Grant,
James Haughton,

Edward Blake.

*Holmes Hinkley,
*George Savage,

John Thomas Dingley.


Ward 12.

JWard 8.

*Eliphalet Williams,

Benj. Parker Richardson,


Alfred Augustus Wellington, *Thomas Jefferson Shelton.
Lucius Doolittle.

Daniel Kimball.
Ward 11.
*John Stevens

*William Walker Parrott.

*Josiah Lee Currell Amee,


George Page,

Horatio Nelson Crane,


Eben Jackson.

RICHARD G. WAITT, Clerk.

1841.

Mayor,
*JONATHAN CHAPMAN.
ALDERMEN,

*Thomas Wetmore,
*Thomas Hunting,

*James Clark,

*Charles Wilkins,
Abraham Thompson Lowe,
William Turell Andrews,

Charles Amory,
Benson Leavitt.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.
Isaac Harris,

*Benjamin Dodd,
William Dillaway,

*Henry Northey Hooper.

coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

Geo. Washington Otis, Jr.,


*Pelham Bonncy,
*Freeman Stowe,
*Edward Parker Meriam.

Ward 9.

*Thomas Coffin Amory,


Jonathan Preston,
Stephen Shelton,

*Moses Whitney, Jr.

Ward 10.
*Ezra Lincoln,
[April,) *Ruel Baker,
*Lemuel
Shattuck,
Newell
Thompson,
A.
(res.
*Freeborn Fairfield Raymond,
Daniel Kimball,
*John Hubbard Wilkins,
*Samuel Emmes,
Enoch Train,
Luther Blodgett,
Erastus Wilson Sanborn.
*Jas. Neale Howe, Jr., (from
Ward 11
Ward 3.
July,)
John Gardner Nazro,
*John Snelling,
Pard 7.
*Richard Urann,
*Simon Green Shipley,
*Edward Shirley Erving,
Ezra Child Hutchins,
*Jacob Stearns,
Ward 2.
Richard Brackett,

JWard 6

*Benajah Brigham.

Edward Blake, President,


John Plummer Healy,

Ward 4.
*Moses Grant,

Theophilus Rogers Marvin.


J/tral 8.
Joseph Thornton Adams,
*Eliphalet
Williams,
*James Haughton,
Alfred Augustus Wellington. Benj. Parker Richardson,

*Thomas Jefferson Shelton,


*William Walker Parrott.

RICHARD G. WAITT, Clerk,

John Gray Roberts.


JWard 12.
Samuel Leeds,

William Henry Howard,


Seriah Stevens,
*William Burton Harding.

CITY GOVERNMENT.

183

1842.
MAYOR,
*JONATHAN CHAPMAN.
ALDERMEN,
*Larra Crane,
William Parker,

*Thomas Wetmore,

*James Longley,
*Richard Urann.
Abraham Thompson Lowe, *Joseph Tilden,
*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

*Nathan Gurney,

COMMON COUNCIL,
Ward 5.

Ward 1.

*Enoch Howes Snelling,


Norton Newcomb,
*Cyrus Buttrick,
Perkins Boynton.

Ward 9.

*Pelham Bonney,

*Thomas Coffin Amory,

George Wheelwright,
*Henry

*Moses Whitney, Jr.,


Charles Edward Cook,
*John Rice Bradlee.
Ward 10.
Luther Blodgett,

''

Samuel Ripley Townsend.

Ward 2.

Ward 6.
*Ezra Lincoln,
*John Hubbard Wilkins,
Enoch Train,

*Samuel Emmes,
Aaron Adams,
*Joseph Cullen Ayer

Abner Williams Pollard.

William Hayden,
Jonathan Ellis,
Henry Worthington Dutton.
Ward 11.

*Joseph Neale Howe, Jr.

Ward 3.

JWard 7.

*John Snelling,

William Tappan Eustis,

John Thomas Dingley,

*Simon Green Shipley,


*Jacob Stearns,

Edward

John Plummer Healy,

William Dall,
Asaph Parmelee,

Theophilus Rogers Marvin.

Robert Cowdin.

Enoch Hemenway Wakefield.


Ward 4.

#' President,

Ward 8.
Benj. Parker Richardson,
*William Augustus Weeks,
*Josiah Moore Jones,

*Moses Grant,

Francis B. Crowninshield,
William Brown Spooner,
*Noah Sturtevant.

Ward 12.
Jeremy Drake,

Willis Howes,
*John Tillson,
Caleb Thurston.

*Benjamin Burchstead.
RICHARD G. WAITT, Clerk.

1843.
MAYOR,

- *MARTIN BRIMMER.
ALDERMEN,
Thomas Wetmore,
*James Longley,
Josiah Stedman,
Abraham Thompson Lowe, *Richard Urann,
Jonathan Preston.
William Parker,
*Simon Wilkinson,
*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk,

coMMON councIL,
Ward 1.
Isaac Harris,
Josh.B. Fowle (seat vac. Feb.)
*J.G.L. Libbey(seat vac. Feb.)
Daniel Bartlett, Jr.. (Feb.)
Wm. Henry Learnard, (Feb.)
J.Ward 2.
Aaron Adams,
*Joseph Cullen Ayer,

Abner Williams Pollard,


Henry Davis.

Ward 4.

Francis B. Crowninshield,
*Noah Sturtevant,
*Geo. Washington Crockett,
Thos. Buckminster Curtis.

*John Rice Bradlee

*James Fowle.

Clement Willis.
Ward 10.

Ward 6.
*John Hubbard Wilkins,

Luther Blodgett,
William Hayden,
Jonathan Ellis,
Henry Worthington Dutton.

Neale Howe, Jr.,


!'
*Kimball
Gibson,

Ward 7.
Edward Blake, President,

Ward 3.

James Harvey Dudley.

Ward 9.

Charles Edward Cook,


Andrew Townsend Hall,

'''

*Henry
*Willard Nason Fisher,

Peleg Whitman Chandler.

*John Snelling,
Enoch Hemenway Wakefield,
James Whiting,

Ward 5.

George Wheelwright,

Ward 11.

*Edward Shirley Erving,

Theophilus Rogers Marvin,

Robert Cowdin,

John Slade, Jr.,

*Isaac

George Tyler Bigelow.

*Greenleaf Connor Sanborn.


Ward 12.
Jeremy Drake,
Eben Jackson,
*John Tillson,
*Romanus Emerson.

JWard 8.

Benj. Parker Richardson,


*William Augustus Weeks,
Josiah Moore Jones,

*Benjamin Burchstead.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.

184

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

1844.
MAYOR,

*MARTIN BRIMMER.
ALDERMEN,
Jonathan Preston,
*James Longley,
*Thomas Wetmore,
*Simon Wilkinson.
Simon Wiggin Robinson,
Abraham Thompson Lowe,
Henry Bromfield Rogers,
*Larra Crane,
*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

Ward 1.

Isaac Harris,
William Henry Learnard,

George Wheelwright,
*Willard Nason Fisher,

*Job Turner,
John P. Ober.
Ward 2.

*Loring Norcross.
Ward 6.

*Joseph Cullen Ayer,


Abner Williams Pollard,

Peleg W. Chandler, Pres.


*Kimball Gibson,

Charles Boardman,

Henry Davis,
*Timothy C. Kendall.
Ward 3.
*John Snelling,
James Whiting

James Harvey

Ward 9.
Charles Edward Cook,
Andrew Townsend Hall,
Clement Willis,
*Charles H. Brown.
Jpard 10.

William Hayden,
Jonathan Ellis,

John Gardner,

Henry WQrthington Dutton,

Otis Clapp.

Horace Williams.

Ward 7.
*Simon Davis Leavens,
*Gideon French Thayer,

Ward 11.

*Edward Shirley Erving,


*Isaac Cary,

budley,

Oliver Dyer.
Ward 4.
Francis Boardman Crownin
shield,
*Geo. Washington Crockett,
Thomas Buckminster Curtis,
Samuel W. Hall.

*B. B. Appleton (died


*Greenleaf Connor Sanborn,
*John Brooks Parker (May), *William Pope.
*Joseph Bradlee.
Ward 8.

Ward 12.
Jeremy Drake,
Asa Brown,

Benj. Parker Richardson,

*Henry W. Fletcher,

*Samuel Topliff,
George Whittemore,

Isaac Jones.

*Samuel Harris.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.


1845.
MAYOR,

*THOMAS A. DAVIS, (died November.)

JOSIAH QUINCY, J.R., (from December 11.)


ALDERMEN,
*John Hathaway
Benson Leavitt,
Cullen Ayer,
Samuel Shurtir Perkins, *Joseph
William Parker, (resigned,)
Lyman Reed,
*Simon Green Shipley,
*William Pope,
*Jas. S. Savage, (from Mar.)
*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

CoMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

Ward 1.

Charles Boardman,

*Henry Northey Hooper,

JTard 6.

Peleg W. Chandler, Pres.


*Kimball Gibson,

Benjamin Wood, 2d,


*John Turner.
Ward 3.
*Asa Swallow,
James Whiting,
Artemas Ward,
Cyrus Cummings.

*Sargent S. Littlehale.

Henry Worthington Dutton,


Horace Williams,

George Stillman Hillard,

James Dennison.

*Gideon French Thayer,


John Brooks Parker,

Ward 4.

Samuel W. Hall,
Samuel Abbott Lawrence,

*Charles H. Brown.
Ward 10.
William Hayden,

Otis Clapp,
Ward 7.
*Simon Davis Leavens,

Thomas Buckminster Curtis,

Ward 9.

Charles Edward Cook,


Andrew Townsend Hall,
Clement Willis,

*Loring Norcross,
*Benjamin Seaver,
George R. Sampson.

*Cyrus Buttrick,
Perkins Boynton,
Samuel P. Oliver.
Ward 2.
James Munroe,
William R. Carnes,

*Joseph Bradlee.
Ward 8.
*Samuel Topliff,

Ward 11.

*Greenleaf Connor Sanborn,


*John Green, Jr.,
George Davis,
Calvin W. Haven.
Ward 12.

Samuel C. Demerest,
*Thomas Jones,
Samuel W. Sloan,
Daniel Denny.
Theophilus Stover.
WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.
George Whittemore,
James Hayward,

185

CITY GOVERNMENT.

1846.
MAYOR,

JOSIAH QUINCY, JR.


ALDERMEN,
*John Hathaway
Frederick Gould,
*Charles Allyn Wells,

William Parker,

Jonathan Preston,
*William Pope.

*Thomas Jones,
*George Edward Head.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

CoMMON couNCIL,
Ward 9.

Ward 5.

Ward 1.

Clement Willis,
*Wiliam Whitney,

Charles Boardman,
*Loring Norcross,
*Benjamin Scaver,
George R. Sampson.

William Eaton,
John P. Ober,
Samuel P. Oliver,
Samuel C. Nottage.

Walter Bryent,
Henry Cushing.

Ward 6.

J7ard 2.

Jyard 10.

Otis Clapp
George S. illard, President,
Thomas Haviland,
Charles Henry Parker.
JWard 7.
*Simon Davis Leavens,
*Gideon French Thayer,
John Gardner,
Nathaniel W. Coffin.
Ward 8.
*Samuel Topliff,
George Whittemore, *James Hayward,
Daniel Denny.

Benjamin Wood, 2d,


*John Turner,
*Noah Harrod,
*George Carlisle.
Ward 3.

*John Snelling,
James Whiting,
George Cofran,
Jeremiah Ross.
Ward 4.

Samuel W. Hall,
William Tappan Eustis,
*Abel Phelps,

*Thomas B. Pope.

Henry Worthington Dutton,


Horace Williams.

James Dodd,
John L. Emmons.
Ward 11.

*Edward Shirley Erving,


*John Green, Jr.,
*Stephen Tucker
*George W. Frothingham.
Ward 12.
Solon Jenkins,
William Eaton,
Seth Adams,
*John W. Crafts,

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk,

1847.
MAYor,

JOSLADI QUINCY, JR.


ALDERMEN,

*Thomas Wetmore,
William Parker,
*John Hathaway,

*John Hubbard Wilkins,


*Thomas Jones,
Billings Briggs.
*George Edward Head,
*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.
John P. Ober,
Samuel P. Oliver,

Samuel C. Nottage,
*Noah Lincoln,

Ward 2.
*John Turner,
*Noah Harrod,
*George Carlisle,
*William Wildes.
Ward 3.

Frederick Gould,

coMMoN councIL,
Ward 5.

*Benjamin Seaver, President


rom July 1st,
Eliphalet Jones,

William D. Coolidge,
*George W. Abbott.
Ward 6.

Ward 10.

*George W. Felt.
Ward 4.
William Brown Spooner,
Samuel W. Hall

Wm. whitwell Greenough,


Darwin E. Jewett,

Henry Worthington Dutton


George R. Sampson,

George S. Hillard, Presi


dent to July 1st,
Thomas Haviland,

*Ezra Lincoln, Jr.,


Samuel Wales, Jr.

Charles Henry Parker,


*Richard B. Carter.

irley
*''''"ng
*John Green, Jr.,
war

James Whiting,
James Boynton,
Edwin C. Bailey,

*:

Wal
alter Bryent 9,
Henry W. Cushing,
William Blake,
*Tisdale Drake.

Ward 7.

Theophilus Rogers Marvin,


*Gideon French Thayer,
William G. Brooks,
*Samuel Eliot Guild.
Ward 8.
*Samuel Topliff,

*Stephen Tucker,

*George W. Frothingham.
Ward 12.

William Eaton,
Jabez Coney,
-

George Whittemore,
Francis Gardner

Willard A. Harrington,
WASHINGTON P, GREGG, Clerk,

Samuel S. Perkins,
Alvan Simonds,

186

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

1848.

Mayor,
JOSIAH QUINCY, JR.
ALDERMEN,
Frederick Gould,

Henry Bromfield Rogers,


*William Pope,

Billings Briggs,
John Plummer Ober,

*Geo. Edw. Head, (res. Apr.)

*Moses Grant, (from April.)


*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

*John Hathaway,

*John Hubbard Wilkins,

coMMON councIL,
Ward 1.

Ward 9.
Walter Bryent,

J.Pard 5.

*Daniel Bartlett, Jr.,

*Philip Greely, Jr.,

Noah Lincoln, Jr.,

Henry W. Cushing,

Francis Brown,

John H. Bowker, (resigned,)


Abel B. Munroe,

William D. Coolidge,

William Blake,
*Tisdale Drake.

*George W. Abbott.
Ward 6.
Thomas Haviland,

William Palfrey.

Ward 10. .

George R. Sampson,
Samuel Wales, Jr.,
Freeborn Fairfield Raymond, Charles Henry Parker,
*Solomon Hopkins,
Henry Davis *
*Richard B. Carter.
Jesse
Maynard.
*W Wildes,
John Phelps Putnam.
George D. B. Blanchard.
Ward 11.
Ward 7.
Ward 3.
Theophilus Rogers Marvin *Edward Shirley Erving,
*John
Green,
Jr.,
James Boynton,
*Gideon French Thayer,
*Stephen Tucker
George Cofran,
William G. Brooks,
*George
W.
Frothingham.
J. Putnam Bradlee.
Edwin C. Bailey,
*Thomas Critchet.
Ward 12.
Ward 8.
Ward 4.
Samuel S. Perkins,
*Samuel Topliff,
Francis
Gardner
Samuel W. Hall,
Alvan Simonds,
Ward 2.

Benjamin James,
Wm. Whitwell Greenough, Willard A. Harrington,
Nathaniel Brewer.
Joseph Smith.
Darwin E. Jewett,
*Benjamin Seaver, President.
WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.

1849.
MAYOR,
JOHN PRESCOTT BIGELOW.
ALDERMEN,

Henry Bromfield Rogers,


*William Pope,
samuel Shurtleff Perkins,

*John Hubbard Wilkins,

| *Moses Grant,

Billings Briggs,
John
Ober,

Samuel Hall.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.
Abel B. Monroe,

William Palfrey,
Isaiah Faxon,
William Parkman.
Ward 2.

coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.
Francis Brown
Frederick

Crosby,

Robert Marsh.

Ward 4.

Richard B. Callender,
Calvin W. Clark.
JWard 10.

Ward 6.

*Edward Hennessey.
Ward 7.

George R. Sampson,
George Woodman,
Moses Kimball,

Reuben Lovejoy.
Ward 11.

Theophilus Rogers Marvin, *Manlius S. Clarke,


William G. Brooks,
George Wm. McLellan,
J. Putnam Bradlee,
*Albert T. Minot,
Daniel N. Haskell.
Ward 8.

wm: Whitwell Greenough. *Samuel Topliff,


*Benjamin Seaver, President, Francis Gardner,
*John Atkins,
Willard A. Harrington,
Nathaniel Seaver.

''

Benjamin Beal,

Freeborn Fairfield Raymond, *Richard B. Carter,


John Phelps Putnam,
Charles Brown,
George D. B. Blanchard,

Julius A. Palmer,

Francis

John M. Wright.

Henry Davis,

*Emery Goss.
Ward 3.
George Cofran.
Thomas Critchet,

Ward 9.

*Tisdale Drake,

Nathaniel Brewer.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.

Francis Richards.
Ward 12.

Josiah Dunham, Jr.,


Benjamin James,
Joseph Smith,
Samuel D. Crane.

CITY

187

GOVERNMENT.

1850.
MAYOR,

JOHN PRESCOTT BIGELOW.


ALDERMEN,

Henry Bromfield Rogers,


Samuel Shurtleff Perkins,
Billings Briggs,

*Moses Grant,

Henry Manning Holbrook,

Samuel Hall,
*Solomon Piper,

James Perkins.

*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

coMMON couNCIL,
Ward 5.
Benjamin Beal,
John M. Wright,
Abraham G. Wyman,
Avery Plumer, Jr.

Ward 1.

Abel B. Munroe,
Isaiah Faxon,

William Parkman,
John Cushing.
Ward 2.

Ward 9.

Francis Brinley, President,


Calvin W. Clark,
James W. Sever,

Joseph W. Merriam,
Ward 10.

Ward 6.

Freeborn F. Raymond,
Henry Davis,
George D. B. Blanchard,
*Emery Goss.

George Woodman,

John P. Putnam,
Charles Brown,
*Edward Hennessey,
Ebenezer Dale.
Ward 7.

Ward 3.

Julius A. Palmer,

William G. Brooks,

Robert Marsh,
Solomon Parker,
Charles Emerson.
Ward 4.

J. Putnam Bradlee,
Daniel N. Haskell,
*Samuel A. Appleton.
Ward 8.

Henry Lincoln,
Nathaniel Seaver,
Henry J. Gardner,
William C. Ford.

Moses Kimball,

George William McLellan,


*Manlius S. Clarke,
*Albert T. Minot,
Francis Richards.
Ward 12.

Willard A. Harrington,
Nathaniel Brewer,

Josiah Dunham, Jr.,


Jabez Coney

David Chapin,
John B. Dexter, Jr.

Joseph Smith,
Samuel D. Crane.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.

1851.

Mayor,
JOHN PRESCOTT BIGELOW.

Henry Bromfield Rogers,


Billings Briggs,
*Moses Grant,

Ward 1,
John Cushing,
*James G. Hovey,
Joel M. Holden,
Charles H. Stearns.
Ward 2.

Cyrus Washburn,
*James B. Allen,
William H. Calrow,
Richard Shackford,
Ward 3.
Solomon Carter
*Hiram Bosworth,
Thomas Sprague,
Andrew Abbott,
Ward 4,
*Asa Swallow,

ALDERMEN,

Holbrook,

Calvin Whiting Clark,


*SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk,
coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

Ward 9.

Benjamin Beal,

Newell A. Thompson,
*Edward S. Erving,
Francis Richards,

Avery Plumer, Jr.,

Abraham G. Wyman,
*Ezekiel Kendall.

Peter C. Jones.
Ward 10,

Ward 6,

Henry Lincoln,
John P. Putnam,
Charles Brown,

*Ezra Lincoln,
Aaron H. Bean,
Otis Kimball

i:dward Reed.

Ebenezer Dale.

Ward 11.

Francis Brinley, President,


James W. Sever,
David Chapin,
John B. Dexter, Jr.

Bradley N. Cumings,
*Albert T. Mino

Andrew J. Loud,
Theodore P. Hale,
Ward 12.

Ward 8.

John M. Wright,

Henry J. Gardner,

Daniel N. Haskell,

James Lawrence,

Oliver B. Dorrance,

Harvey Jewell.

Moses Kimball
Benjamin Smith.

Abel B. Munroe,

Ward 7.

Francis C. Manning.

Reuben Lovejoy,
Aaron H. Bean.
Ward 11.

Josiah Dunham, Jr.,


Joseph Smith,
Samuel D. Crane,
*Zibeon Southard.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk,

188

MUNICIPAL

REGISTER.

1852.
MAYOR,

*BENJAMIN SEAVER.
* ALDERMEN,

John Plummer Ober,


Benjamin James,
Sampson Reed,

Jacob Sleeper,
*Lyman Perry,
*Benjamin Leach Allen,

Thomas Phillips Rich,


*Isaac Cary.

SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, JR., City Clerk.

coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.

Ward 1.

Ward 9.

Newell A. Thompson,

Abraham G. Wyman,

*Elijah Stearns,

*Ezekiel Kendall,
Harvey Jewell,

Benjamin Fessenden,
Edward A. Vose,
*George Wilson.
Ward 2.
Cyrus Washburn,
*James B. Allen,

Joseph D. Roberts.
Ward 6.

Henry Lincoln,

William H. Calrow,

Paul Adams,
William Thomas,

Andrew Burnham.

Frederick H. Stimpson.

Ward 3.
Thomas Sprague,
Andrew Abbott,
Samuel A. Bradbury,
Dexter Roby.
Ward 4.
*Asa Swallow,

*Edward S. Erving,
Peter C. Jones,
*John Odin, Jr.,
Ward 10.
*Ezra Lincoln,
Aaron H. Bean,
Otis Kimball,
John F. Bannister.
Ward 11.
Theodore P. Hale,
Horace A. Breed,
Aaron Hobart,

Ward 7
David Chapin,
*Samuel Nicolson,

*Edward H. Eldridge,
Farnham Plummer.

*David Hamblen.

Ward 12.
Zibeon Southard,
John Proctor,

Ward 8.

John M. Wright,

Henry J. Gardner, President, Daniel N. Haskell,


George N. Noyes,
Amos Cutler,
James Lawrence,
John J. Rayner.
George W. Warren.
Samuel R. Spinney.
WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.
1853.
MAYOR,
*BENJAMIN SEAVER.
ALDERMEN,

Thomas Phillips Rich,

Benjamin James,
Sampson Reed,

*Isaac

Sleeper,

Benjamin Franklin White,

W#

Oliver Frost.

James Whiting,

SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, J.R., City Clerk,


coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.
*Pelham Bonney,

Ward 1.
*Cyrus Buttrick,

Joseph D. Roberts,

*Elijah Stearns,

*Israel C. Rice,
Matt.iew Binney.
Ward 6.
Paul Adams,

Charles T. Woodman,
Charles A. Turner.
Ward 2.
Andrew Burnham,

Ward 9.

Peter C. Jones,
*Thacher Beal,
Joseph L. Drew,
Jonas . French.
Ward 10.
-

*John F. Bannister,
Robert Cowdin,

Danil D. Kelly,

Ezra Forristall, (res. May,)


Francis B. Winter,

Benjamin F. Russell.

Henry F. Durant,

Joel Richards.
Ward 11.
Horace A. Breed,

Henry D. Gardiner,

Wm.Washburn,(from May.)

S Ward 3.

Ward 7.

Thomas Sprague,
Dexter Roby,
Mical Tubbs,
Charles Dupee.
}7ard 4.

Henry J. Gardner, President,

*Samuel Nicolson,
Farnham Plummer,

Alexander Hamilton Rice,

Samuel Hatch,
*William Burrage.
Ward 8.

Gardner P. Drury,(res. Feb.


John A. Cummings,)fr.Feb.

John J. Rayner,

George W. Warren,

William F. Goodwin,

Charles Demond,

Martin L. Hall.

Samuel J. M. Homer,

John H. Thorndike,
Calvin P. Hinds.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk,

Stephen Tilton, Jr.,

Ward 12.

Charles C. Conley,
Joshua Jenkins,
*William S. Thacher,
*James F. Whittelmore

189

CITY GOVERNMENT.

1854.
MAYoR,
JEROME VAN CROWNINSHIELD SMITH.
ALDERMEN,

*Benjamin Leach Allen,


Oliver Frost, (res. May.)
John Thomas Dingley,

Ward 1.

Charles T. Woodman,
*Timothy C. Kendall,
William P. Howard,

George Frederick Williams,


George Odiorne,
William Washburn,
Abel B. Munroe, (from May.)
*Tisdale Drake,
8AMUEL F. McCLEARY, JR., City Clerk.
Josiah Dunham, Jr.,

comMon councIL,
Ward 5.
*Pelham

W. Chipman,
Levi Boles,

John Davis.
Ward 2.

Daniel Warren.

Daniel D. Kelly,

George S. Jones,

Morrill Cole,

Watson G. Mayo,
JEbenezer Atkins.
Ward 3.

Ward 6.
*J. Amory Davis,
Hiram Simmons,
Ebenezer Johnson.
Ward 7.

Charles Dupee,

Farnham Plummer,

Mical Tubbs,
Caleb S. Johnson,

Samuel Hatch,
Artemas Stone,
David Whiton.

Benjamin F. Mahan.
Ward 4.
Martin L. Hall,
William F. Goodwin,

George W. Messinger,
John M. Clark.

Ward 9.
*John Odin
Joseph L. brew,
*Thacher Beal,
J. W. T. Stodder.
Ward 10.
Robert Cowdin,
*David Bryant,
Hezekiah Prince,
John R. Mullin.
Ward 11.
Stephen Tilton, Jr.,
Alexander H. Rice, Pres,

John W. F. Hobbs,

Ward 8.

George W. Warren,
Charles Demond,
Calvin P. Hinds,
Charles O. Rogers.

*Charles Mayo.
Ward 12.
Charles C. Conley,

*James F. Whittemore,
Joshua Jenkins

Edward H. Brainard.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.

1855.
MAYor,
JEROME VAN CROWNINSHIELD SMITH.
ALDERMEN,
Josiah Dunham, Jr.
Joseph Lawrence Drew,
Charles Woodberry,
Wm. Washburi, Chairman, Charles Todd Woodman,
Albion Keith Parris Joy,
Robert Cowdin,
John Morehead Clark, (res. Benjamin Franklin Cooke,
June,)
*Samuel Topliff,
Geo. Washington Messinger,
Salma ilger Gould,
Thomas Sprague,
(from June.)

SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, JR., City Clerk.


coMMON councIL,
Ward 1.

William P. Howard,
William Marble,
Samuel P. Whitman,
Geo. D. Ricker.

Ward 2.

Bradbury G. Prescott,
Austin Gove,
Amos A. Dunnels,
Edward F. Porter.
Ward 3.

Samuel Jepson,
Jonathan B. Severance,
William H. Lounsbury,

Georw':
eorge W.

man

Joseph
resident,
*Joseph A. Pond,
Wi am G. Harris.
Ward 6.

Ward 9.
Jonas H. French,

John W.T. Stodder,


Charles Nowell,
*William B. Merrill.
Ward 10.

George S. Jones,
George W. Learnard,
Benjamin F. Stevens,

*William A. Bell,

Alvin Vinal.
Ward 7.

*Charles S. Burgess.
Ward 11.

Farnham Plummer,
Samuel Hatch,

*Charles Mayo,
John W. F. Hobbs,

Hezekiah Prince,
Samuel W. Ropes,

Folward W. Hinks.
Ward 4.

Artemas Stone,
Hales W. Suter.
Ward 8.

Eben Tarbell,
Jairus A. Frost.
Ward 12.

Robert I. Burbank,

Charles O. Rogers,

Edward H. Brainard,
George S. Dexter,

Charles B. Farley,

Lorenzo S. Cragin,
Jerome W. Tyler.

Joseph Buckley,
P. Gilbert,
*Frederick L. Wasl,burn.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, C7ork.

Daniel Hall,
*Jedediah P. Bean,
*

190

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

1856.
MAYOR,

ALEXANDER HAMILTON RICE.


ALDERMEN,

Otis Rich,
John Thomas Dingley,
Farnham Plummer,
James Cheever,
Eben Jackson,
Geo. Washington Torrey,
Robert
Codman,
*Pelham Bonney, Chairman.
Osmyn Brewster,
*Timothy Converse Kendall,
*Levi Benjamin Merriam,
Joseph Milner Wightman,
(died April.)
(from April.)
William Howard Calrow,
SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

CoMMON CouncIL,
Ward 5.
*Joseph A. Pond,
Reuben Reed,
Barnet F. Warner,

Ward 1.
Oliver Frost,

William Parkman,
William A. Krueger,
Henry L. Dalton.

*Daniel J. Coburn, (res. Apr.)


Joseph Story, (from April.)

Ward 2.
Amos A. Dunnels,
Edward F. Porter,
Bradbury G. Prescott,
*William S. Albertson.
Ward 3.
James M. Stevens,
Lucius A. Bigelow,

Ward 6.

James W. Russell,
John Peak.
Ward 4.

Nahum M. Morrison,
L. Miles Standish.
Ward 10.
Joel Richards,

John R. Mullin,

Ezra Farnsworth,
John G. Webster,
Davis B. Roberts.
Ward 7.
Samuel Hatch,
Hales W. Suter,

Robert Slade

Daniel Cragin.
Ward 8.

*Frederick L. Washburn,

Jerome W. Tyler,
Jacob A. Dresser,

*Thacher Beal,

Ebenezer Johnson,

Rufus B. Bradford,

Robert I. Burbank,

Ward 9.

Jonas H. French,

Nathaniel C. Nash.
Ward 11.
Francis J. Parker,

William F. Richardson,
Frederick F. Thayer,
Julian O. Mason.
Ward 12.
Ezra Harlow
Freeman M.

losselyn, Jr.

Lewis C. Whiton,
Sylvester P. Gilbert,
Sumner Crosby.
David F. McGilvray.
WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.
Joseph Buckley,

Oliver Stevens, President.

1857.
MAYor,
ALEXANDER HAMILTON RICE.
ALDERMEN,

Benjamin James,

Osmyn Brewster,

Oliver Frost,

Otis Rich,
Joseph Milner Wightman,
Solomon Carter,

Samuel Hatch,
Silas Peirce,

James Nute
John Thomas Dingley,
*Timothy Allen Sumner.
*Pelham Bonney, #hairman,
SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.

William Parkman,

coMMON couNCIL,
Ward 5.
*Joseph A. Pond,

Henry L. Dalton,

William G. Harris,

William A. Krueger,

Barnet F. Warner,
George A. Shaw.
Ward 6.

John B. Wedger.
Ward 2.
William C. Ford,
Nehemiah Gibson,
Benjamin F. Palmer,
Benjamin Pond.
Ward 3.
Charles Emerson,

Ebenezer Johnson,
Davis B. Roberts,
John S. Damrell,

George W. Tuxbury.
Ward 7.

Ward 9.

Newell A. Thompson,
William B. Merrill,
Nahum M. Morrison,
Sidney A. Stetson.
Ward 10.

Joseph Smith,
*David Bryant,
John B. Mullin,
John Tyler.
'

Ward 11.

Rufus B. Bradford,

Frederick F. Thayer

James M. Stevens,

John H. Barry,

William Fox Richardson,

James J. Cobb,

Henry E. Bayley,

Samuel Talbot, Jr.

George S. Hale.
Ward 8.

Josiah B. Richardson,
Samuel W. Waldron, Jr.

Ward 4.

Jacob A. Dresser,

Oliver Stevens, President,


Francis E. Faxon,
George N. Nichols.

*Frederick L. Washburn,
David F. McGilvray,
James H. Beal,
Benjamin French.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.

Ward 12.

Freeman M. Josselyn, Jr.,


Lewis C. Whiton,
Davis W. Bailey,
Henry Mason.

191

CITY GOVERNMENT.

1858.
MAYor,

FREDERICWALKER LINCOLN, JR.


ALDERMEN,

Benjamin James,
Osmyn Brewster,
Otis Rich,

Joseph Milner Wightman,


Chairman,

Samuel Hatch (from Feb.)


Silas Peirce,
James Nute (res. March),

Rufus B. Bradford(res. Feb.)

Samuel Dexter Crane,


Charles Emerson,

Jesse Holbrook,

George Dennie,

George Augustus Curtis,

Ebenezer Atkins (fr. April.)


saw UEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk,
coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.
*Pelham Bonney,
Joseph L. Bates,
Jairus Beal,
Lucius Slade.
Ward 6.

Ward 1.

William Parkman,
John B. Wedger,
John W. Bartlett,
Albert Betteley.
Ward 2,

William C. Ford,

*Tisdale Drake,
George W. Tuxbury,
Joseph L. Henshaw,

Nehemiah Gibson,

Benjamin F. Palmer,
Benjamin Pond.
Ward 3.
Charles Dupee,
James J. Cobb,
Horace Poland,
John C. Tucker.
Ward 4.
Francis E. Faxon,
Francis D. Stedman,

Thomas M. Howard,
Edward F. Robinson.
Ward 10.

Charles S. Burgess,
John R. Mullin,

John Tyler,
John A. Warren.
Ward 11.

# e,
#.

Sam'1W.Waldron, Jr., Pres,


Edward F. Hall,
William S. McGowan,

Henry W. Haynes.

Calvin A. Richards.
Ward 12.

. Bayle

Ward 8.
James H. Beal,

Benjamin French,
*Elijah Drew,
Timothy R. Page.

William C. Williamson.

L. Miles Standish,

Prescott Barker.
Ward 7.
en

Alexander Wadsworth,

Ward 9.

Newell A. Thompson,

Benjamin B. Brown,
George P. French,
Henry B. Janes,
Chauncy Page.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.


1859.
MAYor,

FREDERIC WALKER LINCOLN, JR.


ALDERMEN,
George Dennie,

Silas Peirce, Chairman,


*Timothy Allen Sumner (res.
April),
Samuel Dexter Crane,
Charles Emerson,

George Augustus Curtis,


Jesse Holbrook,
Ebenezer Atkins,
Clement Willis,

William Welden Allen,


Joseph Tilden Bailey,

Thomas Coffin Amory, Jr.,


Otis Clapp (from April).

SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.


CoMMoN councIL,
Ward 1.
William Parkman,
John W. Bartlett,
Samuel B. Krogman,

Ward 5.

Joseph L. Bates,
Jairus Beal,
Lucius Slade,

*Cornelius Doherty.

Theophilus Burr, Jr.,

Ward 2.
Wiliam C. Ford,

JWard 6.
*Tisdale Drake,

Daniel D. Kelly,
Gilbert E. Pierce,
Joseph Robbins.

John G. Webster,
*John H. Robinson,
Philip H. Sears.

Ward 3,
Horace Poland,
John C. Tucker,

*Henry E. Bayley,

Ward 7.
Jabez Frederick,

William C. Burgess,
*Thomas Mooney.

*Charles J. McCarthy,
*James Riley.

Ward 4.
Josiah Putnam Bradlee, Pres.
Francis E. Faxon,
Francis D. Stedman,
William C. Williamson.

Ward 8.
Timothy R. Page,
John S. Tyler,
Jonas Fitch,
John L. Batchelder.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.

Ward 9.

I: Miles Standish,
William Carpenter,
Horace Jenkins,
Levi L. Willcutt.
Ward 10.

Robert Cowdin,
Charles S. Burgess,
Justin Jones,
Ansel Lothrop.
Ward 11.

William Fox Richardson,


Calvin A. Richards,
William W. Clapp, Jr.,
Joseph F. Paul.
Ward 12.

Samuel R. Spinney,
Henry B. Janes,
Osborn Howes,

Joel Baker, Jr.

192

MUNICIPAL REGISTER.

1860.
MAYOR,

FREDERICWALKER LINCOLN, JR.


ALDERMEN,
Ebenezer Atkins,
Clement Willis,

Jonathan Preston,
Silas Peirce,

Samuel Dexter Crane,


Jesse Holbrook,

Otis Clapp, Chairman,


Francis Edwin Faxon,

Harrison Otis Briggs,


Joseph Tilden Bailey
*James Laighton Hanson.
Thos. Coffin Amory, Jr.,
SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.
CoMMON councIL,

Ward 1.

Ward 5.

*Cornelius Doherty,

Jairus Beal,

Theophilus Burr, Jr.,

John Dacey,

*Thomas A. Matthews,

Lyman S. Hapgood,
N. C. A. Preble.

Albert P. Morrison.
Ward 2.
Gilbert E. Pierce,
Joseph Robbins,
Daniel Goodwin,
George T. Sampson.
Ward 3.
John C. Tucker,
William C. Burgess,
*John Allison,

Ward 6.

Joseph L. Henshaw,
Prescott Barker,

Benjamin G. Boardman,
G. Howland Shaw.
Ward 7.
Jabez Frederick,
*Charles J. McCarthy,
*James Riley,
John Leahy.
Ward 8.
John S. Tyler,
Jonas Fitch,
John L. Batchelder,
Joseph H. Bradley.
WAshingtoN P. GREGG, Clerk.

J. Milton Roberts.

Ward 4.
J. Putnam Bradlee, Pres.
Francis D. Stedman,

Alexander Wadsworth,
William E. Webster.

Ward 9.
Francis Richards,
Sidney A. Stetson,
William Carpenter,
Horace Jenkins.
Ward 10.
Robert Cowdin,
Justin Jones,
Ansel Lothrop,
Samuel A. B. Bragg.

william's

amF.W.
Clapp,
Joseph
Paul,
p, Jr
Jr.,

George P. Sanger,
William B. Fowle, Jr.
JWard 12.

Joseph W. Howard,
Henry Souther,
George W. Sprague,

Benjamin Pope,

186 1.
MAYOR,

JOSEPH MILNER WIGHTMAN. .


ALDERMEN,

Jonathan Preston

Thomas Coffin Amory, Jr.,

Philip' Rich,
Silas Peirce, Chairman,
Samuel Hatch,

*James Laighton Hanson,


Samuel Rogers Spinney,
Nehemiah Gibson,

G. Washington Parmenter,
Moses Clark,
John Francis Pray,

Elisha Tyson Wilson.


SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.
COMMON COUNCIL,

Ward 5.

Ward 1.
John Dacey,
Andrew Ainsworth,

Ward 9.

John W. Leighton, (res. Oct.)

Theophilus Burr, Jr.,


Lyman S. Hapgood,
Daniel Carr, Jr.,

Francis Richards,
John C. J. Brown,
William A. Clark,

Cornelius Murphy,

John S. Pear.

Francis H. Ward.
Ward 10.
Robert Cowdin,
Justin Jones,
John Borrowscale,

Horace Dodd, (from Nov.)


Ward 2.
Nathaniel Seaver,
George T. Sampson,
Albert Bowker,

Ward 6.

Joseph L. Henshaw,
Prescott Barker,

Benjamin G. Boardman,
Daniel Davies.

Stephen N. Stockwell.
Ward 3.
John C. Tucker,
J. Milton Roberts,

*Charles J. McCarthy,
*James

Sylvanus A. Denio,

''

John Rogers, (res.


Philip O'Donnell, (f'm ay).
Ward 4.
Seldon Crockett,
Elias E. Davison,
Benjamin F. Edmands,

Joseph F. Huntress.

Ward 7.

Jabez Frederick,

#'

Henry W. Foley.
JWard 8.

R. Page,
Joseph H. Bradley, Pres,
Morris C. Fitch,
Frederick Grant.

Ward 11.

Nathaniel Brewer,
Edward F. Robinson, (res.
May,)

Joshua D. Ball,
*John C. Fallon,
Calvin A.Richards(f'm May).
Ward 12.

Sumner Crosby,

#
eorge
W. Sprague
ioilis R. Gray."

Daniel H. Whitney.
WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk,

193

CITY GOVERNMENT.

1862.
MAYOR,
JOSEPH MILNER WIGHTMAN.
ALDERMEN,

Thos. P. Rich, Chairman,


Joseph Lyman Henshaw,
G. Washington Parmenter,
Joseph Frost Paul,
Thomas Coffin Amory, Jr.,
John Francis Pray,
Calvin Allen Richards,
*James Laighton Hanson,
Elisha Tyson Wilson,
Otis Norcross.
Samuel Rogers Spinney,
Francis Richards,
SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.
comMon councIL,
Ward 5.
John S. Pear,

Ward 1.

John W. Leighton,
Cornelius Murphy,
Dennis Bonner,
Matthew Keany.

Ward 9.
William Carpenter,
Franklin H. Sprague,
Samuel G. Bowdlear,
William H. Ireland.
Ward 10.
Joel Richards,

Joseph A. Brown,
Linus M. Child,
Michael F. Wells.

Ward 2.

Albert Bowker,
Richard Beeching,
George Hinman,

Ward 6.

Daniel Davies,
William E. Bicknell,

Augustus Reed.
Ward 3.

George P. Clapp,
George O. Shattuck.
J.Ward 7.

John C Tucker,
Philip ODonnell,

Jabez Frederick,
*Charles J. McCarthy,

Bernard Cullen,

(Resigned March.)
*James Riley,

John Glancy.

Henry W. Foley,

Ward 4.

Edward Ryan,
(From March.)
Ward 8.

Seldon Crockett,
Elias E. Davidson,
Benjamin F. Edmands,
Daniel H. Whitney.

Joseph Buckley,
John S. Tyler,

Loring B. Barnes,
Cyrus Hicks,
orace B. Fisher.
Ward 11.

William B. Fowle, Jr.,


Joshua D. Ball,
*John C. Fallon,
Lucius A. Cutler.
Ward 12.
Sumner Crosby,
George W. Sprague,

*Henry A. Drake,
Stanley Gore.

Morris C. Fitch,
Winsor Hatch, 2d.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.


1863.
MAYor.

FREDERIC WALKER LINCOLN, JR.


ALDERMEN,

T. C. Amory, Jr., Chairman,


Bilas Peirce,
Samuel Rogers Spinney,

Joseph Lyman Henshaw,

Joseph Frost Paul,

Robert Marsh,
Otis Norcross,
Lemuel Miles Standish,
Sylvanus Allen Denio,
John Steele Tyler,
Hiram Ambrose Stevens.
oses Clark,
SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.
coMMON councIL,

Ward 1.

Joseph A. Brown,

Dennis Bonner,
John W. Leighton,
Patrick McLaughlin.
JWard 2.

Joseph Allen,
Joseph Richardson.

Richard Beeching,
George Hinman,
Augustus Reed,
Charles R. McLean.
Ward 3.

John C. Tucker,
Bernard Cullen,
John Glancy,

Philip O'Donnell.
Ward 4.

Alexander Wadsworth,
John M. Fiske,
Granville Mears,
William W. Warren,

Ward 9.

Ward 5.

Matthew Keany,

William Carpenter,
Franklin H. Sprague,
Gilbert C. Brown,
John C. Haynes.

Michael F. Wells,

Ward 6.
Daniel Davies,

Ward 10.
John Borrowscale,
Loring B. Barnes.
Horace B. Fisher,
Patrick F. Logan.
Ward 11.
Lucius A. Cutler,
Nathaniel Adams,
William Cumston,

William E. Bicknell,
David H. Coolidge,
Charles Woodbury.
Ward 7.
Jabez Frederick,
Edward Ryan,
John P. Ordway,
Daniel J. Sweeney.
Ward 8.
Joseph Buckley,

George S. Hale, President,

Nathan Morse.

Ward 12.
George W. Sprague.
*Henry A. Drake,

Morris C. Fitch,
J. Tisdale Bradlee.

WASHINGToN P. GREGG, Clerk.

Wm. Gallagher,
Lewis J. Bird.

MUNICIPAL REGISTER,

194

1864.
MAYOR,

FREDERIC WALKER LINCOLN, JR.


ALDERMEN,

Geo. Washington Messinger,


Otis Norcross, Chairman,
Lemuel Miles Standish,
Sylvanus Allen Denio,

Wm. Warland Clapp, Jr.,

Robert Marsh,
Hiram Ambrose Stevens,
Geo. Washington Warren,
Nathaniel Cushing Nash,

Geo. Washington Sprague,


Daniel Davics,

*Charles Francis Dana.

SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.

CoMMON councIL,
Jyard 5.

Matthew Keany,

Michael F. Wells,

Jabez F. Hewes,
Albert S. Pratt,
John Turner.
Ward 2.
Augustus Reed,
Charles R. McLean,
William W. Elliott,
Nathaniel McKay.
Ward 3.
John Glancy,

Joseph Allen,

JWard 9.
William Carpenter,
James Fitch,
Gilbert C. Brown,

Robert Buntin
Thomas Gaield.

* John C. Haynes.

JWard 6.
William E. Bicknell,
David H. Coolidge,
Charles Woodbury,

Ward 10.
Joshua P. Preston,
Cadis B. Boyce,
Solomon B. Stebbins,

Patrick T. Jackson.

George P. Darrow.

Alexander Wadsworth,

George S. Hale, President,

John M. Fiske,
Granville Mears,
William W. Warren.

J. Tisdale Bradlee,
Samuel H. Loring,

Ward 11.
Nathaniel Adams,
William Cumston,
Moses W. Richardson,
Charles W. Livermore.
Jyard 12.
William Gallagher,
Thomas Gogin,
Horace Smith,

Thomas F. l'ichardson.

Moses Colman.

Ward 7.

*Charles J. McCarthy,

Edwin M. Putnam,

John P. Ordway,

Lewis Rice,
P. H. Farren.
Ward 4.

Daniel J. Sweeney,
William Mooney.
Ward 8.

WASHINGToN P. GREGG, Clerk.

1865.
MAYOR.

FREDERICWALKER LINCOLN, JR.


ALDERMEN,
Daniel Davies,
John Steele Tyler,
G. W. Messinger, Chairman,
*Charles Francis Dana,
Nathaniel Cushing Nash,
Lemuel Miles Standish,
William Warland Clapp, Jr., Edward Francis Porter,
Robert Marsh,
Thomas Gaflield.
Geo. Washington Sprague.
Sylvanus Allen Denio,
SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.

CoMMON councIL,
Ward 5

J.Ward 9.

Jabez F. Hewes,

Joseph Story,

Nahum H. Morrison,

John Turner,

Joseph Allen,

Jonas Fitch,
John C. Haynes,
Gilbert C. Brown.
Ward 10.

Patrick McLaughlin,

N. W. Farley,

John Miller.
Ward 2.

Augustine G. Stimson.
Ward 6.

Charles R. McLean,
William W. Elliott,
Nathaniel McKay,

Weston Lewis,
Jarvis D. Braman,

Solomon B. Stebbins,
Joshua P. Preston,

Benjamin F. Stevens,

Cadis B. Boyce,
George P. Darrow.
Ward 11.

Andrew Hall.
Ward 3.

Francis W. Palfrey.

William C. Burgess,
Nicholas J. Bean,

James J. Flynn,
John P. Ordway,

W. B. Fowle, Jr., President,

Allen Riley,

William Mooney,
William D. Park.
Ward 8.

Moses W. Richardson,

John F. Flynn.
Ward 4.

Alexander Wadsworth,
William W. Warren,
Granville Mears,
Joel Gray.

Ward 7.

Nathaniel Adams,
Charles W. Livermore.
J/ard 12.

Sumner Crosby,

Clement Willis
Samuel H.

i.oring,

Job T. Souther,

Walbridge A. Field,
Horace L. Bowker.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.

Benjamin Dean,
Freeborn Adams, Jr.

CITY

195

GOVERNMENT.

1866.
MAYOR.

FREDERIC WALKER LINCOLN, JR.


Benjamin James,
Geo. Washington Messinger,
Chairman,

Samuel Dexter Crane,


John Steele Tyler,

ALDERMEN,
Nathaniel Cushing Nash,
Daniel Davies,
Edward Francis Porter,
Thomas Gaffield,

Jonas Fitch,

Charles Wesley Slack,


Gilbert Wait

Noah Mayo, Jr.

SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

CoMMON councIL,
JWard 5.
Clement Willis,
James J. Flynn.

Ward 1.

Albert Bowker,
William J. Ellis,
Francis J. Munroe,

Walbridge A. Field,

Ward 9.

Nahum M. Morrison,
John C. Haynes,
George Nowell,
Jeremiah L. Newton.
Ward 10.

Moses B. Tower.
Ward 2.
John Miller,

William D. Park.

John F. Flynn,
Dennis Cawley, Jr.,

Weston Lewis,
Jarvis D. Braman,

Murdock Matheson.
Ward 3.

Alfonso Bowman.

Joseph Story, President,

Christopher A. Connor,

Matthias Rich,

Augustine G. Stimson,

Thomas Leavitt,

Jonas Ball,

Noah W. Farley,

Hugh A. Madden,
Michael Carney.

Hubbard W. Tilton,
Henry D. Hyde.

Ward 6.

Benj. F. Stevens,

Moses W. Richardson,
IDaniel G. Grafton,

Samuel W. Hodges,
Charles Caverly, Jr.

JWard 7.

Elam W. Hale.
JP'ard 4.

Ward 11.

Ward 8.

Alexander Wadsworth,
Granville Mears,
Lewis laice,

George P. Darrow,
Israel S. Trafton,
Edward A. White,

Increase E. Noyes.

William S. Hills.

Ward 12.

George P. French,
Benjamin Dean,

Solomon S. Gray,
Henry E. Bradlee.

WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.

1867.
MAYOR.

OTIS NORCROSS.

Benjamin James,
Geo. Washington Messinger,
Thomas Gaffield,

Jonas Fitch,

ALDERMEN,
Charles Wesley Slack,
William Cumston,
Charles Rankin McLean,
Albert Stevens Pratt,

Jarvis Dwight Braman,


Edward Augustus White,
Walter Edward Hawes,
Newton Talbot.

SAMUEL F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

Ward 1.

Andrew Hall,
Nathaniel McKay,
William Woolley,
George E. Young.
Ward 2.
John C. Tucker,

Dennis Crawley, Jr.,


Murdock Matheson,

coMMON councIL,
Ward 5.
Walbridge A. Field,
Daniel J. Sweeney,
H. Burr Crandall,
Oliver C. Livermore.

JWard 6.
Benjamin F. Stevens,
Alfonso Bowman,
William H. Emerson,

Michael Carney.
JWard 3.

Warren L. Tower.

Michael F. Wells,

Christopher A. Connor,

John F. Jarvis,
Edward R. Merritt,
Charles lt. Train.

Michael Carney,

Ward 4.

Lewis Rice,
Increase E. Noyes,

Edward E. Batchelder,
Francis A. Osborn.

JWard 7.

Henry C. Lougee,
George Baxter, Jr.
Ward 8.
William S. Hills,
Sewall B. Bond,
Lucius W. Knight,

Ward 9.

Nahum M. Morrison,
George Nowell,
Jeremiah L. Newton,
Frederick A. Wilkins.
Ward 10.

Samuel W. Hodges,
Daniel G. Grafton

Charles Caverly, Jr.,


Albert F. Upton.
Ward 11.

Weston Lewis,
Henry D. Hyde,
Charles H. Allen,
Ivory Bean.
IWard 12.
George P. French,
Thomas Gogin,

Henry W. Wilson,
IIoward A. Doe.
William R. Bryden.
WASHINGTON P. GREGG, Clerk.

IND EX.

ALDER MEN.

[The Figures indicate the number of years of service.]


Denio, Sylvanus A.

A.

Alger, Cyrus . . . .
Allen, Benjamin L. .
Allen, William W. .

Amory, Charles . . .
Amory, Thomas C., Jr.
Andrews, William T. .

Jackson, Francis.
James, Benjamin.

Joy, Albion K. P.

Eddy, Caleb . . .

Baxter, Daniel . .
Bellows, John . .

Eliot, Ephraim . . .
Eliot, Samuel A. . .
Ellis, Jabez . . . .

Benjamin, Asher.

Emerson, Charles .

Bent, Adam . . .

Billings, Samuel.
Binney, John . .

Fairbanks, Moses

Blake, George . .

Faxon, Francis E.
Robert.
e n

Brimmer, Martin . .
-

Mayo, Noah, Jr. .


McCleary, John B.
McLean, Charles R.
Meriam, Levi B. .

Frost, Oliver . . .

Briggs, Harrison O.

iryant, John.

Gaffield, Thomas.
Gibson, Nehemiah
Gould, Frederick.
Gould, Salma E.
Grant, Moses . .
Greele, Samuel . .

C
Calrow, William H.
Carney, Daniel . . .
Carter, Solomon.
Cary, Isaac. . . .
Cheever, James .
Child, David W.

*--

Gurney, Nathan .
H

Hall, Jacob . .
Hall, James . .
Hall, Samuel . .
Hanson, James
Harris, Isaac . .

Clapp, Otis . . .
William W., J
Clark, Calvin W. .
Clark, James . . . .
Clark, John M. .
Clark, Moses . . .
Cobb, Samuel C.
Codman, Robert.
Cooke, Benjamin F
Cowdin, Robert .
Crane, Larra . . .
Crane, Samuel D. .
Cumston, William .

Harris, James . . .
Harris, Richard D.
Hatch, Samuel . . .

Head, Joseph . . .

Henshaw, Joseph L.
Holbrook, Henry M
Holbrook, Jesse . .

IDana, Charles F. . . .
Davies, Daniel.
-

Hawes, Walter E. .
Hayward, Joseph H
Head, George E. .

Curtis, George A. .

.
.
.
L.
. .

#: John .

Messinger, George W.
Munroe, Abel B . . . .
N

---

Leighton, Charles
Lewis, Winslow .
Longley, James .
Loring, john F. .

Marsh, Robert . . .
Marshall, Josiah . .

Fiske, Benjamin.
Fitch, Jonas . . .

Braman, Jarvis D.
Brewster, Osmyn .
Briggs, Billings . .

Leavitt, Benson .

Fennelly,

Bowdoin, James . .

Bradford, Rufus B.S

Lovering, Joseph
Lowe, Abraham T.

Fales, Samuel . .
Farnum, Henry .

Boies, Jeremiah S.
Bonney, Pelham . .

K
Kendall, Thomas . . . .

Kendall, Timothy C. .
Kimball, Moses . . . .

Bailey, Joseph T. .

Jenkins, Joseph .
Jones, Thomas . .

Dunham, Josiah, Jr.


Dyer, John D . . .

Armstrong, Samuel T. .
Atkins, Ebenezer . . .
Ayer, J. Cullen . . . .

Jackson, Eben . .

Dennie, George .
Dingley, John T.
Dorr, Joseph H .
Drake, Tisdale . .
Drew, Joseph L.
Dunham, Josiah.

Hooper, Stephen . . .

Hunting, Thomas . .

Nash, Nathaniel C. . .
Norcross, Otis . . . . .
Nute, James . . . . . .
O
Ober, John P. . . . .
Odiorne, George . . . .
Odiorne, George (1854).
Oliver, Henry J . . . .
P

Parker, William . . . .
Parmenter, George W.
Patterson, Enoch . . .

Paul, Joseph F. . . .
Peirce, Silas . . . .
Perkins, James . . .
Perkins, Samuel S.
Perry, lyman
Pickering, John . .
Piper, Solomon . . .
Plummer, Farnham
-

Pope, William . . .
Porter, Edward F.

.
.
.
-

198

INDEX.
W.

Shipley Simon G. .
Slack, Charles W. .
| Sleeper, Jacob . . .
Smith, Benjamin
Q
Spinney, Samuel R.
Quincy, Samuel . . . . . 2 Sprague, George W.
Sprague,
Thomas .
R
Standish Lemuel M.
Reed, Lyman . . . .
Stedman, Josiah . .
Reed, Sampson . . .
Stevens, Hiram A. .
Revere, Joseph W. .
Stevens, John. See note.
Rich, Otis . . . . .
Sumner, Timothy A.
Rich, Thomas P. .
T
Richards, Calvin A. .
Richards, Francis . .
Talbot, Newton . .
Richardson, Thomas
Tilden, Bryant P. .
Robbins, Edward H. .
Tilden, Joseph . .
Robinson, Simon W.
Tileston, William .
Rogers, Henry B. . .
* Topliff,
Samuel . .
Russell, Benjamin, .
Torrey, George W.
Russell, Nathaniel P.
Tyler, John S. . . .

Pratt, Albert S. .
Pray, John F. . .
Preston, Jonathan . . . .

Wait, Gilbert . . . .
Wales, Thomas B. . .
Warren, George W. .
Washburn, William .

Webster, Redford. Se

Wells, John B. . . .
Welsh, Thomas, Jr.
Wetmore, Thomas.
White, Benjamin F.
White, Edward A. .
Whiting, James . .

Wightman, Joseph M.
Wilkins, John H.
Wilkinson, Simon
Williams, George
Williams, Moses .

||

Wilson, Elisha T. . .
Woodberry, Charles.

Upham, Phineas . .

Uraun,

Richard .

CO M M O N

. .
. .
F.
. .

Willis Clement . . . .

Seaver, Nathaniel . . . .

Wilkins, Charles ...".

Savage, James . . . . . .
Savage, James S. . .

n:ote

Wells, Charles . . .
Wells, Charles A. .

Woodman, Charles T.

C O U N C I L.

[The references are to Wards.]


A.

Bailey, Ebenezer . . . 8, 10

Abbot, Andrew . .
Abbott, George W.
Abbott, Samuel L. .
Adams Aaron . . .
Adams, Asa . . . .

Adams, Freeborn, J
Adams, George W.

Adams, Jose

Adams, Nathaniel .
Adams, Paul . . . .

Adams, Philip . . .

3
5
0.
2
3
12
7
4
11
6
3
12
3
1
2
12
11
2
5
3
0.
12
7
9
2
7
6
6
7
3
l
2

.. 1

Adams, Seth . . . .
Adan, John R. . . .

Ainsworth, Andrew.
Albertson, William S.
Alger, Cyrus . . .
Allen, Charles H.
Allen, James B.

Allen, Joseph .
Allison John . .
Amee, Jacob . .
Amee, J. L. C. .
Amory, Jonathan .
Amory, Thomas C. .
Andrews, Henry . .

Appleton, Benjamin B.
Appleton, Ebenezer.

Appleton, Samuel . .
Appleton, Samuel A.
Arnold, Charles . . .
Samuel . .
Atkins, Ebenezer . .
Atkins, John . . . . . . 4

Austin, Elbridge G. . . 7, '


Austin, Samuel, Jr. . . .
Ayer, Joseph C. . . . . . 2

Bailey, Edwin C. . . . . . .3
Baker, Joel, Jr. .
Baker, John.

Bell, William A. . . .
Bemis, Charles . . . .

. 12
8

Bent, Adam . . . . .

Baker, Ruel . . . . . 10, 11

Betteley, Albert . . .
Betton, Ninian C. . .
Bicknell, William E.
Bigelow, George T.
Bigelow, John P..
Bigelow, Lucius A.

Baldwin, Aaron . . . .
Ball, Jonas . . . . . .
Ball, Joshua D. . . . .
Ballard, Daniel . . . .
Ballard, John .
Banister, John F. . . .
Barker, Prescott . . . .
Barnard, Charles . . .
Barnes, Loring B. . . .
Barry, John H.
Barry, William . . . .
Bartlett, Daniel, Jr. . .
Bartlett, John W. .
Bartlett, Levi . . . . .
Bassett, Francis . . . .
Bassett, Joseph . . . .
Batchelder, Edward E. .
Batchelder, John L.

. 10
. 11
. 11
. 2
-

. 10
. 6
. 10
. 10
-

. 1
. 1
-

.
.
.
.

7
8
1
4

Bates, Ezekiel . . . . . . .3
Bates, Joseph L. .
5
Bates, Martin . . . . . . 2
Battles, Jason D. .
3

Baxter, George, Jr. . . . 7


Bayley, Henry E. . . . . 7
Bazin, George W. . . . . 6
Beal, Benjamin
Beal, Jairus . .
Beal, James H. .
Beal, Thacher .

. . . . . 5
.
5
. . . . . 8
. . . . . 9
*

Bean, Aaron H. . . . . . 10
Bean, Ivory . . . . . . . 11
Bean, Jedediah P. . . . . 12
Bean, Nicholas J. . . . . 3

B
Beeching, Richard . . . . 2
Bacon, John A. . . . . . 7 Belknap, John . . . . . . 7
Bailey, David W. . . . . 12 Belknap, Lyman A. . . . 8

Bethune, George . . .

#'

Matthew .

1
Bird, Lewis J. . . .
Bishop, Robert . . .
Blake, Edward . . . . .
Blake, James . . . . . 1
Blake, William . . . . .
Blanchard, Abraham W.
Blanchard, George D. B.
Bliss, Levi . . . . . . .
Blodgett, Luther . . . .
Boardman, Benjamin G.

Boardman, Charles
Boies, Jeremiah S.
Boles, John .
Boles, Levi . . . .
Bond, Sewall B. .
Bonner, Dennis .
-

.
-

.
.
.

Bonney, Pelham . .
Borrowscale, John.
Bosworth, Hiram .
Bourne, Abner . . .

Bowdlear, Samuel G.
Bowker, Albert . . .

Bowker, Horace L. . .
Bowman, Alfonzo.
Bowker, John H. . . .

Boyce, Cadis B. . .
Boyd, John P. . .
Boynton, James . .
Boynton, Perkins .
Brackett, Richard .

199

INDEX,

Bradbury, Samuel A. . . 3
Bradford, Gamaliel. . . . . 9

Bradford, Rufus B . . . . 7
Bradford, W. B. See note.
8
Bradlee, David W.
i.-1
Bradlee, Henry E. .
Bradlee, John R. .
Bradlee, Joseph . .
Bradlee, Josial. . .

Bradlee, Josiah P. .

Bradlee, J. Tisdale.
Bradlee, Samuel . .

Bradley, Joseph . .
Bradley, Joseph H.
Bragg, S. A. B. . .
Brainard Edward H.
Braman, Jarvis D.

Breed, Aaron H. . .
Breed, Horace . . .
Brewer, Nathaniel . .
Brewer, Thomas . .
Brigham, Benajah.
Brigham, Levi . . .
Brimmer. George W.
Brinley, Francis, Jr.
Brinley, George . .

Chapin, David. . . . . . 7,
Chapman, Jonathan
Chessman, Samuel.
Child, Linus M. . .
Child, Stephen . . .
Chipman, George W.
Clapp, George P. . . .
Clapp, Otis . . . . . .
Clapp, William W., Jr.
Clark, Benjamin . . .
Clark, Calvin W. . . .
Clark, James . . . . .
Clark, John M. . . . .
Clark, William A. . .
Clarke, Manlius S. . . .
Coburn, Daniel J. . .
Cobb, James J. . . . .

111|
*1

Brooks, Peter C. . .

Brooks, William G.
Brown, Asa . . . .
Brown, Benjamin B.
Brown, Charles .
Brown, Charles H.
Brown, Francis .
Brown, Gilbert C.

Brown, Joseph A.
1

Bryant, David . .

Bryant, Walter . .
Bryden, William R

Buckley, Joseph
Bullard, Asa. .

Bullard, Calvin
Bullard, Silas .
Bunten, Robert . .

Burbank, Robert I.
Burchstead, Benjamin.
1

Burgess, Charles S. .

. . . . 2
. . . . 1
. . . . 1
-

... 10

. . . . 12
. . . . 11

Doherty, Cornelius . . . . .1

Dorr, Samuel . . . . . . 7

Crosby, Frederick . .
1

Crosby, Sumner . .
Crowninshield, F. B
Cruft, Edward, Jr.
Cullen, Bernard . .
Cumings, B. N. . . .
Cummings, Cyrus .

Dorr, William B . . . . . 12
Dorrance, Oliver B . . . . 8
Drake, Andrew . . . . . 10
Drake, Henry A. . . . . . 12

Drake, Jeremy . . . . . . 12
Drake, Tisdale . . . . . 6, 9
Dresser, Jacob A. .
Drew, Elijah . . .
Drew, Joseph L. .
Driscoll, Michael J

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

4
8
9
5

Dudley, James H . . . . . .3
Dunbar, Peter . . . . . . 1

Dunham, Josiah . . .
Dunham, Josiah, Jr. .
Dunnels, Amos A. . .
Dupee, Charles . . .
Dupee, Horace . . . .
Durant, Henry F. . .
Dutton, Henry W . .

.
.
.
.
.
.
.

. 12
. 12
. 2
. 3
. 8
. 6
. 10

Dyer, Ezra . . . . . . . . 5

Dyer, John D. . . . . . 3
Dyer, Oliver . . . . . . . 3
R.

Cunningham, A. Jr.
Curtis, Thomas B. . .
Cushing, Henry W.
Cushing, John . . .

Cutler, Amos . . .
Cutler, Lucius A. . .
Cutter, Ammi . .

Eaton, William . . . . 1, 3
Eaton, William . . . . . 12
Eaton, William G. . . . . 8
Edmands, Benjamin F. . 4
Edmands, George W. . .
Edwards, Henry . . . .6*

Eldrdege, Edward H. .
Elliot, John . . . .

- *-

Cutter, Samuel L.

Elliott, William W.
Ellis, Ebenezer . . .

Ellis, Jabez . . .
Dacey, John . . . . . . . 1 Ellis, Jonathan .
Ellis,
Rowland.
Dale, Ebenezer . . . . . . 6
Dall, William . . . . . . 11 Ellis, Samuel . .
Dalton Henry L.
1 Ellis, William J .
Ijamrell, John's. . . . . 5, 6 Emerson, Charles .
Danforth, Isaac . . . . . 7 Emerson, Romanus

Carruth, Nathan . .

Carter, Richard B. .
Carter, Solomon . .

Cary, Alpheus . . .

Chandler, Peleg W. .

Dinsmore, Thomas
Dodd, Benjamin .
Dodd, Horace . .
Dodd, James.
Doe, Howard A. .
Doggett, John . .

Coolidge, William D.
Copeland, Elisha, Jr
Cornell, Walter . .
Cowdin, Robert . . . . 1
Crafts, John W. .
Cragin, Daniel . .
Cragin, Lorenzo S.
Crandall, H. Burr
1
| Crane, Horatio N.
Crane, Larra . . . . .
1
Crane, Samuel D . . .
Critchett, Thomas . .
Crockett, George W. .
Crockett, Seldon . . .

Cunningham, N. F. .
Curtis, Charles P. .

Center, John . . . .

Dingley, John T. . . 11, 12

Dolan, Thomas . . . . . 13
Doolittle, Lucius . . . . . 4

Burr, Theophilus, Jr.

Cawley, Dennis, Jr.

Dorr, Joseph H . . . . . 8

Cumston, William .

* - -

Dexter, Theodore . . . ... 3


Dickinson, Daniel . . .
Dillaway, William .
Dimmock, John L. . . . .

Coolidge, David H.
Coolidge, Joseph . .

Burnham, Andrew . .
Burr, Theophilus . .
1

. . .

Cummings, John A.

Buttrick, Cyrus . . . .

Denny, Daniel.
Denny, George P.
Derby, Elias H. .

Cook, Zebedee, Jr. .

Burgess, William C. .

Burrage, William . . .
Butler, Charles S. . .

Dexter, John B., Jr. . .7


1

Brown, James . .
Brown, John C. J.

Davis, Jonathan .
Davison, Elias E.
Dean, Benjamin .
Demerest, Samuel C.
Demond, Charles . .
Denio, Sylvanus A.
Denison, James .

Dexter, Franklin .
Dexter, George S

Coffin, Nathaniel W. .
Cofran, George . . . .
Cole, Morrill . . . . .
Collamore, John Jr. .
Colman, Moses . . . .
Coney, Jabez . . . . .
Conley, Charles C. .
Connor, Christopher A.

Cook, Charles E. .

Brooks, Edward . .
Brooks, Noah . . .

Cary, Isaac . . . . .
Caverly, Charles Jr.

Coffin, George W. . .

Brooks, Charles . .

C
Callender, Richard.
Calrow, William H.
Carlisle, George . .
Carnes, William R.
Carney, Michael . .
Carney, Michael . .
Carpenter, William.
Carr, Daniel, Jr. . .

Davis, John . . .

Darrow, George P. .
Dascomb, Thomas R. .
Davies, Daniel . . . .
Davis, George . . . .

. 8,
. .
. .
. .

10
10
6
11

Emerson, William H.

Emmes, Samuel . .
1
Emmons, John L. .
Emmons, Joshua. .
Davis, Henry . . . . . . 2 Erving, Edward S. . . 11, 9
Davis, J. Amory . . . . . 6 Eustis, William T. . . . 4, 7

200

INDEX.

Eveleth, Joseph . . . . . 4, 5
Everett, Otis . . . . . . .11
11

- - o - - - - - - -

-5---.-3

Felt, George W. .
Fennelly, Robert.
Fenno, John . . .
Fessenden, Benjamin

Field, Walbridge A.
Fisher, Horace B.
Fisher, Oliver . .
Fisher, Willard N.
Fiske, John M. . .

Fitch, Jonas . . .
Fitch, Morris C. .
Flanders, William M.
Fletcher, Henry W.
Flint, Joshua B. .
Flint, Waldo . . .
Flynn, James J. .

Flynn, John F. . .
Foley, Henry W.

l
Gray, Solomon S.
Greely, Philip, Jr.
Green, John Jr. . .
1 l
Greenough, Wm. W.
Gregg, Washington P.
Grosvenor, L. P. . . .

Hale, Elam W. .
Hale, George S. .
Hale, Theodore P.

Hyman

Hutchins. Ezra C. .

S.

Harris, Leach . .
Harris, Samuel . .
Harris, William G.
Harro * Noah
Hartshorn, E. P. .
Haskell, Daniel N.
Haskell, Elias . .
Haskell, Levi B. .
Haskell, William O.
-

--

Frost, Walter . . .
Frothingham, G. W.
Frothingham, Samuel

Fuller, Abraham W. .
G

9.- - |1

|
1

Hastings, Edmund T.
Hastings, Joseph S. .
Hatch, Henry . . . .
Hatch, Windsor, 2d
Haughton, James
Haven, Calvin W.
Haviland, Thomas
Hay, Joseph . . .

Hicks, Cyrus. . . .
Hildreth, Richard .

Hinds, Calvin P..


Hinks, Edward W.

J
Jackson, Eben . . .
Jackson, Francis . .
Jackson, Patrick T.
Jacobs, Francis W.
James, Benjamin

#
*

1.

James, John W.
Janes, Henry B.
Jarvis, John F.

:
12
- - - - -s- - -

Jewett, Darwin E.
1

Johnson, Caleb S.
Johnson, Ebenezer.
Johnson, George W.
Jones, Eliphalet
Jones, George S.
Jones, Isaac . .
Jones, Josiah M.
Jones, Justin .

Jones, Peter C. .
Jones, Samuel .

Josselyn, F. M., Jr.


Josselyn, Lewis .

Jones, Thomas .

.
#

Keany, Matthew.

Hewes, Jabez F. . .
Heywood Zimri B. .
Hillard, George S. .
Hills, William S. .
Hinkley, Holmes.

Ireland, William H.

Jenks, Thomas L.
Jepson, Samuel .
Jewell, Harvey .

- - - - - - -7

Hayward, James. .
Healy, John P. . . .
Hennessey, Edward
Henshaw, Joseph L.
1

Hunting, Thomas
Huntress, Joseph F.

Jenkins, Solon.

Hatch, Samuel . . .

Haynes, John C. . .
Hayward, Ebenezer

: |:

Jenkins, Joshua

Haynes, Henry W. .

Jenkins, Horace

Hayden, William

Gardner, Henry J. .

1.

Howard, Joseph W.

|
1

Harris, Joseph, Jr..

Hovey, James G. .
Howard, Charles . .
Howard, Eleazer. See note.

Hapgood,

Homer, Samuel J. M.
Hooper, Henry N. .
Hopkins, Samuel B.
Hopkins, Solomon .

Hyde, Henry D. . .

Harding, Wm. B.
Harlow, Ezra . .
Harrington, W. A.
Harris, Isaac . . .
Harris, James . .

e
- -

Holden, Joel M. . .
Hollis, Thomas . .
Holmes, Barzillai .

'i

Hall, Andrew .
Hall, Andrew T.
Hall, Daniel . .
Hall, Edward F.
Hall, Martin L. .
Hall, Samuel W.

Hobart, Enoch . .
Hobart, James T.
Hobbs, John W. F.
Hobbs, William, Jr.
Hodges, Samuel W.

Howard, Thomas M.
Howard, William H.
Howard, William P.
Howe, John . . . .
Howe, Joseph N. . .
Howe, Joseph N., Jr.
Howe, William . . .
Howes, Osborn .
Howes, Willis . .
Hudson, Thomas.

'i

Guild, Samuel E. . .

Hamblen, David
Hammond, Nathaniel

Frost, jairus A.".


Frost, Oliver . . .

Goodwin, William F.

Gray, Joel . . .
Gray, John C. . .

French, George P.

Gardner, John . . .
Gay, George . . . .
Gibbens, Daniel L. .
Gibson, Kimball . .
Gibson, Nehemiah .
Gilbert, Samuel, Jr.
Gilbert, Sylvester P.
Gill, Perez . . . .
Glancy, John . .
Goddard, William
Gogin, Thomas .
Goodhue, Samuel
Goodwin, Daniel.

|
1

Hallett, George

Follett, Dexter . .
Ford, William C.
Forristall, Ezra .
Foster, William. Seen
Fowle, Henry, Jr. . .
Fowle, James . . . .
Fowle, Joshua B. . .
Fowle, William B., Jr.
Fox, Horace . . . . .
Francis, David . . .
Franklin Benjamin .
Frederick, Jabez . .
French, Benjamin
French, Charles .

Gallagher, William
Gardiner, Henry D.
Gardner, Francis . .

Gould, Benjamin A.
Gould, Frederick . .
Gould, Thomas . .
Gove, Austin . .
Grafton, Daniel G.
Grant, Frederick
Grant, Moses .

Fitch, Jeremiah .

Gaffield, Thomas . .

Hobart Aaron . .

Gray, Hollis R.

Raxon, Nathaniel
Fay, Richard S. .

|1

Hinman, George.
1.

Gray, Henry D.

Faxon, Isaiah ...

French, John . .
French, Jonas H.

i-

Gore, Stanley . . .
Goss, Emery. . . .

Fallon, John C. .
Farley, Charles B.
Farley, Noah W. .
Farnsworth, Amos
Farnsworth, Ezra
Farnum, Henry .
Farren, Patrick H.
Faxon, Francis E.

Gordon, George W.
Gore, Christopher .

Keith, James M. .
Keith, Robert . .
Kelly, Daniel D. .
Kendall, Ezekiel.
Kendall, Thomas
Kendall, Timothy C.
Kent, Henry S. . .
Kent, William V. .
Kimball, Benjamin.
Kimball, Daniel . .

l0.

201

INDEX.

Kimball, Moses . . .
#
9:verett C.
ngs
C.

. .
Knight, fucius W. . .
Krogman, Samuel B. .

McLaughlin, Patrick .
McLean, Charles R. . .

McLellan, George W. .
McLellan, Isaac, Jr. . .
Means, James . . . . .

Lamb, Thomas . . . .

Lamson, Benjamin . .
Lane, George. . . . .

Lawrence, Abbott . .
Lawrence, James . . .
Lawrence, S. Abbott.

Leahy, John . . . . .
Learnard, George W.
Learnard, William H.
Leavens, Simon D. .
Leavitt, Joseph M. .
-

Leighton, Charles. .

Leighton, John W. .
Lerow, Lewis
*

Lewis, Asa

Lewis, George W. .
Lewis, Joseph W. .
Lewis, Weston . . .
Lewis, Winslow. . .
Lewis, Winslow, Jr.
Libby, J. G. L. . . .
Lincoln, Ezra. . .
Lincoln, Ezra, Jr.

Meriam, Levi . . . . .

Parker, Amos B. .
Parker, Augustus

Merrill, William B. . .

Parker, Benjamin
Parker, Charles H.

Lincoln, Hawkes.

#|12f

Lincoln, Jared . .

Lincoln, Levi R. .

Parkman, William .
Parks, Luther . .

Little, William, Jr. .


Littlehale, Sargent S
Livermore, Charles W.
Livermore, Oliver C. .

Paul, Joseph F. . .
Peabody, :

Peabody, O. W. B. .
Peak, John . . .
.
Pear, John S. . . .
Penniman, Scammell
Perkins, James . . . .
Perkins, John S. . .
Perkins, Samuel . .
Perkins, Samuel S. .

Morse, L. Foster.
Morse, Nathan . .
Motley, Thomas .
Moulton. Thomas . .

Mullin, John R. . .

I|11:

Munroe, Abel B. . .
Munroe, Francis J. .

Nazro, John G. . . .

Nelson, Ebenezer . .
Nevers, Benjamin M.

Perrin, Payson . . .
Phelps, Abel . . . .

Phelps, Henry B.;..

: ::|#
: :
|

Phillips, George W.
Phillips, John L. . .
Phillips, Thomas W.
Pickering, Henry W.
Pickman, Benjamin T.

Nash, Nathaniel C. .
Nason, J. Byron . .

Lodge, Giles . . .

Parrott, William W. .

Logan, Patrick F.
Loring, Caleb G. .
Loring, Jonathan .

Parmelee, Asaph . . .

Munroe, James . . .
Murphy, Cornelius.

Lincoln, Noah, Jr.

Parker, William . .

Moseley, David C.

Lincoln, Henry . . . . 6:

11

Parker, Francis J.
Parker, Isaac. . .
Parker, John B. . . . .
Parker, William . .

Miller, John . . .
Milton, Ephraim .
Minns, Thomas . .
Minon, Michael G.
Minot, Albert T. .

Morrison, Nahum M.

1.

Palfrey, Francis W. . . . 6
Palfrey, William . . .
Palmer, Benjamin F.

Merriam, Joseph W. .

Morse, Elijah . . .

Palmer, Julius A. .
Park, John C. . . .
Park, William D. . . .

Moody, David. . .
Mooney, Thomas.
Mooney, William.
Morey, George, Jr.
Morrison, Albert P. .

Meriam, Edward P...

Mears, Granville . . .

Merritt, Edward R. . .

Leeds, Samuel . . .

Page, George . . . . . . . 12
Page, Thaddeus.
1,2
Page, Timothy R. . . . . 8
Paine, R.T. . . . . . 10, 11

Messinger, Daniel . . .
Messinger, George W.

Leavitt. Thomas . .
-

Page, Edward . . . . . . 4
1

McKay, Nathaniel . .

Page, Chauncy . . . . . . 12

McGowan, William S.

Krueger, William A. .

Henry.

McAllaster, James .

McCarthy, Charles J.
McGilvray, David F.

'H' W. .

Leeds,

Mayo, Watson G. .

Pierce, Gilbert E. .

Pierce, Josiah . . .

Piper, Solomon . . .

. 11

Plumer, Avery, Jr. .

"

Loring, Perez . . .

Newcomb, Norton .

Loring, Samuel H.
Lothrop, Ansel . .

Newell, Joseph R. .

Loud, Andrew J.
Lougee,
C.
Lounsbury, Wm. H.

Nichols, George N.

Newton, Jeremiah L.

Lovejoy, Reuben . .

# William R.
Lovell. Michael . . .

I owell, John, Jr. .

1.

M
Madden, Hugh A. .

Mahan, Benjamin F.

Marrett, Philip . . .
Marsh, Robert
Martin, Israel . . . .
Marvin, Theophilus R.
-

Mason, Julian O. . . .

A.

aynard, Jesse. . . .

Noyes, George N.
Noyes, Increase E.
Noyes, Nicholas .
Nurse, Gilbert . .

Porter, Jonathan
Pratt, Eleazer Pratt, Albert S.

Preble, N. C. A. .

Prescott, Bradbury G.
Prescott, Edward G.
Prescott, William .
Preston, Jonathan . . . 9, 10

6 1.

Olney, Stephen W. .

Preston, Joshua P. .
Prince, Hezekiah . .
Pritchard, Gilman .
Proctor, John . . .

Ordway, John P. . .

Prouty, Joel . . . . . . . 6

Oliver, Samuel P.

Orne, Henry . . . .
Orrock, James L. P.
Osborn, Francis A. .

# Lewis G.

Ober, John P. . .
Odin, John, Jr. .
O'Donnell, Philip.
Oliver, Henry J. .

Matheson, Murdock . .

Mayo, Charles . . . .

Nowell, George .

Oliver, Francis J.

Mason, Henry . . . .

Pond, Benjamin. .
Pond, Joseph A. .
Pope, Benjamin. .
Pope, Thomas B .
Pope, William . .
Porter, Edward F.

Nicolson, Samuel . .
Norcross, Loring . .
No
, Samuel C.
Nowell, Charles . .

Malone, Edward . .
Mann, Nehemiah P. .
iManning, Francis C.
Marble, William . .
-

lympton, Henry.
Poland, Horace . .
Pollard, Abner W.

Otis, George W. . .
Otis, George W., Jr.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

. 10
. 10
. 11
. 12

Putnam, Edwin M. . . . . .3

Putnam, John P. . . . . . 6
Q
Quincy, Josiah, Jr. . . . . 4

202

INDEX.

Raymond, Freeborn F. .
Raymond, Thatcher R. .
Raymond, Zebina L. . .
Rayner, John'". . .
Rayner, John J. . .
Reed, Augustus .
1

Reed, Oliver . .
Reed, Reuben .

Tarbell, Eben . . .
Tarbell, Silas P. .

Shaw, Jesse . . . . . . . 6
Shaw, Robert G . . . . . 4
Shelton, Stephen . . . . 9, 10

Shelton, Thomas J . . . . 8

Reed, Thomas

Reed, William
Rice, Alexander H

Rice, Henry . . .
-

Tappan, Lewis . . .

Shaw, G. Howland . . . . 6

Reed, Edward .

Rice, 'o.

Shackford, Richard . . . 2
Shattuck, George O. . . 6
Shattuck, Lemuel . . 10, 11
Shaw, George "A . . . . . 5

Rice, John P. . .

Rice, Lewis . . . . . . . l
Rice, Samuel . . . . . . .
Rich, Matthias . . . . . . 11

Shipley, Simon G. .
Silsby, Enoch . . .
Simmons, Hiram . .
Simonds, Alvin . .
Simonds, Jonathan .
Simonds, William .
Slade, John, Jr. . .
Slade, Lucius . . .
Slade, Robert . . .
Sloan, Samuel W.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

. .3
. 7
. 6
. 12
. 10
. 5
. 7
. ~5
. 10
. 12

Richards, Calvin A. . . . 11

Smith, George W. . . . 2, 3

Richards, Francis. . . . 10, 9


Richards, Joel
10
Richardson, Benjamin P. .. 8
Richardson, Bill . . .
8
Richardson, James B.
Richardson, Jeffrey. .

Smith, Horace . .
Smith. Joseph . .
Snelling, Enoch H
Snelling, John . .
Snow, Asa B . . .

Richardson, Josiah B . . .11


Richardson, Moses W. 10, 11
Richardson, Thomas F. .. 8
Richardson, William F. . 11
Ricker, George D. . . . .
Riley, Allen . . . . .

# James .

. .
. .
. .
. .
. .

. . 12
10, 12
. . 1
. . 3
. . 3

Spooner, William B . . . 4

Sprague, Charles - 10,


Sprague, Franklin H.

Sprague, George W.
Sprague, Thomas .
Sprague, William .
11111

Robinson, Simon W.

Roby, Dexter . . . .
Rockwell, Horace T.

Rogers, Charles O. .
Rogers, J. Austin.
Rogers, John . . .
Ropes, Samuel W .
Ross, Jeremiah . .
Roulstone, Michael
Russell, Benjamin.
Russell, Benjamin F

11
12
12
12

Spear, William T. . . . .3
Spinney, Samuel R. . . . . 12

Robbins, Edward H. .
Robbins, Joseph . . .
Roberts, Davis B. . .
Roberts, J. Milton.
Roberts, John G. . .
Robinson, Edward F. 9
Robinson, John H. .

.
.
.
.

Squires, Sidney. . .
Standish, L.
les. .
Starbuck, Charles C.
Stearns, Charles H.
Stearns, Elijah . . .
Stearns, Jacob . . .
Stebbins, John B. .
Stebbins, Solomon B.

Stedman, Francis D.
Stedman, Josiah . . .

Ryan, Edward . . .
Ryan, Joseph T. .

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

. . 6, 12
. . . 11
. . . 4
. . . 12

Sanborn, Greenleaf C. . 11

Sanger, George P . . . . . 11
Sargent, Ensign . . . . . 6

Sargent, Henry . . . . . 8
Sargent, Lucius M. See note.

Savage, George . . . . 11, 12


Savage, James . . . . . 8, 10
Sears, Joshua . . . . . . 3, 8
Sears, Philip H.
6
Seaver, Benjamin . . .
5

Seaver, Joshua, Jr. . . . 6


Seaver, Nathaniel . . . . 2, 4
Seaver, Norman . . . . . 9
Seaver, James W. . . . . 7. 9
Severance, Jonathan B, ... 3

Thompson, Erasmus . . .
Thompson, John . . . . . l
Thompson, N. A. . . . . 6,
Thompson, Thomas H. .
Thorndike, John H.
-

Thurston, Caleb . .
Tillson, John . . . .

|:

Tilton, Hubbard_W
Tilton, Stephen, Jr.

Titcomb, Stephen

Tower, Warren L.
Townsend, Isaac P. .
Townsend, Samuel R.

Trafton, Israel S. . .
Train, Charles R. . . .
Train, Enoch . . . . .
Tremere, John B. . . . *
Trull, Ezra . . .
Truman, John F. . . .
Tubbs, Mical . . . . . . . :3.
Tucker, Horace G. . . .
Tucker, John C. . . .
l
Tucker, Stephen . .
Tufts, Quincy . . .
Turner,
Turner,
Turner.
Turner,

Job . . . .
John
John
Otis.

Tuttle, Jedediah . .
Tuxbury, George W.
Tyler, John . . . .
Tyler, John S. . .

Tyler, Jerome W .

Stimson, Augustine G. 3, 5

Stockwell, Stephen N.

Urann, Richard .

Stodder, Joseph . . . .
Stodder, J. W. T. . .
Stone, Artemas . . . .
Stone, Joseph . . . . .
Story, Joseph . . . . . .
1
Stover, Theophilus.
Stowe, Freeman . .
Sturtevant. Noah . .
Sullivan, William .
Suter, Hales W. . .
Swallow, Asa . . .
: :
Sweeney, Daniel J
Sweet, Samuel . . . . .

Talbot, Samuel, Jr. . . . 3

Upham, Henry . .
Upham, Phineas.
Upton, Albert F.

Stimpson, Frederick H. .. 6

Sampson, George R. . 10, 5


Sampson, George T. . . 2
Sanborn, Erastus W. . . .3

Thomas, William . . . .

Turner, Charles A.
4
1
2

Stevens, James M . . . . .3
John .
John .
Oliver .
Seriah

Thom, Isaac . . . . .

|!1

Stevens, Benjamin . . . . 12
Stevens, Benjamin F. . . 6
Stevens, Isaac . . . . . . 10
Stevens,
Stevens,
Stevens,
Stevens,

|
1.

Tracy, Charles . . . .

Stetson, Alpheus . . .
Stetson, Sidney A. . . . . . 9

Russell, James W.
Russell, John B. .

Thomas, George F. .

Topliff, Samuel .
Torrey, Charles .
Torrey, Samuel D.
Tower, Moses B . .

. . . .

Roberts, Joseph D.

Thayer, Joseph H .
Thayer, Sereno T.

Snow, Samuel T.
Southard, Zibeon
Souther, Henry .
Souther, Job T. .

.
.
.
.

|
7.

Thayer, Joel . . . .

Snow, Ephraim L. . . . .5
.
.
.
.

||

Thaxter, Jonathan .
Thaxter, Samuel . .

Thayer, Elias B . .
Thayer, Frederic F.
Thayer, Gideon F. .

Tombs, Michael .

.
.
.
.

11

Thatcher, William S

Van Nostrand, Wm.T.


Vinal, Alvin . . . . . .
Vinson, Thomas M . . .
Vose, Edward A. . . . .
Vose, Joshua . . . . .
Vose, Josiah . . . . . .
Vose, Thomas . . . . .

. 12
. 6
. 12
. .1
. 11
. 11
. 11

W
Wadsworth, Alexander .. 4
Wakefield, Enoch H . . . 3
Waldron, Samuel W., Jr. 11

Wales, Samuel . . . . . . 10
Wales, Thomas B. . . . 10
Ward, Artemas . . . . . .3

203

INDEX.
t

Ward, Francis H. .
Ward, Samuel D. .
Ward, Thomas W.
Ware, Ephraim G. .

.
.
.
.

Wheeler, Joseph . . . . ... 1


Wheeler, Samuel . . . 11, 12
Wheelwright, George . . 5
1

White, Edward A. . . . . 8

Ware, Horatio G. . . .

White, Horace H . . . . . 15

Warner, Barnet P. .
1

White, John . . .
White, Warren . .
Whiting, James .
Whitman, Samuel

Warren, Daniel . . .

Warren, George W.
Warren, John A. . . .
Warren, William W.
Washburn, Calvin . .
Washburn, Cyrus. . .
Washburn, Frederic L
Washburn, W. R. P.

. . . . 7
. . 11, 12
. . . .
P.

Williams, Horace .
Williams, Moses . .
Williams, Samuel K.
Williamson, William
Willis, Benjamin . .
Willis, Clement . .
Willis, Horatio M. .

. . 6,
. . 1
. .
C.
. 5,

Wilson, George . .
Wilson, Henry W. .

Winslow, Isaac . .
Winter, Francis B. .

Whitney, Daniel H. .
Whitney, Moses, Jr.
Whitney, William . .

Winthrop, G. T. . .

Whiton, David . . .

Wood, Amos . . . .
Wood, Benjamin, 2d.

Whiton, James M.

woodbury, Charles

Waters, Isaac . . . .
Watts, Francis O . .

Whiton. Lewis C. .

Whittemore, George.

Woodman, Charles T.

Webster, John G. . .
Webster, William E.
Wedger, John B. . .
Weeks, William A. .

Whittemore, James F
Wildes, William . . .

Woodman, George.
Woolley, William .

Wiley, Thomas . . .

Wright, Albert J. .
Wright, James . .

Welles, John . . . . .

Wilkins, Charles . . .
Wilkins, Frederick A

Wellington, Alfred A.
Wells, Charles . . . . .

Wilkins, John H. . .

Weston, Joshua . .

Wilkinson, Simon . .
Willard, Aaron, Jr. .
Wilcutt, Levi L. . . .
Willett, Joseph . .
Williams, Elijah, Jr.

Wetmore, Thomas.

Williams, Eliphalet

Wells, John B
Wells, Michael F. . .

Wells, Thomas . . .

11

5 |:

Wright, John M. .
Wright, William .
6, 1
#
Wright, Winslow
Wyman, Abraham G. . . 5

Yeaton, Benjamin . . . . 10
Young, George E. . . . . 1

C O N TENTS.

Committees, how appointed . . . .

A.

of the whole . . . . .

Aldermen, Rules and Orders. . . . . . . 83


business order of . . . . . . . . 37
names and residences . . . . . . 55

powers and duties . . . . . . . . 16


vacancies in . . . . . . . . . . . 10
election of . . . . . . . . . . 10, 11
no choice of . . . . . . . . . . 10

Standing, how appointed .


when not to sit

. . . .

amounts to expend . .
Clerk of.
Chairman of . . . . .

Notice of Meetings
when to report . . . .
of Board of Aldermen
Claims. . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
Committee on . . . . .
.38, 62
51 Chairman of Committees . . .
of Board of Aldermcn

Standing Committees of . . . . 37, 60

:"
"'.

chosen by ballot. . .
Chairman of, pro tem.

or . . . . . . . . . . 42
"

Appropriations, to .

transfers of . . . . . . . .
Amendment of Rules and Orders
Accounts, Committee on . . . .

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

60

County, Committee on . .
City Charter . . . . . . . . . . . .
Armories, Committee . . . . . . . . . . 60
how altered . . .
Assessors Department, Committee on ...
Assessors, and how

chosen, etc

60

City Debt, amount of . .

. . . 19, 71

Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Auditor of Accounts . . . . . . . . . . 73
Advertising, etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
B
18
42
54

By-Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
titles to

Ballot, election by . .

vote to increase .
Committee on . .

City Officers, times of choice


City Council, powers of . . .
organization . . . . . .
ineligible to other offices
rules of . . . . . . .
resent members . . .
ormer members . . .

Buildings, Public,
mmittee on . . . . . . . . . . 65 City Hospital, trustees . . . .

Physician . . . . . . . . .
Superintendent of . . . . . . . . 91 City
Common Council . . . . . . .
Burials (see Cemeteries).
Committees of . . . .
Bridges, Committee on . . . . . . . . . 60
Superintendents of . . . . . . . 72
Bells and locks, Committee on . . . . . 61
Ballast, Ins ectors of
101
-

Bark, etc., Measurers of .


Boats, etc., Weighers of .
Bundle Hay, Inspectors
Business, order of . . .
Births, regi
of . . . .
Bills, approv

. .
. .
of .
. .

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

organization of . .
how chosen . . .
rules of . . . . .
vacancies in . .
President.
Clerk of . . . . .

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

. . 101
. . 101
. . .
... 101
Committee on . .
. 37, 50 Cemeteries,
Coroners. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . 82
of . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Conferences .

* *

. . . . . . . . . .
Boylston Fund, trustees . . . . . . . . .. 89 City Clerk
Vacancy . . . . . . . .
Bathing Committee . . . . . . . . . 41, 62
absence . . . . . . . .
C
County Accounts, Committee on
Carriage hire bills for . - - - - - - - 45
flicers
Cochituate Water Board . . . . . . . . 9 Common, etc., Committee on .
Committees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Superintendent of . . .
expenses of . . . . . . . . . .43, 45 Constables. . . . . . . . . .
not to act separately . . . . . . . 44 Clocks, etc., Committee on . .
joint records and reports of . . . 44 Court irouse, Keeper of . . . .
time allowed for reporting . . . 44 Courts, Officers of . . . . . . .
powers and duties . . . . . . 48, 52 Cullers of Hoops, etc. . . . .
Conference. . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Charitable Institutions . . . .
Joint Standin
.40, 61 Consulting Physicians . . . . .
Committees, Common Council . . . . . . 52 Chief of Police . . . . . . . .
number of members . . . . . 36,53 Correction, House of . . . . .

87

:
2:

|
54,
-15

:#
p

##

206

CONTENTS.

Joint Rules and Orders . .


Jont Standing Committees.

Debt, City

Increase of . .

43

how composed . .
records to be kept.
Chairman of . . .

Committee on .

Deaths, Registry of . .

21, 101

Deeds, Register of . . .

reports of . . . .
Jailer . . . . . . . . . .

I)ivision of questions .

36, 48

Justices, Municipal Court

Decorum of members . .
Doubted votes . . . .
Disagreement of two Boards

L
-

District Attorney . . . . . .

41
101

Licenses, Committee on . .

Lands, Public, Committee on


Superintendent of .
Lamps, Number of, etc. . .

Excuses for not voting


Elections by ballot . .

Lunatic Hospital . . . .

Committee on . .
Superintendent of.

by the people .
67

Committee on . .

Lighters, Weighers of . . .

Engines, officers, and members

Lime, Ins

Engineer, City . . . . . . . .

Leather, Measurers of . . .
Library, Public,

Committee on . . .

Engineers, Fire . . . . . .

ctor of . . . .

Committee on . . .
Trustees . .
Librarian . .

Finance, Committee on . .
Faneuil Hall, Committee on
Superintendent of .

Superintendent

Lock-ups, Keeper of
M

Fire Department
Committee on . . .
Officers of . . . . .

Motions to be in writing
withdrawn

Fire Alarm, Superintendent, etc.

. . . . . .

Members, rights and duties of .

Stations . . . .

78

Committee
Ferries, Committee .

not to stand up .

not to be interrupted .

not to be on more than tw

Fence Viewers . . .
Field Drivers . . . .

mittees . .

not to be named . . .

Further time to report

all to vote . . . . .

Funeral Undertakers .
Fuel Committee . . . .

two or more rising

interested . . . . .
seats of . . .

Mayor and Aldermen


Mayor, absence of...

General Meetings . . .
Government, City . . .

no choice of .
election of . .

Grain, Measurer of . .
H

decease of . .

Harbor of Boston, Committee on


Master . . .
Commissions . . . .
House of Correction
Reformation

vacancy . . .

duties of . .
compensation
veto powers.

Clerk for . .

terms of service.
Memorials, etc. . . . . .

Industry, etc.
Hospital, Lunatic . .

Market, Committee on . .
e
d Dep
Superintendent and
-

City . . . .
Committee on .
Trustees

Visitors, rules for

courts . . . . . . .

Superintendent . .
Surgeons, etc. .
Health Department . .

Messenger to City Council .


Assistant . . . . .
Meetings of citizens . . . .
Marriages, etc., registry of

Committee . .
Board of . . .

t
Measurers of Wood, Bark, etc.
Marble, Surveyor of .
Milk, Inspector of . .

Superintendent of .

Hay Weighers . . . . . .
Hay, Inspectors of . . . .
# Surveyors of . . .
Hoops an

limits . . . . . . .

Municipal year . . . . . .

: : ':

Staves, Cullers of . .

Hacks, &c., Superintendent of . .

Mount Hope Cemetery


N

Newspapers, City . .
Non-concurrence

. .

Industry, House of . . . . .
Instruction, Public, Committee on .
Institutions, Public . .
Committee on .
Directors . . .
Officers . . . . .
J

Jail, Committee on . .

.
85

Oaths of office . . .
Order of business . .

Orders, titles of . . .
85

to have two reaings


Ordinances, titles of .
Committee on .
Overseers of the Poor.
Committee on .

207

CONTENTS.

Officers, election of, time, etc . . . . . . 161 | Sewers,


Orators of Boston . . . . . . . . . . . 162

Committee on . . . . . . . . . . 61

Qrganization of City Council . . . . . . 13

Superintendent of . . . . . . . . 99
Salaried Officers, how chosen . . . . . . #
Solicitor,
: ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; #
Clerk
99
*
e.

Police Department . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Committee on . . . . . . . . . . 61
Stations . . . . . .
Probate Court . . . . . . .
Paving, etc., Committee on
City .

*:

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
95
. . . 103
. . . 61
. . .

""

... 100
. 160

46

of . . . . . . . . .

*::: . .

. . . . #
Clerk". . . . . . . . . . . . 70

: : ; ; ;On; ;- ;* ;* ;*
Superintendent of

Streets and Ways, Committee

Steam Engines.

Priority of business . . . . . . . . . . 37, 50


Pound Keepers.
:Population of the City.
President of the Council,
rights and duties of.

#
61
99

Surveyor,
City
. . . . . . . . . . . .. 20,
. 99
99
Surveyors of
Highways

Staves, etc.,
Sheriffs,
etc Cullers
. . . . of,
. .etc
. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .

to call to order . . . . . . . . . 4. superior Court, officers . . . . . . . . . 101

Previ

tions,'...' ... . . . . . . 47, ' | Schools,


Sealers of Weights and Measures . . . . 100

Public Buildings, Supt. of . . . . . . . . 91

Committee on . . . . . . . . . . 65

Public Library, Committee on . . . . . . 66

# ion, Committee on .

. . :

65

:
::::::: .# #
Superintendent . . . . . . . . . 105
T

ublic Lancis,

: . . . . .3, #
: ; ; ; ; ; ;";
P
o': ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; #
Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, #
72
"
# Trea":
Superintendent of . . . . . . . . 91
Committee on . . . . . . . . . . 66
of .

ommittee on . . . . . . . . . . 6

Printing, etc., Committee on . . . . . 66,98 ||Titles to etc . . . . . . . . . ;


Q

. . . . . .
: '" ; ; ; ; ; ; ;

Questions

Trucks, &c., Supt. of . . . . . . . . . . 95


. . Two-thirds vote . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
. . 34,47 | Truant districts . . . . . . . . . . .
150

34

Officers for . . . . . . . .

divisions of. . . . . . . . . .36, is


R

Undertakers

Rules and Orders,

. . 130

84

Upper Leather, Measurers of . . . . . . 101

Joint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Board of Aldermen . . . . . . . .33

Common Council . . . . . . . . 46 | Veto Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22


*
suspension of.
. 38, 51 Votes, returns of.
28
repeal or amendment of . . . .38, 51
how transmitted . . . . . . . . . 29
Reduction of City Debt,
doubted . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Committee on . . . . . . . . . . 62
of all required . . . . . . . .35, 29
3 || Voters, qualified . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 26
Resolves, what are . . . . . . . . . . . 42
of Committees.
44 Vacancies in Ward Offices, etc .
13, 14
-

Records

Reports,to be in writing . . . . . . . . . 44

Joint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 ||Water Department . . . . . . . . . . . 99

Reports agreed to by Committee . . . . . 44


time allowed

44

Committee on . . . . . . . . . .

Registrar

67
100

Reconsideration . . . . . . . . . . .34, 49

Superintendents . . . . . . . . 100
Ward Officers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152

Reformation, House of .
Registrar. City . . . . .
Water . . . . .
Registry of Births, etc . .

duties of . . . . . .
Vacancies, etc . . .
Ward Rooms . . . . . . . .
Meetings, how held .

Refreshments, bill for . . . . . . . . . . .45


.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

86
82
100
82

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.

. . 7, 8
. 13, 14
. . 159
. . 30

Register of Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

Warden, power and duties . . . . . . . . 7

Wards, division
boundaries
of . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 154
5

Standing Committees, Joint. . . . .39, 59 | Widening Streets, Committee on . . . . 61


members of . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Warrants for meetings . . . . . . . . . .30
Chairman of . . . . . . . . . . . 41 || Wood, etc., Measures of . . . . . . . . . 101

meetings, how called . . . . . . 53 | Weights and Measures,


of Aldermen . . . . . . . . . 36, 59
to keep records . . . . . . . . . 44

Sealers of . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Committee on . . . . . . . . . .

61

Selectmen since 1799 . . . . . . . . . . 164

Wagons and Trucks, Supt. of . . . . . . 95

Sums, and times, votes on . . . . . . .34, 47

Suspension of rules, etc. . . . . . . .38, 51


Seats of members . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 || Yeas and Nays . . . . . . . . . . . .34, 42

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*-e

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#.

-- -- |

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| |
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|-|

-..-

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||
||||||||||

FOURTH

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY HOSPITAL,


BOST ON;

WITII

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT, RULES OF ADMISSIONS


AND DISCHARGES, ETC.

B O STON:

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, CITY PRINTERS, 34 SCHOOL STREET.


1868.

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES.

CITY HospitAL,
BosToN, Jan. 1, 1868.
TO THE CITY COUNCIL:

In compliance with the ordinance establishing the Board of


Trustees of the City Hospital, the following is respectfully
submitted as their Fourth Annual Report, it being for the
year ending Dec. 31, 1867.
The number of patients admitted to the Hospital is considera
bly in excess of last year, while those treated as out-patients
have largely increased in each department.
The business for the year has been as follows:
-

Patients in Hospital, Jan. 1, 1867

163

Admitted

Surgical

687

Medical

690

83

Ophthalmic
Small-pox .

74

1,534
1,697

Discharged
Died .

Remaining .

1,410
146

1,556

141

Largest number of patients in Hospital at any one time .


Smallest number of patients in Hospital at any one time .
Daily average number of patients in Hospital .

Surgical Out-patients

Medical

64

Ophthalmic

2,823
2,274
1,918

7,015

Total

194
100
135

CITY

HOSPITAL.

Number of Visits of Out-patients:


Surgical .

Ophthalmic

Medical

Total

4,108
4,550
17,745
26,403
-

The accompanying report of the Superintendent gives a


detailed statement of cases treated, and also a careful account
of the expenditures of the year.
The increase of patients together with the cost of water by
meter, and the large orders by the Professional Staff for extra
diet, owing to the extremely debilitated state of many under
their charge, has caused the expenses, notwithstanding the re
duced price of fuel and a portion of the supplies, to exceed the
cost of maintaining the Hospital the previous year. The table
giving the average cost in detail of articles purchased will
show that due care has been exercised in that respect, and the
internal management has been conducted by the Superintendent
with the greatest economy, consistent with the welfare and
comfort of the inmates.

The estimated expense of the Hospital for the next financial


year is as follows:
Supplies.

Salaries and Labor.

Fuel

Furniture

|-

Buildings and Grounds .


Medical Supplies .

$42,250 00

18,500
10,000
1,000
7,250
6,000

00
00
00
00
00

$85,000 00

Estimated income from Pay-patients

$6,000 00

In making their estimate, the Trustees, after looking care


fully at the expenses of the last year, and exercising their best

CITY HOSPITAL.

judgment regarding the market prices likely to rule during the


coming scason, have made allowance for such increase of
patients as, after conference with the local authorities, they
think may reasonably be expected to seek the benefits of the
Hospital from Roxbury, whose residents, by the Act of Annexa
tion, will so soon have claims upon our Public Institutions.
They have been moderate in computing this number, thinking
it wiser, if their estimate shall be exceeded in fact, that a fur
ther appropriation shall then be asked of the City Government
than that an amount should now be called for that might be

in excess of the real needs of the Hospital.


The estimated amount for buildings and grounds is larger
than heretofore, and requires some explanation. It includes,
in addition to the ordinary yearly expenses, the cost of a new
steam-boiler for heating; the substitution of brass pipes, for the
hot water, in place of those of lead now in use, and alterations
in the ice-house. During the extreme cold weather of the
present winter, it has been found that the three boilers were
taxed to their utmost to warm the various wards, and if at such
a time one of them should by any accident become temporarily
useless, great suffering and perhaps loss of life would ensue.
Such an accident has already occurred, but it was during the
summer when repairs could easily be made without trouble to
the inmates. When the Hospital was erected, the foundation
was laid for a fourth boiler in anticipation of its necessity; and
the Trustees are decidedly of the opinion that it would be
unsafe to attempt to run another winter without this addition to
the means of heating the buildings. A considerable item of
annual expense has been the plumbing made necessary by leaks
and breakages occurring in the lead hot water pipes, the cost
for the past year being over five hundred dollars; a small
amount of brass pipe has been in use two years without any
repairs being needed, and as the expense of such pipes entire
for the hot water, will probably not equal the plumbers' bills

CITY

HOSPITAL.

paid for the last two years, the Trustees consider that the
change would be an economy of expenditure, besides relieving
the Hospital from the inconvenience and damage so often expe
rienced under the present arrangement.
The ice-house, as now constructed, is so much affected by the
outside atmosphere, that an unnecessary quantity of ice is thereby
consumed, and it is proposed to lower the floor so as to admit
the introduction of lining cases filled with a non-conducting
material. No expenditure is proposed that would not, it is
thought, commend itself to the City Government as of essential
need for the interests of the Hospital, and dictated by a true
spirit of economy.
In the third report of the Board, an appropriation of $6,000
was asked for special repairs, and with the money thus obtained,
the ceilings have been cleansed and whitened, and the Hospital
painted inside and out, including the iron fence on Harrison
Avenue.

The painting has been thoroughly done, and the build

ings in this respect are in better condition than when new.


In June 1867, the City Council appropriated $16,000 for the
erection of a building for out-patients in connection with the

Porter's Lodge, and in July, the foundations of the Lodge being


found in such condition that it was deemed unsafe to build, in

connection therewith, an appropriation of $1,200 was made to


take down and rebuild the same; the total amount being
$17,200.

The building is now nearly completed, and will be ready for


occupancy in a few weeks; in addition to the accommodation of

out-patients, it will prove convenient for coroners' inquests,


funerals, etc.

It will be seen by the statistics heretofore given, that the out


patients' department has assumed very large proportions, and is
constantly on the increase; this does not add materially to the
cost of maintaining the Hospital, as the services of the physicians

CITY

HOSPITAL.

and surgeons are gratuitous, and medicines are not furnished by


the city, except in cases of actual need.
An incalculable benefit is thus conferred by the medical
faculty upon the suffering poor of our city, and many thus pro
vided for would otherwise be admitted to the Hospital, thereby
considerably increasing the expense; in fact it can readily be
seen that this department is where the greatest number are
assisted at the least cost, and it was due to the gentlemen hav
ing charge of these patients that they should have the increased
conveniences provided by the new building. Clinical instruc
tion has been given to the students of the Harvard Medical
School, and lectures delivered at the Hospital twice in each
week during the school terms, which have been largely attended,
the number of tickets issued this winter being two hundred and
thirty.
Early in the year, Dr. Chas. E. Buckingham resigned his posi
tion as Visiting Surgeon, on account of ill health, and Dr. George
Derby was chosen to fill the vacancy.
In November, a second vacancy occurred in the same depart
ment by the resignation of Dr. Algernon Coolidge, and the

Trustees are happy to state that the health of Dr. Buckingham


having improved, they were able to avail themselves of his ser
vices, and he has resumed his post as Visiting Surgeon.
Dr. Derby being elected as Visiting Surgeon, occasioned a
vacancy in the position of Admitting Physician, which was filled
by the choice of Dr. H. F. Damon.

In July, the number of surgical out-patients having increased


so much that the Visiting Surgeons could not, in addition to their
regular duties at the Hospital, give the time requisite for their
care, the Board created the office of Surgeon to Out-patients, and
elected to the position Dr. Francis C. Ropes.
By reference to the statement of Bequests, it will be seen that
the claim for damages for land taken by the New York Central

Railroad, being a portion of the bequest of Mr. Elisha Good


now, situated upon Third Street, South Boston, has been settled

CITY

HOSPITAL.

and the remainder of the lot sold, thereby adding to the interest
bearing fund $4,633.1%.
The appeal of the Trustees, in their last report, for donations
to establish a fund, the income to be applied to the purchase of
clothing for needy patients, has recently met with a generous
response, in the gift of Two Thousand Dollars for this object,
by Hon. Otis Norcross, whose connection with the management
of the Hospital gave him a knowledge of the great benefit that
could thus be conferred upon the poor and unfortunate. It is
to be hoped that others may follow the example of Mr. Norcross,
and thus aid a truly practical charity.
The circulating library is becoming reduced by wear and tear,
and donations of useful and entertaining books are solicited.
The medical library has been increased somewhat during the
year by gift and by purchase, and now numbers about four
hundred and fifty volumes.
There seems to be some misapprehension on the part of many
citizens regarding the class of persons for whom the Hospital
was intended, and the Trustees are often solicited to admit those

who are in such condition as to be beyond hope of cure, and


from lack of means, being paupers in the strict sense of the
term, seek admission for the purpose of securing a comfortable
home until death shall relieve them from their troubles; and it
is said by those who are interested in their behalf, that there is

no reason for debarring them from this privilege, as the institu


tion is a Free Hospital, and the expenses thereof are borne by
the tax-payers of the city. If this view of the case were correct,
a few days would suffice to fill the wards to their utmost

capacity, and vacancies would be caused by death only; but the


trustees believe that neither the law, nor the intent of the

originators, contemplated any such course.

The act of the

Legislature of 1858 reads as follows:

The city is hereby authorized to erect and maintain a hos


pital for the reception of persons who by misfortune or poverty
may require relief during temporary sickness.

CITY HOSPITAL.

The ordinance of the city says:

The City Hospital is established for the reception of those


only who require temporary relief during sickness. The Trus
tees may however admit other persons to the institution tempo

rarily, when necessity requires; but such persons shall be


removed to other appropriate public institutions as soon as their
condition will permit. The intent of the government in estab
lishing the Hospital was stated in a report of a Committee to

whom was referred that portion of Mayor Rice's address in


1857, relating to a Free City Hospital, as follows:
It is, however, proper to state that the term City Hospital
would probably better express the character and design of the
proposed institution than Free Hospital, since it appears
from the address of the Mayor, and from the general evidence
in favor of this establishment, that, while its benefits are
intended to be free to those persons of temperate and industrious
habits who by sickness or accident require that care and atten
tion for which they are unable to pay, yet, where there is the
ability, there is no reason why a just and proper amount should
not be received to aid in meeting the expenses of the Hospital,
and we have no doubt that many of the patients or their friends
would prefer to pay something in proportion to their means,
to prevent the feeling that they were the objects of public
charity. There is no class in the community in which this
sentiment or desire of independence is so strong, as among
that class for whose special benefit this Hospital is intended;
and it is one which, as the great barrier to pauperism, cannot
be too highly commended and encouraged.
Hence we would not have this a Hospital for the reception
of the degraded victims of vice and intemperance, or a home
for the hopeless pauper; but we would have it regarded as an
asylum for the industrious and honest mechanic and laborer,

who, by sudden injury or disease, is temporarily prevented


from laboring for the support of himself and family, and who,
2

10

CITY HOSPITAL.

by proper care and medical treatment, may have his sufferings


alleviated, and be sooner restored to his health and his family,
and enabled to resume his labor.

We would have it a home to which the respectable domestic


may be sent, when struck down by sickness; whose attic chambers
cannot be made comfortable, and who cannot receive the requi

site attendance, however well disposed may be the family in


which she resides. We would open its doors to the stranger
overtaken by disease, when absent from friends and home, and
to all others among the various classes of society who in sick
ness require that comfort and medical advice which their means
and homes cannot afford.

A Committee, appointed to consider the subject in 1860, used


precisely the same language to describe the character of the
organization they thought it desirable to establish. It is there
fore plainly to be seen, that the city did not have authority to
erect or maintain a Free Hospital in the broad sense of the
term, and that they had no intent so to do, but that they did

establish a City Hospital for the care and relief, during tem
porary sickness, of those of its residents, who, until afflicted by
disease or accident, were, and on restoration to health, would
again become self-supporting: and further, that if able, such
persons were to pay for their treatment in proportion to their
means; no large amount of income can however be expected
from this source, as in most cases when inability to labor comes,
wages cease, and the little pittance saved from former earnings

is required for the support of the family of the sufferer while


deprived of his aid.

Again, the income of the Goodnow Fund, the principal of


which is now $21,133.25, could not be applied under his
will to the support of a hospital free to all, as that document
distinctly states: And by such hospital I mean an institution
similar to the Massachusetts General Hospital, suitably endowed
and properly managed, and not such public hospital as may be

CITY

11

HOSPITAL.

established or maintained in connection with the City Almshouse


or House of Correction, or other municipal establishments, or for

the care and relief of paupers supported by the city.


The Trustees have gone thus at length into this subject that
citizens may understand the objects of the Hospital, and to cor
rect an erroneous opinion that seems to exist to a considerable
extent in the community.

In concluding their report, the Board desire to bear testimony


to the faithful and devoted efforts of the Physicians and Sur

geons, as well as the Superintendent, in all that relates to the


welfare and comfort of the inmates, and the success and standing
of the Hospital.
JOHN T. BRADLEE,
NEWTON TALBOT,

WALBRIDGE A. FIELD,
CHARLES H. ALLEN,
NATHL. C. NASH,
JOEL RICHARDS,
THEODORE METCALF,
JONAS BALL,

DAVID H. COOLIDGE,
Trustees.

SUPERINTENDENT's

REPORT.

"

CITY HospiTAL, Dec. 31, 1867.


GENTLEMEN OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES:

I respectfully submit to you herewith a summary of the


general operations of the Boston City Hospital for the year
1867, together with an account of the current expenses and

statistics for the year, it being my Fourth Annual Report.


The institution has been opened since June 1, 1864.

The

following table will give the annual and total number of patients
admitted.

1864. 1865.

* isot,

Total.

Patients Admitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

475

| 1,066 | 1,432

Patients visited by Admitting Physician . . . . . . . . 459 | 1,081 | 1,278

1,534 || 4,507

1,338

4,156

2,847

Patients admitted by Admitting Physician . . . . . .

231

696

961

959

Patients admitted by Superintendent . . . . . . . . .

115

128

126

247

616

Accidents admitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

129

242

345

328

1,044

Number of out-patients treated . . . . . . . . . . . .

371

1,143

3,324 || 7,015

us

The number of out-patients who come daily to the Hospital


for advice and medicine, in the several departments, are as
follows:

Ophthalmic, under the charge of Dr. Williams, 1,918


Surgical,
Ropes,
2,823
Medical,

**

&G

-G

**

Q&

*&

Swan,

Assisted by

Gavin,

2,274

Total,

7,015

CITY

13

HOSPITAL.

FIXTURES AND FURNITURE.

The amount given in my last Report, bearing date


Dec. 31, 1866, included all the fixtures and fur
niture to that date

$50,057 72

There has been expended during the past

year for fixtures and improvements. $2,914 32


For new furniture, additional .

For surgical instruments


For books for Medical Library

450 62
47 60

610 00

For cart, harness, and market wagon

730 66

4,753 20
Total cost of furniture and fixtures to Jan. 1868

$54,810 92

DISBURSEMENTS FROM JAN. 1, 1867, To JAN. 1, 1868.


-

Quantity.

ARTICLES.

Beef. ......

- -

- - - -

- - - - - - - -

- - -

- -

Average.

Cost.

$5,796 47

39,232 lbs.

143c per lb.

Mutton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10,463

1,145 01

Lamb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2,194

238 82

10ic

Veal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- - - - -

1,180

141 83

12c

Fowls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5,601

. 1,310 60

270

35 40

Lara

- - - - - - - - -

- - - - - -

- - - - - -

- - - - - - - - -

Eggs.......

- - - - - - - -

23; c
13c

13, c

- -

1,023

- -

6,777;

2,000 78

29;c

- - - - - - -

- -

3,3213 doz.

1,029 60

31c

- -

138 60

Vegetables and Fruit...........................

1,260 04

Bread . . . . . . . . .

- -

- - - - - -

- - -

Fish .........

- -

- - - - -

- -

- - - - - - -

Pork. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Butter.....

- -

11c

3,078 65

897 96

- - - - - - - -

- - * -

- - -

3,634 41

6}c per qt.

678 00

$1653; per bbl.

Ice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . 2523-20th tons.

1,345 15

$5333 per ton.

Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,166,168 galls.

1,849 84

3c per 100 galls.

Milk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Flour.........................

Amount carried forward . . . .

55,353 qts.

doz.

41 bbls.

s21,5si

16

14

CITY

ARTICLEs.

HOSPITAL.

Quantity.

Average.

Cost.

Amount brought forward....................

$24,581 16

- - - - - - - - -

6,544 37

Liquors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1,449 20

Groceries ..............

- - - - - - - - - - -

Ale and Porter ............... [...

- -

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

860 50

Medical Supplies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3,663 40

Surgical Instruments...........................

450 62

Repairing Surgical Instruments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Gas............. :. . . . . . . . . . . . .

60 28

. .. ...... .. .....

1,468 13

Salaries and Labor.............................

17,071 14

Compress and

Bandages... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

684 77

Incidental Expenses........ . . . . . . . . . . .........

123 75

1.222 tons, gross.

8,142 00

$6 66 per ton.

383 58

$6 123 per cord.

Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- -

- - - -

Wood ............... . . . . . . . . .

623 cords.

Wood and Charcoal for kindling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Stable . . . . . . .

- - - - - - - - - - - -

Cart and Harness,

- - - - -

- - - - - - - -

- -

132 50

- - - - - - - - -

- -

- - - - - - - -

- -

. Market Wagon,

385 001. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Current Expenses,

57233. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Grounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1,182 33
3,469 55

Repairs . . . . . . . . . . .

3,393 91

- - - -

- - - - - -

- - -

- - - - - - - - - - - -

- -

1,785 77

Books, printing, and stationery..................

846 19

Fixtures . . . . . . .

- -

$225 00. ...............................

- -

- - - - - -

- -

- -

- - - - - - - - -

- - - - - -

Furnishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Repairs and Renewals,

- - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - -

Add'l new Furniture,

780 66l................

1,349 82

$77,642 97

Stock on hand, Jan. 1, 1867.


Groceries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,465 32

Liquor.......

- -

- -

$619 16|................................

- - - - - -

- -

- - -

- - -

- - - - - - -

- -

....

Fuel . . . . . . .

Medical Supplies...
Supplies in Stable ........

- - -

- - - - * * * * * *

* * *

600 00

6,376 92
1,530 29
50 00

10,022 53

Amount carried forward...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . $87,665 50

CITY

15

HOSPITAL.

Amount brought forward.................... ..... $87,665 50


Leduct Stock on hand, Jan. 1, 1868.
Supplies................................. $1,678 84
Compress and Bandages.....
Fuel. ............ .

- - - - - - - - -- -

160 25

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

5,906 00

Medical Supplies..........................

701 38

Liquor...................................

332 25

8,778 72

sts, so 7s
Cash received from pay patients...........

6,222 41

sta,644 37
Fixtures and Improvements................ $1,785 77
Trees, Summer Houses, and Paving ........

1,128 55

New Furniture-additional................

730 66

Surgical Instruments

450 62

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Books for Medical Library.. ..............

47 60

Cart, Harness and Market Wagon...........

610 00

4,753 20

Net cost of Maintaining Hospital, from

Jan. 1, 1867, to Jan. 1, 1868,

+.

STATISTICAL STATEMENT.

Applications for admittance visited by the Admitting


Physician,

Admitted of the above

1,338

959

163

Patients in Hospital, Jan. 1st, 1867

Admitted during the year


Total number treated during the year
.
Discharged, including deaths .
Remaining in Hospital, Dec. 31, 1867 .
Total number of patients, including out-patients treated
during the year

1,534
1,697
1,556
141

8,712

There have been brought to the Hospital, accidentally


injured

328

Daily average number of patients in Hospital .

135

Largest number of patients in Hospital at any one time .

194

16

CITY

HOSPITAL.

Smallest number of patients in Hospital at any one time .


The average number of calls from patients in the Ophthal
mic Department, 341+ per week
.

100

17,745

The average number of calls from patients in the Surgical


Department, 79 per week .

. .

4,108

The average number of calls from patients in Medical


Department, 873 per week
.
4,550
Total number of calls of out-patients
. 26,403

Number of patients treated in Small-pox Department


CONDITION OF

Recovered

Relieved

74

PATIENTS DISCHARGED.
-

964

363
59

Not relieved

Not treated

24

146

1,556

Died

Total

17

CITY HOSPITAL.

PATIENTS EXAMINED

BY THE ADMITTING PHYSICIAN, AND


THE RESULTS.

Total.

condition or disease.

January

Chronic or incurable...........

74

21

95

February ...

60

27

87

Phthisis ......................

March ......

51

19

70

Chronic.......

April. ......

77

26

103

Not need of Hospital treatment..


Non-residents..................

- - - - - - - -

- - - - - - -

May........

72

40

112

June........

87

17

104

Syphilis .....

July........

93

36

129

Insane..............

August .....

97

36

133

Under four years...............

September ..

86

37

123

Delirium tremens...........

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - -

- -

October.....

106

24

130

Referred to Overseers of the Poor

November...

64

53

117

Paralysis ....................

December ..

92

48

135

Varioloid . . . . . . . . . .

- - - - - -

Convulsions...........
Total. ....

959

379

- - - -

- - - - - -

1838"

Venereal......................

Changed mind in regard to enter


ing Hospital...............

Made out-patients .........


Convalescent .......

- - - -

- - - - - - - - -

Miscellaneous .................
Sent to Soldiers'

Home...

- - - - -

Total ..............

379

18

CITY

HOSPITAL.

EMPLOYMENT OF PATIENT'S ADMITTED DURING THE YEAR.


MALES.

Brought up..................

699

Architects ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

Gardeners ............ . . . . . . . . . . . .

Bookkeepers.......

Grooms ..........................

Bookbinders ......................

1
7

Hatters...........................

Bankers . . . . . . .

- - -

Printers . . . . .

- - - -

Porters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Painters.....

- - - -

- - - - - -

- - - -

Barbers...............

- - - - -

- - - - - - -

- - - - - - - -

Bar-keepers.............

Blacksmiths .... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

27

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- -

- - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

...

Plasterers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Photographers ....................

Piano makers.....................

Children....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

34

Carriage makers...................

Store-boys . . . . . . . . . .
School-boys.......................

40

Boilermakers. . . . . . . . . . . .

..

Brassfinishers . . . . . . . . . . .
Bakers ... .

* - - -

- -

- -

- - - -

- - - - - - -

Plumbers... ..........

22

- - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Clerks........

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

25

Cabinet-makers ...................

Carpenters........................

62

Coopers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tailors ...........

Curriers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Traders ...........

Upholsterers...........

- - - - - - - - - -

Clergymen ....... . . . . . . .

Stonecutters......
Shoemakers , ....

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

15

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

21

Teamsters ....................... .

81

* -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - -

- -

22
15

- - - - - - - - - -

... . . . . .

18

Gentlemen........................

Discharged Soldiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10

Waiters .....

Farmers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12

- -

- - - - - - - - - - -

Hotel Keepers.......
Engineers... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Harnessmakers....................

Glass-blowers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Gasfitters................. . . . . . . . .

Domestics ..................

- - - - - -

332

Grocers... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Housewives.......................

87

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Total....................... 939
5
FEMALES.

Lawyers. . .

Housekeepers . . . . . . . .

... ....

Laborers ...

Shop-girls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
School-girls......

28

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

21

Seamstresses . . . . .

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

50

Machinists........................
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . .

- -

- - - - -

....

Masons... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
Marbleworkers....................

27
10
9

Mariners ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

39

Musicians ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- -

Children.................
Nurses........

- - - - -

- - - - - - - - -

20

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

11

Teachers.........

No occupation...........
Physicians. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- - -

- - - - - - - - - -

41

5
Total........
699

- - - - - - -

- - - - - - -

595

CITY

19

HOSPITAL.

AGES OF PATIENT'S ADMITTED DURING THE YEAR.


MALEs.

FEMALES.

Under 1 year.........
From 1 to 10 years........ . ...

- - - - - - - - - - - -

.............

48
88

From
ts
g4.

1 to 10 years .............
....

22

10 to 20
20 to 30

87

*
*
**

... 104
78

230

10 to 20

4-

20 to 30

............. 306

{4

30 to 40

............. 182

ts

44

40 to 50

............. 156

st

30 to 40
40 to 50
50 to 60

50 to 60
60 to 70

"

.............
.............

44

60 to 70

17

44

70 to 80

st

$4

70 to 80

.............

91
55

49

12

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595
Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 939

N OF PATIENTS.
FEMALES.

Married.......

* *

* *

* *

163

* * *

Single . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47

. . . . .349
Widows ................. . . . . . . . . . 88

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 939

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 595

Widowers. . . . . . . .

- - - - -

- - - - - - - -

NATIVITY OF PATIENTS.
Boston .....
Mass

- - - - -

199

.. . . ... . .... . ... . . .. . . .. .. .

142

- - - -

- - - - - - - - -

Maine ...........

- - - - - - - -

New Hampshire. . . . . . .

Rhode Island........

* - - -

New York ......

- -

- - - - -

- - - -

- -

- -

85

Brought up................. 1,460


Sweden . . . . . . . . . .

Sicily . . . . . .

- - -

- -

* *

34

France .........

- - - - -

13

Prussia...........

* * * * * *

Vermont . . . . . . . . . . .

Connecticut .....

- -

* *

- -

- - - - - -

- - - -

- - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

* * * - - - * - - - - - - - -

- - -

- -

- - - -

- - -

Western Islands..................

Holland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1
22

- - -

22

Scotland ............. . . . . . . . . . . .

17

Portugal.............

Middle States ....................

Western States...

- - - - - -

Southern States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

* - - - - - - -

7
1
14

- - - -

Austria................

- -

- - -

- -

* * * * * * *

* - - - - -

.. ...

691

British Provinccs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

125

Spain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

63
39

Denmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Egypt...........................

Norway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Wales......................

South America. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Switzerland. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ireland.....

- - - - -

- -

England.............
Germany ..............

* * * * * * * *

* *

- - -

2
8

- - - - -

* * * *

Total...................... 1,584

20

CITY

HOSPITAL.

REPORT OF DISEASES AND THEIR RESULTS, FROM


JAN. 1, 1867, TO J.A.N. 1, 1868.
MEDICAL.

# *
# # #

DISEASE-

* | *

|##
* * ===

|:
# ####| #

25 | 3 || 3 || 3 | #| <
CLASS I.

ZYMotici.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . |

2 |

1 ||

. .. . . . . . . ..

3 |.

Morbilli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 2 || 3 || 5 || 4 | . . . . . . . . . .
Scarlatina

|###

Order 1st. Miasmatici.


Variola

. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .

Febricula . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Febris Typhoides

2 || 5 ||

6 || 9 || 15
| 19

4 ||

... . . . . . .

7 || 4 |.

15 . . . 1 | . . . . . 16

22 || 41 | 32 || 1 | . . . . . . 10 || 43

. . . . . . . .

Febris Typhus . . . . . . . . . .

1.

5 ||

Febris Intermittens . . . . . . . .

3 || 1 || 4 || 4 || 1 | . . . . . . . . .

Erysipelas . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.

6 | 13 |19| 21 |.

1 || 6 || 4 | . .

- - -

11...
5

1.

- 1 ||22 |- - -

Erythema . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 1 || 1 || ||--|--|--| 1 || -Dysentery (acute) . . . . . . . .

6 || 5 || 11 || 10 || 2 | . . . . . . . . 112 | . . .

(chronic) . . . . . . .

1 || 4 || 5 || 4 || 1 | . . . . . | 1 ||

4-

Diarrhoea (acute). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . 2 || 2 | . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - - |-

(chronic) . . . . . . . .

3 || 3 || 6 ||

1 || 4 | . . . . . . .3

s!...

|| | | | | | |...

. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .| 1 |. . . 1

1 ........ . ...

Cholera Morbus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 |.

order 2d. Enthetici.


Gonorrhoea

* ... . . .. . . . . . .. . .

1 || 3 || 4 || 3 ||

1 | . . .. . .. . . 4

. . .

Axillary Adenitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 1 | . . . 1 . . . . . . | 1 |- - - - || 1 || ---Inguinal Adenitis. . . . . . . . .


Order 3d.

Dietetici.

. . . . . .. . .. .I

1 - . . . . . . .

Purpura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 || 1

| | | | | || --

Alcoholismus (acute). . . . . . . . . . . | 2 || 1 || 3 || 1

1 |. . .. .|

1 || 3 | . . .

Alcoholismus (chronic) . . . . . . . . .

2 . . . . . .

1 || 3 || - - -

CLASS II.

. .

3 |. . .

CACHECT1c1.

Order 1st. Diathetici.


Rheumatism (acute) . . . . . . .
-

(sub-acute) . . . . . . . . .

22

| 28 || 50 || 41 || 7

is is

30 || 23 ||

. . 48

3.

......

Numbers carried forward . . . . 19 how his 219 its 25

2.

* *

15

21

CITY HOSPITAL,

MEDICAL.-Continued.
-

*=

ADMIrred.

#:

3 - 1.3

5.5 || > | < | #

#:

#| *| = |

F5

Numbers brought forward. . . . . 19 104 115 219 173 ||25 || 2 || 3 | 20 223

15

Rheumatism (chronic) . . . . .

Lumbago. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . ||

| 15 ||

B | 3 |

9 || 24 || 17 ||

7 ||

. . . 27

1 ||

2 ||

3 ||

1 ||

1 ||

. .

- - -

1 ||

3 ||

2 ||

- - -

. . . 13

- - -

Pleurodynia . . . . . . . . . . .

2 ||

Anaemia . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 | 10 || 11 | 11 || 1 || 1

Debility . . . . . . . . . . . .

Morbus Addisonii

. . . . . . . .

Anasarca. . . . . . . . .
Carcinoma . . . . . . .

| 16 || 31 || 47 || 30 | 16 |.
-

. . . . . |
-

Cancer of CEsophagus . . . . . .

2 | . . |

2 |

Stomach . . . . . . . .

Spleen . . . . . .

Liver

44

Uterus . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

||

1 ||

- 2 -.

1.

. . .

1 | . .

2 || 2 |..

1 ||

2 | . . .

1 || 1 | . . .

| | |

1 | . . .

. . .

1 .. . ..
.
1 || 1 | . .
... 1 || 1 || || 1 |. . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
2| 2 |.. 1 | 1 - - - || 2 | . .
-

Lead Poisoning . . . . . . . . . . . .
Order 2d.

. . . 1 || 1 || 2 |..

1 | . . . 47

3 ||

2 || 5 | . . . .3

. .

1 || 5 || 42

4.

Phthisici.

Phthisis . . . . . . . . . . . . .

26 || 13 || 39

Miningitis Tuberculoa . . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

1 |.

31 || 5 ||
-

1 |

1 | . . .

CLASS III. MonoRGANICI.

Order 1st. Cephalici.

cephalalgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . 2 . . . 2
Encephalitis . . . . . . . . . . .
Myelitis

...

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

1
1 |

Spinal Miningitis. . . . . . . . .

1.

Cerebro-Spinal Miningitis . . . .

||

1 |. .
-

1 || 1 |.

Apoplexia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . || 1 || 3 || 4
. .

General Paralysis . . . . .

||

. . .

- - -

1 |

- -

1 |

- -

1.

. . . . . . . .

1.

... .

. . .

1.

3 || 5 ||

2.

1 ||

Hemiplegia. . . . . . . . . . . . ||

2 || 3 || 2 || 5 || 1

2 ||

3 || 2 | . .

.. ..

1 || 1 || 2 ||

Paraplegia . . . . . . . . . . . .

Numbers carried forward . . . .

1 |. .

Spinal Congestion . . . . . . . . . . . .

Delirium Tremens. . . . . . . .

. . .
- . 1

... 110

. . .

6 || ||

... "

52 186 108 as 243 107 || 17 | 5

36.408 || 28

22

CITY

HOSPITAL.

MEDICAL.-Continued.

E.#: :
#

DISEASEs.

##

~ | -

# #| | | | | | | | | |##
52 is:
.

Numbers brought forward . . . .

198 |384 243 107 | 17 |

Progressive Locomotor Ataxia . . . . .

1 |. . .

Chorea . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.

3.

Epilepsy . . . . . . . . . . . .

:=
###
# |##
#

#| || || 3 || 3 | #|####| 3 || 3 ||3:

1
-

5 || 36

28

. 11 - . 1. . 1
2 .. . . . .. .
-

1|, |

. . .

1.

1.

Insanity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 | 1

8 . . . . . . 8 || || 8 || -

Puerperal Mania . . . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

Hysteria . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . |
1

1 ||

15

.
3 ||

2 ||

Neuralgia

5 ||

7 || 12 ||

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Order 2d.

|| -

ll. .

15 || 6 || 5 || 2 || 2 | . . . 15

Hypochondriasis . . . . . . . . . . . .

sciatica . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 | . .

2 ||

2 || 1 | . . . . . .

9 ||

3 | . .

1.

5 1. .

... "

1 || 2 | 1 || 3 || 2 || 2 |..

. . 41.

Cardiaci.

Pericarditis

Morbus Valvularum Cordis . .

Dilation of Heart . . . . . . .

1 ||

2 ||

2 ||

1 ||

1 ||

. .

. . .

. .

. 2 ..

1 | . . . .
3

| 2 || 1 || 3 | . .

Aneurism of Aorta . . . . . .

1 ||

. . . . . .

3 |.

1 ..

1 ||

4 |. .

3|. .

..

Angina Pectoris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Order 3d.

Pneumonici.

. . . . .

Laryngitis . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . 1

.. .

... 1

|| -

Pharyngitis . . . . . . . . . .

1 . .

Tom" . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . " ' " 1|...... I

Bronchitis (acute)

Bronchitis (chronic)
Pleuritis . . . . .
Pneumonia
Asthma

|| 10 ||

3 || 10 |

. . . . . . . . . . .

- - - - - - - - - - - -

Gangrene of Lungs. . . . . . . .

4 ||

8 ||

1 ||

1 ||

1 ||

1.

1 || 13

7 || 31

6 | . . . . . ||

1 ||

9 |.

21.

1.

1 ||

2 ||

10

1 || 5 || --

1 || 11 || 7 || 4 || 1 |.

4 ||

1
-

2 |. . . . . . .

| 20 | 13 ||33 || 23 || 1 | . . . . . .

Emphysema . . . . . . . . . .

Capillary Bronchitis . . . . . . .

6 || 16 || 17 ||

4 || 1 | #| 1 || 3 | . . . . .

. . . . . . . 1 . .

. . . .

- - -

1 |. .

1.

...

* :

'''

|.

Order 4th. Enterici.


Stomatitis . . . . . . . . . .
Emesis . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.
. . .

Numbers carried forward . . . . . 74 267

1 ||

1 ||

1 ||

* *

331 II.48

- -

|-

- -

10 || 48 |560

43

CITY

23

HOSPITAL.

MEDICAL.-Continued.

|#
#:

DISEAS-8

ADMITTED.

74 |267 262 (529

Numbers brought forward. . . . .

||

al

Gastraegia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 1 || -

1 | 1

Enteritis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 | 1

a 2

Peritonitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . |

..

Constipation . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

s: s:

#| 3 | #

5: | < | < |

148 || 23

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Hepatic Congestion . . . . . . . .

48 |560

10

. .

3.

. . .

2.

Stricture of Intestine . . . . . . . . . . . |

5 ||
1 | . . .

5 ||

1
-

. .

* :

. .

1.

5 | - - -

1 || 1 | . . .

Nephride.

Nephritis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

1 ||

... .

Ischuria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

2. 21.

... 2

1 ||

...

Enuresis . . . . . . . . .

. . . .

...

1.

Albuminaria . . . . . . . .

. . . . . a6 || 11
1 |||| 145 |||| 61 |||| 206 | 1 || 75 |. |

Diabetes . . . . . - - - - - - - -

Lithiasis . . . . . . . . . . .
Haematuria . . . . . . . . .

Cystitis

...

1 ||

3.

1 |.

*".........
. ..

Order 6th.

1 | . . .

1 || | | | | | . .

Ascites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Order 5th.

1 |
-

1 || 2 || 2 || 4 || 5 | . .

*... . . . . . . . .

8 ||

. 2

. . . . . . . . . . . * * *

Icterus. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

43
. .

a
| | ||
.

... 1

1 |. . . 1 | 1

Hepatitis . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cirrhosis . . . . .

... .. ... "

1 || 1 || 2 || 2

Abscess . . . . . . . . . . . . . |

| = | 8 || "a

Dyspepsia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 8 || 15 |*|| 14 || 7 | . .
Collea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " | 8 || 9 || 7 || 1 | . .
Haemorrhoids

Genetici.

Ovaritis . . . . . . . . . . .

Tumor Ovarii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Polypus Uteri . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

Prolapsus Uteri . . . . . . . . .

...

. . |

2. l. . . 4 || 4

1.

| -

. . ..

..

2.

1 ||

. . .

..

3.

12 62 664

53

Numbers carried forward . . . . . 82 |322 313 635 377 185

28

2 | . . .

24

CITY HOSPITAL.

MEDICAL.-Continued.

##

ADMITTED,

# g ###
===

#
#| || ||###

+ # g # # |##
55 || 3 | < | 8 || > || 3 | #

Fs

DISEASEs.

###

355

Numbers brought forward . . . . . 82 322 313 635 377 185 28 |12 || 62 664
1 | 1
1
1.

Anteflexion

53
-

Order 7th. Myostici.


Periostitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- - - - - -

2. l. . .

Synovitis

11. . . . . . . . . . .

1 -- -

- -

Order 8th. Chrotici.


Eczema, Specific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 - 1

--

chronic . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 | 1

*:

Impetigenodes . . . . . . . . .

..

1 - - -

1|--|--|--|--

1 || 1 || 1 |. . . . . . .

11. . .
1 - - -

Herpes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . 1

1......l.. 11...

Herpes, Foster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 1 | . . | 1 ||

1 | . . . . . . . . . . . | 1 |- - -

Psoriasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 1 | . . | 1 | . . | 1 | . . . . . . . . . 1 1. . .

Rupia Specific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 1 | . . | 1 | . . | 1 | . . . . . . . . || 1 |- - Order 2d.

Dis. of Connective Tissue.

Pelvic Cellutitis

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 2 || 2 || 2 | . . . . . . . . . . . .

21. . .

Peri Nephritic Abscess . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 1 || 1 | . . . . | 1 | . . . . . . 1 . . . .


CLAss IV.

METAMorphic.

Order 2d. Gyniaci.

Abortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . |
4.

1 |. .. 2

Sequelae of . . . . . . . . . . .

Miscarriage

Parturition

1 ||

.... ... .. ... .


....... ..... .

Menorrhagia . . . . . . . . . . .

. .

Amenorrhoea.

... 8

. . . . . . . . . .

2 || 2 ||--|--|--|--|->
1 ||

. . . . . . . . . . .

- -

- - --

1.

1 1. . .

1|--|--|--|--

1.

11......l.,

1 - - -

3 || 3 ||
3

Dysmemorrhaea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . || 3 || 3
Lucorrhoea

1.

3 || 1 | . . . . . . . . . .41 - - -

. . . . . . . .

41 - - -

1| 2 ||--|--|--| 8 || --

1 1. . . 6 || 6 || 6 || 1 | . . . . . . . . . 7 - - -

Vaginitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

'''.

1 1. . . . . .

11 - - -

Follicular Vulvitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . || 1 || 1 || 1 | . . . . . . . . . . . | 1 |- - Uterine Derangement . . . . . . . . . .

1 i 1 || 1 | . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1- - -

CLAss V. THANATICr.
Ordcr1st. Accident.

Numbers carried forward . . . . . 86 326||347 | 673.407 193 || 30 | 12

62 T04 || 55

CITY

HOSPITAL.

ZO

MEDICAL.Concluded.
-

ADMITTED.

DISCIIARGED.

###

#
52

#| <

~~~

+ * | = | # ## ##| < | # ###


# | 3 | #| #| 5 | # 23 g
#| ###

#~ | #

DISEASEs.

=#|#| | | = | # ** = & ###


Numbers brought forward . . . . . . 86
Insolatis . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Poisoning by Sumach
Uraemia

. . . . .

. . . . . . . . . .

326||347

. . .

2 | . .

. . |

1 | . . |

1 |

. . . |

1 | . . .

407 193 30 12 62 704


2

. . . . . . . . . . |

. . . . . .

- - - ||

1 . . . . . . .

Surgical Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 || 3 | 13 | . . . . . . . . . 12

Total . . . . . . . . .

. . . . .

86

**** *

31

24

55

2 | . . .
1 | . . .
1

. . .

. . . 12

62 720

56

26

CITY

HOSPITAL.

TABLE OF DEATHS, MEDICAL.


l
Male. Female. Total.

D IS E A S E .

Typhoid Fever . . . . . . .

Typhus Fever . . . . . . . . . . .
Erysipelas

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1
1

Dysentery (chronic) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Diarrhoea (chronic)

. . . |
1 |

Carcinoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.. .

Cancer of CEsophagus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .

. . . . . . . . . .

. . .

Alcoholismus (acute)

Addison's Disease . . . . . . . . . . . .

(chronic)

44

44

Stomach . . . . . .

ti

Spleen

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

* *

Phthisis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meningitis Tuberculosa . . .

Myelitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Spinal Meningitis . . . . . . . .

General Paralysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Valvular Disease of Heart . . . . . . . . . .

.. .

"

. .

1
1

. . |

. . . |

Asthma

. . .

1.

Hepatic Abscess . . . . . . . . . . . .

Cirrhosis

Stricture of Intestine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Bright's Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Emphysema . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enteritis . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chronic Bronchitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . 5"

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
-

Pleurisy . . . . . . . . . . . .

Apoplexy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pneumonia

1
1

. . |
.

Cystitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ovarian Tumor

1
-

1
1
3.

. . |

6
l

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

27

CITY HOSPITAL.

REPORT OF MEDICAL OUT-PATIENTS.


DISEASES.

DISEASES.

No.

No.

Acne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enuresis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Adiposis . . . . .

1
1

Epilepsy . . . . . .
Erysipelas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Erythema. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Erythema Nodosum . . . . . . . . . .
Fatty Stools .....

..
Alcoholism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
-

- -

- -

- -

- -

Alopecia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Amenorrhoea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

56

Amygdalitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13

Anaemia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . 152

Favus . . . . . . .

* *

Febricula

- - - -

* *

. .... .... .

5
7

3
4
2
1
1

- -

12

Fever, Intermittent. . . . . . . . . . .
Fever, Remittent . . . . . . . . . . ...

9
3

Flatulence .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fumuculi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Gastric Disturbance . . . . . . . . . .

13

Anasarca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Anorexia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

16

Anteversio uteri. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Aphonia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aphthae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arrest of Development . . . . . . .

* * *

* *

* *

- -

- - -

- -

Ascarides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Hematemesis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ascites . . . . . . . .

- -

Asthma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

20

Bright's Disease. . . . . . . . . . . . ..

Hemoptysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Herpes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Herpes Zoster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hypochondriasis . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hysteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Impetigo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11
10
1

Jaundice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- -

Bronchitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Cardiac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13

1
8

Catarrh, nasal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

28

Cephalalgia . . . . . . . .

.... .... ..
Cessatio Mensium............

36
1

Lead Poisoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Cholera Infantum........... ...

Leucorrhoea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23

Chorea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13

Colic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Constipation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
Convulsions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
Coryza. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
Cough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Cutaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
Deafness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32
10

Debility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Delirium Tremens............
Diarrhoea . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......

Eczema . . . . . . . . . .

Emesis

- - -

- -

. .. .... .... ........ ..

16

Menorrhagia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Neuralgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12

Marasmus . . . .

19

Nicotism . .

Oedema . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Organic Disease of Heart. . . . .


Otalgia . . . . . . . .

- -

- -

2
9

Ovarian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ozaena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

158

Paralysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Palpitation . . . . . . . . .

16

Parotitis
1

Enlarged Glands .............

35

.. .. ...... ..

. ..... ....

Dysentery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Dysmenorrhoea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Dyspepsia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Dysuria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
4
Elephantiasis. . . . .

Lichen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lumbago . . . . . . . . . .

Otorrhoea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1
34

- -

- -

. .... .... .. .. .. .... .

Pediculi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pertussis . . . . . . . . . .
Petechiae . . . . .

- - - -

- - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

CITY

HOSPITAL.

REPORT OF MEDICAL OUT-PATIENTS Concluded.


DISEASEs.

No.

Phthisis

Pulmonalis. .

Scarlatina, Sequelae of . . . . . . . .

137

Sciatica

19

Pleurisy ..
Pleuritic Effusion. . . . .

* * - - - -

Pneumonia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- -

Poisoning by Ivy . . . . . . . . . . . .
Polygalactia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pregnancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prolapsus Uteri . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prurigo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Stomatitis . . . .
Sunstroke . . . . . . .

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- - -

- - -

- -

Suppressio Mensium.... . . . . . .
Sycosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Synovitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syphilophobia . . . . .
Taenia . . . . . . .

- - - -

- -

- - - -

- - - -

- -

Teething
| Torticollis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pruritus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Psoriasis . . . . . .
* -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Stammering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

40

Pleurodynia ...

N0.

DISEASEs.

32

Pharyngitis

Urticaria . . . . . . . . .

Rachitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Uterine . . . . . . . . .

Retentio Mensium . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rheumatism . . . . . .

Varicella. . . . . . .
|

5
- - - -

- -

- -

- - - -

Variola

Rubeola. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Vertigo ....

Rupia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Vicarious Menstruation. . . . . .

Scabies . . . . . . . . . . .

- - - -

- -

- -

- -

Scarlatina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total

Weaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- -

. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,274

HOSPITAL.

CITY

TABLE OF OPHTHALMIC PATIENTS.


Admitted.

it:

#: |&
3-1

DISEASEs.

2.5
[33].

orexations.

2 *|ss
##| s=

*#| #13 -

54315 #

#|3|:

>|-| E-

-|

Extraction
Cataract, Hard . . . . . . . . 3 1512, 27 ||Flap,
| with Suture . . .
Soft . . . . . . . .

.2524, 48
. . . . . 4 3| 7

2, 3, 5 ||Discission

. . . . . . . . . | 1 | . . . . . . ||Removal of Capsule, 1, 1] 2

Cretaceous . . . . . . . . . 1| 1 ||Flap Extraction and

Congenital

Iridectomy . . . | 1 , || 1

1.

. . . .. . . ..

. . . . . . . . .

Glaucoma

|*

1 ||Iridectomy . . . . . 1 1, 2

. . . 3| 3 ||Iridectomy . . . . 1 2 3

Cataract Congenital . . . . . . . . . 1.

1 ||Removal of Capsule, 1.

Opaque Capsule . . . . . . | 1 || 3 1 4 ||Removal . . . . .


-

s
2}2*:

2, 3,

... . . . . . . . . own . . . . . . . "

|-

Strabismus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1| 1 ||Division of Muscle, 1, 1] 2


Staphyloma Anterior . . . . . . . 1|3| 4 ||Abscission . . . . . 2, 2 4
. . . . 4.

Conical Cornea . . . . . . . . . . . .

3| 3 ||Paracentesis

Cystoid Cicatrix . . . . . . . . .

1| 1 ||Abscission . . . . . 1 - || 1

Conjunctivitis
Iritis

1
-

Sympathetic Ophthalmia . . . . . .

4| 1

** . . . . . . .

5' 5" . .

2 1.

1. .

. . . . . . .

1 ||Removal of Eye. . . . 1| 1

Leucoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1| 1 ||Iridectomy . . . . . 1 1/ 2

Gonorrhoeal Conjunctivitis ... 3. 3 ||None . . . . . . . 3 8 . .


Conjunctivitis with Ulcer Cor
Ile. .. . . 2 .

. . . . . . . . 2, 2 .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . I 11.

. . . . . . .... 1 . .

Xeroma

Hernia of the Iris. . . . . . . . . | 1 , || 1 ||Exscission

Abscess of Lachrymal Gland, 1 |. |-|-- opened

. . . .. 1 , | 1

- - - - - - - 1

1
1.

Hydrophthalmia . . . . . . . . . . . 1| 1 ||Removal of Globe. 1 - || 1

Hyperaesthesia of Retina . . . . .
Dislocation of Lens. . . . .

1| 3 ||None . . . . . . .
1|

. ... . 1

3, 11.

with

| Scoop . . . . . . . 1 - || 1

Opacity of Cornea with Ulceration . . . . . .

Extraction

|
1 ||None . . . . . . . . 1, 1] . .

83

70%

99

30

CITY

HOSPITAL.

REPORT OF OPHTHALMIC OUT-PATIENTS.


NATURE OF DISEASE.

NATURE OF DISEASE,

Conjunctivitis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Papular Conjunctivitis........
Granular Conjunctivitis.......
Gonorrhoeal Conjunctivitis ...
Ophthalmia Neonatorum......
Conjunctiva, Fungus of.......
Ecchymosis of Conjunctiva ...

540

Ulcer of Cornea. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

157

43
86
5

Abscess of Orbit . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14

Paralysis of Muscles of Eye ...


Microphthalmos.. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Exophthalmos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -

Ulcer of Cornea, with Conjunc


tivitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Brought forward.......... 1331


Abscess of Lachrymal Sac. ... 11
Inflammation of Lachrymal Sac, 4

29

Opacity of Cornea, with Con


junctivitis . . . . . . . . . . ....... 35
Opacity of Cornea............ 79
Foreign Body in Cornea ...... 17

Ciliary Neurosis......... . . . . . .3
Ophthalmitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
Sympathetic Ophthalmia . . . . . .
4
Strabismus Convergens....... 38
Strabismus Divergens . . . . . ...
7
Rectus, Internal Insufficiency of 1
Iritis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

Leucoma. . . . . . . . . . . ..........
Abrasion of Cornea ..........
Perforation of Cornea ........

Iritis Specific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6
1

Hernia of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

Synechia Anterior............

Xeroma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

Keratatis . . . . . . ..............

Conical Cornea. . . . . ..........

Hypopion . . . . . . . .............
Staphyloma Anterior .........
Pinguecula...................
Pterygium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Symblepharon......
-

20
1
6

Synechia Posterior . . . . . . . . . . .
Occlusion of Pupil . . . . . . . . . ...
Traumatic Injury. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Myopia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hypermetropia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Presbyopia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Amblyopia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asthenopia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
Astigmatism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dislocation of Lens . . . . . . . . . .

Disease of Meibomian Glands 202

Cataract, Hard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cataract, Soft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- - - - - - - - -

Hordeolum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CEdema of Lids ..............

Vitiligo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Cataract, Cretaceous . . . . . . . . .
Cataract, Pyramidal . . . . . . . . . .

Trichiasis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Cataract, Traumatic . . . . . . . . .

Tumor of Lids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

17

Ectropion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
Entropion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

3
6

Molluscum .................. ...

Noevus....... -

- - - - - - - -- - - - - -

2
16
37
16

9
17
35
8

2
2

|
l1

Opaque Capsule . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sclerotitis . . . . . .

- - -

- - - -

- - - - - -

Cataract, Congenital...... . . . .
Staphyloma Posterior ........

Retinitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choroiditis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Obstruction of La chrymal
Irido-Choroiditis . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ducts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......
Carried forward ..........

33
133

Carried forward .......... 1736

CITY

31

HOSPITAL.

REPORT OF OPHTHALMIC OUT-PATIENTS. Continued.


NATURE of DISEASE.

NATURE OF DISEASE.

Brought forward........ 1736


Separation of Retina .........
7
Congestion of Retina.........
5

Brought forward. . . . . . . . . . 1796


Incipient Cataract . . . . . . . . . . . .
Foreign Body in Fundus . . . . . .

Congestion

Optic Disc and

Retina.............

- -

Abscess of Globe. . . . . . . . .
12

- - - - - -

Alteration Optic Disc...... .

..

16

Retina, Apoplexy of ..........


Cerebral Amaurosis
Glaucoma .... - - - - - - -

- - -

- - - -

...

Disorganization of Globe . . . . .
Hydrophthalmia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Circumorbital Neuralgia . . . . . .
Conjunctivitis Catarrhal ......
Atrophy of Optic Disc........

- -

- -

Atrophy of Globe ............

|
80
18

Abscess of Brow. . . . .

Carried forward .......... 1796

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,918

Males

Females .................................

. .... .. .. ..

813

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

1,105

Average attendance, 341+ per week. Total, during the year, 17,745.

OPERATIONS ON OPHTHALMIC OUT-PATIENTS.


NATURE OF DISEASE.

No.

Abscess of Lachrymal Sac ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Abscess of Globe.............................

- -

- -

- -

- -

- - -

- -

.... ..
. .. .. .. ..
- -

5
2

Abscess of Brow ............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Foreign Body in Cornea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


...
Fungus Conjunctiva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................
Entropion.....
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

Hernia of Iris . . . .

. ... .. . . .... .. .. .... .. .... .. ...

12

Molluscum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

Pterygium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Strabismus Convergent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Strabismus Divergent........
Staphyloma Anterior . . . . .

- - - - -

- -

- -

- -

- - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- -

- - -

- - - -

- -

- -

- - - - - -

- - - -

........... ...... ...... ..


- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- - - -

- - -

1
1

. . . . . . . . . . 29

. . . ... . ... .. .. ..... . . ... ..

.. ...... .... ....

- --- ------ - - - - -- ---- ------ ----

11

Opening Puncta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

- - - -

- - - - - - -

- - -

Tumor of Lid

- - - - -

- - - -

- -

- -

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

32

CITY

HOSPITAL.

REPORT OF DISEASES AND THEIR RESULTS, FROM


JAN. 1, 1867, TO JAN. 1, 1868.
SURGICAL.

| H.

Abarret. I

#
#:

DISEAs Es.

premaraen.

--

#*

:
-

* | *

* | *

|=g
*~..
#

=#|####| ||*|####
CLAss I.

ZYMotic.

Order 1st. Miasmatic.


-

Erysipelas, Phlegmonous . . . .
-

Traumatic

. .

Carbuncle . . . . . . . . . .
Croup

. . . . . . . . . .

- -

1 ||

11 - .

1 ||

2.

- -

- - -

- -

1 || || 1 || || 1 ||--

- *|
-

Bubo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Syphilis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.

8 |

3 || 11 || 3 || 8 ||

2 | 11 || 9 | 20 || 6 || 13

Gonorrhoea . . . . . . . .

Orchitis . . . . . . . . . . .

stricture of Urethra. . . . . . . . . . .
-

with Fistula . . . . .

with Perineal Abscess.

4
... 4
. . . . . a
. . . 1 || || 1

Paraphymosis. . . . . . . . . . . . .

12 | . . .
19

3.

2 || 1 | . . . . .

1 ||

3 ||

1 || 2 |... 1141. . .
- ||

..

. . . .. . . .

Vesico-Vaginal Fistula . . . . . . . .

2 || 2 | . . . . . . . . 2 - - -

- -l

Phymosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- 1

1 i.

Syphilitic Ulcers . . . . . . . . . .

Order 1st.

1.

21. . .

Order 2d. Enthetic.

CLAss II.

----| 2 || 2 || --

1 || 1 || 2

- - -

1 |. . .

3.

3 ||

2 ||

1 | . . .

1 ||

1.

|.

...

. . . .

''

3 |. .

|...

BlooD Diseases.

Diathetic.

Cancer of Breast . . . . .

1 ||

1 || || 1 | . . . . . . . . ||

Rectum . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

**

Uterus

1 |

Encephaloid . . . . . .

1 ||

1 | . . . .

Epithelial . . . . . .

Keloid

... I

. . . . .

. . ... . . . . . .

Tumor Fatty . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

1 ||

1.
1.
- - -

2 || 1 || 3 || 1 || 1 ||
.

1 |. . .

1 ||

1 | . . .
- - -

1 |. . .. . . . . .
- -

1.

1 || 4 | . . .

- -

1 .. . .
-

- - -

Numbers carried forward . . . . . .

5 | 40 || 21 | 61

22 || 29 || 3 || 4 || 58

33

HOSPITAL.

CITY

SURGICAL.-Continued.

# | Apartree. - *|-- #
# -:
#|-

DISEASEs.

Numbers brought forward . . . . .


CLAss II. Blood

Fibro Cartilaginous . . . . .

Nucleated . . . . . . . .

Plastic

. . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Cystic

Naso-pharyngeal . . . . . . .

. . || 1 ||

2 ||

2 ||
1

. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .|

- -

1 ||

1 || 3
2

2 |.
|

- ||

1 || 1 ||

2 ||

2 ||

1 ||

1 || 2 | . . .
-

1 || 1

Local Diseases.

Disease of Brain.

Concussion of Brain . . . . . . . . . .

*
order 2d.

Order 1st.

29 || 3 || 4 || 58

Tumor Fibrous of Uterus . . . . . . .

CLAss III.

22

*came

Diathetic.- Continued.

40 || 21 || 61

Spinal Cord

* * * |

7 ||

3 || 10 ||

. . .. 2

. . . . . .

5 ||

Disease of Blood vessels.


| 1

Popliteal Aneurism . . . . . . . . . .
Varix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

6 || 1 || 7 | 3 ||

Order 3d. Disease of Air Passages.

...

Epistaxis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

1 ||

2 |

1.

Order 4th. Disease of the Bowels.

* .............

* *

Crural

. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .

11.

Fistula in Ano

. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .

6 || 3 | 9

6 ||

Hemorrhoids.

5 ||

Recto-Urethral Fistula

. . .

. . . . . . . . .. . . .

Intussusception . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 ||

8 |

1 ||

1.

1
1

Order 5th. Disease of Kidney, etc.


- ||

Urinary Calculus . . . . . . . . . . .
Genetic.

1 | . . .

3 | . .

3 | . . .
2

Numbers carried
forward . . . . . .
5

Testicle Diseased . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 3 | . .

3
1.

9.

8
l

... I

Hypertrophied Prostate. . . . . . . .

Order 6th.

1
1

1 l.

3 || 1

.3

3.

. . . . . 21. . .

*..

. . ss a 12" | St " ' " s his 12

34

CITY

HOSPITAL.

SURGICAL.-Continued.

admirred.

---

#
#:

DIs EASEs.

.#*

| =2

DIS-H-A.R.G.E.D.

B | *

|-# |2:

* | *

|##
|#

*||||####|
~|~|-|--|--||
Numbers brought forward . . . . . .

|| 85

6 ||

47

39 l?4 || 57

12

8 |11

Local Diseases.- Continued.


Genetic.- Continued.

Hydrocele

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. .

Ovarian Dropsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Haematocele . . . . . .
Varicocele

Order 7th.

. . . . . .

... 1

...

Chronic

. . . . . . . . . .|

Lateral Curvature, Spine . . . . . . .

3 ||

||

||

... . ... 11.


1.
... .
|
| |

1.

. 2

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Spine - - - - - - - - - - - - -

4 ||

. .

1.

1 |

Wrist

Leg - - - - - - - - - - - -

1 ||

- -

1|- - - -

1.

*
1|--

.. . ..

Arm . . . . . . . . . . .
Tarsus

. . . . . . . . . .

Stump

. . . . . . . . . .

Orbit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ... 2 | 1 |..l.... 1 |

. ..
- *|.. * | * | 1 |..

Anchylosis, False, Knees. . . . . . . . . . .


Deformity, Palate. . . . . . . . . . .
Harelip - - - - - - - - -

Paronychia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

..l.. 1

1 | 1
1

... 1

2 .

.
1 || 3
2..

1.

1.

. .

. . ...

2 || || 1

Ingrowing Toe-Nail . . . . . . . . . .

..

1 |.

1...
2 ...

1 .. . .

1.

1 || 5 |. . .

|| |

4.

1 || 4 ||

... 4 || 2 || 6 || 2 || 8 |
|

11...

2 . .

*|| || ||

. . . . . . . . . .

7 1. . .

|| ||

* ..

11.

- -

|..

..

. . . . 1 || 1

Knee . . . . . . . . . . . | 2 || 3 |. - 8

Necrosis of Jaw . . . . . . . .

1|--|--| 1 | . . .

- 1 || 1 || 2 |.

Disease of Hip . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 || 1

1 |. .| 1
1 |

1. 1
s 3 |11

. . . . . . .

Caries

Synovitis, Acute . . . . . . . . . . .

Angular

1 || 2 || 3 || 6 | . . .

-1 - .

* . . .

1 || 1

Diseases of Bones, Joints,


Muscles, etc.

Inflamed Bursa . . . . . . . . . . . .

..

6 ||

. .. . . .

1.
-

1
1.

2.. . ..
... 11...
|..

.. .

1.

- || 3 | . . .

...

Numbers carried forward . . . . . . . 17 184 65 199 || 82 75 14 18 1so

27

CITY

35

HOSPITAL.

SURGICAL.-Continued.

Gs

Discworp.

AbMitre D.

5:

#
:
* -:
#
##|
#|
|
|
|
|
#|
###|
3
||
3
||3:
** | 5 | # | 3 || 3 || E| 5 || 3 ||3:

DISEASE8.

Numbers brought forward . . . .

17

134 || 65

82 | 75 || 14

18 189 || 27

Local Diseases.-Continued.
Order 8th. Skin Diseases.
Ulcers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
*

4 | 30

Varicose . . . . . . . . . .

18 || 48 | 28 || 11 || 1 || 2 || 42 |

2 | 11 || 3 || 14 || 9 ||

Lupus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

Malignant Pustule . . . . . . . . .

Erythema Nodosum . . . . . . . .

A". . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Perinephritic . . . . . . .

Diffuse . . . . . . . . . . .

5 | . .

1 || 1 ||

30 | 8 | as

1
.

3 ||

2 ||

**

3 | . . . 40

5 ||

2 |

. . .

1 | . .

1 || 1 || 2 | 1 |
3

10

14

1
-

1 |
1

5 ||

2
1

CLAss IV. METAMoRPHIC.


Order 2d. Diseases Women.

Mammary Abscess . . . . .
-

CLASS V.

1 | . . . 1 || 1 || 2 | . . . .

|-

one Lower . . . . . . .

Burns and Scalds . . . . . . . . .

... 8

... "

3 || 3 | . . .

3 || 7 || 9 | 16 || 13 || 1

|:

Dislocation of Neck . . . . . . . .

1 | .

Clavicle . . . . . . . .

1 ||

5 ||

2 | .

Shoulder . . . . . . .

Elbow

Hip . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

Sprain . . . . . . . . . . .

2 ||
4

Fracture, Ossa Nasi Compound . .

1 |

4 | 3 |

.
1 ||

3 ||

8 || 3 || 11 |
2

2
3

...

3
-

. . .

7 || 6 || 1

14

. .

3.

7 || 2 || 9 || 7 || 1

Numbers carried forward . . . . .

2
-

Skull Compound.

Base Skull . . . . . . . .
-

1 || 3
1 || 1

1 | 15

1 | . . |

Frost Bite. . . . . . . . . . . . .
-

Than ATIC.

order 1st. Accidents.


Crushing

42 |261 [117 ||378 (188 116

1 ||

|..] 3 || 8
.

4 || 12

20 || 43 |367 || 53

36

HOSPITAL.

CITY

SURGICALContinued.
-:...

-AbMirred.

DISEASEs.

|Eg

DISCHARGED.

~ 1 -

| =# | s:
-

- I -

#
|###

*|| ||######"
Numbers brought forward . . . . . .

42 1261 [117 | 378,188 116 || 20 || 43

287

53

Than Aric-Continued.
Accidents.-Continued.

Fracture Maxilla Superior, Compound.

Interior. . . . . . . |

|-

Clavicle
-

..

Compound . . . . .

. . . . .

Scapula, Body . . . . . . . .

Coracoid Process . . . . . . .

1.

Ribs . . . . . . . . . . .

Humerus : . . . . . . . . . .

44

. .

4 |

4.

into Elbow Joint . . . . . 4


. . . . . . . . .

Radius . . . . . . . . . . . .

|-

and Ulna. . . . . . . .

Compound

Ulna. . . . . . .

Hand, Compound
Fingers, Compound

Spine

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Ilium

. . . . . . . . . . . .

Femur, Neck . . . . . .

. . . . .

Shaft.

Compound

- -

......

- -

2 . . .

.. |- - - - 2

21. . .

| | | | | | ||...

11.

...

2 || 2 | . . . . . .
2 . . .

21.

.3

2 . . .

1 | 4 |. . .

|12 || 1 || 13 || 0 | . . . . . | 1 || 10 |

2 ||

2 ||

4 ||

compound . . . . . . .

1.

|.

1. ... .

. . .

*| | | |

. . . . . . . . . . . .|

1 ||

Patella . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

2 . . .

2 ||

Tibia

. . .

1 ||

. . . . .

1 || 1 || 2 || 5 | . . .

7 |.

. 2.

2 ||

... . 2

5 || 14 | 12 ||

1 ||

2 . . .

- - -

1 ||

5 || 1 ||
1

11...

.. ..

4 || 2 |.
.

1.

|- - -

... .

2 || 1 | . . | 1 |.

3 || 4 || 7 ||
-

1 ||
-

. . . . . . . .

9 ||

1.
-

7 ||

10

1 ||

. . . . .

3 || 7 ||

1 || 1 || 2 |..

Comp.l.. . .

1 ||

2 || 2 | . . . . .

Anatomical Neck . . . . . . .

Both Arms

1
2

| -

1|..
. . . .

.. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

7 || 9 || 1

6 || 1 ||

Comminuted . . . . . . . .

- - - || 1 | . . .

1
5 ||

2 || 1 || 3 || 1 | . .

2 || 7 | . .
2 |. . .

7 || 7
.2

2|--

s!...

| | |||

". . . . .
|

Numbers carried forward. . . . . . . , 56 |347 138 485

270,128

2 - - |

23 iss *

67

CITY

HOSPITAL.

SURGICAL.-Continued.

#:

Dlse ASEs.

Numbers brought forward . . . . . .

TE:

Eischara.
# -:

Apurren.

##

56 347 138 485 270 128 || 23

*:
-

53 474 || 67

THANATIc-Continued.
Accidents.-Continued.
Fracture Tibia and Fibula . . . . . . .
-

24 ||

Compound

and.com.

Tibiae and Fibulae . . . . . .

Fibula . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 || 27 | 20

7 ||

...

1 ||

3 ||

8 ||

5 ||

1 |

2
...

with Dislocation . . . .

Tarsus . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 ||

Toes . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 || 2 | 2

Toes, Compound . . . . . .

2 ||

. . . . . . . . . . .

Gunshot Wound, Head . . . . . . . .


-

crest of Ilium

Thorax . . . . . . .

Groin

Back . . . . . . . .

1 |
1

Throat . . . . . . . .

...

1 |

2 ||

2 ||

1 ||

1 ||

2 |

3 ||

2 ||

Arm . . . . . . . . .

2 ||

Hand

. . . . . . . .

6 || 1 ||

. . . . . . . .

Knee

Foot . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

2
-

..

72

..

il. . .

. . . . .

.3

1 ||

. .. . . 2
1
1

7 || 4 || 2

2
3

2 || 8 | . . .
2

4 || 2 | 1

7 || 1 || 8 || 6 || 2

Wounds Lacerated, Head . . . . . . .

||

. . . .

1 || 1 || 2 | 2
4

3 ||

1 ||

1 || 1 || 2 || 2 |

. . . . . . .

Wounds Incised, Face . . . . . . . . .


-

1 ||

|| 57 | 14 || 71 || 60 | 12

12

Contusions

23

7 || 3 || 10 || 10

7 || 3

...

. . .

... 1

Face

Knee . . . . . . .

- 1

Hand . . . . . . .

1 | 8 || 1 || 9 || 7 || 2 | 1 |.. 10

Groin . . . . . . .

- -

1 1.

Foot

4 ||

. . . . . .

1 |

1
1

1
2 ||

1
|

Numbers carried forward . . . . . . . 68 l800 169 |669 |405 161 124167 657 | 80
\

CITY

HOSPITAL.

SURGICAL.-Continued.

---

ADMITTED.

Els
"E-

I-T-

!.5.
*

**

-:

I -

.5

--

E==

#3

-:

**:

# = | 3 || F = | 3 |##

5* | 3 | #
Numbers brought forward . . . . . . . 68

g |:

3- | | | < |

DISEASEs.

|##

D-15CIIARGED.

500 169 669 |405 161

24 || 67 657 | 80

ThNATIC.-Continued.
Accidents.-Continued.
Wounds Punctured, Abdomen

. . . .

Neck . . . . . . .

4-

Thigh

it.

Leg . . . . . . . .

Foreign Body in CEsophagus . . . . .


-

||

... '

2
-

. . .

... . . . . .

...

- |.

1 | . . .

1 ||
|

1 ||

. . .

. . . .

Side . . . . . . . . .

Medical Cases Reported in Surgical Table.


Constipation

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Poisoning by Arsenic . . . . . . . . .
Disease of Uterus . . . . . . . . .

2 || 2 ||

2.

Retention Urine . . . . . . . . . . . .
Neuralgia . . . . . . . . . .

Uterine Haemorrhage . . . . . . . . . . .

Myalgia . . . . . . .

1 ||

2 | . . .

1 | . . .. . .
2

. . .

2 . . . .
2

. . .

3 || 3 | . . | 2 || 1 |.

31. . .

1 ||

. . .

1 ||

1|... 1

. . . . . .
-

Sum Total of Columns . . . . . . . . . 69 |509 178

412 170 ||25 | 69

* *

CITY

39

HOSPITAL.

TABLE OF OPERATIONS. SURGICAL.

operaTIONs.

* | :
Amputat'n at shoulder joint

Arm ... . . . . . . . .

REsULT.

:
1

One, primary, died of pyaemia.


One, primary, recovered with necrosis;
one pathological, recovered with ulcera

tion of stump; one, pathological, nearly


well; one, pathological, died of pyaemia;
one, primary, died of pyaemia; one,

secondary, died of pyaemia.


44

Fore-arm ... . . . .

3 ||

Two, primary, well; one, pathological,

died of pyamia; one, secondary, died of


pyaemia.
*

di

Fingers....... ... 13 |...


Thigh.......... 10 | 1

13

Nine, primary, well; two, secondary, well;


one, primary, died of pyaemia.

11

One, primary, well; one, pathological, in


Hospital, doing well; two, primary, died
of pyaemia; three, primary, died of
exhaustion; one, pathological, well;
two, pathological, died of pyaemia; one,
secondary, well.
*

Knee joint......| 1 |....

Well; had necrosis femur.

Leg . . . . . . . . . . . .

One, primary, well; one, primary, pyae

7 |

mia, recovered with necrosis; two, pri

mary, died of exhaustion; three, patho


logical, well; one doing well in il'pital.
44

Foot Lisfrancs ...

One, primary, well.

44

Toes...........

6 |.

One, primary, much relieved; one, pri


mary, died of pyaemia; one secondary,
recovered with necrosis; three, patho
logical, well.

Breast. . . . . . . . . . . . ....

One, for cancer, well.

Ablation superior maxilla .......

Carcinoma, well, in Hospital.

g"

Died in ten weeks of abscess of the brain.

Artery Ligature of common


Carotid........... . . . . . . .

Artery Ligature, Femoral ... 2

One died of pyaemia, one of haemorrhage.

Acupressure ........

For popliteal aneurism, well.

Ligature Ulna. .....

Incised wound in hand, died of pyaemia.

44

Palmar Arch, ..

Carried forward....... 51 || 8

Doing well, in Hospital.

40

CITY

HOSPITAL.

TABLE OF OPERATIONS, SURGICAL. Continued.

opert Arions.

* | # 1 Ta
.#
#
:

Re8 ULT.

Numbers brought forward 51 || 8 || 59


Bullet removed. . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 ....

Dislocation of the Hip . . . . . .

2 |

1 || 3 One, of a year's standing, not relieved; two,

Shoulder ...|

4 ||

1 ||

One, from groin, well; one, from axilla,


well; and one from crest of ilium, well.
well.

4-

of Radius et Ulna.

Enucleation of Eye-ball. . . . .

4
2

- -

Three, well; two, in Hospital, nearly well.

Well.

2 One, contents of Orbit removed for epi

thelic dis., well; one, traumatic rupture


of globe, well.
Exscission of Knee. . . . . . . . . .

One, pathological, died of pyaemia; one


pathological, doing well, in Hospital.

Head femur. . . . . .

2 ||

1 ||

One, well; one, in Hospital, doing well;


one, relieved.

Elbow Joint .....

2 ||

1 ||

One, primary, not relieved: one, primary,


died of pyaemia; one, pathological, not
relieved.

Fissure of Palate. . . . . . . . . . . ... .

1 |

Fistula in Ano .............

6 ||

2 |

8 Seven, well; one, relieved.

Hare lip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

....]

1 ||

double ... . . . . . . . . .

Hernia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Well.

Well.

1 |.

Well.

One, double ingl. well; two, strangulated,


one, well; and one, died; one, omental,

Well.
Well.

well.
Haemorrhoids . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 |

Haematocele ...............

Hydrocele .................

3 |.

Lithotomy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 |.

Lithotrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Minor Operations...........
Necrosis...........

- - - - - - - -

2 |

Well.
Well.
Relieved.
Well.
82 || 34 |116
9 ||

3 | 12

One, tibia trephined, doing well; eight,


well; one, relieved; one, not relieved;

two, in Hospital, doing well.


Carried forward.... ...

183| 57 |240

CITY

41

HOSPITAL.

TABLE OF OPERATIONS, SURGICAL. Continued.

*
oPERATIONs.

g
# ~
#| -5 || -=

REs ULT.

Numers brought forward...183 || 57 240


Necrosis of Stump..........

2 ||

Ovariotomy ...............

.....

1 ||

3 0ne, followed by amputation; one, in

Hospital; one, died.

Dead, one in twenty-seven hours; and one


in two hours.

Paracentesis Thoracis.......
-

Abdominis ..... ....

Perineal Section............

1 ||

1.

Well.

Relieved for ovarian disease.

Three, well; one, by direct puncture, well;


and one by same operation, doing well,
in Hospital.

Perinephritic'Abscess.......

One, well; one, died after leaving Hospital.

Phymosis..................

3 |.

Well.

Plastic Operation...........

Flap taken from nates and applied to


ulcer of hand, ulcer improved, died,

..., |

2 |

atheroma of aorta.

Polypus-Nasopharyngeal ...

*
by temporary depression of supe
ricr maxilla

Puncture of the Bladder . . . .

1 ..

Followed by perineal section.

Removal of needle from side,....|

1 || 1 Well.

Trephining Skull...........

1 ||

3 ||

4 One, for compound comminuted fractured

skull, with depression, died of pyaemia;


one, compound comminuted fractured
skull, with depression, died of shock;
one, for injury of head, died; one, com
pound depressed fracture into frontal
sinus, well.

Spine...........

For dislocation of neck,died.

Tenotomy .................

1 |.

1.

Well.

Tracheotomy...............

2 ||

1 ||

3 One, for oedema of glottis, well; two

Tumor Cheloid.............

1 ||

1 ||

2 One, of face, well; one, of breast, nearly


well.

Cystic ............. ... -

1 |

1 Of lip, well.

Fibro nucleated....| 1 |.

memb, croup, died.

Carried forward........ 205


6

| 68 273

Of neck, well.

42

CITY

HOSPITAL.

TABLE OF OPERATIONS, SURGICAL. Concluded.

# # #

OPERATIONs.

Result.

Numbers brought forward. .205 | 68 |273


Femur Fibro Plastic........ . . . .]
64

1 |

1 Of labium, well.

Cartilaginous......| 2 | 2 One of neck, well; one, of face, well.

Ununited Fracture Femur...

Not relieved.

Inferior Maxilla ............

Well.

Varix, Ligature of..........

Four, well; three, relieved; and one in


Hospital, nearly well.

Varicocele ................

1 ....

1
Well.

Ligature Ext'l Iliac..... ....


Wesico-Vaginal Fistula......

Totals.........

* * * * * * *

1 Died of exhaustion.

1 .

- -

1 |

217, 72 |289

Much relieved.

CITY

43

HOSPITAL.

TABLE OF ACCIDENTS.
|
Males. Females.

NATURE OF 1NJURY.

Burns .................................................. . .

Crushing both lower extremities......... ...................

One

44

Dislocation
44

(s

44

- - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - -

Clavicle......................
Radius and Ulna ................................

Shoulder ...................

.....

- - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Compound ........................

...

Compound........

44

ts

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

**** * * * * * * * * * ** *

**

Superior

Nose, Compound............. ........ ..

44

Clavicle.................
44

"

........................
- - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Comminuted ..............

4-

Scapula ..............

*4

Coracoid process . . . . . . . . .

".

44

Humerus Shaft .........

- - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - -

- - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

into Elbow Joint.........................

44

Compound .......

Radius...........................

|-

44

44

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

and Ulna.............. * *

1
1

7
2

4.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

14

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** *

4.

Compound..................

- - - - -

Ulna........................................ - - - -

Numbers carried forward............

- - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

|-

- - -

Anatomical Neck ...........

both Humeri..............

| | 6

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

**

44

44

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

44

- - -- - - - --- - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - -

Inferior Maxilla...................

-4

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

4-

4
1

Spine ................

44

*-

15

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Fracture, Skull, Base..........


44

............................

*...........

Total.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

...

92

1
2

27

119

44

CITY

HOSPITAL.

TABLE OF ACCIDENTS.Continued.

Male. Female. Total.

NATURE OF INJURY.

Numbers brought forward..............................


Fracture, Hand, Compound..........

- -

44

Fingers

44

Femur, Neck ...............

92

27

- -

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

.....................

- - - - - -

st

Shaft..............

did

Compound .......... .......

- - - - -

...

- -

13

- - - - - - - - - - -

**

Crest Ilium ... .................

*4

Patella......................

Tibia ................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

**

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

* - - - - - - - - - - -- - - -- - - -

Compound................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

Fibula .... .......................................

Tibia and Fibula.......

**

44

*4

44

st

44

ti

4t

2
8

10

- - - - -

28

25

Compound .......................

Comminuted............

- - - - - - * - - -

44

Fibula ...........

- - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Compound......

Spine..............

- -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- -

10

...

45

13

58

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

44

44

Arm and Thorax ....................

44

44

Head.............

44

Back ...............

is

st

Crest of Ilium......................

Incised Wound, Neck ..........

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

- - - - - - - -

- - - - -

- -

* - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Contusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Gunshot Wound, Groin .....

- -

- - - - - - - - - - -

Concussion, Brain... .................


*

Tarsus ............

si

12

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- -

- -

* - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

44

| 119

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

* - - - - - - -

- -

- -

- -

44

4t

- -

i4

44

238

58

296

- - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -

Numbers carried forward. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CITY HOSPITAL.

45

TABLE OF ACCIDENTS.Concluded.

|Males.

NATURE of iN.j u ft Y.

Females. Total.

Numbers brought forward..............................

238

Incised Wound, Wrist ......................................

- - - - - -

..

- - - - - - - - - - - -

44

st

Foot .....

i4

st

Knee ...........

st

Face .......

- - - - - - - - -

- -

- - - - - -

- - - - - - - * *

- - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - -

- - -

* * * *

- - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Lacerated Wound of Hand ...............

- - - - -

* * * *

- - - - -

58

|| 296

44

Foot...................................

3.

{&

**

Groin.....

- - -

Face ... ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

i4

st

Knee .........

- - - - - - - - - - *

- - - - - - - -

Puncturel Wound, Abdomen... . . . . .


44

- -

- - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - -

- - - -

- - - - - - - - -

- - - - - -

- -

- - -

- -

44

Frost Bite .......

- - -

- - - -

- -

- - - - - - -

- -

- -

- - - - - - - -

Sprains... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- - - -

- - - - - - -

- - - - - -

- - - - - -

- -

204 || 84

328

Totals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.

1
- -

46

CITY HOSPITAL.

'

TABLE OF DEATHS, SURGICAL, FROM JANUARY 1st, 1867, TO


JANUARY 1ST, 1868.

Diseases, &c.

Abscess of Knee Joint......

Males. Females. Total.

- - - - -

- - - - -

- - - -

- - - - -

Burn.................................................. . . . . . .

Concussion of Spine...........
Contused Wound of Foot, (Pyaemia).........................
- -

44

of Leg,

Croup ..........

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - -

......................

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - -

44

(one)...........

st

Cystitis. . . . . . . . . . . .

- - - -

- - - * - - - - - -

Dislocation of Neck ..........

Epithelioma ............
Exhaustion . . . . . . . .

- - -

- - - -

- - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - -

- -

- - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

* - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - -

- -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - -

- - - - -

- - - - - -

- - - - - -

- - - -

skull, compound

- - - - - - - - - - - -

Spine ..........

- - - - - - - - -

Femur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

44

44

- -

1 || 1

.......

. . .. . . .

|. . . . . . .

. .. . .. .

|. . . . . . .

- - - - -

1
1. . . . . . .

1
1

- - -

. . . . . ...

- - -

... . ...

. ......

3.

Fracture Base Skull........................................


44

...||

Crushing Lower Extremities, (both) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


44

... |

1.

- -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. . . . . . .

. ......

... . ...

Compound ...........

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Tibia and Fibula, Compound............

- - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - -

- - -

and Commin., (Pyaemia, 6)

Arm, Compound and Comminuted, (Pyaemia).........

.......

44

44

44

Both Arms, Compound and Comminuted, (Pyaemia)...

.......

Scapula, Compound.................................

. .. . . . .

Nose

. . . . . ...

(Pyaemia)........................

Hip Disease...........................

- - - - - -

- -

...

- - - - - - - -

- - - -

Incised Wound of Hand (Pyaemia).....


of Foot (Pyaemia).......................

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

. ... .. .

- - - - -

I. . . . . . .

Necrosis Orbit..............................................

|.......

4t

Numbers carried forward. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- - - -

- - - -

- -

- - -

40

48

CITY

47

HOSPITAL.

TABLE OF DEATHS, SURGICAL.Concluded.


|
diseases.

Numbers brought forward......................


Necrosis Stump, (Pyaemia, 1)........

- - - - -

Wrist, (Pyaemia, 2). . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ovarian Tumor ................

- -

re-

Males.

- -

- - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - -

Punctured Wounds, Groin............

- - - -

- - - -

- -

- - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - -

- -

- -

- -

40,

2.

48

2.

-- - -

3.

- -- --

Total.

- - -

Scrofulous Disease Knee Joint, (Pyaemia)....................

1.

- -

1.

- - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

2.

---

1.

* *

1.

---

1.

- * - - - - - -

.....

Ulcer-Atheromata Aorta, (Pyaemia).........................

1.

1.

2.

Strangulated Hernia..........

- - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Stricture................................
Tetanus ........................

- - - - - - - - -

- - - -

- - - - - -

- - - - - - - - -

- * * *

Uterus, Fibrous Tumor .....................................


Diffuse Suppuration, (Pyaemia, 2)............................

Total....................

- - - -

- - -

- - - - - -

- - - - - - - - -

.. .....

2.
3.

1.

1.

5.

54

15.

69

--- - -

Among the deaths are included the cases of those taken up in the streets in convul
sions, or injured from accident on shipboard, railroads, or otherwise, and brought to the
Hospital by the Police, often in a dying condition.

All accidents thus brought in are received without reference to the probability of

cure. Whatever aid the circumstances demand, is administered. Otherwise, no pa


tients are received whose cases do not appear to admit of cure, or, at least, relief; and
these are referred to the admitting physician.
Died in accident-room, without treatment, soon after being brought in, 3

48

CITY

HOSPITAL.

REPORT OF SURGICAL OUT-PATIENTS.


Disease.

No.

Abscess............ * * * * * * *

Facial . . . . . .

- -

* * * * * * * *

- - - -

- - - - - -

Mammary.................

Palmar ...................

Parotid .........

- - - - -

- - - - -

Perinephritic.....

tg

Popliteal..................

of Scalp......

- - -

- - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - -

Adenitis...................

- - - -

Disease.

75

No.

Number brought forward......

534

Fracture of Clavicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

7
18

*4

Costal Cartilage . . . . . . . . .

*4

Humerus ..............

1
4

**

Femur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

44

Fibula. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

44

50

44

Fingers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Metacarpal . . . . . . . . . . . .

*4

Metatarsal .............

1
I

**

Jaw ...................

4-

Olecranon. . . . .

1.

16

44

Patella.................

44

Radius and Ulna. . . . . . ...


Radius ............ . . . .

9
37

(4

Rib ........... . . . . . . . . .

44

Toe ......

- - - - - - - - - - -

1
5

Bites ...... ......................


Burns ............................
Bursae ..................
Carbuncle ........................
Caries ........................... . .

10

Concussion of Spine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contraction from Burn.............

44

Ulna...................

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

241

*4

and Dislocation at Elbow

Corns ....................... . . . . .

*4

Old....................

14

Contusions..... * *

Curvature Spine, Angular...


.

44

ti

Frost Bite. . . . . . .
Furunculus . . . . . .

14

Lateral....

- -

2
- - -

- - - - - - - - - -

- - -

10

Ganglion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Haemorrhoids .....................

Dislocation Acromial end Clavicle ..

Harelip...........................

Costal Cartilage ........


Fingers . . . . .
...
Hip...............

Hernia...........

House-Maid's Knee................

Cyst of Testicle . . . . . . . . . . . .

Disease of Finger Nails.............


44

44
st

- - - -

- - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

4
24
2

Hydrocele ........... ..

- - -

- - -

- - -

of Cord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10
1

Radius and Ulna...

3
1

Hygroma .........................

44

Shoulder Joint. . . . . . . ...


Thumb ......
- - - - -

44

44

44

*4

Ulna............ ......

Ingrowing Toe-nail ................


Irritable Stump.......

Enchondroma .....................

Lupus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Epididymitis......................
Epistaxis.........................
Erysipelas . . . . . .

Malformations ....................
Mollities Ossium ...

3.
4

Morbus Coxarius. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21

- - -

Fissure of Soft Palate. . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Fistula in Ano ....................

Myalgia ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Naevus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Necrosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

29

10
3

Neurosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Arm . . . . . . . . . ... ..

898

- - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

(Esophageal.....
Foreign Body in Hand ........... ...
*

44

- - - - - - - - -

- - - - - -

- -

- -

- - - - - - -

*4

Eye...............

Odontalgia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Onychia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

{{

(Esophagus ... . . . .

Orchitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Number carried forward......

534

Nun.ber carried forward. . . . . 1181

49

CITY HOSPITAL.

REPORT OF SURGICAL OUT-PATIENTS.Continued.


Disease.

DiskAs E.

No.

Number brought forward...... 1181

No.

Number brought forward...... 1651


Tumors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10

Ostitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

Otalgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Cheloid .......... . . . . . . . . .

Otitis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Encysted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Otorrhoea. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Epithelial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ozana . . . . . .....................

Paralysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Paraphymosis ....................
Paronychia.......................

Fibro-Cellular . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fibrous....................

Glandular..................

44

Mammary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Periostitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14

Ovarian . . . . . . . . . . .

Phymosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Scirrhus ......... . . . . . . . . .

Prolapsus Ani ....................

Vascular.......

. ....

Uteri ...................

Ulceration of Colon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1
2

44

- - - - - - -

Knee ..........
Wrist .........

**

*4
44

Skin Disease .....................

- -

- - - -

Scrofulous Disease, Elbow . . . . . . . . .


**

- - - -

- - - -

Gms................

st

Ranula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1
85

Ulcers, chronic....................

varicose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Varix ............................
Venereal.........

64

21
19

- - - - - - -

105

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- *

- -

- - - - - -

Sinus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Warts . . . . . . .

Spermatorrhoea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Spina Bifida ......................
Sprains ... .......................

Wounds, Incised and Lacerated . . . . 208

Stomatitis.............

* * * * *

Synovitis, acute . . . . .

Gunshot..... . . . . . . . . . . . . .

240

Scalp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

* *

Wry-neck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Wen . . . . . . . . . . . .

- -

chronic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Referred to Medical Out-patients De


partment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Referred to Admitting Physicians... 113
Admitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

- -

* *

- - - -

Talipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tongue-tied.......................
Tonsillitis.........................

9
1
18

|
Number curried forward...... 1651 |
Average attendance, 79 per week.

** * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,823

Total during the year, 4,108.

50

CITY

HOSPITAL.

OPERATIONS UPON SURGICAL OUT-PATIENTS.


No.

Abscess. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - -

Palmar ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Parotid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mammary ...

44

- - - -- - - -- - - - - - - - -

* - - - - - - - - -

- -

- -

- * *

12

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - *

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - -

- - -

- -

1.
18
1
4

Carbuncle ............
Extraction of Bullet.........................
Dislocation of Shoulder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Furunculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
- - - - - -

- -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

1
6

- - - -

Harelip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Hydrocele ...
Ingrowing Toe-nail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lancing Gum..........
Naevus, Injection of . . . . . .
- - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - -

Necrosis...............

- - -

- - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - -

- -

- - - - -

- - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - -

Paraphymosis. . . . .
Phymosis . . . . . . .

- -

- -

- - - - -

- - - -

- -

- -

1
4

Ranula ........... **

2
30

* * * * * * * *

- - - - -

- - - - - -

* - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- -

- -

...... .

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - -

7
2

- - - - - - - - - - -

Needles in Hand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Onychia. . . . . .
Paronychia ........

3
1

- - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - -

- - -

2
4
1

- - - - - -

Removal Foreign Bodies...........................

Finger Nails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Toe-nails ..............

5
4
2

Scrofulous Glands............ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- - - - - * - - - - - -

Suppurating

- - - - - - -

...

Sinus ... . . . . . . . . . . . .

- -

- - - - - - -

Spina Bifida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Talipes .........

- -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Tonsils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

- - - - -

Tongue-tie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tumors, Epithelial . . . . . .
Encyst?d . . . . . . . . .

Cheloid...... ......
Fibrous...............

It will be noticed that the number of patients treated has


increased yearly since the Hospital was opened, and during the

1
4
2
1

CITY

HOSPITAL.

51

last season far in excess of other years; and we trust with a


success commendable to the medical faculty connected with the
Institution.

From the members of your Board I have continued to receive


much encouraging sympathy and support, for which I would
renew the expression of my thanks. From the medical staff,
the resident officers, and from many other persons who have

filled places of responsibility and trust, I have received cordial


and efficient co-operation.
-

Respectfully submitted,
L. A. CUTLER, Superintendent.

RULES OF ADMISSIONS AND DISCHARGES.

Applications for admission of patients shall be made at the

Hospital on each day of the week (Sunday excepted), between


9 and 11 o'clock, A.M.

Whenever able, the patient shall apply in person. When not


able to appear in person, application may be made by a friend,
and the patient shall be visited by one of the House Officers, or
by some Physician designated by the Trustees.

Any Trustee, or either of the Physicians or Surgeons in


attendance, may, in case of emergency, send a patient in the

first instance to the Hospital by written permit; and the Visi


ting Committee shall, on the certificate of one of the medical
officers designated for the purpose, decide as soon as may be
afterwards whether such patient shall remain.
Persons accidentally wounded, or otherwise disabled or
injured, shall be received at all hours.

Permits for admission shall be subject to the approval of the


Visiting Committee for the time being, or, in their absence, to

that of the Superintendent.


The Visiting Committee, however, shall have the power at

any time to require the Superintendent to report to them the


names of applicants before admitting them, and may dismiss
any patient whom they think improperly admitted.
Patients discharged on the recommendation of the Physicians
or Surgeons shall be provided with a certificate stating their
condition at the time of discharge, whether cured, relieved, or
not relieved, which certificate shall be signed by the Superinten
dent.

CITY

HOSPITAL.

53

Patients may be admitted by the Trustees to the privileges of


the Hospital, at such rates of board as they may from time to
time determine; such board being secured by their friends, or

by the authorities of the place to which they belong.


In all cases where, in the opinion of the Trustees, the circum

stances of the patient will warrant it, the whole or part of the
board shall be paid.

If separate apartments, or articles not

usually furnished at the Hospital, are provided, such payment


shall be made therefor as the Trustees shall deem reasonable.

HOU S E

RU LES .

PATIENTs must be in their proper places in the wards during


the visit of the Physicians and Surgeons, and always by 8 P.M.,

unless specially exempted by the Superintendent.


Those free patients who are able, are expected to assist in
nursing, and in such other services as may be reasonably re
quired of them.

Patients shall not leave the Hospital Grounds without a pass


from the Superintendent, nor their respective wards without the
consent of the nurse in attendance.
No patient shall purchase, or cause any member of the house
hold to purchase for him, any article of food whatsoever, nor any
other article, without the consent of the Superintendent. Nor
shall any officer or servant of the Hospital receive a gift or fee
from a patient.

Profane or obscene language, loud talking, and incivility are


prohibited.

No person shall be admitted to the Hospital whose case is


judged to be incurable, unless there be urgent symptoms which,
in the opinion of the Physician or Surgeon, are capable of being
relieved.

No patient having acute syphilitic disease, or mania-a-potu,


shall be admitted as a charity patient, or at a lower rate than
twenty-five dollars a week for the former, and fifteen dollars for
the latter.

~.

Patients may be visited by clergymen of their own selection;


and, where there is a wish for the performance of any particular
religious rite, it shall be indulged when practicable.
It is expected that patients will implicitly obey the rules of
, the Hospital. Complaints, for whatever cause, may be made to

CITY

HOSPITAL.

55

the Superintendent or Visiting Committee; and, when reason


able, shall be by them reported to the Trustees.
All employs must be in their respective places during their
hours of duty. The doors and gates of the hospital will be
closed at 9%, P. M., at which time all are expected to be quiet,
and those not on duty, in their own rooms.

The smoking of tobacco is prohibited within the Hospital;


also the use of wine and intoxicating liquors, unless prescribed

by a physician.
VISITORS.

No person shall visit any part of the premises, except on


business, or at such times as may be fixed for the reception of
visitors, without the permission of the Superintendent, or of
some one of the Trustees.

On Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday of each week,


from two to three o'clock, P. M., friends may be permitted to

visit patients, though no patient shall receive more than one


visitor on the same day. In all cases, however, the Trustees or
Superintendent may exercise discretionary powers as to exclud
ing or admitting visitors.

No visitor will be permitted to take any meal in the Hospital,


or pass the night therein, without permission from the Superin
tendent.

No visitor shall be allowed to give any article of food or


drink to a patient, unless by permission of the nurse; and any
article sent to the patients shall be left with the Superintendent.

NURSES.

Nurses ar required to be in their several wards each morn


ing, ready for duty, before the night watchers leave the same.
Nurses are to decide what clothing or other articles patients
are to retain in the ward.

56

CITY

HOSPITAL.

STUDENTS.

The Trustees may grant any practitioner or student of medi


cine of one year's standing, on the joint recommendation of the
Physician and Surgeon in attendance, a ticket of admission to
follow the practice of the Hospital for not more than one year.
Before receiving this ticket, the applicant shall sign an obli
gation to obey in all respects the By-laws and Regulations of
the Hospital. The privilege thus granted may be modified or
revoked.

No student shall be entitled to admission except at the regu


lar hours for visiting, operation, or lecture.
Every student, when requested, shall show his ticket to the
porter at the gate, and shall conduct himself with decorum and

propriety. It shall be the duty of the Superintendent to report


any infringement of the rules to the Visiting Committee.

FORM OF APPLICATION,

The form of application for admission shall be as follows:


B OST ON

CITY

HO SPITAL.

The undersigned, inhabitant of


and now residing at
Born

for the last

being

in

years of age, by employment a

, married, and ill

, requests to be admitted to the City Hospital.

of

Boston,

, 186 .

CERTIFICATE OF ADMITTING

PHYSICIAN.

Having examined the condition of the said applicant, I find


it a suitable case for admission to the City Hospital.
, M. D.

CITY

57

HOSPITAL.

TO BE SIGNED BY SUPERINTENDENT.

to the Hospital.
is assigned to ward

Admit
Said

Extra payment, $
Said

Transferred to ward

is discharged,

, bed
, bed
186 .

, Superintendent.

BE QUEST S.

Elisha Goodnow of Boston, by will dated July 12, 1849,


makes the City of Boston residuary legatee to his estate, real
and personal, for the benefit of a City Hospital. Provided,
that one-half of the proceeds shall be applied to the establish
ment and perpetual maintenance of free beds, under the control
of the government and officers of the said Hospital for the time
being.

The following sums of money have been received:


1862, June 9.

From executor's balance of

account at Probate Office

$623 85

1864, April 14. Proceeds of sale of estate on


Cross Street, containing 6,228 square feet
of land

$14,907 12

Old buildings upon same .


.
1864, December 31. From City of
Boston, for 225 square feet of
land

223 00

taken from above estate

to widen Cross Street

523 36

15,653 48

1864, July 1.
this date

Interest on same from City to


-

222 67
$16,500 00

1867, Nov. 30.

From Boston, Hart

ford and Erie R. R. for 5,167

square feet land taken by New

CITY

59

HOSPITAL.

York Central R. R. from estate

on Third Street, South Boston 1868, January 1. Proceeds of sale


balance of estate on Third Street,
South Boston, 1,516 square feet -

3,875 25

758 00

$21,133 25

1868, January 1. Of the above amount say $16,500 is in


vested in city scrip, dated July 1, 1864, twenty years, interest
semi-annually, at six per cent per annum, and deposited with
the City Auditor, who is required to receive the interest upon

the said scrip, and add the same to the moneys appropriated for
the use of the Hospital.
The balance on interest in the hands of the City Treasurer to
be invested as above, is $4,633.25.

1868, January.

The $10,000 deposited by the Executors of

Mr. Goodnow, June 22, 1852, with the Massachusetts Hospital

Life Insurance Company, the interest upon which is to be paid


to the widow, will, upon her decease, be distributed as follows:
$500 to the Penitent Females Refuge.

$5,000 to City of Boston; income to be expended for


the relief of sick and infirm persons.
$4,500 to be added to the fund heretofore provided for the
support of free beds in the City Hospital.
Lawrence Nichols of Boston, by will dated August 19, 1862,
and recorded Suffolk Registry of Wills, vol. 160, fol. 140,
bequeathed to the City of Boston, towards the support of a City
Hospital, the sum of one thousand dollars.
1863, April 29. The Executor of Mr. Nichols paid the City
Treasurer $1,000, less the United States tax
The City of Boston paid interest on same

$93.7 25
-

62 75

$1,000 00
* Plans, copy of the will, and other papers, are on file with the Secretary
Of the Board of Trustees.

60

CITY

HOSPITAL.

1864, July 1. The above amount, say $1,000, has been in


vested in City of Boston scrip, dated July 1, 1864, twenty years,
with six per cent interest, payable semi-annually, and deposited
with the City Auditor, as required by ordinance.
1865, March 14. Received as Residuary Legatee, from the
estate of Mr. Nichols, and now in the hands of the Treas
ul'er -

1868, January 1.

$530 50

The Trustees have received the sum of

two thousand dollars from Hon. Otis Norcross, as the founda

tion of a fund for the benefit of patients leaving the Hospital,


poor and destitute of proper clothing. The principal sum is to
be invested in a City of Boston interest-bearing note, to be
deposited with the City Auditor, the interest of which to be
collected annually or oftener, and paid over to the President of
the Board of Trustees, for the time being, of the City Hospital,

to be by him expended at his discretion for the benefit and


temporary assistance of those patients who are in his judgment

deserving, and who are destitute of proper clothing, in which to


leave the Hospital, and having no means of procuring it.

MEDICAL AND SURGICAL STAFF.

CONSULTING PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.

JoHN JEFFRIES, M. D.

S. D. TownsPND, M. D.
EDwARD REYNOLDs, M. D.

SILAS DURKEE, M. D.
JoHN HOMANs, M. D.

WINSLow LEWIS, M. D.

VISITING PHYSICIANS.

FITCH ED. OLIVER, M. D.

J. N. BoRLAND, M. D.
J. G. BLAKE, M. D.

J. BAxTER UPHAM, M. D.

JoHN P. REYNoLDs, M. D.

WM. W. MoRLAND, M. D.

VISITING SURGEONS.

C. E. BUCKINGHAM, M. D.
D. McB.THAxTER, JR., M. D.
CHARLEs D. HoMANs, M. D.

DAVID W. CHEEVER, M. D.
W. H. THORNDIKE, M. D.
GEORGE DERBY, M. D.

OPHTHALMIC SURGEON. HENRY W. WILLIAMS, M. D.


ADMITTING PHYSICIAN. H. F. DAMON, M. D.
PATHOLOGIST. CHARLEs W. SwAN, M. D.

PHYSICIAN TO OUT-PATIENTS. CHAs. W. Swan, M. D.


ASSISTANT PHYSICIAN TO OUT-PATIENTS,
M. F. GAVIN, M. D.
SURGEON TO OUT-PATIENTS. FRANCIS C. RoPEs, M. D.
HOUSE PHYSICIANS.
R. H.

Frtz.

W. E. BoARDMAN.

HOUSE SURGEONS.
GEORGE GAY.

G. F. JELLY.
L. D. GUNTER.

OPHTHALMIC EXTERNE M. F. GAVIN, M. D.

62

CITY

HOSPITAL.

TRUSTEES FOR 1863.

ALDERMEN THOMAS C. AMORY, JR., President.


OTIS NORCROSS.

CoUNCILMEN JOSEPH BUCKLEY,


LUCIUS A. CUTLER,

DAVID H. COOLIDGE, Secretary.


AT LARGE THEODORE METCALF, for three years.
SUMNER CROSBY, for two years.
WILLIAM R. LAWRENCE, for one year.

TRUSTEES FOR 1864.

ALDERMEN OTIS NORCROSS, President.


GEORGE W. WARREN.

CouncILMEN-WILLIAM CUMISTON,
JOHN T. BRADLEE,

DAVID H. COOLIDGE, Secretary.


AT LARGE WILLIAM R. LAWRENCE,
THEODORE METCALF,
SUMNER CROSBY.

TRUSTEES FOR 1865.

ALDERMEN N. C. NASII,
TIIOMAS GAFFIELD.

CouncILMEN SUMNER CROSBY,


M. W. RICHARDSON,

WALBRIDGE A. FIELD, Secretary.


AT LARGE JOHN T. BRADLEE,
OTIS NORCROSS, President.
THEODORE METCALF.

CITY

HOSPITAL.

TRUSTEES FOR 1866.

ALDERMEN N. C. NASH,
THOMAS GAFFIELD.

CoUNCILMEN WALBRIDGE A. FIELD, Secretary,


M. W. RICHARDSON,
MATTHIAS RICH.

AT LARGE THEODORE METCALF,


JOHN T. BRADLEE,
OTIS NORCROSS, President.

TRUSTEES FOR 1867.


ALDERMAN NEWTON TALBOT.

CouncILMENWALBRIDGE A. FIELD, Secretary.


CHARLES H. ALLEN.

AT LARGE NATHL. C. NASH,


JOEL RICHARDS,
THEODORE METCALF,
JONAS BALL,
DAVID H. COOLIDGE,
JOHN T. BRADLEE, President.

LUCIUS A. CUTLER, Superintendent.

63

City Document. No. 4.

CITY

OF

BOSTON.

:= #

&$:
BostoRIA
:
TAM p:%
*oe

AUDITOR'S MONTHLY EXHIBIT,


JANUARY 6, 1868.

CITY

OF

B O ST ON .

GENERAL AND SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS


FOR 1867-68.
MONTHLY

EXHIBIT.

OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR of AccoUNTs, CITY HALL,


January 6, 1868.
To the Hinorable City Council :
Gentlemen, The undersigned, in compliance with the 3d
Section of the Ordinance on Finance, herewith presents an Exhibit
of the General and Special Appropriations for the present finan
cial year of 186768, as shown in the books in his office,
January 1, 1868, including the January Draft, being nine
months' payments of the financial year, exhibiting the original
appropriations, the amount expended and the balances of each
unexpended at that date. Under the head Expended is in
cluded $947,200 debt paid off.

Respectfully submitted,

ALFRED T. TURNER,
Auditor of Accounts.

GENEE.A.T.,

A.EPEPEOEPEIATIONS.
|

Amount of each

OBJECT of APPROPRIATIONs.

Appropriation.

Adams School House


.

$11,659 27

4,000 00
1,200 00

2,426 12
740 00

460 00

72,000 00
16,000 00

47,332 89
9,567 77

24,667 11
6,432 23

1.506 95

493 05
6.324 74

Albany Street Bridge


Armories
Bells and Clocks
Boston Harbor

2,000 00

9,300 00
14,000 00

Bridges.
Cemeteries

7,700 00

City Debt
City Hospital

$400,000 00

Common, etc.

91,000 00
*54,050 00

County of Suffolk.
Engineer's Department.
External Health Department.

225,000 00

20,000 00

Fire Alarms .

Fire Department .
Harbor Dredging .

b-partment

Internal
Interest and Premium

7,500
19,500
159,500
*21,763
232,400
930,000
75,000

Incidental Expenses
Lamps .

250,500

Markets

Meridian Street Bridge.


Militia Bounty
Mount Hope Cemetery .
Add Revenue

siojosa:

New Lunatic Hospital .


Old Claims .
Overseers of the Poor
-

Paving, etc. .
Police

Public Bathing
Public

Buildings

2,975
11,359
5,479
947,200

2,640 56
2,220 47

66,541 55

24,458 45

45,420 84

8,629 16

164,756 19
15,771 88

60,243 81

3,859 27
16,432 69
118,018 14

00

184,986 21
317,003 31
60,466 80

00

00
00

$340 73
1,573 88

26
44
53
00

00
00
00
48

8,200 00
*38,002 50
30,000 00

Bal. Unexpended.

$12,000 00

Advertising .
Annuities

Expended.

10,825 58

157,017 33

4,228
3,640
3,067
41,481
10,937

12
73
31
86
90

47,413 79

612,996
14,533
93,482
2,607

69
20
67
84

5,592 16
37,721 93
280 57
40,432 00810,432.00 adv. by Tr.

14,673 14,

23,099 61|

2,276 75

*114,428 03

4,159 12

110,268 91

1,500 00
50,300 00

262 03
20.000 00

30,300 00

250,000
473,835
25,000
63,000

00
00
00
00

229,610 26
321,318 67|

115,000
78,000
55,000
13,000

00
00
00
00

93,269 29
52,399 07

12,000 00

5,760 30

6,000 00

4, 149 69

22.513 47

53,008 74

1,237 97
20.389 74

152,516 33
2,486 53
9,991 26

Public Institutions, viz:

House of Industry
House of Correction .

Lunatic IIospital
Steamboat Henry Morrison.
Pauper Expenses
General Expenses at City Office.
-

Carried forward

40,960 25
8,726 21

21,730
25,600
14,039
4,273
6,239
1,850

71
93
75
79
70
31

$3,972,352 15 $3,164,329 8251,376,357 55

*To these appropriations have been added the balances brought from 1866-67.
tExcess of $547,200.00 taken from the Debt Sinking Fund.

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 4.

Amount of each
Appropriation.

OBJECT of APPROPRIAtions.

Expended.

Bal. Unexpended.

$3,972,352 15 $3,164,329 8251,376,357 55

Brought forward .

*18,102 00
*43,258 11
30,000 00

Public Lands

Public Library.
Printing and Stationery
Reserved Fund .
Salaries

8,210 98
40,740 15
13,210 29
52,950 00
78,494.15

#219,950 00
-

100,000 00

9,891 02
2,517 96
16,789 71

167,000 00
21,505 85

Schools and School Houses, viz:

High and Grammar School Instructors


Grammar Schools, Public Buildings,

368,700 00

265,963 21
79,590 09

102,736 79

84,000 00

Grammar Schools, School Committee,

35,900 00

19.482 42

16,41758.

8,758.33
126,757 36
00
57,279 33
00
11,988 23
00
5,058 53
00
39,155 16
00 1,694,150 00
00
3,684 43
00
106,956 08
00
103,790 00
16,
199,514 63

Salaries Officers School Committee

12,500 00

Primary School Instructors .


Primary Schools, Public Buildings,
Primary Schools, School Committee,
Sealers of Weights and Measures

174,750 00

Sewers and Drains


State Tax.

74,250
*13,000

6,800

50,000

1,700,000
10,000
179,000

War Expenses .
Water Works .

550,000

Water Works, Interest and Premium,


Widening Streets
-

*227,261

4.409 91
3,741
47,992
16,970
1,011
1,741
10,844

67
64
67
77
47
84

5,850 00
6,315 57
72.043 92
446.210 00

27,746 53

$7,869,823.4286,080,063 1982,358,095 45
10,703 22

Add Revenue received since May 1,


Advanced by Treasurer
From Debt Sinking Fund

10,432 00

547,200 00

Total

$8,438,158 64

Total appropriations made by the City Council for 180708


Total balances from 186667

$7,742,435 00
127,388 42

$7,869,823 42

Total appropriations and balances

*To these appropriations have been added the balances brought from 186667.
f The following amounts have been transferred from the Reserved Fund to the following general
appropriations, viz:
Meridian Street Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,800 00
Common, etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4,000 00

Public Bathing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5,000 00

Public Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4,000 00

Primary Schools, Public Buildings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,250 00


Public Buildings . . . . . .
Public Lands . . . . . . . . . . . .
-

* *

5,000 00

6,000 00

$30,050 00

AUDITOR's MoNTHLY EXHIBIT.


SPECIAL

APPROPRIATIONS.

[Under this head the appropriations in some instances are only the balances
brought from last financial year, and in others, balances and additions made to
them the present financial year.]
Loan, Revenue,

Object of Appropriations.

Expended.

or from

Unexpended.

Reserved Fund.

Albany Street Damages (loan).


Albany Street Grading (loan).
Albany Street South of Dover Street
(from Dedham Street Grading)
Apple Island (reserved fund)
Back Bay and Surface Drainage (reve
*

nue)

36,896 36'
7,000 00
3,750 00

43,232 15

20,298 73

$7.260 04
16,597 63

Central Charity Bureau (revenue and


loans)
*
*
Chestnut Hill Driveway (loan)
Chestnut Hill Reservoir (loans)
City Hospital Lodge (reserved fund)
'' Grading (loan)
Dover Street (loans)
Engine House No. 1 and Ward Room
Ward 12 (loans).
-

$26,527 74 $19,267 70

7,000 00
3,750 00
43,232 15
-

125,410 90.
9,091 82.
111,305 59' 45,156 37
535,116 $ 360,807 94,

116.319 08
66,149
174,308
3,105
2,287
2,479

22
44
00
89
11

17,200 00

14,095 00

18,17467
4,704 11,

15,886 78
2,225 00

38,000 00

29,264 57

8,735 43

14,000 00

13,500 00

500 00

75,000 00

50,288

Grammar School House, East Boston

(reserved fund) .
Grammar School House W. 7 (loans)
Hose House No. 1 (loans)
Oliver Street (revenue) .
Primary School House, Thacher Street
(reserved fund) .
People's Ferry Drops (loan and re
served fund)
School House, Richmond Street (loan)
Soldiers Relief (revenue)

Soldiers and

24,711 54
20,000 00 11,952 68.
8,047 32
26,472 20 132,646 978108,174.77 adv.by Tr
4,000 00

3,612 16

387 84

23,991 55
17,785 43
211,592 40,

21,473 76
17,762 42
74,031 79

2,517 79

27,453 52
106,000 00.
7,000 00

3,779 55
23,673 97
45,406 04
60,593 96
7,008 97|38.97 to be prov'd for.

23 01

137,560 61

Sailors Monument on

Boston Common (bal. appropriation)


Wells School House (loans) .
West City Stables (reserved fund)
-

$1,500,613 00$901,306 71
Advanced by Treasurer

106,174 77|Less

to be

$705,490 03
8 97

prov'd for
$1,606,787 77|$901,306 71

$705,481 06

RECAPITULATION.

"
General

Special

Expended.

Unexpended.

$8,438,158 64 $6,080,063 19 $2,358,095.45


1,606,787 77

901,306 71

705,481 06

$10,044,946 41 $6,981,369 90 $3,063,576 51

City Document. No. 5.

CITY OF BOST ON.

R U L ES AND

OR DERS

FoR THE

GOVERNMENT OF THE CITY COUNCIL


E"OE, 1868.

CITY

OF

B O S TO N.

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 13, 1868.


The Joint Special Committee appointed to prepare Joint
Rules and Orders for the Government of the City Council during
the present municipal year, have attended to that duty, and
would respectfully recommend the adoption of the accompanying
Rules and Orders.

BENJAMIN JAMES,
JOSEPH F. PAUL,
BENJAMIN F. STEVENS,
LEWIS RICE,

JAMES J. FLYNN,
Committee.

CITY

OF

B O S T ON .

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 13, 1868.


ORDERED: That the following Rules and Orders be adopted
for the Government of the City Council during the present
municipal year:
SECTION 1. At the commencement of the Municipal Year,
the following Joint Standing Committees shall be constituted, viz:
A Committee on Finance, to consist of seven members of the

Common Council, to be chosen by ballot; and the Mayor, and


the Chairman of the Board of Aldermen, ex officiis.

A Committee on Accounts, to consist of three Aldermen, and


five members of the Common Council, all to be chosen by
ballot.

And the following Committees shall be appointed, viz:


A Committee on Public Lands, to consist of three Aldermen
and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Public Buildings, to consist of three Alder


men and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Public Instruction, to consist of three Alder

men, and the President and four members of the Common


Council.

A Committee on Institutions at South Boston and Deer Island,


to consist of three Aldermen and five members of the Common
Council.

A Committee on the Assessors Department, to consist of three


Aldermen and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on the City Hospital, to consist of two Alder


men and three members of the Common Council.

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 5.

A Committee on Fuel, to consist of two Aldermen and three


members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Water, to consist of three Aldermen and five


members of the Common Council.

A Committee on the Treasury Department, to consist of two


Aldermen and three members of the Common Council.

A Committee on the City Engineer's Department, to consist


of two Aldermen and three members of the Common Council.

A Committee on the Harbor, to consist of two Aldermen and


three members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Printing, to consist of one Alderman and


two members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Public Library, to consist of three Aldermen


and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on the Overseers of the Poor and the Temporary


Home, to consist of two Aldermen and three members of the
Common Council.

A Committee on Ordinances, to consist of three Aldermen


and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Fire Alarms, to consist of two Aldermen


and three members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Public Baths, to consist of three Aldermen


and five members of the Common Council.

A Committee on Claims, to consist of three Aldermen and


five members of the Common Council, who shall have full power
and authority to investigate all claims against the city, and to

take any measures for the defence of such claims that they may
deem expedient; and also, under the advice of the Mayor, to
adjust and settle all claims not exceeding the sum of $500.
The members of the Board of Aldermen and of the Common

Council, who shall constitute the Joint Standing Committees


shall be chosen or appointed by their respective boards.
The Mayor, the President of the Common Council, and the
Chairman of the Committee on Finance, on the part of the

RULES

AND

ORDERS.

Common Council, shall, according to the ordinance, constitute


the Committee on the Reduction of the City Debt.
The member of the Board of Aldermen first named on every

Joint Committee, of which the Mayor is not a member, shall be


its Chairman; and, in case of his resignation or inability, the
other members of the same Board in the order in which they
are named, and after them the member of the Common Council
first in order, shall call meetings of the Committee, and act as
Chairman.

SECT. 2.

In every case of disagreement between the two

branches of the City Council, if either Board shall request a


conference, and appoint a Committee of Conference, and the

other Board shall also appoint a Committee to confer, such


Committees shall, at a convenient hour, to be agreed upon by
their Chairmen, meet and state to each other, verbally or in
writing, as either shall choose, the reasons of their respective
Boards for and against the matter in controversy, confer freely
thereon, and report to their respective branches.

SECT. 3. When either Board shall not concur in any action


of the other, notice of such non-concurrence shall be given by
written message.

SECT. 4.

Either Board may propose to the other, for its con

currence, a time to which both Boards shall adjourn.

SECT. 5.

All By-Laws passed by the City Council shall be

termed Ordinances, and the enacting style shall be: Be it

ordained by the Aldermen and Common Council of the City of


Boston in City Council assembled.
SECT. 6. In all votes, when either or both branches of the
City Council express anything by way of command, the form of
expression shall be Ordered; and whenever either or both
branches express opinions, principles, facts or purposes the form
shall be Resolved.

SECT. 7. In the present and every future financial year, the


specific appropriations for the several objects enumerated in the

CITY DOCUMENT. - No. 5.

general appropriation bill shall be deemed and taken to be the


maximum amount to be expended, by the several Committees
having the charge thereof, for the entire financial year, and
shall be expended with a proper regard thereto; and, after the
annual order of appropriations shall have been passed, no sub
sequent expenditures shall be authorized for any object, unless
provision for the same shall be made by special transfer from
some of the appropriations contained in such annual order, or by
expressly creating therefor a city debt, in either of which cases
the order shall not be passed unless two-thirds of the whole
number of each branch of the City Council shall vote in the
affirmative, by vote taken by yea and nay.
And any Joint Standing or Special Committees may expend
from the appropriations provided by the City Council an
amount not exceeding two hundred dollars.

SECT. 8. In all contracts or expenditures to be made under


the authority of the City Council, whenever the estimates shall
exceed the appropriations specially made therefor, or whenever
any Committee shall have expended the sum specially appro
priated for its use in the order of appropriation for the year,
and in either case shall require a further sum, it shall be the
duty of such committee, having such matter in charge, to submit

the fact to the City Council for instructions, accompanied with


a detailed statement, in print, of the cause or causes which have
created the necessity for such application, and the object for
which the same is needed.

And no contract shall be made or

expenditure authorized in either case, unless by a specific vote


of the City Council, first making the necessary provision for the
payment resulting therefrom; and no debt shall be created, or
transfer from one special appropriation to another be made,
until such report or statement shall have been submitted to the
City Council, by the Committee requiring the same.
SECT. 9.

Joint Standing Committees shall cause records to

be kept of their proceedings in books provided by the city for

RULES

AND

ORDERS.

that purpose. The Committee from neither branch of the City


Council shall act by separate consultations; and no report shall
be received unless agreed to in committee actually assembled.
SECT. 10. It shall be the duty of every Joint Committee, to
whom any subject may be specially referred, to report thereon
within four weeks, or to ask for further time.

SECT. 11.

All reports and other papers submitted to the

City Council shall be written in a fair hand, and no report or

indorsement of any kind shall be made on the reports, memori


als or other papers referred to the Committee of either branch.
All reports shall be signed by the writers thereof, unless other
wise directed by the Committee; and the Clerk of Committees
shall make copies of any papers to be reported by Committees,
at the request of the respective Chairmen thereof.
SECT. 12.

No Chairman of any Committee shall audit or

approve any bill or account against the city for any supplies or
services which shall not have been ordered or authorized by the

Committee, nor shall he approve for payment any bill or account,


except by vote of the Committee.
SECT. 13. No bills shall be approved by the Committee on
Accounts for refreshments or carriage hire furnished to any

member of the City Government, unless said bills are approved


by the Chairman of a Standing or Special Committee of the City
Council, or either branch thereof, duly authorized by vote of such
Committee; in which cases, said bills shall be paid from the

appropriation to which they are incident: and the Committee on


Accounts shall not pass any bill, unless it is approved, as pro
vided in this and the preceding section.
SECT. 14. All bills for refreshments or carriage hire, incurred

more than three months previous to the date of their presenta


tion, shall go before the City Council for approval.

City Document.No. 6.

CITY

OF BOSTON.

A N NUAL

REPORT

of The

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS.


1868.

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 13, 1868.


Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed.
Attest:

S. F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

CITY

OF

B O ST ON .

OFFICE of THE SUPERINTENDENT of PUBLIC BUILDINGs,

CITY HALL, January 1868.


To THE HONORABLE CITY COUNCIL.

GENTLEMEN:The fifteenth section of the ordinance relating

to Public Buildings requires the Superintendent of the same to


render, in the month of January of each year, a statement of the
number of buildings under his charge, the condition of the same,
and the amount of expenditures thereon. In conformity with
these requirements, I have the honor to submit the following
REPORT.

The expenditures for repairs, alterations and improvements


of Public Buildings, so-called, include all the buildings belong
ing to or hired by the city, (excepting the school-houses and
County Buildings,) used for the accommodation of the City Gov
ernment.

The amount expended on this class of buildings dur

ing the past year has been $50,235.04, as follows:


Rents of buildings hired for the use of the several
departments
Fuel

Cart and cleaning

$1,057 50
3,267 22
5,240 04

Alterations, repairs, supplies, water, gas and furni


ture .

40,670 28
$50,235 04
-

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 6.

Of this amount $5,298.23 was expended on Police Stations;


and $11,647.26 on Engine, Hose and Hook and Ladder Houses.
COUNTY BUILDINGS.

There has been expended on County Buildings, $14,122.22,


as follows:

For care, supplies, repairs and furniture

Fuel

$11,298.49
2,823.73
$14,122.22

GRAMMAR

SCHOOLS.

The expenditures on these houses for the past year, have been
$93,451.19, of which amount, there was expended for
Fuel

Rents

Care and cleaning

Repairs and stipplies

$20,224.17

|-

1,698.50

15,035.47
56,493.05

$93,451.19

Of this amount, $9,000 was expended by order of the City


Council, in rebuilding the exterior walls of the Lawrence school
house, and $5,500, in fitting up and repairing the Rice (formerly
the Old Franklin) school-house, which has been re-occupied.
PRIMARY SCHOOLS.

The expenditures on these buildings during the past year


have been $62,325.84, as follows:"
Fuel
Rents

Care and cleaning

Repairs and supplies

$14,584.89
2,593.75
11,951.02
33,196.18
$62,325.84

PUBLIC

BUILDINGS.

EXTRAORDINARY

EXPENSES.

The extraordinary expenses of this department are those for


the erection of new, and alteration of old buildings, for which
appropriations are made by order of the City Council.
The following is a list of the buildings in progress of erection.
A Grammar school-house in Ward 7, containing twelve school
rooms 30 x 32 feet each, and a hall 50 x 80 feet. Heated by
Gold's Steam Radiating Apparatus. Will be ready for occu
pancy about March 1st.

Cost, $75,000.

Two lots of land, contiguous to the Wells school-house, have


been purchased at a cost of $30,500, the old school-house
removed, and contracts made for the erection of a new building

which will be ready for occupancy about Sept. 1st.

It is to con

tain twelve school-rooms 32 X 28 feet each, and a hall 50 X 81


feet, and will cost $75,000.
The School Committee having voted to establish a Grammar
school in the Old Franklin building, the building has been

fitted up at an expense of $5,500. It is now known as the Rice


Grammar School.

The old house on the estate purchased in 1864, adjoining the


Mayhew school lot, has been removed and the land added to the
school yard.
Land has been purchased on corner of Paris and Decater
streets, East Boston, for a Grammar school-house.
The mastic with which the exterior walls of the Lawrence

school-house was covered having become detached, and by con

tinual dropping endangering the children as well as passers-by,


the Committee were authorized to remove said mastic and

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 6.

rebuild the walls with face brick, which has been done at a cost
of $9,000.

An estate adjoining the Thacher Street Primary school-house


has been purchased at a cost of $3,606, the old buildings removed,
and the land added to the school yard.
Hose House No. 1, on Salem Street, having proved too small
for the requirements of the department, two estates opposite
the present house were purchased at a cost of $4,300, and con
tracts made for the building of a new house, containing the

latest improvements. It will be finished about March 1st, and


cost obout $20,000, including land.
A brick building is being erected in Ward 12, containing a
house for Steam Fire Engine No. One, a ward room for Ward

12, an armory for Co. E, First Regiment, and a school-room.


The building will be finished about April 1st, and cost, including
land, about $38,000.

Steam Fire Engine House No. 3, not being large enough to


accommodate the new engine, has been enlarged, a bath room

put in, and a hose tower built, the whole costing about $4,500.
Steam Fire Engine House No. 5, has been enlarged for the
reception of the new engine, a bath room put in, a hose tower
and a stable built, the whole costing about $5,000.
Hose House No. 10 is being rebuilt at a cost of about $5,000.

A bath room has been put in, and a hose tower and stable
built at Hose House No. 6.

A bath room has been put in Hose House No. 5.


A part of the West City Stables, destroyed by fire, has been

PUBLIC

BUILDINGS.

rebuilt, together with an addition, containing a dwelling for the


feeder, the whole costing about $7,000.
Contracts have been made for the erection of a building for a

Central Charity Bureau and Temporary Home on the lot of


land purchased in 1865, situated on the corner of Hawkins and
Chardon streets. The building will be finished next October,
and will cost, including furniture, about $125,000.

The following list will show the number and location of the
buildings belonging to the city which are under the charge of
this department.
In addition to these, there are nineteen rooms and buildings
hired for school accommodation in various parts of the city at
an annual rental of $2,598.75.

All of which is respectfully submitted,


JAMES C. TUCKER,

Supt. of Public Buildings.

CITY DocuMENT. - No. 6.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

'ity Hall, lot on School Street and Court Square, containing


in all 26,427 feet. The old buildings covered 6,010 feet; the
new building covers 13,927 feet. Total cost of new building,
including furniture for same, $505,192.42.
-

City Building, corner Court Square and Williams Court,


covering about 2,035 feet of land. This building is occupied
by the Second Police Station.

Public Library, building and lot on Boylston Street. The lot


is 107 feet on Boylston Street, extending to Van Rensselaer
Place, which opens at 215 Tremont Street. Whole contents of
lot, 23,384 feet. Cost of land and building, $367,000.
City Hospital Buildings. These buildings are located on the
square bounded by Harrison Avenue, Concord, Springfield and
Albany streets, containing 292,633 feet, or about 6.1', acres.
The wharf lot on Albany Street, in the rear of the Hospital
grounds, is used by the Trustees. Total cost of buildings,
grading of grounds, and furniture, exclusive of the land,
$408,844.34.

Old Hancock School-house, on Hanover Street, containing


about 4,890 feet, affording accommodations for Police Station

No. 1, and three Primary Schools.


Old Endicott School-house, Cooper Street, 4,742 feet, now

occupied as an Armory for the First Light Battery, and by three


Primary Schools.

Lying-in Hospital. The land, and buildings thereon, situated


on Worcester and Springfield streets, were purchased of the
Boston Lying-in Hospital Corporation in 1858, for $45,000;

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

resold to the New England Female Medical Society in 1859,


for $50,000; and reverted to the city in October 1861. The
lot contains 40,000 square feet; the building is now occupied
by invalid soldiers, and is known as the Discharged Soldiers'
Home.

Faneuil Hall, and Market underneath, covering about 8,250


feet. Rents, $16,188 per annum.
Faneuil Hall Market-house, and Quincy Hall over the same,
covers 27,012 feet of land.

Rents for $52,293.90.

Old State House, containing about 4,448 feet, leased for ten
years, from July 1, 1866, for $21,000 per annum.
Bridge Estate, so called, containing about 1,228 feet. This is
a wooden building at the junction of Tremont Row and Court
Street, being one of the estates purchased in 184748 for the
purpose of widening those streets. Rents for $1,100 per annum.
South City Stables, Shops and Sheds, situated on Albany Street,
on the South Bay territory, opposite Sharon Street. The lot be
longed to the city, and contains 92,911 feet. The stable and
buildings connected therewith are of brick. The stable is two
stories high, with French roof, and has accommodations for one
hundred horses.

Total cost, exclusive of land, $79,089.23.

Connected with the stable, are blacksmith's, wheelwright's and


harnessmaker's shops, with all the necessary tools, in which all
the wagons, carts, harnesses, etc., used by the Department of In
ternal Health, are constructed and kept in repair.
Offal Depot. Erected in 1864, on the wharf fronting on Al
bany Street, on the opposite side of the dock used by the Paving
Department. The lot which the building occupies, and the yard
attached to the same, contains 32,780 feet, and belonged to the
city. The building cost $18,578.89. The building is used for
2

10

CITY DocuMENT. - No. 6.

the deposit of house offal collected in the city carts, and is thence
conveyed from without the limits of the city by the contractor
for the removal of the same.

West Stable, North Grove Street. This is a brick building,


one and a half stories high, 128 x 50 feet, built in 1861. It has
accommodations for thirty-eight horses, with all the requisite
out-buildings and conveniences. The lot occupies about 47,500
feet.

Foundry Building, on North Grove, Vine and Fruit streets,


used for breaking stone for macadamizing, and for storing tools
and materials. This building is under a lease which came into
the possession of the city through the purchase of the Attleboro'
Bank property, upon which the city stable stands, on the oppo
site side of North Grove Street.
COUNTY

BUILDINGS.

Court House, on Court Street.

The area within the Court

House fence measures 15,185 square feet.

Registry of Deeds and Probate Office, in Court Square, cover


ing about 2,380 square feet.
Stone Jail, on Charles and Fruit streets, containing within its
enclosure 134,250 square feet.

House of Reception, North Grove Street, on the Jail lot; in


tended for the reception of dead bodies, subjects for coroners'
inquests, etc.
STATION-HOUSES.

No. 1. In old Hancock School building, Hanover Street,


two first floors and basement, 4,890 feet.

No. 2. City Building, Court Square, 2,035 feet.


3. Brick House, Joy Street, 4,234 feet.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

11

No. 4. Brick House, built in 1865, in La Grange Place,


lot 5,040 feet.
No. 5. Brick House on East Dedham Street, 3,372 feet.

6. Brick House, Broadway, S. Boston, 2,850 feet.


7. Brick House on Meridian Street, East Boston, 3,775
feet.

No. 8. Brick House on Commercial Street, 3,236 feet.

ENGINE

HOUSES.

No. 1. Broadway, near Dorchester Street, South Boston.


2. Fourth, near K Street, South Boston.
3. Washington, near Dover Street.

4. Court Street.

5. Marion Street, East Boston.

6. Wall Street.

7. Purchase Street.

8. North Bennet Street.

9. Paris Street, East Boston.


10. River, foot of Mt. Vernon Street.
11. Sumner Street, East Boston.

HOSE

HOUSES.

No. 1. Salem Street.

2. Hudson Street.

3. Fruit Street.

. 4.Northampton Street.

5. Shawmut Avenue.

6. Chelsea Street.

8. Warren Street.

9.B Street, South Boston.

10.Washington Village.

12

CITY DOCUMENT. - No. 6.

HOOK AND LADDER

HOUSES.

No. 1. Friend Street. .


2. Orleans Street.
3. Harrison Avenue.

Armory, on Wareham Street.

Erected in 1867.

Occupied by the Second Light Battery.


POUNDS.

One on Albany Street, South Bay land.


One on Bennington Street, East Boston.
One on First Street, South Boston.
PEOPLE'S FERRY PROPERTY.

This property was taken possession of by the Committee on


Public Buildings, June 6, 1864, and cost the city $125,000.
The property consists of 17,360 square feet of the avenue, 10
511 square feet of solid wharf inside the gates, and 31,531
square feet of water lot between the sea-wall and Commissioners'
Line, making a total on the Boston side of 59,402 square feet.
On the East Boston side of the ferry, there is 80,600 square
feet of the avenue, solid wharf and water lot, originally taken
by the People's Ferry Company from the Maverick Wharf Com
pany under and by virtue of their charter, and conveyed to the
City by deed from the said Wharf Company, Feb. 24, 1859:
the drop, tank, and all the buildings, and other improvements,
situated on or attached to said property. The ferry has not
been in operation since Dec. 1, 1863.
The slips and drops have been rebuilt; the buildings put in
complete repair; the dock on the East Boston side widened;
the slips dredged out ; a new fence built on the East Boston
avenue, and now everything is ready for running the boats as
soon as the city gets satisfactory titles to the property.

The

expense of putting the slips and landings in repair has been


about $42,000.

PUBLIC

13

BUILDINGS.

HIGH AND GRAMMAR SCHOOL-HOUSES.

Latin and English High, on Bedford Street, built in 1844;


an additional story added in 1863. Lot contains 12,980 feet.
Normal, for Girls, on Mason Street, built in 1848, with large
additions and alterations in 18612. Lot 12,771 feet.

Normal Training, on the corner of Allston and Somerset


streets.

Lot, 5,488 feet, exclusive of stable lot, which contains

812 feet.

The stable is rented for $250 per annum.

Adams, at East Boston, on Sumner and Lamson streets; built

in 1856. Lot 14,100 feet. In September 1866, 7,500 feet of


land was purchased to enlarge the yard of this house, for which
$2,450 was paid. There is an engine house, which is not used,
on the lot.

Boylston, Fort Hill, built in 1818; rebuilt in 18523.

Lot

8,204 feet.

Bowdoin, Myrtle Street, built in 1848.

Lot 4,892 feet.

Brimmer, Common Street, built in 1843.

Lot 11,097 feet.

Bigelow, Fourth Street, South Boston; built in 184950.


Lot 12,660 feet.

Bowditch, South Street, built in 186162.

Lot 12,006 feet.

Chapman, Eutaw Street, East Boston; built in 184950. Lot


13,040 feet.

Dwight, Springfield Street; built in 1857.

Lot 19,125 feet.

Eliot, North Bennet Street; built in 1838; rebuilt and lot


enlarged 185960.

Lot 11,077 feet.

14

CITY DOCUMENT. - No. 6.

Everett, Camden and Northampton streets; on a city lot run


ning from street to street. Lot 32,409.

New Franklin, Ringgold Street, corner Hanson; built in 1859.


Lot 16,439 feet.

Phillips, new, corner of Anderson and Phillips streets; built


in 18612.

Lot 11,190 feet.

Prescott, on Prescott, Saratoga and Bennington streets, East


Boston; built in 1865.

Lot 39,952 feet.

Hancock, on Richmond and Prince streets; built in 1847.


Lot 13,468 feet.

Hancock Branch, on Richmond Street; built in 1867.

Lot

12,400 feet.

Lyman, Meridian Street, East Boston; built in 1846.

Lot

13,616 feet.

Lincoln, Broadway, near K Street, South Boston; built in


1859.

Lot 17,560 feet.

Lawrence, corner of B and Third streets, South Boston; built


in 1856. Lot 14,343 feet.

Mayhew, Hawkins Street; built in 1847.

Lot 9,625 feet.

Quincy, Tyler Street; built in 1847; destroyed by fire in

March 1859; rebuilt in 185960. Lot 11,766 feet.


Rice, formerly Old Franklin, Washington Street; rebuilt in
1845. Lot 15,073 feet.
this building.

Wells, Blossom Street.

The ward room for Ward 10 is in

Rebuilding.

Lot 17,657 feet.

15

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

Winthrop, Tremont Street; built in 18545.

Lot 15,078

feet.

Lot on Ferdinand Street, purchased in 1865 for a Grammar


school-house, containing 25,691 feet.

Cost $32,171.

Total number of feet of land occupied by High, Latin,


Normal and Grammar school-houses 411,207. The cost of
these houses and the land has been about $2,216,705.51.
PRIMARY SCHOOL-HOUSES.

Armstrong, Belcher's Lane; built in 1840.

Lot 1,639 feet;

tWO rooms.

Andrews, Genesee Street; built in 1848.

Lot about 5,418

feet; three rooms.

Austin, Paris Street; East Boston; built in 1849.

Lot 7,294

feet; six rooms.


Baldwin, Grant Street; built in 1864.

Lot 6,139 feet.

Bailey, Newbern Place, leading from Carver Street; built in


1840.

Lot 1,669 feet; three rooms.

Channing, Cove Street; built in 1866. Lot 9,000 feet; nine


roomS.

Cook, Groton Street; built in 1852.

Lot 4,567 feet; six

roomS.

Cheever, Thacher Street; built in 1846.

Lot 3,388 feet; three

TOOInS.

Cooper Street; built in 1840. Lot 4,743 feet; four rooms.


Dwight, Rutland Street; built in 1851. Lot 7,830 feet;
six rooms.

16

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 6.

Dean, Wall Street; built in 1853.

Lot 3,645 feet; six

TOODns.

Dawes, High Street place; built in 1860.

Lot 3,940 feet;

six rooms.

Emerson, Poplar Street; built in 186061.

Lot 6,040 feet;

six rooms.

East Street Place; built in 1849.

Lot 2,743 feet; four rooms.

East Street (Engine House); one room, the lower story being
used for storage.

East Orange Street, built in 1850.

Lot 2,500 feet; three

TOOmS.

Friend Street, built in 1843.

Lot 1,694 feet; one room.

Freeman, Charter Street, two houses; the front has four, and
the rear three rooms. Lot 5,233 feet.

Guild, East Street, two houses; old house built in 1835;


twelve rooms.
22,049 feet.

New house built in 1866, nine rooms.

Lot

Grant, Phillips (formerly Southac) Street; built in 1852.


Lot 3,742 feet; four rooms.

Hawes, on Broadway, South Boston; built in 1823; eight


rooms.

The lot contains about 11,401 feet including the land

occupied by the Simonds School.


Ingraham, Sheafe Street, built in 1848.

Lot 2,347 feet;

three rooms.

Mackintosh, Lane Place and Purchase Place; three buildings,


two brick and one Wood; four rooms in each of the brick and
two in the wooden building. Lot 5,550 feet.

17

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

Mather School-house, on Broadway, between B and C Streets,


built in 1842. Lot 10,132 feet; ten rooms, and a ward room
for the citizens of Ward Seven.

May, Washington Square, Fort Hill, built in

18634.

Lot

4,000 feet; six rooms.

North Margin Street, built in 1837. Lot 1,655 feet; two


TOOmS.

Oliver, Sumner Street, near Lamson Street, East Boston, built


in 1843.

Lot 2,260 feet; two rooms.

Old Hancock, on Hanover Street; three rooms.


Pierpont, Hudson Street, near Oak, built in 1850.

Lot 3,840

feet; four rooms.


Parkman, Silver Street, South Boston, between Federal and

A streets; built in 1848.

Lot 5,382 feet; six rooms.

Pormort, Snelling Place, from Hull Street, built in 1855. Lot


4,799 feet; six rooms.
-

Rice, Concord Street, built in 1845, remodelled and enlarged


in 1861.

Lot 10,773 feet; twelve rooms.

South Margin Street, built in 1825.

Lot 1,587 feet; two

I'OOmS.

Savage, Harrison Avenue (near Essex Street), built in 1862.


Lot 5,550 feet; four rooms for schools, and a ward room for
Ward Five.

Smith, Joy Street, corner of Smith Court, built in 1834.


2,108 feet; two rooms.
3

Lot

18

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 6.

Sharp, Old Phillips, corner of Anderson and Pinckney Streets.


Lot 5,533 feet; six rooms, and a ward room for Ward Six.
Shurtleff, Tyler Street, built in 1855.

Lot 3,900 feet; six

rooms.

Simonds (rear of Hawes), Broadway, South Boston, built in


1840; three rooms.

Ticknor, Washington Village, Dorchester, corner of Middle


Street, built by the town of Dorchester in 1848, purchased by
the City of Boston in 1855; was enlarged from four to twelve
rooms in 1865.

Lot 12,041 feet.

Tuckerman, City Point School, on Fourth Street, between L


and M.; built in 1850, enlarged in 1865.

Lot 6,000 feet; six

roomS.

Thurston, Hanover Street (rear of the church),built in 1851.


Lot 2,508 feet; three rooms.

Tappan, Lexington Street, East Boston, built in 1846.

Lot

3,777 feet; three rooms.


Wisner, Warren Street, built in 1854.
rooms and a ward room for Ward Eight.

Lot 3,047 feet; six

Webster, Webster Street, East Boston, built in 1852.


5,040 feet; six rooms.

Lot

Ware, North Bennet Street, built in 1862; has 6,790 feet of


land, four rooms, and a ward room for Ward Two.

Webb, Porter Street, East Boston, built in 1853.

Lot 7,500

feet; six rooms.

Winchell, Blossom Street, built in 1845.


three rooms.

Lot 5,055 feet;

PUBLIC

19

BUILDINGS.

Wait, Suffolk Street, built in 185960.


eight rooms.

Williams Street, built in 1847.

Lot 10,922 feet;

Lot 2,722 feet; not occupied.

The Primary school-houses occupy about 249,492 feet of

land.

The land and buildings cost about $1,184,258.17.

City Document. No. 7.

ANNUAL

REP () RT

OF THE

C H I E E

O F

P O LI C E.

1 S 6 S.

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 13, 1868.


Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed.
Attest :

S. F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

CITY

OF

B O ST ON.

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE,

BosToN, January 13, 1868.


To HIs HoNor THE MAYOR, AND THE CITY CouncIL OF BosTON.

Gentlemen: In obedience to the Police ordinance, I herewith

present my Report for the quarter ending December 31, 1867,


to which is appended a synopsis of the doings of the depart
ment under my charge for the year 1867.
I have the honor to be

Your obedient servant,

JOHN KURTZ, Chief of Police.


DOINGS OF THE POLICE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 1867.
Arrested

Committed .

. 1,023 Males
. . 1,174 || Foreigners .
1,117 | Non-residents.

Males

Foreigners.

1,530

Non-residents.

316

Minors .

305

2,617
2,145
1,755
2,103

Lodgers

395

Minors .

LOCK-UPS.

Committed

884

Males

676

Foreigners

603
-

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 7.

Amount of property taken from prisoners and


lodgers while in custody, and restored as
per their receipts

$9,381
$15,786
$25,285
$2,787

Amount of property reported stole


Amount of property reported recovered
Amount of fines imposed
Amount of witness fees earned

$1,180 55

Number of days spent in court

13
29
00
00

Aggregate amount of imprisonment (years) .

600

93 1?,

Number of larcenies on stations

185

Number of arrests for same

121

Number of despatches sent over Police Telegraph .

500

NATURE OF CRIME.

Assault and battery .

90

Assault felonious

15

Assault on officers

Attempt to commit rape


Attempt to extort money .

Attempt to pick pockets .


Attempt to break and enter
Attempt to pass counterfeit money
Bail bond

Breaking and entering


Common beggars

17

Common drunkards .

22

Cruelty to animals
Deserters

Disorderly persons

Disturbing the peace


Drunkenness
Embezzlement

Evading U.S. Revenue Law


Fornication
Fraud

Fugitive from justice


Gaming on the Lord's day

135
79
706

REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE.

Gambling
Insane

Idle and disorderly .

Keeping house of ill-fame.


Keeping dog without license
Larceny, simple
Larceny, felonious .

4
6

1
1
120

15

21

12

Malicious mischief

Manslaughter .
Night-walking .

Obtaining goods under false pretences


Perjury

Pickpockets

Peddling without license .


Receiving stolen goods
Robbery .

2
4

20

Runaways

Stubborn children

Suspicious persons .
Suspicion of larceny.

87

46

Threatening violence
Truants

Violation of city ordinances


Vagabonds

Violation of Sunday law .

22

Witnesses

4
32

Total

1,530

321

MISCELLANEOUS.

Accidents

Boats challenged
.
Buildings found open and secured
Cases investigated .
Cases of small-pox reported .
-

40

173

165

Defective hydrants .

Defective cesspools .

Defective fire-alarms.

CITY DoCUMENT. No. 7.

Defective cellar doors

Defective lamps

3,244

Defective drains, vaults and nuisances

314

Defective gas pipe


Defective water pipes

1
4

Disturbances suppressed .

643

Dead bodies provided for .


Foundlings
.
Fires extinguished without alarm
Fire alarms given .

7
11

Intoxicated persons helped home


Injured persons provided for

221
33

Lost children restored

10

Rescued from drowning

Streets and sidewalks reported .

46

Streets and sidewalks repaired .

43

Street obstructions removed

Stray teams put up .

Vessels boarded

Water reported running to waste

Ireland .

England

France .

Germany

Africa

Sweden .

Italy
Scotland

53

Nativity or Lodgers.

NATIVITY OF CRIMINALS.

United States .

402 | United States

Canada .
Russia .

25

991 Ireland . . . . . .
49 | England . . . . .

1,423

9 | France .

137
25

Germany

- -

30

Africa

18

Italy

. .

3
Sweden .
14 | Scotland

.
.

.
.

.
.

.
.

3
3

.
.

1,530

52
2
1

2 | Canada .

890

27

Russia

Total .

19 | British Provinces

1 | Spain
3 | Norway

Norway

16
121

British Provinces

1,473

Total

2,617

APPEND IX,

SYNOPSIS OF THE DOINGS OF THE POLICE FOR THE YEAR 1867.

Arrested . . . . . 19,120 | Lodgers .

. . . . 20,390

Committed

. 12,446

Males . .

. 16,042

Males . . . . . . 13,824
Foreigners . . . . 13,923
Foreigners . . . . 14,004 | Non-residents . . . 15,867
Non-residents
Minors

. 4,070

Minors

3,381

4,446

LOCK-UPS.

Committed

Males

Foreigners

10,429
7,740
6,727

Amount of property taken from prisoners and


lodgers while in custody, and restored as
per their receipts

Amount of property reported stolen .


Amount of property recovered .
Aggregate amount of imprisonment .

Amount of fines imposed

$124,020 00
1,201 yrs. 9 mos.

Number of days spent in court

Amount of witness fees earned

$61,952 90
$130,510 89

Number of despatches sent over Police Telegraph

$48,966 03
5,743
$8,196 11
2,558

CITY DoCUMENT. No. 7.

NATURE OF CRIME.

Arson

Abandoning child
Abduction

3
18

Adultery

Abortion

Assault and battery

Assault felonious

.
-

1,189

134

Assault on officers

38

Attempt to commit rape


Attempt to rescue prisoner

25

Attempt to pick pockets

16

Attempt to steal
Attempt to rob
Attempt at fraud
.
Attempt to rob U. S. Mail
Attempt to break and enter

6
2
1

Attempt to pass counterfeit money .

Attempt to murder

Attempt to extort money


Attempt to poison
Assuming to be an officer

30

Cruelty to animals

23

120

Breaking and entering and larceny


Breaking glass maliciously
Breaking street lamps
Breaking prison
Being present at gaming .

5
5
1
1
6
7

Common drunkards

Common beggars

Bail bond
Bastardy
Boarding vessels unlawfully
Breaking and entering
.
-

4
2

452
-

Common railer and brawler

Carrying concealed weapons

14
11
2

APPENDIX.

Crime against nature


Contempt of Court .
Deserters

Disorderly persons
Disturbing the peace

Drunkenness

...

102

1,737
990

7,004

Disturbing public worship


Disturbing public schools
Detained as witnesses

60

Defrauding the revenue


Doing business on the Lord's day
Dog fighting

Embezzlement

19

14

Escaped convict
Extortion

Escaped prisoner
Enticing seamen to desert
Evading revenue law
Entering with intent to steal

14

False pretences

Forgery .
Fornication

14

15

Fraud

14

Fugitives from justice


.
Gambling
Gaming on the Lord's day
Highway robbery
House breaking

Impostor .

Incest

70
61
13

Idle and disorderly .

238

Incendiaries

Insanity

65

Indecent exposure of person

23

Illegally conveying liquor


Inciting to riot

Keeping house of ill fame

126

10

CITY DocuMENT. - No. 7.

Keeping liquor nuisance .


Keeping noisy and disorderly house .
Keeping gaming house .
Keeping dogs without license .
Keeping bowling alley without license
Keeping billiard table without license
Kidnapping
.
Larceny (simple)
.
-

Larceny (felonious).

24
17

302

11

1,113

170

Lewdness

Lottery dealing
Manslaughter

2
1

Making bonfires
Malicious mischief

Murder

Mutiny

4
5

Mutual assault

Night-walking .
Noisy and disorderly
Obtaining goods under false pretences
Obstructing railroad track
-

187

Pickpockets

356

338
9
2
75

Polygamy
Passing counterfeit money
Peddling without license .
Perjury .

Passing forged check


Procuring forgery
Prize fighting .

2
3
11
4
2
1
5

Robbery .
Rape
Runaway
Runaway from almshouse

43

Receiving stolen goods

32

Refusing to assist an officer


Rescuing prisoner

Shop-breaking .

1.
46
2

1
8
17

11

APPENDIX.

Stubborn children

Suspicious persons .
Suspicion of picking pockets
Suspicion of larceny
Suspicion of robbery
Smuggling
Stealing a ride
Selling lottery tickets
.
Selling obscene pictures

82

1,434

522
2
1.

Truants

Violation of sentence

Violation Sunday law


Violation city ordinances

Threatening violence
Till tapping .
Throwing stones at steam-cars

1.
140

2
34

838

Vagrants

191

Witnesses

219

Total .

19,120

MISCELLANEOUS.

Accidents

Attempt to commit suicide

Boats challenged
Buildings found open and secured
Bonfires extinguished
Cases investigated .

Cases small reported

51

1,828

&G

.
.

Defective hydrants reported


Defective cesspools

81

6,095
2,014

198
28
31

Defective fire-alarms reported .

16

Defective cellar doors

39

Defective lamps

66

. 12,945

Defective drains, vaults, and nuisances

Defective gas-pipe reported

1,943
4

12

CITY DocuMENT. No. 7.

Defective water-gates reported .


Defective water-pipes

.
Defective fences

18

Defective coal-hole covers

221

Defective water-meters

Defective clocks

7,956

18

23

336

73

86

2,208

Disturbances suppressed .
Dangerous buildings reported
Dangerous chimneys

Dangerous walls
44

Dead bodies recovered

. .

Dead bodies provided for


Dogs killed
.
Fire-alarms given .
Fires extinguished without alarm
Foundlings provided for .

Intoxicated persons helped home


Injured persons provided for .
Insane persons provided for
.

249

Lost children restored

711

Rescued from drowning

55

Streets and sidewalks reported and repaired

Street obstructions removed

Stray teams put up .


Sanitary examinations

. 2,967
. 23,663

154

4,236

School children rescued in snow storms


Vessels boarded

Water reported running to waste

127

1,771
.

290

NATIVITY OF CRIMINALS.
-

5,159

British Provinces

295

Ireland

United States

. 12,259

England .

485

France

130

Germany .

332

Africa

158

13

APPENDIX.

Holland

31

Italy
Sweden

50

33

Portugal .

18

Denmark .
Russia
Poland

Prussia

Spain

11

Scotland .

100

Peru

Wales
Canada

16

Norway

18

Total

19.120

NATIVITY OF LODGERS.

United States

6,619

British Provinces

England

344

Ireland

1,006
. 11,243

France

193

Germany .

301

Africa

223

Scotland

341

Sweden

11

Denmark .

Norway

Prussia

Mexico

Russia
West Indies

Belgium
Spain
Turkey

14

CITY DocuMENT.No. 7.

Canada

20

10

Portugal .
Italy

Wales

Greece

Japan

Poland

Switzerland
Total

20,390

Number of trips made to the lower harbor by the Police


schooner

|-

240

Vessels boarded, and a copy of the Harbor Police Regula


tions furnished

Boarded for quarantine purposes

Number of boats challenged and examined

Mutinies suppressed on board vessels

1,922

100

5,571
10

Number of vessels taken in charge at the request of cap


tain or owners, to prevent crews deserting .

306

Value of water-borne property recovered, and delivered


to the owners, consisting of timber, &c. .
.

$3,500

Number of vessels assisted to sea, the crews being


mutinous

14

Value of lost or stolen boats recovered and delivered to


the owners

$4,200

Number of crews returned to vessels, after having been


removed therefrom by force and threats by mobs
-

Number of vessels taken from the upper harbor to quaran

tine ground having the yellow fever on board .


In addition to the foregoing, we have rendered assistance
to the Port Physician, whenever called upon, by noti
fying captains who have evaded the quarantine regu
*

lations to report to the Port Physician.


We have also collected the quarantine fees on orders from

the captains to the owners or consignees.

15

APPENDIX.

CENTRAL STATION.
YEARLY REPORT.

Arrests

Nature of Crime.

172

Males . . . . . . . 150 | Assault and battery


Foreigners . . . . . 66 | Arson .
Non-residents

Minors

Commitments

8
1
1

Adultery .

68

27 | Drunkenness
Disturbing the peace .

1
1

156

Embezzlement

6
1

Nativity of Criminals.

United States . . . . 104 || Extortion.


British Provinces

Ireland

. . . . . .

England .

France

35 | Fraud

13

. . . . . ..

Germany
Africa

.
-

Spain .

Scotland

Forgery

1
*
"
*

||
|
|
.

10

11

Fugitive from justice .

Idle
Kidnapping .
Larceny (felonious)
Lottery dealing.

75
3
1

Murder
Perjury

Pickpockets .

23

Receiving stolen goods


Robbery

2
1

Suspicious persons

12

Vagabonds
Violation city ordinance .
172

2
6
172

MISCELLANEOUS.

Amount of property recovered .

Amount taken from prisoners and restored

Days attendance at Court

Witness fees earned at Court

Years sentence imposed on prisoners


Amount of fines imposed on prisoners

. $45,641 00

900 00

115

$122 75

60?

. $15,153 00

16

CITY DocumENT. No. 7.

The following table is a synopsis of the Liquor Trade in the


city, as reported by the Police Captains of the several stations,
showing the number of places where liquor is the only trade,
and also the number where it is sold in connection with other
business.
LIQUOR TRADE.

S.T.A.T. I O N S -

T:

>

OTHER TRADE.
1

Apothecaries . . . . . . . .
Boarding Houses ....

12

Billiards . . . . . . . . . . . .

Bowling. . . . . .
Bagatelle ..

- -

- -

Dog Market . . . . . . . . .
Dance Halls . . . . . . . . .
Dwelling Houses. . . . . .
Drug Stores . . . . . . . . . .

7 |
8
5
l

13
2
6
l

* -

- -

..
1
2 |

- -

Breweries . .
Brokers . . . . . . . . . . . . .

..
..

9 |
7
4

12
1
5
*

- -

* -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

15

..

- -

- -

... I

- -

- -

* -

- -

- -

- -

- -

11

2
1

1
1

Eating Houses.......

35

46

11
1

9
4

Groceries . . . . . . . . . . .
Hotels . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Houses of Ill-Fame . . .

Lager Saloons . . . . . . . .
Lodging Houses . . . . . .
Oyster Saloons ... . . .

1
1
76
9
2 .

..
..

5
3 |
5

- -

11
..
10
2

1
13
1

79 ||

- -

1
11

- -

2
20 |
- -

- -

- -

* *

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

..

- -

- -

- -

* *

* -

- -

- -

..

62 |

12

80

247 | 171

275

Total, Dec. 1867 . . . . .

313

Total, Dec. 1866 .....

299 || 168

244

2
*

- -

* -

- -

20 | 67
185

1.

, |

Variety Store. . . . . . . . . . .
Liquors only......... 159

..

- -

2
3

25 |

- -

4
1

- -

- -

- -

6
1

..

Tea Store . . . . . . . . . . .
Tobacco Stores . . . . . . .

- -

6
8
-

2 . .. . .. . ..

1 |

Prop Room . . . . . . . . . . .
Soap Store . . . . . . . . . .
Ship Store. . . . . . . . . . .
Sugar Store . . . . . . . . . .

- -

99 || 122 | 103 | 120 |

9
..
- -

- -

1
5

12
7

4 :
..
1

Provisions. . . . . . . . . . . .
Produce . . . . . . . . . . . .
Periodicals . . . . .

1 |

..

2
1

- - - - -

3 |
-

15
1

Fancy Goods . . . . . . . .

- -

12

..
..

1
8

Commission . . . . . . . . . .
Club Rooms . . . . . . . . . .
Confectioners. . . . . . . .
Fruit Stores . . . . . . . . .
Flour Store. . . . .

8
l

..
7 |

226 || 145

187 | 187 | 161

133

1
l
1
1
- -

16 ||

58
31
31
2
l
3
1
2
2
27
1
5
20
6
131
7
l
2

697
45
7
15
2
36
49
1

1
l
1
1
1.
1.
8
3
423

61

1,623

48

1,515

17

APPENDIX.

LIQUOR TRADE, continued.


STA. T.I.O. N. S.

-:

5
O

Wholesale. . . . . . . . . . .

52 ||

48 ||

3 |

4.

34

Retail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 | 199 || 168 || 241 | 159


Total . . . . . . . . . . .

313

247

20 ||

||

4 ||

36

223

206 || 141

25 | 1,400

in is is as is

61 | 1,623

HoUSEs of DouBTFUL REPUTATION, AS REPORTED BY CAPTAINS


OF POLICE.

S.T.A.T. I O N S.

3
C

28

.. .

43

25

Assignation ......... . . . . . . 21 | 15

Number of Houses. . . .

Houses keeping Girls.

28

22

Number of Girls..... | 89

...

106

10

25 |

22

15

.. . .. . ..

51

73

17 |

- -

- -

..

- -

E-4

6 |

13 ||

124

250

18

CITY DocuMENT. No. 7.

GAMING ESTABLISHMENTS.
Ti

S.T.A.T I O N S.

-->

Billiards . . . . . . . . . . . .

13

13

Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

27 |

40 ||

13 |

10 |

61

48

51 |

39 ||

224

||

Bowling . . . . . . . . . . . .

..

Alleys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 |

..

5 |

Bagatelle. . . . . . . . . . . .

4 ||

16

Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 ||

16

Cards and Dice . . . . . .

- -

Faro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 | ..
15

..

36

- -

BUILDING IMPROVEMENTs, As REPORTED BY CAPTAINS OF POLICE.

Station. Stone.

CoSt.

Brick.

No. 1 | . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$674,000

3 | .. .. . .. .. .. ..
4

21 | 1,020,300 ||

Wood.

12

775,000

40

641,000

23,000 ||

48

664,000

32

519,800

18,000 ||

58

1,558,100

2,982,000

27

69,250 | 267

3,066,250

605,000 | 264 |

1,415,000

65,000 ||

46
10

745,000 |216
95,500 ||

8 . .... . .. .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. ....

$42,000

Cost.

101,000 | . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15,000 || 239

18

Total.

$144,000

$102,000 |

Cost.

23

7 | ..... .. .. . ...

Cost.

70 | . 233,350 |

. .... . .. .. ....

32 |$1,774,300 376 |$5,186,300 | 344

$990,600

80

328,850

. .... . .. .. ....

752

$7,951,200

19

APPENDIX.

SHIP BUILDING AT EAST BOSTON, 1867.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Cost.

Ships

2,350

$205,000

Barks

2,110

191,000

Brigs

1,054

90,000

Schooners

2,427

255,500

18

133

Boats

|. . .. ..

- - -

7,941

16,404

$757,904

|*
-

Cell
18
17
..mattresses
24
52
7
2
1
6
23
4

--

.Coal
tons)
6
3
8
55
|Coal
9
.46
hods
3
8
4
7
2
| Coal
.7
stoves
8
2
4
5
33
1

Cooking
1
6
ranges
|1

.36
sheets
Bed
42
70
40
38
4
12
54
07
57
:

instrum'ts.
surgical
.Case
1

Carpets
(wool)
4
3
1
2
34
chests.
Clothes
.9
2
1
chairs
Common
.44
24
46
36
47
8
2
30
22
5
85
cushions
8Chair
.5
2
8
34
6
4

.Cell
locks
|2
15
6
1
7|2
36
9
0

Clocks
.12
30

.Brooms
7
2
1
1
44
39
.40
Brushes
5
2
64
1
4
3
.1
Bookcases
2
10

blankets
Bed
23
11
24
13
4
19
171

Anchors
.3*

Bed

24
51
12
21
40
48
30
266

.. Axes

PROPERTY.
|

of
branches
department:
the

T.
S
ALT
I
S
N
O

City
.ordinances
1
2
|1l. 0

books
Blank
28
10
11
55
t;
2

Lot
Lot.
ware
.Crockery

(oil)
.-l
2
1
4
3
18
l
..Carpets

.Barometer
1
1
O

Bed
cases
pillow
73
364
2
39
60
0
48
36
6
Z
Directories
Boston
.H
10

20
.tr;
pillows
Bed
24
15
37
29
36
3.
109

Bedsteads
35
14
24
23
30
21
3
25
195
C

comforters
Bed
.51
44
73
63
4
49
45
12
50
3
o

.20
barrels.
Ash
6
5
2
dAmerican
flags
.7
2
1
23

4
1
3
2
1
6.0
5
2ToTAL.
9
S

~~

following
The
alist
is
movable
of
the
to
belonging
property
by
use
in
and
City,
S
several

21
APPENDIX.

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No. 7.

CITY DOCUMENT

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APPENDIX.

POLICE CHANGES DURING THE YEAR 1867.

#| <

":

;:

#| || || |#| | | | | |########
# *| | | | | | | |* * *
No. 1. . . . . . . . . . .

2. . . . . . . . . . .

45 || 5 || 1 || 1 |..

of 5 || 8 || 5 || |

2
to
1|.. 18 || 3 || 1 || 55
...

6 || 1 || 2 | 45

3. . . . . . . . . . .

48

4. . . . . . . . . . .

61

' ' ' | | | | | | | 2 |.. I

5. . . . . . . . . . .

"

6. . . . . . . . . . .

7.... .. .... .

"

8. . . . . . . . . . .

9.... ...... .

.. . .

17 | 2 |

6 || 52

38

6 || 2 | | | st

4 ||

* ... 1

| 19 || 8 || 8 || 1

**

28
2

28

s | 1 || 21

22 ||25 || 4 || 3 || 4 || 1 || 7 ||22 || 13 | 844

The Superintendent of Carriages has the charge and super


vision of three hundred and thirty-eight public conveyances.
The Superintendent of Trucks and Wagons, two thousand
three hundred and fifteen public teams.

The Superintendent of Pawn Brokers and Second-hand


Dealers, of two hundred and twenty-five shops where pledges
of property are made, and attempts to fence stolen property
often detected.

Officer J. M. Dunn, of the Chief's Office, looks after forty


three intelligence offices.

City Document.No. 8.
CITY

OF

ANNUAL

BOST ON.

REPORT

of TIIE

SUPERINTENDENT OF HEALTH.

1868.

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 6, 1868.

Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed.


Attest:

S. F. McCLEARY,
City Clerk.

C IT Y

O F

B O S T ON .

HEALTH OFFICE, CITY HALL,


BosTON, Jan. 6, 1868.
To THE HONORABLE CITY COUNCIL :

Gentlemen, In conformity with ordinance relating to health,

I herewith submit my Annual Report of the expenditures


and income of this department for the year 1867, and the por
tion of this financial year of 1867 and '68 embraced within the

year 1867.
The amount appropriated for the present financial
year 18678
-

$232,400 00

Unexpended balance this financial year, January


1, 1868

47,413 79

Amount expended during the financial year 18667,


from January 1 to May 1

Expended this financial year 18678, from May 1,


1867, to January 1, 1868 .
Total amount expended for 1867

$184,986 21

$240,862 98

This amount of $240,862 98 was expended in detail as fol


lows:

* For sweeping and cleaning the streets, cleaning


cesspools, and the removal of snow and ice
from Public Garden, streets, walks and yards
Amount carried forward

$85,027 32
$85,027 32

*The cost of removing snow and ice from streets, walks, yards, etc., for the year, was
785 days team work, a $300, $2,355, and 4,635 days labor, a 11s., $8,497 50. Total cost,
$10,853 50.

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 8.

Amount brought forward

$85,027 32

For collecting house dirt and offal from city proper


and East Boston

66,562 34

For hay, corn, meal, oats and feed at south and


west stables .

21,366 26

Amount paid two foremen, two feeders, five black

smiths, three wheelwrights, one painter, two


harness makers, two watchmen, one clerk, one
constable, one driver of prison carriage, one

driver of carriage connected with public insti


tutions

For new horses and exchanges of old ones .


Salaries of Superintendent of Health and assistant,
City Physician and clerk, and Milk Inspector
For collecting ashes at East Boston
For stock used in blacksmith's shop for manufac
turing purposes
-

20,774 28
9,120 00
7,534 00
4,089 99
3,694 48

Amounts paid for abating nuisances as per orders


of Board of Aldermen, in detail, as follows:
Crescent Place, order Nov. 26, 1866

$365 66

Sister, cor. Williams Street, order May 13,


1867

Sewall Place, order May 29

12 00

114 14

133 61

East Lenox Street, order July 22 .


Cotting Place, order Aug. 5 .
Causeway Street, order Aug. 19
Utica Street, order Aug. 10
Essex Street, order Aug. 19
Pinckney and Myrtle streets, order

103 64

Union Park Street, order June 10

Aug. 26

95 74
6 00
6 00
6 00

230 47

122 96

43 90

F and Second streets, order Aug. 26

42 70

Goodwin Place, order Aug. 26


E Street, order Aug. 26 .

Amounts carried forward

$1,282 82

$218,168 67

REPORT OF

SUPERINTENDENT

Amounts brought forward

Spring Street, order Sept.

OF

$1,282

HEALTH.

82

$218,168 67

84 70

Tudor Street, order Sept. 2


Brighton Street, order Sept. 2 .
Morni Court, order Sept. 23
G Street, order Sept. 23.
Broad Street, order Oct. 5

313 31
11 10
*

39 00
11 50

206 50

Services of one constable, Sanitary


Department

939 00

Extra team work removing filth


Printing nuisance blanks, posters, etc.
Assessments remitted per order of
Board .

409 70
225 41

50 46

Removal of dead cats, dogs and


swine

37 50

Cleaning sundry vaults of city


Expense of hollow log on Paris Street
Removal of dead body from Prince
Street

36 00
10 00

Towing dead horse to sea


3,661 00

The cost

of constructing water

closets and urinals in different

parts of the city as follows:

For plan and building of Sanitary


Police Station on Boston Com

mon, together with water closets,


urinals and water fixtures com

plete

$1,814

14

For building on Public Garden, heat

ing apparatus, water closets and


fixtures complete
For new urinal on Province Court

1,375 30
.

For new urinal on Dover Place

162 85
111 25

For services of employ at Sani


tary Police Station, Boston
Common

Amounts carried forward

97 50

$3,561

04

$221,829 67

CITY DocumENT. - No. 8.

Amounts brought forward


Incidental expenses of Sanitary Sta
tion and building at Public
Garden

$3,561 04

$221,829 67

50 19

Repairs on urinal in passageway


leading from Market Square to
22 30

North Street

3,633 53

Incidental expenses of this depart


ment in detail, as follows :

Sundry expenses of Committee in


entertaining guests, and visita
tion to New York: refreshments

1,735

and carriage hire

90

New rubber hose for offal, station

and stable use, couplings, pipe


and fixtures

197 60

Cesspool boots and overhauls fur


nished employs in cleaning
cesspools

147 25

For oil, saleratus, brooms, blacking,


soap, wicking, matches, vinegar,
mustard, salt, etc., for stable use,

72 00

For steel springs used on wagons for


conveying house offal

64 96

For cast iron sled shoes .

61 80

For offal buckets, bails, and buttons

55 40

For wheel grease and Mecca oil

32 56

For new stove and stove-pipe, and


repairs on old ones

23 70

For rope, lanterns, butts, wicks, and


tips

23 03

For

water-fixtures, solder, butts,


screws, and labor

Spruce poles for broom-handles


Boston Daily Journal for office use

Amounts carried forward

19 45
19 00
18 00

$2,470

65

*3225,463 20

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF HEALTH.

Amounts brought forward


.
Ice used at stables and workshops
Paid James Glover for privilege of
dumping snow into dock on Fed
eral Street

$2,470 65

15 00

For clipping horse


Washing towels, bedding, etc., used
-

at stables

15 00

$225,463 20

16 00

12 75

Paid Corey & Green for dinners fur


nished employs while removing
snow in East Boston

For window glass, stable use


Cast-iron cylinder .
For clipping-shears and tubing
For rattan shavings, stable use
-

12 50

12 20

9 05
7 00
7 00

Lumber purchased for manufacturing purposes


Paid for stock consisting of shovels, hoes, curry
combs, brushes, blankets, sponge, buffalo
robes, horse collars, baskets, vehicles, etc.

2,577

15

1,861

()6

1,719

97

1,622
1,451
1,307

19
06

1,066

11

For stock used in harness shop for manufacturing


purposes

Stock used in paint sho


For coal and gas .

11

For hubs, rims, spokes and tools used in wheel

wright department
Water rates for year 1867

825 75

Pasturing horses, horse medicines and medical


attendance on sick horses

527 02

For removal of offal from East Boston as per


COntract

Sawing and planing cesspool and other stock


Milk Inspector's department for analysis of milk,
lactometers and stationery

Paid for shoeing horses, West End stable


Amounts carried forward

500 00
392 28

382 25
284 63

$239,979

78

CITY DOCUMENT. - No. 8.

Amount brought forward


Paid for locks, keys, handles, gas fixtures, can

$239,979

78

vas, sand, lime, rubber moulding, and repairs,


South End stable .

280 98

194 00

Ferry passes to East Boston, used by employs


Blank books, diaries, pens, cancelling hand stamp,

stationery, and revenue stamps

183 80
-

West End stable, rope for stalls, gas fixtures,


stove, funnel, and cast iron gutters

City Physician's office, stationery, surgical in


struments, and printing
Printing notices, bill heads, and extracts from
-

102 36

83 28

ordinances

38 78

Total amount expended

$240,862 98

Bills deposited with the City Treasurer for col


lection during the year 1867.

$25,681

09

There have been paid into the City Treasury, during the year
1867, the following amounts, and the same placed to the credit
of this department:
Sale of ashes

Sale of house offal, as per contract

Abating nuisances
Police Department, for conveying prisoners
Paving Department, horse keeping, team work,
-

$13,335
5,500
4,742
2,068

37
00
25
75

ashes, shoeing, and repairs on harnesses and


vehicles

2,025
1,725
1,175

Sale of street sweepings


Sale of old horses
Removal of ashes
Sale of stable manure .

00
00

847 24
-

City Hospital, for one new cart and harness,


ashes, and repairs on vehicle and harness
Amount carried fo

21

585 00

472 26

$32,476

08

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT

OF

HEALTH.

Amount brought forward


Public Buildings, for horse keeping, shoeing,

$32,476

08

repairs on vehicles and harnesses, and clean

ing cesspools at Quincy Hall Market


External Health Department, for use of horse
at Galloupe's Island
.
For sale of old sled, cart and cart body

For old horseshoes and scrap iron


For removing dead horses from fire in Hawkins
Street .
.
.

140 00
100 00
70 00

Fire Department, for reservoir covers

196 72

69

40 00

50 .

From County of Suffolk, for use of prison vehicle,


Public Land Department, for ashes
Storage of vehicles at South stable

20 00

For sale of old material

14 00

For sale of broom stuff

12 00

Total amount

16 75
15 00

$33,170

05

There has been paid into the City Treasury, during the
present financial year, of the above amount, $18,771 00.
2

CITY DocuMENT. - No. 8.

10

The whole number of entries for cleaning privy vaults, by

wards, may be found in the following table, together with the


prices of the respective seasons.
3 per load $4 per load $6 per load

Ward 1

Total

1|##"|''"

WARDs.

. .

194

213

134

541

419

260

147

826

201

151

82

434

105

62

56

223

212

158

111

481

**

90

73

39

202

.300

196

137

633

8 . . . . . . . . .

109

59

51

219

150

106

89

345

10

108

57

33

198

11

34

37

24

95

12

201

185

115

501

2,123

1,557

| 1,018

4,698

The within report embraces all expenditures and receipts of


this department for the year 1867; and the attention of the
City Council is respectfully called to the following subjects.
PAUPER AND PRISON VEHICLES.

One two-horse vehicle is furnished the Department of Public


Institutions, for conveying paupers and the sick from several

localities to Lunatic Hospital. Steamer Henry Morrison


and railroad stations, also, for transportation of prisoners to and
from the Court House and Jail, for the use of which no income
is derived.

REPORT OF

SUPERINTENDENT OF

11

HEALTH.

One is also employed for conveying prisoners (morning and


evening) from the several Police stations to the city lock-up, un
der Court House, and for which 25 cents per head is charged.
The following statement gives the number of persons conveyed
by each:

From the several Police stations to lock-up. Males, 6,295;


females, 2,319.

Total, 8,604.
PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS.

From Court House to Jail

To Deer Island Boat (sentenced) .


Railroad for State Almshouses

House of Correction

. 3,706
. 2,551
. 1,132

454

From Jail to Court House

400

To House of Reformation

147

R.R. Stations and Charles St. Home

...

103

Deer Island Boat (permitted) .

76

Lunatic Hospital

53

Total number conveyed

. 8,622

ANNUAL INSPECTION.

On the 29th day of April, an order passed the Board of

Aldermen authorizing a sanitary inspection of the city, by


officers detailed for this purpose. On the first day of May a
thorough and systematic cxamination was commenced, and
those having charge of this special duty were required to
report daily at this office. The work continued until the first
day of November, when the force was withdrawn; the inspec
tion was performed in a manner satisfactory to this depart
ment, and results have shown the importance of continuing the
system adopted for the two past years. During the year 1867,
3,025 persons have been notified for maintaining nuisances on

their premises; of this number a large majority responded, and

12

CITY DocumENT. - No. 8.

signified their willingness to conform to said notice, yet of


necessity, 423 orders were passed, directing the Superintendent
to cause nuisances to be abated, and of this number, only a

small portion was required to be enforced.


SANITARY CONDITION OF CITY.

As regards Real Estate, an improvement over the year 1866


has been general with those having charge of property; yet
there have been many cases of wilful neglect, where the impor
tance of a law to reach such is required, and without which the

authority of this department is not heeded to the extent desired.


In certain localities large buildings have been demolished,

and new ones constructed, which, of necessity, has caused the


condition of our streets to be strewn with the debris transported

through the city.


The most prominent evil that has existed, and one which this
Department could not control, has been the removal of earth
from Fort Hill to extreme parts; little or no regard having
been paid to the loading of teams, each and all attempting to
convey more than the capacity of their carts would allow; con

sequently, a portion of each load was left upon the highway, and
the soil being of such a nature, it was collected upon the wheels
of following vehicles and again deposited upon our streets.
Extra labor has also been furnished, and more than ordinary
care bestowed, but without favorable results; and it only re

quires the united action of those in authority to regulate a


matter not only obnoxious to the public, but injurious to a
department having the cleanliness of our streets under their im
mediate supervision.

There have been collected during the year, 61,167 loads of


ashes, 24,941 loads of street dirt and other material, 2,875

loads of cesspool matter; nine new reservoir covers have been


furnished for the fire department; 193 cesspools have received
new covers.

REPORT

OF SUPERINTENDENT

OF

HEALTH.

13

TENEMENT BUILDINGS.

For several years the attention of our city government has


been called to the importance of a law regulating the construc
tion of this class of dwellings, but without favorable results.
During the past year, the committee on health have visited

New York, where valuable information respecting such was


obtained, and it is to be hoped that a law, similar to those now

in force in New York and other large cities, may be passed by


our legislature during its present session, the practical opera
tion of which, where the same has been adopted, proves sat
isfactory.
PUBLIC URINALS.

In accordance with city document No. 102 of 1866, a special


appropriation was made in 1867 for the above purposes, and
during the past year there has been one constructed upon
Boston Common and placed under the supervision of the police,
called the Sanitary Police Station, containing water closets and
urinals, which since its opening in October has been visited by
more than 18,000 persons; one at the Public Garden conserva
tory for the convenience of women and children, which has been
found of great advantage; there has also been constructed a
urinal in Province Court, and one in Dover Place, the cost of

each appearing on page 5 of the within report.


It is believed the public will duly appreciate these sanitary
measures which have proved so beneficial to the community, and
I would recommend a continuance of their construction in differ

ent parts of the city


WINTER

WORK.

During the winter season, this department has the following


labor to perform:
The removal of snow and ice from sidewalks of public build
ings, Public Garden, Commons, malls, squares, school-house

14

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 8.

yards and private streets; in addition, we are called upon to


remove snow and ice from the public streets.

The regular work performed by employs and teams in col


lecting ashes and offal at this season of the year is frequently
more than can be performed, yet I am expected to remove
snow from the public highways. In many instances it has
proved an injury to the stock, and caused the regular work to
be neglected.

By referring to third page, the exact cost of winter work


amounts to $10,853.50, and a large proportion of this amount
is for other departments.
As the increase of population and new territory will require
more vigilance to accomplish its regular work, it will be impos
sible to furnish teams and labor in removing snow from the

public highways.
Respectfully submitted,
EZRA FORRISTALL,

Superintendent.

REPORT

OF

SUPERINTENDENT

OF

HEALTH.

15

Schedule of City Property connected with South and West Stables.


100 horses with harnesses, at $375

$37,500 00

8 cart harnesses (new), at $75 .

2 express harnesses at $25

50 00

600 00

1 chaise harness

20 00

1 wagon harness

35 00

100 00

100 00

4 light harnesses, at $25 .


4 spare leading harnesses, at $25
3 single cart harnesses
.
2 double leading harnesses, at $50
-

Lot Harness

14 collars, at $1.50
1 cart saddle

50 00

100 00

40 00

21 00

6 pair hames, at $1.75

5 00

10 50

1 riding saddle and bridle.

10 00

2 surcingles

3 00

3 pairs horse-covers (rubber), at $12.


2 horse-covers (linen), at $2
.
70 carts for collecting dirt, gravel, and stone,
.

10,500 00

at $150

36 00

4 00

26 one-horse wagons for collecting house offal,

5,200 00

6 one-horse wagons for cesspools, at $200


4 express wagons, at $175

1,200 00

700 00

1 wagon

60 00

1 cart-body and pole to wagon .

50 00

Lot old wheels .

10 00

6 00

100 00

60 00

at $200 .

4 cart wrenches, at $1.50

8 sets cart and wagon axles


Sets springs .

3 vehicles for conveying prisoners to and from


the several station houses, railroads, city
prison and jail, at $125
.

5 buggies, at $75

Amount carried forward

375 00

375 00

$57,320 50

16

CITY DoCUMENT No. 8.

Amount brought forward


2 chaises .

100 00
100 00

1 hay rigging .
1 covered carriage
93 sleds for conveying offal and ashes, at $75
-

4 sleighs, at $75
2 pungs .

|-

$57,320 50

200 00

6,975 00

300 00

125 00

1 covered omnibus sleigh .

50 00

1 two-horse sled

50 00

2 hand-sleds for removing snow from passage


ways

11 snow-boxes, same purpose

28 snow-drags .
1 snow-scraper

4 00

33 00

28 00

15 00

10 00
20 00

25 snow-shovels (wooden), at .40


2 snow-ploughs
1 ice-plane

21 tons hay, at $30

100 00

630 00
315 00

103 straw

.
3 carrots, at $18
105 bush. meal, at $1.45
.
125
oats, at .95 .
25
cr. corn, at $1.45

54 00

152 25

2 hay-cutters

Lot spruce plank, etc.

90 cesspool covers, at $4. .

36 25

40 00

**

2 six-tine forks

10 00
540 00

20 00

360 00

4%

74 street hoes, at $1.25


76 mauls, at .25

174 steel and iron shovels (new), at $2


**
(old), at .50

224

118 75

2 sets hay-hooks
9,000 feet oak planks, boards, etc., at $60
-

348 00

112 00

92 50

19 00

8 50

108 00

56 25

$68,451 00

54 offal-chisels, at $2
75 offal-buckets, at .75

Amount carried forward

17

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF HEALTH.

8
60
13
5
12
11

$68,451

Amount brought forward


offal-tubs, at $2
water-pails, at .75
water-pots, at $1.50
goose-necks .
manure-forks, at $1.75 .
iron rakes, at $1

00

16 00
45 00
19 50
75 00

21 00
11 00
6 75

9 hay-forks, at .75
163 broom-handles, at .75

122 25

2,200 bundles broom stuff, at 10 cents

220 00

48 spruce poles, at 75 cents

36 00

84 baskets, at 75 cents

63 00
25 00

5 crowbars, at $5
21 ice chisels, at $2.50

52 50

4 wooden rakes, at 50 cents


8 dipping poles, at $2
13 cesspool hooks, at $1

16 00

00

13 00
00

3 sets cesspool tools


9 ladders, at $4
2 slate ramps

36 00
30 00
00

100 lbs. nails

6 pairs steps

21 00

1 staging .

25 00

2 window frames

12 00

5 whitewash brushes

12 50

2 coils rope

16 00

1 anvil

10 00

1 Vise

18 00

1 axe

50

1 Cross-Cut SaW

00

1 sweeping machine .

107 woollen blankets with girts, at $5 .

24 00
140 00

7 buffalo robes, at $20

00

535 00
32 UU

4 street blankets, at $8
3 knee robes

Amount carried forward

2,000

$72,129

00

18

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 8.


$72,129

Amount brought forward

00

50 00

1 cast-iron urinal

150 00

2 feed troughs and tools


1 grindstone

10 00

1 lot sleigh bells


3 spare halters .

50 00
50

4 00

2 pairs overalls and frocks


1 doz. Green Mountain salve

00

1 lot horse medicine .

00

2 pairs cesspool boots

00

1 bag salt

25

2 wheelbarrows

00

11 zinc coal hods

00

9,100 lbs. choride of lime at 7' cents


1,350 deodorizer, (Gould's) at 33 cents

648 37
50 62

1 water cask

00

1 lot rubber hose


1

leather

125 00

40 00

2 tackle and falls

35 00

1 lot broom cord

10 00

1 oil can

5 00

1 lantern

1 00

2 iron weights

3 00

1 wood horse and saw

2 50

30 hind boards to carts at $2.50

75 00

1 lot currycombs and brushes

75 00

22 lbs. castile soap at 20 cents

4 40

32 lbs. sponge at $2.50


2 dust brushes

15 gallons neats-foot oil


1 lot patent wheel grease .
1 furnace and copper boiler

80 00
3 00
30 00
20 00
100 00

2 hoisting blocks
3 sets branding irons

30 00

1 broom press

10 00

Amount carried forward

5 00

$73,876

64

REPORT

OF SUPERINTENDENT

Amount brought forward


2 sledge hammers
.
1 lot straw matting
1 ferry tickets
1 hard coal

OF

HEALTH.

19

$73,876 64

2 00

10 00

30 00
350 00

1,500 00

Stock and tools in blacksmith's shop


wheelwright's
$4

6 4.

**

4&

harness

64

6 4.

&4

paint

64

900 00

400 00

325 00

$77,393 64

Furniture, beds and bedding of stables South and West, also


office furniture and stoves.

HORSE STOCK ACCOUNT.


1867.

Jan.

Feb.
&4

1868.

1, on hand .

99

1, purchased
7,

March 9,
*4
26,

Jan.
1867.

4*

Jan.

8, died .

Feb.

1, exchanged

G-

April 1,
**
2,
44
19,

&4

**

1,
11,

July 9,
*&
&4

15,
31,

Aug. 6,
Sept. 1,
&4
5,
4:
13,
**
30,
Nov. 12,
44
29,
Dec. 10,

7,

13, died

April 1, exchanged

**

*4
**

May

. . 100

1, on hand

May

&4
Go

2,

**

1,

44

10, soldf

11, exchanged
July 11, sold

4 4.
&4

12, died

**

15, exchanged
4&
*4

31,

31, sold

**

4*
*-

Aug. 6,

**

&4

24, exchange
Sept. 5,
*-

4-

10, sold
13, exchanged
**
30,
44

Q&

4&

Nov. 12,
**
29,
Dec.
4.

125

4*
4 *

3, sold
16, 4 1 25

* Bills for horses purchased, with the allowance for all exchanges, are deposited with City
*

Auditor.

t Bills for sale of horses are deposited with the City Treasurer, and the same by him col
lected.

City Document. No. 9.


CITY

OF

B O ST ON .

, Ap:
ges:
<

A N NUAL REPORT

of ThE

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS.

1868.

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 13, 1868.


Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed.
Attest:

S. F. MCCLEARY,

City Clerk.

CITY

OF

B O ST ON .

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETs,


CITY HALL, Jan. 11, 1868.
To THE HONORABLE CITY COUNCIL.

According to the provisions of the fifth section of the Ordi


nances concerning Streets, the Superintendent of Streets has the
honor to submit to the City Council his Annual Report of the

Expenditures of the Paving Department, during the municipal


year 1867, embracing a portion of the financial years 18667

and 18678, the financial year of the city commencing May 1,


of each year.
The amount appropriated at the commencement of the finan

cial year for the Paving Department was $250,000. The


amount expended, and charged to the appropriation, during the
financial year 18667, from January 1 to May 1, 1867, was $54,
031.30. The amount expended, and charged to the appropri
ation, during the present financial year, 18678, from May 1,
1867, to January 1, 1868, was $229,610.26.

Total amount expended by the Paving Department during the


municipal year 1867, and charged to both appropriations for .
paving, etc., as above stated, $283,641.56.

This amount of $283,641.56 was expended for paving, repav


ing, grading, repairs of streets, removal of snow, and for grade
damages on the streets of the city, in detail, as follows:

CITY DoCUMENT. No. 9.

CITY PROPER.

Acton Street, resetting edgestones, repaving gut


ters and sidewalks and macadamizing

$214 49

Adams, Chardon and Portland streets, resetting


edgestones and repaving gutters

304 99

Albany Street, between Dover and Concord streets,


setting edgestones, building cesspools and
grading

29

Albany and Springfield streets and East Chester


82

Park, grading and gravelling

Appleton Street, resetting edgestones, relaying side


walks, paving gutters and crosswalks, building
surface drains and cesspools and macadamizing
Arch Street, resetting edgestones and repaving
portions

Ash Street, repaving


Battery Street, grading city lot

3,386

12

468 19

253 43

303 87

Beacon Street, between Charles and Dartmouth

streets, macadamizing, laying flagging cross


2,049

walks, and sidewalks in front of vacant lots

Bond Street, resetting edgestones, repaving gutters


and sidewalks and gravelling roadway
Boylston Street, macadamizing and repairs on gut
ters

46

179 03

811 81

Brookline Street, West of Tremont Street, setting

edgestones, paving gutters, macadamizing, build


ing surface drains and laying flagging cross
walks

1,643 90

Cambridge Street, between Charles and West Cedar


streets, repaving a portion

176 05

Canton Street, between Tremont Street and Warren

Avenue, setting edgestones, paving gutters, ma


cadamizing, building surface drains and laying
flagging crosswalks .

Amount carried forward,

2,666 48

$19,041

93

REPORT

ON

STREETS.

Amount brought forward,


Canton Street, between Albany Street and Harrison
Avenue, grading and gravelling
Cesspools, building cesspools on East Chester Park,
Albany Street, near Harvard Street; River and

Commercial Streets, not otherwise specified

Chandler Street, grading .


Channing Street, repaving
Chatham Street, repaving a portion .
Chester Square, laying crosswalks
Chestnut Street, gravelling
Clarendon Street, resetting edgestones, paving gut
ters, macadamizing, building surface drains, and

$19,041

93

966 59

516 55

2,174

13

254 84
126 29
569 08
139 00

laying crosswalks

2,781

56

18,011

51

Commercial Street, repaving with round stone


between Lewis and Cross streets, and paving
with small granite blocks between Cross and
State streets

Common Street, resetting edgestones, repaving gut


ters and sidewalks

347 24

Concord Square, repairs on iron fence, gravel and


trees for the park

321 58

Congress Street, between Channing and High streets,


repaving .

Crossings constructing new crossings and repairing


old ones not otherwise specified
-

3,128

14

1,561 44

Dedham Street, between Albany Street and Shawmut


506 31

Avenue, grading and gravelling portions .


Dwight Street, resetting edgestones, paving gutters,

relaying sidewalks, macadamizing and laying


crosswalks

Exchange Street, paving with small granite blocks .


Federal Street, filling cellars where widened, and
resetting edgestones, relaying sidewalks, and
repaving portions
Amount carried forward,

2,311
1,680

74

1,394

34

69

$55,832 96

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 9.

Amount brought forward,


Fruit Street, grading and gravelling, setting edge
stones, paving gutters and sidewalks
Harrison Avenue, between Dover and Northampton
streets, repaving portions

Henchman Street, laying sidewalks .

96

1,998

05

1,338

07

85 56

High Street, filling cellars where widened, and re


paving portions
.
. .
James and Newton streets, setting edgestones and
paving gutters .
Joy Street, gravelling
.

$55,832

478 08

277 44
209 00

Kingston Street, repaving between Essex and Beach


streets with small granite blocks, and near Sum
mer Street with round stone

McLean Street, macadamizing

4,319
-

82

72 18

Milford Street, resetting edgestones, repaving gut


ters and crosswalks, and macadamizing

Mt. Vernon Street, grading and gravelling


Newland Street, setting edgestones and gravelling
North Grove Street, macadamizing
Norwich and Meander streets, paving with round
Stone

Oak Street, paving with small block pavement,


(blocks purchased in 1866)
Oliver and Belmont streets, building foot bridge at
Purchase Street, fences on Washington Square,
and cesspool near Milk Street, gravel, etc.
Otis Street, repaving a portion
Passageways, belonging to city, South of Dover
Street, grading and gravelling
Pembroke Street, West of Tremont Street, setting
edgestones, paving gutters, building surface
drains, laying crosswalks, and macadamizing .
People's Ferry Avenue, repaving a portion
Pinckney Street, grading and gravelling
-

Amount carried forward,

1,690
1,014

43

122 73
182 35

795 89

1,392 06

895 00
394 17

3,474

28

2,230

05

202 43
782 78

$77,787

REPORT ON

STREETS.

Amount brought forward,


Plympton Street, grading

$77,787

Poplar Street, resetting edgestones, relaying side


walks and repaving gutters on a portion
Providence Street, grading
Repairing macadamized streets, not otherwise
specified

Repairing paved streets not otherwise specified


Repairing unpaved streets, not otherwise specified
Richmond Street, grading, setting edgestones, pav
ing gutters, laying sidewalks and gravelling
Rutland Square, repairs on iron fence, gravel, sods,
and trees for park, repairing gutters, etc.
Suffolk Street, gravelling
-

Summer Street, between Chauncy Street and Church


Green, paving with small granite blocks, and
flagging crossings .
Tremont Street, between Indiana Place and Roxbury
Line, grading and repaving portions

91

66 78

639 57
390 81

11,597
13,805

05
22

257 68

2,952

69

506 17
89 25

8,762

30

5,727

02

Tremont Street, front of Children's Mission School,

laying sidewalk on land taken by city


Tremont Street, between Temple Place and Winter
Street, removing stone pavement and putting
down concrete .

1,489 07

Union Park Street, grading and gravelling


.
Warren Avenue, resetting edgestones, paving gut
ters and crosswalks, repaving sidewalks, build
ing surface drains, and macadamizing
.
Warren Street, resetting edgestones, repaving side
walks and gutters on portions .

115 50

3,048

45

7,540

95

991 93

Washington Street, between Boylston and Dover


streets, resetting edgestones and repaving where
widened

Washington Street, between Court Street and Corn


hill Court, repaving with granite blocks (blocks
purchased in 1866) .
Amount carried forward,

345 33

308 98

$136,422

66

CITY DocuMENT. - No. 9.


$136,422 66

Amount brought forward,

West Street, repaving a portion


.
West Cedar Street, macadamizing .

220 82 .

103 93

1,353 58

West Orange Street, repaving

$138,100 99
-

souTH BosTON.

C Street, grading and gravelling .


Cesspools on E, L, F and K streets, not otherwise
specified .

117 90

491 34

D Street, setting edgestones, gravelling and building


cesspool

Dorchester Street, setting edgestones, paving gutters,


grading and gravelling .
Dove Street, gravelling .
E Street, between Sixth and Seventh streets, grad
ing and gravelling .
E Street, between First Street and Broadway, set
ting edgestones, paving gutters, laying side
walks, and gravelling

344 35

6,005 82

187 50

371 74

Edgestone setting, not otherwise specified

2,839 46
996 35

Eighth Street, between Dorchester and K streets,


grading and gravelling .

1,277 66

Emerson Street, between G and M streets, grading


and gravelling .

952 03

Federal Street, between the railroad and Dorchester


Line, gravelling

110 91

Fifth Street at L Street, building cesspools and grav


elling

6.25 41
-

First Street, gravelling .


Fourth Street, between G Street and City Point,
setting edgestones, paving gutters, gravelling,

and building cesspools

Fourth Street, between Federal and A streets, repav


ing a portion .

Amount carried forward,

340 00

3,517 83
495 59

$18,673 89

REPORT ON

STREETS.

Amount brought forward,


Gold Street, between D and C streets, gravelling
H Street, grading .
-

$18,673

89

187 95

252 00

L Street at Bath House, repairing sea-wall and wharf


and grading
.

211 71

L Street, between First and Second streets, grav


elling

249 42

O Street, setting edgestones and grading


Repairing streets .
.
. .
Second Street, between B and F streets, resetting
edgestones, relaying sidewalks, repaving road

way, and rebuilding bulkhead .

6,469

8,820 08

97

Second Street, between K and L streets, gravelling,


Sixth Street, between C and D streets, grading and
gravelling
Sixth Street, between K and L streets, grading
Sullivan Street, grading and gravelling .

131 06

544 43

1,145

79

250 00

439 17

Telegraph Street, setting edgestones, paving gutters


and crosswalks, building cesspools, grading and
gravelling

4,154

Third Street, grading and gravelling portions .


Vinton Street, grading and gravelling

1,991

64

$43,784

01

44

262 46

EAST BOSTON.

Bennington Street, grading

(>

Bremen Street, between Sumner and Maverick streets,


paving with new round stone
Cesspools not otherwise specified

$331 98

4,026

206 38

1,550

Condor Street, gravelling


Eagle Street, gravelling .

25

86

177 77

Havre Street, grading, gravelling and building cess


pools
London Street, gravelling

1,813

Meridian Street, grading and gravelling .

1,179

50

$10,070

23

Amount carried forward,


2

77

783 72

..]0

CITY DoCUMENT.No. 9.

Amount brought forward,


People's Ferry Avenue, resetting edgestones, relay
ing sidewalks, and repaving portion of roadway
Repairing streets
Saratoga Street, gravelling
Sumner Street, repaving portions .
-

$10,070 23
537 19

2,337 54
326 40
303 94

$13,575 30
-

INCIDENTALS.

Clerk hire

Ferdinand Street Bridge, painting, .


Horse-keeping, new buggy and sleigh, repairs on
vehicles, etc.

$1,190 00

90 00

1,627 65

Levelling snow, picking ice upon the streets, and re


moving snow last winter, and in December 1867.

51,118 96

Printing and Stationery .


Removing Dead Trees
Repairs at South Yard, dredging docks, gas fixtures,

356 36

etc.

149 88

Repairs at West Yard, building fence, etc.


Stock of materials on hand, purchased during the
year, consisting of granite and North River
blue stone blocks, North River flagging, edge
stone, round stone, gravel, and cesspool curbs .
Street signs, and numbering streets
Sundry expenses of Committee on Paving
Superintendent's Salary 1867

Tools

94 62

243 68

18,048 97
1,635 64

1,649 25
2,425 00
3,767 95
$82,397 96
-

REPORT ON

GRADE

11

STREETS.

DAMAGES.

Dorchester Street

W. M. Wilson, agent for


Oakes Ames & others

J. B. Carpenter

$2,200 00

700 00

$2,900 00
Havre Street

John McGonagle
Jerry McCarty

.
-

$650 00

650 00

1, 300.00
Richmond Street
Paid for alterations in
houses to conform to

1,483 30

new grade
Sullivan and Lark Streets
James Timmons

100 00

5,783 30
RECAPITULATION.

City Proper
South Boston .
East Boston

Incidentals

Grade damages

$138,100
43,784
13,575
82,397
5,783

99
01
30
96
30

$283,641 56

Total amount appropriated for paving, etc., for the present


financial year, 18678, $250,000; total expenditures of the
present financial year, to Jan. 1, 1868, $229,610.26;. balance
of appropriation unexpended, Jan. 1, 1868, $20,389.74.
The amount of bills for edgestone, constructing and repairs
of sidewalks, paving work, and old materials sold, lodged with
the City Treasurer, during the year 1867, for collection, was
$6,134.41. . . .

CITY DocumENT. - No. 9,

12

The amount paid into the City Treasury during the same
period, and credited as having been paid in by the paving
department on account of work done by said department, was
$2,471.93.
ALBANY STREET.

Sept. 10, 1866. The Board of Aldermen authorized the


extension of Albany Street from Troy Street to the Dover Street
Bridge. The work to be performed was the building of a sea
wall two hundred and seventy-one feet in length, and the filling
of the same length of street eighty feet in width, and about six
teen feet in depth. Owing to difficulties arising, in settling with
the abutters for grade and land damages, it was not commenced
till the spring of 1867. It is now nearly completed. The sea
wall was built by Messrs. Boynton Bros., under the immediate

superintendence of Mr. Joel Wheeler. The earth filling was


supplied principally from Fort Hill. The cost of the work up
to Jan. 1, 1868, has been as follows:
Paid Boynton Bros.

for

building wall

$13,005 00

Paid Joel Wheeler for superintending the building of


Same

Earth, gravel and ashes

1,036 00
8,249 75

Labor, Paving, Edgestones, Team work, building


fence, etc.

1,111 62
$23,402 37

ALBANY

STREET

BRIDGE.

The bridge over the tracks of the Boston & Worcester Rail
road on Albany Street, a wooden structure built in 1856 at a
cost of $23,231, having become so much decayed as to be unsafe
for public travel, the Board of Aldermen, May 21, 1867, author
ized the erection of an iron bridge with stone abutments and
retaining walls. The Boston & Worcester Railroad Corpora

REPORT ON

13

STREETS.

tion desiring that the southerly abutment should be set back to


allow room for another track under the bridge, agreed with the
city to pay the cost of constructing and keeping in repair the
additional length of twelve feet of the iron bridge.

The cor

poration also agreed that from twelve to eighteen inches in


width of the retaining walls on each side of the bridge should
be built upon their land so as to make a party wall, and to pay
to the city for said party wall, on the completion of the whole
work, the sum of $7,000.

In July, the Committee on Paving made a contract with


Messrs. Clapp & Ballou for the erection of the abutments and
retaining walls, containing about 2,600 cubic yards of stone

work, and on September 30, a contract with Messrs. McKay &


Aldus, of East Boston, for a wrought-iron lattice bridge. The
plans for the stone abutments and walls were drawn by N. Henry

Crafts, City Engineer, and the work executed under the super
intendence of Mr. Joel Wheeler. The plans for the iron bridge
were drawn by Mr. Clemens Herschel, who superintended the
The cost to January 1, 1868, has been

construction of the same.


as follows:

Paid Clapp & Ballou for stone work, etc. (on account)
Paid McKay & Aldus for iron bridge, (on account)

$35,109 41
10,000 00

Paid Clemens Herschel for plans of iron bridge and

superintending the building of same, (on


account) .

600 00

Paid Joel Wheeler for superintending the building of


stone-work

Labor, team work, ashes, etc. .

976 00

647 48

$47,332 89
DEDHAM STREET.

The raising and grading of Dedham Street, between Shawmut


Avenue and Tremont Street, authorized by the City Council the
latter part of 1866, was completed during the past year. The

14

CITY DocuMENT. - No. 9.

cost of this work, including the compensation paid to the abut


ters for grade damages, has been as follows:
Grade Damages.
William Collier, Nos. 67, 73, and 75
Edward Collerton, No. 76
.
-

.
-

Fanny W. Cooper, 98
.
Mary Daley,
** 74
.
Eliza Dinsmore,
99, paid for rais
ing .

Mary Dwyer,

NO. 90

$748 00
315 00

512 : 00

470 00

125 00

700 00

1,125 00

D. C. Eddy's Estate, Nos. 85 to 95


Michael Finley, No. 55
.

420 00

Thos. Fitzpatrick, 71
Peter Henderson, 53

.
.

560 00

445 00

Thomas Hughes,
Gregory Keane,

753

124 00

**

96

512 00

Patrick Leonard,

80

580 00
990 00

Robert McNinch,

92 and 94 .

Owen Munday,
Patrick Munday,
Wm. Pendergast,

686 00

86 and 88 .
81
.

1,069 00

663 00

Cranston Pond,

70 and 72 .

527 00

Thomas Ray,

**

62

500 00

Owen Russell,

97

800 00

60

34500 $12,216 00

G. A. Woodruff,
Labor

Earth and gravel

100

1.440 12

5,637 75

Furnishing and setting edgestones, laying sidewalks,


paving gutters, etc.

Paid S. & D. Richards for making estimates for rais


ing houses, 1865 and 1866
Paid William L. Brown for making estimates for
raising houses, 1866
-

1,268 24

100 00

50 00

$20,712 11

REPORT ON

STREETS.

15

FORT HILL.

The grading of Oliver Street, Washington Square and


Belmont Street, which was commenced Oct. 15, 1866, was

prosecuted with all the despatch possible, until Jan. 17, 1867,
when the great snow storm which occurred at that time caused
a suspension of operations till Feb. 25, when the work was
resumed and continued until March 8, at which time, the con

tractor, Mr. T. Hannon, abandoned his contract, having lost a


considerable sum, the compensation which he received ($5.50
per cubic square) being much less than the cost of excavating
and carting. The Committee on Paving then advertised anew
for proposals for the excavation and removal of the earth from

the hill to the territory lying between the easterly line of Albany
Street, Harrison Avenue, Troy Street and the Dover Street
Bridge. Proposals were received, ranging from $7.50 to $9.75
per square. The contract was awarded to Bonner & Suther
land, their proposal being the lowest. They commenced opera
tions April 10, and continued steadily at work, doing all that
seemed possible to do, through a wet and unfavorable scason,

till Dec. 24, when the grading of Oliver Street, Washington


Square and Belmont Street fifty feet in width and to a depth of
eighteen inches below the grade, ready to receive the gravel for
paving, was completed.
The whole amount of earth removed from Fort Hill has been

about 8,500 squares, or 68,000 cubic yards.


has not yet been made.

The final estimate

RAILROAD LOCATIONS.

By an act of the Legislature, passed April 25, 1867, Thomas


Russell, Edward Crane, Harvey Scudder, their associates and

successors, were made a corporation under the name of the


Marginal Freight Railway Company, and authorized to construct

16

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 9.

a street railway of not less than two tracks, with suitable turnouts,
commencing at the Boston and Worcester Railroad tracks in
Lincoln Street, thence through Lincoln or South and Beach

streets to Federal Street; also commencing at the freight tracks


of the Old Colony and Newport Railway Company, near Cove
Street; thence through Cove and Beach streets to Federal Street,
or through Cove and East streets to Federal Street; thence
through Federal and Broad streets to Rowe's Wharf; thence
through intervening estates, at the head of Rowe's Wharf and

India Street; thence through India Street and the westerly end
of Central Wharf block and through the street east of the Cus
tom House to Commercial Street; thence through Commercial,
Causeway and Lowell streets, or Causeway, Andover and
Minot streets to the freight tracks of the Boston and Lowell

Railroad Company: with the right to construct side tracks from


the above tracks to any wharf or warehouse on the route.

By the same act, the Board of Aldermen is authorized, upon


the application of the Marginal Freight Railway Compafly, to
straighten and widen the streets, through which the railroad is
to pass, to a width of not less than fifty feet between the curb
stones, one-half of the net costs of such straightening and
widening to be paid by the company.
The Commercial Freight Railway Company, incorporated in

1866, was authorized to unite with the Marginal Freight Rail


way Company, and form one company. This act was accepted
by the Board of Aldermen May, 7, 1867; and rules were pre
scribed for the government of the road, July 9.
By an order passed Nov. 19, the Fitchburg Railroad Com
pany was authorized to lay down a straight track in Haverhill
Street, adjacent to the sidewalk on the southerly side of the pas
senger depot of said company; also, a curved track from their
premises on Haverhill Street to the tracks to be laid down by
the Marginal Freight Railway Company, on Causeway Street.
The Boston & Worcester Railroad Company was authorized

REPORT

ON

STREETS.

17

Aug. 27, 1867, to lay down an additional track across Lehigh


Street, and Nov. 2, 1867, a track across South Street.
In a location granted by the Board of Aldermen Nov. 18,
1867, the Metropolitan Railroad Company was authorized to lay
down an additional track on Boylston Street, between Tremont

and Charles streets, and a double track on Boylston Street, be


tween Charles and Berkeley streets.

Also, additional tracks on

Tremont Street, between Boylston and La Grange streets, and


between Eliot and Dover streets.

Jan. 2, 1868.

The same company was authorized to con

struct a turnout or side-track on Tremont Street, extending two


hundred and seventy-five feet south of the northerly line of Cam
den Street.

Annexed to this Report is a schedule of the property belong.


ing to the Paving Department.
Respectfully submitted,
CHARLES HARRIS,
Superintendent of Streets.

SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY BELONGING TO THE PAVING


DEPARTMENT.

Sets of stone cutters' tools, consisting of 273 points and


chisels, 6 hammers, 2 squares, 8 ledge drills, 6 pean hammers
7 sets, 34 drills and 2 bush hammers.
219 ice pickaxes.

7 chains.

100 gravel pickaxes.

7 ice chisels.

200 snow shovels.

80 gravel shovels.
141 stone-crack hammers.

1 derrick.
34 crowbars.

7 pinch bars.

6 face hammers.

2 shackle bars.

8 sledge hammers.
7 paving hammers.

3 tamping bars.

4 iron rammers.

15 wooden rammers.
19 wooden street-horses.
12 lanterns.
27 wheelbarrows.
4 handbarrows.

1 claw bar.

16 cesspool rods.
10 padlocks.
2 post diggers.
1 hand cart.
1 small cart.
4 trucks.

6 water pails.

1 grindstone.

9 mortar pails.

9 axes.

2 stone rolls.

8 augers.

5 tool chests.

3 vises.

7 ladders.

5 planes.

7 levels.

9 saws.

7 trowels.

2 saw sets.

7 street hoes.

19 files.

5 iron rakes.

4 squares.

5 hand sleds.

1 hatchet.

1 set of blocks.

9 chisels.

REPORT

ON

STREETS.

4 nail hammers.

7 iron wedges.

1 bit stock and 10 bits.

2 boilers.

4 drawing knives.

1 set stencil plates.

3 spoke shaves.
2 pairs dividers.

3 baskets.
124 hammer handles.

1 adze.

308 pick handles.

1 frow.

600 lbs. iron.

1 hone.

350 lbs. steel.

5 mallets.

2 horses.

2 water pots.

1 sligh.

3 sand screens.
3 fluid cans.

1 buggy.
1 wagon

1 whitewash brush.

2 harnesses.

19

City Document. No. 10.

CITY

OF

BOSTON.

(3-5

\& BosTNIA *>


& Conbir AAD,

*:
A N NUAL

REP () RT

of THE

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC LANDS.


1 S 6 S.

---------------_-_-

==

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 13, 1868.


Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed.
Attest:

S. F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

C IT Y

O F

B O S T ON .

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC LANDS.

BosTON, January 13, 1868.


TO THE HONORABLE BOARD OF ALDERMEN OF THE CITY OF
BOSTON:

The Superintendent of Public Lands respectfully submits his


Annual
R E POR. T.

The sales of land, under the direction of the Committee on


Public Lands, during the year ending December 31, 1867, have
been as follows:

One lot on James Street, containing 12,100 square


feet, at $1.00 per foot

Two lots on Fourth Street, containing 19,582,',


square feet, at 35 cents per foot
Five lots on Concord Street, containing 8,8691,
square feet, at $1.25 per foot
Five lots on Concord Street, containing 7,91718,
square feet, at $1.00 per foot .
Two lots on East Dedham Street, containing 18,530
-

$12,100 00
6,853 88

11,086 74

7,917 02

square feet, at 85 cents per foot

15,750 50

One lot on Harrison Avenue, Concord and Stoughton


streets, containing 40,000 square feet, at 75
cents per foot .
Amount carried forward,

30,000 00
$83,708 14

CITY DOCUMENT. - No. 10.

Amount brought forward,


One lot on Northampton Street, containing 18,688
square feet, at 60 cents per foot

Two lots on Harrison Avenue, containing 7,717


square feet, at $1.25 per foot .
Sixteen lots on Broadway, containing 50,000 square

feet, at 65 cents per foot .

$83,708 14
11,212 80
9,646 25
32,500 00

One lot on Broadway, containing 3,750 square feet,


at 40 cents per foot .

1,500 00

One lot on Fourth Street, containing 3,429.1%, square


feet, at 40 cents per foot .

1,371 84

Making a total of 190,583.1%, square feet for the


sum of

139,939 03

Of the foregoing amount, there has been received by


the superintendent in cash, and paid over to the
Treasurer the sum of

10,988 66

And there has been taken in bonds from the purchas


ers, payable in nine annual instalments with
.
.

interest

Total,

128,950 37

. $139,939 03

In the sales made of sixteen lots upon Broadway, the usual


cash payment of ten per cent was omitted, as one of the condi

tions upon which the land was sold requires the full amount of
purchase money (viz., $32,500) to be paid in one year from the
date of each purchase.

The superintendent has also received and paid over to the


Treasurer the following amounts.
For wharfage and rent of land on South Bay .

rent of land on Harrison Avenue

$1,066 40

37 50

on Northampton Street

25 00

**

**

foot Of Belchers Lane

37 50

at South Boston

137 50

edgestone and paving of sidewalks .

198 56

$1,502 46

Total,

REPORT

ON

PUBLIC

LANDS.

The above does not include any rent received for land leased
by the committee upon South Bay, as the same is made in quar
terly payments to the Treasurer.
There has also been received during the year for entrance

into the Common Sewers, the cost of which was paid from the
appropriation for Public Lands, $2,259 36.
EXPENDITURES.

The expenditures charged to the appropriation for Public


Lands from January 1st to December 31st, 1867, have been as
follows:

For grading vacant land in rear of West Chester Park,


as per order of the City Council,
For salary of Superintendent, one year
For paving sidewalks in front of vacant land on

$2,450
1,800

00
00

Harrison Avenue, as per order of the Board of


Aldermen .

596 60

For edgestones and paving sidewalks in front of


vacant land on Fourth and Emerson streets, as
per order of the Board of Aldermen.

588 10

For edgestones furnished on Albany Street between


Canton and Sharon streets, as per order of the
Board of Aldermen .

236 07

For edgestones and setting the same on Dorchester,


F and Seventh streets, being in front of the Old

Burying Ground lot, as per order of the City


Council .
-

859 57

For grading passageway between Wareham and


Plympton streets, South Bay

311 85
-

For grading passageway between Dedham and Canton


Streets

For grading done on Northampton Street


For grading done on Brookline Street
For grading done on Northfield Street
Amount carried forward,

176 00
221 25
65 00
110 00

$7,414

44

CITY DocuMENT. No. 10.

Amount brought forward,


For grading vacant land between Broadway and Third
Street

$7,414 44
150 00

For grading land on Harrison Avenue to abate a


nuisance .

118 50

For widening sidewalks on Harrison Avenue


For labor on Public Lands

60 00
257 85

For grading sidewalk on East Canton Street


For amount paid Sewer Department for construction
of sewers in Canton and Plympton streets
For amount paid extending sewer in passageway

15 75

452 72

between Newton and Pembroke streets

38 50

For amount paid examining sewer in Northampton


Street

5 00

For amount paid repairs done to railing around


vacant land between Brookline and Pembroke
Streets

20 33

For amount paid Town of Hull, tax on Great


Brewster Island

16 96

For amount paid for stationery

11 75

For amount paid for printing notices of meetings,

also Superintendent's Report to the Committee


on Public Lands

17 70

For amount paid carriage hire


For amount paid expenses of the Committee of 1866
For amount paid incidental expenses of the Com

mittee of 1867

20 00

109 75

758 70

For amount paid repairs on iron fence upon East


Chester Park

27 30

Total amount of expenditures

$9,495 25

Respectfully sabmitted,
R. W. HALL,

Superintendent of Public Lands.

City Document. Mo. 11.

CITY OF B O ST ON.

ANNUAL

REPORT

of

J O II N

D.

C A D O G. A. N.,

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES,


SOUTHERN

DISTRICT.

1 8 6 8.

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 13, 1868.

Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed.


Attest :

S. F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.

CITY

OF

B O S T ON .

SEALERS OFFICE, CITY HALL,


Jan. 6, 1868.
To HIs HONOR THE MAYOR AND THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY
OF BOSTON.

Gentlemen: In accordance with requirements made in an

Ordinance passed January 25th, 1867. I herewith submit my


Annual
REPORT.

The subject of Weights and Measures is something that con


cerns not a few, and is of the most vital importance to every
family in the city. A uniform standard of weights and meas
ures, and a correct system of weighing is something that should
claim our serious attention. Of the origin of weights and
measures, we are told, no direct mention is made; but Josephus

asserts they were invented by Cain, the tiller of the ground,


and the first builder of a city. The division of numbers by
decimal arithmetic, and the use of the cubit as a standard
measure of length, are distinctly proved to have been established
before the general deluge.

The ages of the patriarchs are noted in units, tens and hun
dreds of years; and Noah, we are told, built by divine instruc
tions his ark three hundred cubits long, fifty cubits broad, and
thirty cubits in height.
The Hebrew cubit measured in the vicinity of twenty-two
inches, the Roman seventeen and a half, and the English

eighteen.

We certainly will not deem it out of place here to

4.

CITY DOCUMENT.No. 11.

quote the language of

'scripture

as we find it, and hope, if it

should apply to any parties, they may read and profit by it.
We find two precepts respecting weights and measures. The
first, Leviticus xix:35, 36 Ye shall do no unrighteousness

in judgment, in meteyard, in weight, or in measure.

Just bal

ances, just weights, a just ephah and a just hin shall ye have.
The second, Deuteronomy xxv : 13, 14, 15 Thou shalt not

have in thy bag divers weights, a great and a small. Thou


shalt not have in thy house divers measures, a great and a
small. But thou shalt have a perfect and just weight; a perfect
and just measure shalt thou have.
In the Senate of the United States, March 3d, 1817, a resolu

tion was passed, instructing the Secretary of State to prepare


and report a statement relative to the regulations and standards
for weights and measures in the several States, and relative to

the proceedings in foreign countries, for establishing uniformity


in weights and measures, together with such propositions relative
thereto as may be proper to be adopted in the United States.

To show you the great importance of this work, and the vast
amount of time and labor consumed in preparing that report, it
was nearly four years before it was submitted.
Among the earliest traces of Colonial legislation in Virginia

and New England, we find acts declaring the assize of London,


and the standard of the exchequer, to be the only lawful proto
types of the weights and measures of the Colonies. The foot
and inch were of dimensions perfectly well ascertained; and in
the year 1601, only seven years before the settlement of

Jamestown, and less than twenty before that of Plymouth,


new standards, not only of the yard and ell but of the Avoirdu

pois and Troy weights, and of the bushel, can, gallon, quart and
pint, had been deposited at the exchequer. There was neither
uncertainty nor perceptible diversity with regard to the long
measure or the weights but the standard vessels of capacity
were of various dimensions.

The bushel of 1601 contained

WEIGHTS

AND

MEASURES.

2,124 cubic inches; it was therefore a copy from an older


standard, made in exact conformity to the rule prescribed in
the Statute of 1266, and very probably the identical standard
therein described.

The able and elaborate report of John Quincy Adams, referred


to elsewhere, and transmitted to the Senate, February 22, 1821,
is one so masterly and full of interest, it would well repay those
who take an interest in weights and measures a perusal.
Among the nations of modern Europe there are two, who, by
their genius, their learning, their industry and their ardent and
successful cultivation of the arts and sciences are scarcely less dis
tinguished than the Hebrews, from whom they have received most
of their religions, or the Greeks, from whom they have received

many of their civil and political institutions.

From these two

nations the inhabitants of these United States are chiefly


descended, and from one of them we have all of our existing

weights and measures. Both of them, have for a series of ages


been engaged in the pursuit of a uniform system of weights and
measures. To this, the wishes of their philanthropists, the
hopes of their patriots, the researches of their philosophers and
the energy of their legislators have been aiming with efforts so
stupendous and with perseverance so untiring, that to any person
who shall examine them, it may well be a subject of astonishment

to find that they are both yet entangled in the pursuit at this

hour, and that it may well be doubted whether all their latest
and greatest exertions have not hitherto tended to increase

diversity instead of producing uniformity.


He then leads to an historical description of the English and
French systems of weights and measures, together with a brief

summary of the earlier discussions of the subject in this country.


In regard to Sealing of weights and measures in this State,

and more particularly in our own city, we will, as in many


things, compare favorably with any State or city in the Union,
for the thorough manuer in which the work is performed. Few
cities equal, and none surpass us.

CITY DocuMENT.No. 11.

Many people labor under a misapprehension in regard to the


law, as it now stands, for the sale of fruit, vegetables, etc. The
following may be of some service. Extract from the General
Statutes, Chap. 49, Sec. 61 and 62.
SEC. 61. The dry measure shall be the sole authorized pub
lic standard for measuring all Fruits, Vegetables, and Nuts,
when the same are sold by measure. Whoever sells such ar

ticles, by any other than dry measure, shall forfeit and pay a
sum not exceeding ten dollars, for every such offence.
SEC. 62. Chestnuts, Walnuts, Cranberries and all other
berries when sold, shall be measured by the strike or level
measure, in the same manner as Flaxseed and other similar

articles are measured. The following Table of Weights may be


of some service and assist many in their purchases.
A bushel of wheat weighs

60 pounds.

56

32

G-

barley or buckwheat .
cracked corn, rye meal or corn meal .

48
50

G&

potatoes

60

G4

* Onions

52

G6

** Salt

70

4&

corn or rye

49.

** Oats

4&

In the above table, we differ in the weight of some articles as

provided for in many other States, as for instance, in New York


a bushel of salt weighs 56 pounds; indian corn, 58; onions,

57, etc. While, in Kentucky, a bushel of salt weighs 50 pounds,


oats, 333; and in the States of Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, lllinois,

Iowa, Wisconsin and many others, the commodities usually sold


by weight are nearly similar to our own standard. For some
time past, custom and usage have established among some whole
sale dealers a rule to sell many articles by weight, which should

be sold by measure. Among the rest, we might mention beans,


berries, etc., the only law that we can find relating thereto, will
be found in this report.

WEIGHTS AND

MEASURES.

I would respectfully take this occasion as heretofore, to

request our citizens to furnish themselves with weighing and


measuring apparatus, and that the same may be kept at their
residences whereby the accuracy of their purchases may be
tested. Many people will say, there is no need of examining
weights and measures so often as once a year. My own expe
rience has shown to the contrary, having found it necessary to
visit places two or three times a year, sometimes by invitation
of the proprietor, and sometimes WITHOUT.
-

Another admonition at this time will not be deemed out of

place, viz: the vending of charcoal.

Examine the basket and

ascertain if the same has been sealed by an authorized Sealer.

Baskets sealed in Boston are branded thus: (Boston Sealer.)


As a portion of our citizens still have the impression that the
Sealers are paid by fees, for their information, I will state that,
in July 1863, the City Council accepted of the following Act,
which made the Sealers of Weights and Measures salaried
officers:

By an Act passed April 23, 1863, new provisions relating


to sealing weights and measures are made as follows:
The respective Sealers of Weights and Measures in the
several cities and towns are authorized and required to go to
the houses, stores and shops of all such persons within their
respective cities and towns using weights and measures.
If any such person shall refuse to have his measures, milk
cans, weights, balances, scales or beams so tried, adjusted and
sealed, the same not having been tried, adjusted and sealed
within one year preceding such refusal, he shall forfeit ten dol
lars for each offence, one-half to the use of the city or town,
and one-half to the use of the Sealer of Weights and Measures.

If any person shall alter any weight, measure, milk-can,


scale, balance or beam, after the same shall have been adjusted
and sealed, so that the same thereby shall not conform to the

CITY DocuMENT.No. 11.

public standard, and shall fraudulently make use of the same,


he shall forfeit for each offence the sum of fifty dollars, one half
to the use of the city or town, and one-half to the use of the
complainant. And any Sealer when he shall have reasonable
cause to believe that any weight, measure, milk-can, Scale, bal
ance or beam has been altered since the same was last adjusted
and sealed, is authorized and required to enter the premises in
which any such weight, measure, milk-can, scale, balance or beam
is kept or used, and examine the same.

No milk-can shall be sealed by any Sealer, which does not


contain one or more quarts, without any fractional parts of a
quart.

The following will show the expenses of this Department for


the past year:
Salary of Sealer and Assistant
Repairing wagon .
One bay horse.
-

$2,100 00

85 90

350 00

Repairing harness, blankets, etc.


.
One harness, saddle pad, halter, etc.
Sealing one set standard weights
.
Horse keeping from May 1 to Dec. 31

4 00

244 00

Shoeing horse

21 00

23 48

30 00
21 00

64

46

Stationery

Extra labor

Blanket, surcingle and robe .


Horse medicine, tripoli and acid
One pung sleigh
.

75 50
123 00

12 71

100 00

6 41

Small expenses by health department and others

$3,197 00

Previous to May 1st, transportation for the standards was

provided by the Committee on Internal Health, since which time,


it has been furnished by the Committee on Weights and Meas
ures.

We would not let this occasion pass, without expressing

WEIGHTS

AND

MEASURES.

our entire approbation and approval of the ordinance passed


January 1867, which places the Department of Weights and
Measures under a Committee of the Board of Aldermen, which

also requires each sealer to make an annual report in detail of


the receipts and expenditures of his department. The receipts
of this department for the year ending Dec. 31, 1867, were
$1,833.94, all of which has been paid into the City Treasury.
The following figures will show the number of places visited,
and the number and kind of different scales, weights and
measures sealed during the year:
Number of places visited
Platform balances

1,614
1,236

Platform balances 5,000 lbs. and over

105

Butchers scales

214

Spring balances

169

487

401

Public weighers' scales

116

Balances

Weights

Trip scales

Counter balances

Dry measures

Wet measures

Yard sticks

62

11,877
2,108
5,817
1,245

Of the above, 996 were adjusted at the places of business or


at this office, and 75 were condemned.
Schedule of City Property contained in Sealers Office.
One set avoirdupois weights.

One balance and case.


One set Troy weights.
One set apothecary weights.
Forty 50-pound iron weights.
One set standard dry measures.
One set standard wine measures.

10

CITY DoCUMENTNo. 11.

One brass yard measure.


One working set avoirdupois weights.
One working set dry measures.
One working set wine measures.
One 3-gallon measure.
One set steel stamps (January to December).
One measure for trying charcoal baskets.

One stampOne brand (marked condemned).


One yard measure.
One vise.
One anvil.

One spirit-level.
One drill-stock and drills.
Two hammers.
One mallet.

One surcingle.
One soldering-iron.
One tool-bag.
Two brands, marked Boston Sealer.
One wrench.

One try-frame.
Two try-scales.

One horse.
One wagon.
One pung sleigh.
One harness.
Two blankets.

Two robes.
Three pecks linseed.
One pair cut-nippers.

Small quantity shot.

Very respectfully
Your obedient servant,
JOHN D. CADOGAN,

Sealer Weights and Measures, Southern District.

C ITY

O ST ON .

a Bostonia.

& se: *3.


NSA.1630-se

%
>{{<

AN NUAL

REPORT
of

VV IL L I A M

E'.

F. E. E. D.

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES,


N OR THE R N

DISTRICT.

1 86 8.

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 13, 1868.


Laid on the table, and ordered to be printed.
-

Attest:

S. F. McCLEARY, City Clerk.


-

C IT Y

OF

B O S T ON .

OFFICE OF SEALERS OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

January 7, 1868.
To HIs HoNor THE MAYOR, AND THE CITY CouncIL OF THE CITY
oF BosTON.

Gentlemen, In compliance with the city ordinance in

relation to Sealers of Weights and Measures, I respectfully sub


mit my annual

REPORT,
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1867.

I find by the record kept in this office, that my predecessor,


during the months of January and February, sealed such scales,
weights and measures, as were used in 190 places of business,
and received for the same the sum of two hundred and forty

nine dollars and fifty-eight cents ($249.58).


I commenced sealing, the 6th of May following; and owing to

the time lost (March and April), I have not been able to quite
complete the year's work.

From May 6th to Dec. 31st, I have tried, proved, adjusted


and sealed the scales, weights and measures used in 1,560 places
of business, and received in fees sixteen hundred and six dollars

and fourteen cents ($1,606.14), and paid the same to the City
Treasurer.

CITY DoCUMENT. - No. 12.

The following table shows the number and kind of scales,

weights and measures, adjusted and sealed by my predecessor


and myself during the year.

##
C. J.

"'".

# ########## # # *# * 'welsa."
E: TTE ITT THE
*

-:-TT|,

WM. F. REED.

1180,

82

|318 |199 $398

36

85 |10412||1348|2606,2187|112 |575

1256 s. 366 23s. 421 320 | ST115 |11392.13703153,2378,171 710

Total.

It will be seen by the above, that 20% per cent of the weights
did not conform to the standard and were adjusted, and that
793 per cent were correct.

Of the measures, about 16 per cent were adjusted, and 84 per


cent Were COrrect.

I have condemned 108 measures and 6 weights, that could


not be made to conform to the standard.

Expenditures for the year ending Dec. 31st.


Amount expended by my predecessor, as per Audi
tors Accounts
One Horse

$82 53

300 00

63 67

General repairs, painting and varnishing wagon

General repairs on harness, new reins, halter, linen


cover, surcingle, weight strap, bit, etc.
.
Repairing Standard Measures .
-

Adjusting and Sealing Standard, by State Sealer

Extra labor

Small repairs on harness, wagon and tools, 1 blow


pipe, bells, weight, etc. .
Horse-keeping
Horse-shoeing
1 blanket, 1 robe

45 75
6 00
6 00
63 00

11 07

243 00

25 42

18 50

Amount carried forward

$864 94

WEIGHTS

AND

MEASURES.

Amount brought forward


1 record book and stationery .

$864 94

23 12

6 00

1 newspaper, from June 6 to Dec. 6

Salary of Sealer and Assistant, from Jan. 1 to Dec.


31

Total expenditures

Whole amount received and paid into the treasury,


including $249.58 paid by my predecessor
.

2,100 00
$2,994 06

$1,855 72

The cost of transportation from Jan. 1st to May 1st is not


included in the above, as it was furnished during that time by
the Internal Health Department.
The appropriation for Sealers of Weights and Meas
ures for the financial year 186768 was .
.

$6,800 00

From which the following amounts have been paid.


Salaries of Sealer and Assistant from

April 15 to Dec. 31
All other expenditures

$1,492 47
811 53

Expended by my predecessor, as per


Auditors Account

82 53

Total for Northern District

for Southern District

$5,058 53

Balance unexpended .

$1,741 47

Expended .

2,386 53
2,672 00

CITY DocumENT. No. 12.


SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY UNDER MY

CHARGE

BELONGING TO

THE CITY.

Standard Weights, Measures and Balances.


1 Dearborn's avoirdupois balance of 50 lbs.
1 box containing set of avoirdupois weights for the above, one
each 50 lb., 25 lb., 20 lb., 10 lb., 5 lb., 4 lb., 2 lb., 1 lb.
One each 8 oz., 4 oz., 2 oz., 1 oz., 8 dr., 4 dr., 2 dr., and
two 1 dr. (17 weights.)
1 set liquid measures, one each, 1 gal., 2 qt., 1 qt., 1 pt., 3 pt., 1
gill. (6 measures.)
1 set dry measures, one each, bush., 1 peck, 4 qts., 2 qts., 1 qt.
(5 meas.)
1 Troy balance and set of weights: two 500 pennyweights, one
300, one 200, one 100, one 50, one 30, one 20, one 10, one 5,

one 3, one 2, one 1, one 4.


2 sets Troy cup weights.
1 Try Scale for office.

(13 weights.)

Working Set.

1 box contain