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Averoigne

Players Handbook

Paul Ste. Marie


August 2016

Table of
Contents
TABLE OF CONTENTS........................2
HISTORY.........................................4
RACES.............................................4
AVERONES...............................................5
Druids................................................5
THE CHURCH............................................5
The Inquisition...................................5
The Order of Saint Benedict..............5
The Order of Saint Bernard...............5
APOSTATES AND HERETICS..........................5
Witches.............................................6
THE ROMANI............................................6
DEMI-HUMANS..........................................6
ALIGNMENT.....................................6
CHARACTERS...................................7
STEP
STEP
STEP
STEP
STEP
STEP
STEP
STEP
STEP
STEP

1: ROLL FOR ABILITY SCORES..............7


2: CHOOSE A CLASS..........................7
3: EXCHANGE ABILITY SCORE POINTS....8
4: ROLL FOR HIT POINTS.....................8
5: ROLL FOR MONEY..........................8
6: BUY EQUIPMENT............................8
7: DETERMINE YOUR ARMOR CLASS, HIT ROLL CHART,
8: NOTE ADJUSTMENTS FOR ABILITY SCORES
8
9: GIVE YOUR CHARACTER A NAME AND ALIGNMENT
10: CHOOSE A BACKGROUND FOR YOUR CHARACTER

PLACES...........................................9
CITIES, TOWNS, AND VILLAGES....................9
Abbey of Perigon..............................9
Cistercian Monastery.........................9
La Frenaie.........................................9
Les Hiboux........................................9
Sainte Zenobie.................................9
Touraine............................................9
Vyones..............................................9
Ximes................................................9
RUINS.....................................................9
Chateau des Faussesflammes...........9
Gate of Sylaire...................................9
Ylourgne..........................................10
OTHER FEATURES....................................10
Forest of Averoigne.........................10
Marshes...........................................10

AND

SAVING THROWS
8
8

The Mists.........................................10
River Isoile.......................................10
Roads..............................................10
MONSTERS....................................10
BEASTS.................................................10
Dragons...........................................10
Homunculus (Flesh Golem).............11
Lou Carcolh (Carrion Crawler).........11
Loup-Garou (Werewolf)...................11
Serpents..........................................11
Vermin.............................................11
Wild Game.......................................11
Wolves............................................11
Wyvern............................................11
DEMONS AND SPIRITS...............................11
Cambion..........................................11
Chevel Mallet...................................11
Dames Blanches..............................12
Faun (Satyr)....................................12
Fee (Fay or Fey).............................12
Feu Follet (Will-O-Wisp)...................12
Lutin................................................12
Matagot...........................................12
Mullo (Vampire - Revenant).............12
Ondine.............................................12
Succubus.........................................12
MAGIC...........................................13
CLERIC SPELLS........................................13
MAGIC ITEMS..........................................13
Agrippa............................................13
Aspergillum.....................................13
Book of Dead Names.......................13
Book of Eibon..................................13
Crux Immissa..................................13
Fetishes...........................................14
Grimoire..........................................14
Magical Weapons............................14
Potions............................................14
Reliquary.........................................14
Rosary.............................................14
Scrolls.............................................14
Stoup...............................................14
VARIANT RULES.............................15
THAC0.................................................15
FEAR, HORROR, AND MADNESS..................15
Effects of Fear.................................16
Effects of Horror..............................16
Effects of Madness..........................16

CORRUPTION..........................................16
What is a Corruption Check?...........17
When to Make a corruption Check...17
How to Make a Corrruption Check...17
Determining the Chance of Failure..17
The Effects of Corruption.................19
Descent into darkness.....................19
The Thirteen Steps..........................19
Minor Changes................................21
Moderate Changes..........................21
Major Changes................................22
Redemption.....................................22
APPENDIX A: CLERIC SPELLS..........24
TABLE A.1 CLERIC SPELLS BY LEVEL...........24
CLERIC SPELL DESCRIPTIONS.....................24
1st Level Spells...............................24
2nd Level Spells..............................24
3rd Level Spells...............................25
4th Level Spells...............................25
5th Level Spells...............................26
6th Level Spells...............................26
APPENDIX B: WEAPONS & EQUIPMENT27
TABLE B.1 WEAPONS...............................27
TABLE B.2 NORMAL EQUIPMENT.................28
TABLE B.3 ARMOR..................................29

History

On Easter, in what has since been


decried as an unholy mockery of the
Resurrection, Averoigne was delivered
from the grip of the Black Death and
into an even more grim caretaker.
People awoke to find that a strange
mist had enveloped the land, clinging
to the ground and growing thicker and
heavier the further one moved away
from the heart of Averoigne. Those
who attempted to breech the mists
were turned back, unable to find their
way through, or simply vanished.

Not even the Church could stem the


tide of avarice and immorality that
tainted
Averoigne.
Clerics
too
succumbed to temptation, casting
aside vows of chastity and poverty.

Even the land itself seemed to turn


against the people. Crops withered
and the soil grew sallow and dry while
woodland paths became overgrown
with biting brambles. The once clear
waters of the River Isoile became
brackish and choked with mud. Colors
faded as the landscape became
shrouded in perpetual gloom.

Averoigne was once a prosperous


province of farmers and vintners,
envied for its fertile fields and robust
wines. Their coffers overflowing with
coin, the merchants and nobles grew
more corrupt with each passing
season. Their greed knew no bounds
and hedonism ran rampant throughout
the larger villages and towns no
extravagance too great, no sin too
wicked.

When
the
Black
Death
came,
Averoignes people flocked to the
cathedrals and churches, prostrating
themselves before God and begging
forgiveness. As the plague continued
to ravage Averoigne, its survivors drew
further away from the Church, seeking
salvation in pagan rituals and heresy.
Apostates arose in the larger towns
and cities, crying their outrage against
God
and
the
Church,
sealing
Averoignes fate.

Worse was the fate of those already


infected by the Black Death. The
progression of the illness was halted,
yet its symptoms lingered in the
infected,
neither
worsening
or
improving. Accused of trafficking with
the Devil, anyone showing signs of
illness
was
arrested,
tried
for
witchcraft, and executed or simply
driven into the wilderness.
The Church used the corruption of
Averoignes elite and the timing of the
ending of the Black Death to seize
power, appointing the Inquisition to
purge Averoigne of its immoral
nobility. Most of Averoignes nobles
were tried and executed in the Great
Purge and the Arch Bishop of Vyones
became the political and spiritual
leader of Averoigne.
Today, Averoigne is a shadowy husk,
enshrouded within an impenetrable

mist from which radiates apathy and


despair. Monsters from childrens
nightmares stalk the night and
malevolent spirits haunt crumbling
ruins. Indeed, Averoigne has been cast
into the Abyss.

Races

Averoigne is home to a diverse


population with differing beliefs and
customs, struggling to eke out
whatever existence they can within
the confines of the strange mists
enshrouding their land.

Averones
The Averones are the descendants of a
tribe of human warriors who settled
Averoigne
in
ancient
times,
establishing several settlements along
the River Isoile. When the Roman
Empire conquered the region, the
Averones
forsook
their
warrior
traditions in favor of the more civilized
customs and beliefs of their Roman
conquerors, becoming accomplished
farmers and tradesmen. Later, as
Christianity spread throughout the
Empire, the Averones renounced
paganism,
establishing
Christian
churches and monasteries upon the
ruins of their ancient temples and
shrines.
DRUIDS
Druids are an ancient order of priests,
shamans, and soothsayers who pay
homage to the Old Gods of
Averoigne. Before the advent of
Christianity, Druids tended to the
religious needs of the Averones,
leading rituals, providing spiritual
guidance, and acting as liaison to the
Averones many gods. Today, they are
regarded as apostates and heretics by
the Church.

The Church
Centered in the Great Cathedral of
Vyones, the Church holds absolute
authority over the lives of the people
of Averoigne. The Arch Bishop of
Vyones serves as the spiritual and
political leader of Averoigne, presiding
over matters of both ecclesiastical and
secular law.
THE INQUISITION
The Inquisition is a religious tribunal
convened by the Pope (the head if the
Church) to investigate and suppress
apostasy and heresy. The Inquisitions
authority in such matters Is absolute,
outweighing the authority granted by
any other ecclesiastical or secular
body.

THE ORDER OF SAINT BENEDICT


The Order of Saint Benedict is a
monastic order of the Church devoted
to scholarly work. Based in the Abbey
of Perigon, overlooking the tiny
farming village of Perigon in Lower
Averoigne, the Benedictine Monks
have taken it upon themselves to
investigate
and
chronicle
the
supernatural occurrences plaguing
Averoigne, putting them at odds with
the Inquisition.
THE ORDER OF SAINT BERNARD
The Order of Saint Bernard, more
commonly known as the Cistercian
Order, is a monastic order of the
Church devoted to enlightenment
through manual labor and selfsufficiency. Living in a secluded
monastery in the hills of Upper
Averoigne, the
Cistercian
Monks
support themselves by brewing ale,
farming, and trading goods with
nearby villages.

followers of the, they are actively


hunted by the Inquisition, brought to
trial, and executed.
Most accused witches are simply
magic users, whose ability to cast
spells and knowledge of herbalism
puts them at odds with Church dogma.

The Romani
The Romani are a group of nomadic
performers, troubadours, and seers
who travel throughout Averoigne in
small bands, hocking all manner of
herbal remedies and spells to the
superstitious Averones. Arriving in
Averoigne around the same time the
province was enveloped by the Mists,
many Averones regard the Romani
with suspicion, believing them tied to
the dark forces plaguing Averoigne.

Apostates and Heretics


Apostates and heretics are all too
common throughout Averoigne and
pose a significant and real threat to
the
authority
of
the
Church.
Surrounded by the supernatural, it is
very easy for the weak of faith to
abandon Church dogma, embracing
apostasy and heresy. Apostates are
perhaps the most dangerous, having
completely abandoned their religious
beliefs and renounced all ties to the
Church. Heretics are proponents of
variant religious beliefs contrary to
established Church dogma.
WITCHES
Practitioners of arcane magic, witches
(and
their
male
counterparts
warlocks) are reviled by the Church.
Widely feared and denounced as

Romani have swarthy completions


with dark hair and eyes. They dress in
bright, vibrantly colored clothing and
adorn themselves with all manner of
garish jewelry.

Demi-Humans
Demi-humans, in particular dwarves
and halflings, form an interesting
subculture within Averoigne society
an oppressed minority looked upon as

little more than sideshow freaks to be


loathed and ridiculed. With their own
cultures
swept
away
through
generations of decline, demi-humans
have little choice but to accept their
roles as fringe members of Averoignes
human-centric society.
Industrious and hard-working, dwarves
are grudgingly accepted as important,
but fringe members of society, living
either alone or in small family groups
among the human folk of Averoignes
larger towns and cities.
Largely
considered
untrustworthy,
Halflings eke out their meager
existences on the fringes of human
society, living as street performers,
thieves, and urchins.
Elves, owing largely to their fee
heritage, are generally reviled among
the superstitious human folk of
Averoigne who view them as demonic
woodland spirits in humanoid form.
Preferring to avoid human contact,
most elves do little to dissuade
humans of their misconceptions.

Alignment

Unlike more traditional Dungeons &


Dragons
settings,
the
axis
of
alignment in Averoigne is aligned
along good vs. evil rather than law vs.
chaos. When referencing either the
Dungeon Masters Rulebook, Players
Manual, or Expert Rulebook treat all
instances of lawful alignment as
good alignment and treat all
instances of chaotic alignment as
evil alignment.

Characters

Follow the rules for creating characters


found on page 48-52 of the 4th Edition

Players Manual, with the following


changes as noted below:

Step 1: Roll for Ability


Scores
Use
the
classic
method
for
determining your characters ability
scores: roll four six-sided dice (4d6),
dropping the lowest; so, if you roll a 5,
5, 4, and 2, you would drop the 2 and
add the rest together, giving you a 14.
Do this six times and then arrange the
numbers however you like among the
six ability scores. Ability scores can be
adjusted in Step 3.

Step 2: Choose a Class


Players are free to choose from any of
the character classes listed in the
Players Manual. However, it should be
noted that humans enjoy significant
social advantages over demi-humans.
Players should consult the DM before
choosing one of the demi-human
classes for their character.
Clerics are members of the Roman
Catholic
Church,
a
monotheistic
religion that dominates the political
and spiritual landscape of Averoigne.
All clerics indirectly serve the Arch
Bishop of Vyones, the spiritual and
political leader of Averoigne. Clerics
may not choose to be of Romani
descent
when
detailing
their
background. More information on
clerics can be found in Magic and
Appendix A: Cleric Spells.
Fighters are common throughout
Averoigne, serving as bodyguards,
soldiers, and armed retainers for more
powerful merchants, noblemen, and
other officials.
Reviled as witches and heretics, magic
users live on the fringes of Averoigne

society, practicing their skills in


secrecy so as to avoid the attention of
the Inquisition. Only among the
Romani are magic users readily
accepted.
Thieves are common throughout
Averoigne, especially in the larger
cities and towns where they can ply
their skills without fear of the harsh
justice dispensed in the smaller
villages.
Demi-humans, particularly dwarves
and halflings, form a beleaguered
subculture within Averoigne society.
They are an oppressed minority,
looked upon as little more than
sideshow freaks to be loathed and
ridiculed. With their own cultures
swept away through generations of
decline, demi-humans have little
choice but to accept the social
injustice heaped upon them as fringe
members of a human-centric society.
Industrious and hard-working, dwarves
are grudgingly accepted as important,
but fringe members of society, living
either alone or in small family groups
in Averoignes larger cities and towns.

society, living as street performers,


thieves, and urchins.
Elves, owing largely to their fee
heritage, are generally reviled among
the superstitious Averones who view
them as demonic woodland spirits in
humanoid form. Preferring to avoid
human contact, most elves do little to
dissuade
the
Averones
misconceptions.

Step 3: Exchange Ability


Score Points
Follow
the
standard
rules
for
exchanging ability score points as
described on page 49 of the Players
Manual.

Step 4: Roll for Hit Points


Do not roll for hit points as described
on page 50 of the Players Manual.
Instead, 1st level characters receive
the maximum number of hit points
allotted to their character class and
adjusted for their Constitution Score.
Thus, a 1st level cleric with a
Constitution score of 14 begins play
with 7 hit points (6 base with a +1
bonus for their high Constitution
score).

Step 5: Roll for Money


Follow
the
standard
rules
for
determining
starting
money
as
described on page 50 of the Players
Manual.

Step 6: Buy Equipment

Largely
considered
untrustworthy,
Halflings eke out their meager
existences on the fringes of Averoigne

Follow the standard rules for buying


equipment as described on page 50 of
the Players Manual; however, use the
equipment lists in Appendix B when
purchasing equipment.

Step 7: Determine your


Armor Class, Hit Roll chart,
and Saving Throws
Follow
the
standard
rules
for
determining your characters Armor
Class and Saving Throws as described
on page 50 of the Players Manual. The
Hit Roll chart is replaced by THAC0
see Variant Rules.

Step 8: Note Adjustments


for Ability Scores
On your character sheet, note the
adjustments for your characters
ability scores as described in the
Players Manual.

Step 9: Give your


Character a Name and
Alignment
Give your character a name and
choose their alignment. Note that evil
may not be chosen for your
characters starting alignment.

Step 10: Choose a


Background for your
Character
Everyone comes from someplace and
your character is no different. Where is
your character from? What did they do
for a profession before beginning their
career as an adventurer? If your
character is human, are they of
Averones or Romani descent?

While the DM may provide general


guidelines, the exact details of your
characters background will be left for
you to determine. Remember, such
information is fluff, and should not
imply or convey any advantages or
disadvantages to your character
other than those already defined for
the campaign or established through
roleplaying. For example, Romani
characters are mistrusted by nonRomani, and it should be expected
that the DM will impose penalties to
NPC reactions to reflect this mistrust.

Places
Averoigne is divided into two primary
regions: Upper Averoigne, being those
lands north and west of the Forest of
Averoigne, and Lower Averoigne, being
those lands south and east of the
forest.

Cities, Towns, and Villages


ABBEY OF PERIGON
The abbey, surrounded by a small
village which shares its name, is home

to a small group of Benedictine monks


devoted
to
investigating
and
chronicling the strange occurrences
plaguing Averoigne.
CISTERCIAN MONASTERY
This, the largest of Averoignes
monasteries, is built upon the ruins of
a Druidic holy site. The Cistercian
monks living here practice a life of
manual labor and self-sufficiency,
supporting themselves by farming and
brewing ale.
LA FRENAIE
Located at the junction of the River
Isoile and the road from Ximes, La
Frenaies location makes it a natural
crossroads for trade if only any trade
moved through Averoigne anymore.

SAINTE ZENOBIE
Once a large village of farmers and
woodcutters in Lower Averoigne,
Sainte Zenobie has been beset by a
dreadful curse. The fields have turned
sallow and a terrible beast stalks the
surrounding hills and woodlands.
TOURAINE
Touraine is a large, once prosperous
village in Upper Averoigne, surrounded
by rolling hills and extensive farmland.
VYONES
The walled city of Vyones serves as
the capital of Averoigne and houses
the Great Cathedral of Vyones home
of
the
Archbishop
of
Vyones,
Averoignes political and spiritual
leader. Outside Vyones' walls is a large
cemetery and the plains beyond host
numerous small farms, inns, and
taverns.
XIMES
The second largest city of Averoigne,
Ximes has smaller walls than Vyones.
The Bishop of Ximes lives here,
presiding over local matters of church
and state.

Ruins

LES HIBOUX
Les Hiboux is a small village in Lower
Averoigne, straddling the marshes fed
by the River Isoile. Once a prosperous
community of farmers and fishermen,
the encroaching marsh has reduced
the village to a stagnating husk of
abandoned homes and lingering
dregs.

CHATEAU DES FAUSSESFLAMMES


Faussesflammes is a crumbling ruin in
Lower Averoigne, not far from Perigon.
The ruins are reportedly haunted by
evil spirits that owe fealty to a Mullo
(vampire) lord.
GATE OF SYLAIRE
Only three moss covered standing
stones mark the ruins of this ancient
Druidic shrine. Folklore holds that the
veil between worlds is thin here and
that the site is a portal to another
realm.

YLOURGNE
Ylourgne, a great, craggy pile built by
a line of evil and marauding barons
now extinct, is a place even goatherds
shun. The wrathful spectres of its
bloody lords are said to move
turbulently about its crumbling halls;
their scullery maids and retainers are
the Undead. No one dwells within the
shadows of Ylourgnes cliff-founded
walls.

Other Features
FOREST OF AVEROIGNE
This large gloomy forest infested
with all manner of fay creatures,
goblins, and other malevolent spirits
sprawls across the heart of Averoigne,
dividing the province in two.
MARSHES
Much of Lower Averoigne is dominated
by brackish marshes and shadowy
fens fed by the River Isoile. A damp,
gnat-infested fog hangs over the
entire region, evoking feelings of loss,
sadness, and gloom.
THE MISTS
Little is known of the strange mists
that envelop Averoigne. They defy all
logic, seeming as little more than a
dense fog; yet foiling all attempts to
penetrate them. Those who enter the
mists either emerge a short time later,
disoriented and confused, or are never
seen or heard from again.
Adding more to the mists sinister
reputation, it appears that people from
beyond the mists can enter Averoigne
freely. However, once inside the mists,
they too become trapped.
RIVER ISOILE
The River Isoile runs through central
Averoigne, its brackish waters feeding
the fens and marshes that dominate

Lower Averoigne as well as the once


fertile fields surrounding Vyones.
ROADS
An old cobblestone road runs from
Vyones, through Ximes, to La Frenaie,
and then northward to Touraine; a
well-traveled dirt track leads from
Ximes to La Frenaie, continuing on to
Sainte Zenobie and ending at Vyones.
The Abbey of Perigon is connected to
Sainte Zenobie by an old rutted cart
track, and a similar track connects
Vyones to Les Hiboux.

Monsters

Averoigne is plagued by all manner of


beasts, both natural and supernatural,
which stalk the night searching for
prey.

Beasts
DRAGONS
Dragons are large, fire-breathing,
scaly, horned, reptilian creatures with
leathery, bat-like wings, four legs, and
long, muscular prehensile tails. They
slumber
in
forgotten
caves,
periodically emerging from their
underground lairs to wreak havoc and
destruction upon the countryside
before retiring once more.
Folklore holds that the blood of a
dragon has magical properties which
promote longevity and sharpen the
intellect.

HOMUNCULUS (FLESH GOLEM)


Homunculus are animated constructs
stitched together from human remains
and brought to life using forbidden
necromantic rituals.
LOU CARCOLH (CARRION
CRAWLER)
The Lou Carcolh, or Crawler of
Carrion, is a frightening snail-like
creature that lives in underground
caves, tombs, and burial mounds. The
lou carcolh seizes its prey with it long
tentacles, causing paralysis, before
dragging it towards its gaping, fanged
maw.
LOUP-GAROU (WEREWOLF)
Also known as the rougarou, the
loup-garou is a human who can
change into a wolf at will. Loup-garou
are cunning creatures who go to great
lengths to conceal their true natures.
They prefer to live on the fringes of
society, preying upon those foolish
enough to venture into the wilderness
alone.

SERPENTS
Serpents are common throughout
Averoigne, ranging from harmless
grass snakes to small venomous
vipers. According to folklore, serpents
are synonymous with evil and
witchcraft.
VERMIN
Numerous small creatures such as
bats, rats, and giant spiders lair in
darkened caves and ruins as well as
the villages and towns of Averoigne.
WILD GAME
The Forest of Averoigne and the
surrounding hills are home to a
diminishing
population
of
game
animals such as boar, deer, grouse,
and pheasants.
WOLVES
Although the wolves of Averoigne
avoid human contact, tales persist of
violent attacks upon children and lone
travelers.
According
to
folklore,
children carried off by wolves will
return years later as adult loup-garou
(werewolves), exacting revenge upon
those who failed to protect them as
children.
WYVERN
According to folklore, wyverns are
distant cousins of dragons, much

smaller and possessing a dragon-like


head and wings, two legs, and a long
tail. Wyverns are typically associated
with cold weather and ice and are said
to have a venomous bite.

Demons and Spirits


CAMBION
The offspring of the unholy union of a
succubus
(incubus)
and
human,
cambions appear as normal humans,
save for some minor physical trait
denoting their demonic lineage (black
eyes, darker skin, etc.). They possess
a strong affinity for magic, often
possessing innate magical powers.
The cambions human parentage
determines its gender the offspring
of an incubus and human being always
female and the offspring of a succubus
and human being always male.
Cambions are always evil.
CHEVEL MALLET
The Chevel Mallet, or Black Horse, is
a malicious spirit appearing in the
guise of a large black stallion, bridled
and saddled, to lure weary travelers to
their doom.
DAMES BLANCHES
Also known as White Women, Dames
Blanches are female spirits that lurk in
ravines, fords, and near bridges, trying
to attract the attention of passersby.
Once enthralled, the Dame Blanches
victim is compelled to perform a single
task, which, when completed, will
release them from the spirits thrall.
FAUN (SATYR)
Faun, also known as satyrs, are
lustful supernatural spirits, half-man
half-goat, that haunt the Forest of
Averoigne, singing bawdy songs and
engaging in all manner of drunken
debauchery. They are infamous for

using their enchanted pipes to lure


unwary women into the forest for
sexual encounters.
FEE (FAY OR FEY)
Fee are supernatural spirits that live
in secluded places seldom visited by
humans. Once angelic beings, they
became trapped between Heaven and
Hell when Satan was cast out by God.
FEU FOLLET (WILL-O-WISP)
The feu follet, or will-o-wisp, is a
ghostly orb of light that appears
briefly
at
night,
floating
over
cemeteries, swamps, or bogs. Folklore
maintains that feu follet are spirits of
the dead which, when followed, will
lead pursuers to their deaths.
LUTIN
The Lutin is a malicious fee spirit that
haunts the homes of families
deserving of the lutins wicked
attentions. They are known to harass
their victims with all manner of minor
troubles, such as blunting tools and
filling shoes with pebbles. Salt is
considered abhorrent to them and
they will go out of their way to avoid
crossing it when spilled upon the
ground.
MATAGOT
The matagot is an evil spirit that takes
the form of an animal (usually a black
cat) and serves as a familiar to
witches.
MULLO (VAMPIRE - REVENANT)
Mullo are the restless spirits of people
who died of unnatural causes or were
buried without proper funeral rites.
Mullo appear much as they did in life,
except they always wear white clothes
and their hair is long and unkempt,
extending
to
their
feet.
They
relentlessly stalk their victims
usually a relative who had caused

their death, or hadn't properly


observed the burial ceremonies, or
kept the deceased's possessions
instead of destroying them as was
proper.
According to folklore, the only way to
kill a Mullo is to drive a wooden stake
through its heart, then chop of its
head and place holy wafers upon the
creatures tongue.
Romani traditions hold that a Mullo
cannot be destroyed and that it will
continue to rise from the grave until it
has its vengeance.
ONDINE
Ondines are elemental water spirits
that appear as beautiful human
females. Found in secluded forest
pools or waterfalls to which they are
bound, their beautiful singing can
sometimes be heard over the sound of
the water. Unlike humans, ondines
lack a soul. Marriage with a human
shortens their lives, but earns the
ondine an immortal human soul and
releases them from confines of their
watery homes.
SUCCUBUS
The succubus is a demonic entity that
appears in dreams, taking the form of
a beautiful woman in order to seduce
men through sexual activity. Their
male counterparts, incubi, fulfill an
identical role in the seduction and
damnation of women.
Folklore holds that succubae are the
daughters of Lilith, Adams first wife
and the mother of all demons. These
same traditions further maintain that
succubae can freely change between
female and male forms.

Magic

Averoigne is a low-magic setting,


meaning that character will not have
access to the typical array of magical
items usually available.
The Church considers magic to be an
evil pagan practice. Clerics do not cast
spells (although see below), and other
spell casters are viewed with great
suspicion. Although ecclesiastical laws
are not rigidly enforced, spell casters
who draw attention to themselves are
subject to arrest and trial by the
Inquisition

with
subsequent
imprisonment and execution left to the
civil authorities. Spell casters who
occasionally aid the citizens of
Averoigne, without actively harming
them, will not likely draw the attention
of Inquisitorial authorities.

Cleric Spells
In light of the authority granted the
Inquisition, clerics have found an
interesting way to circumvent the
ecclesiastical ban on magic and the
use of spells. Clerics do not choose
spells before an adventure. Instead,
the cleric invokes the power of God
through prayer, spontaneously casting
any spell permitted from the cleric
spell list, up to their maximum number
of spells per level. Thus, a 3rd level
cleric may cast up to two 1st level
spells per day.
When casting spells, clerics do not use
the spell tables from the Players
Manual or Expert Rulebook. Instead,
they use the spell tables and
descriptions from Appendix A in the
back of this book.

Magic Items
AGRIPPA
The Agrippa is a magical tome, its
cover the color of blood and its pages
made of stretched human skin. The
book is said to contain the true names
of several demons that hold dominion
over fate and false prophecy.
ASPERGILLUM
The aspergillum is a ritualistic macelike weapon, which dispenses holy
water upon enemies in hand-to-hand
combat.
An aspergillum conveys a +2 bonus
to-hit and damage against undead.

BOOK OF DEAD NAMES


Also known as the Necronomicon,
the Book of Dead Names is a grimoire
of spells and rituals for summoning
and controlling the dead and those
ancient gods that hold dominion over
the underworld.
BOOK OF EIBON
One of several ancient and forbidden
texts, the Book of Eibon is an occult
volume containing veneration rituals,
magical formulae, and treatises on

demonology and the


otherworldly beings.

conjuring

of

CRUX IMMISSA
The Crux Immissa, or simply the
cross, is the divine symbol of the
Church and, when wielded by a pious
person, is anathema to evil spirits and
the undead.
The Crux Immissa takes the place of a
clerics holy symbol and is used when
the cleric attempts to turn undead.
FETISHES
A fetish is an object representing a
spirit that is used to establish a bond
between its possessor and the
supernatural. Fetishes impart magical
powers and are typically worn or
possessed to assure protection, ward
off evil, provide luck, or bestow curses
upon enemies.
Fetishes range from dolls and carved
images to common stones or animal
parts such as hair, claws or bones.
Sometimes they are small pouches or
boxes of "medicine" that contain small
parts of plants, fruits or vegetables, or
animal hair, paws, dung or liver, spittle
or urine. Usually it is believed that the
spirit that originally resided in these
objects is still present within the
fetish.
Fetishes encompass a rather broad
variety of magical items, and the use
of such items will almost certainly
mark the user as a heretic, drawing
the attention of the Inquisition.
GRIMOIRE
A grimoire is a specially prepared
tome which holds a magic users
repertoire of magical spells and
incantations.

Magic users must have a grimoire in


order to learn and memorize spells.
MAGICAL WEAPONS
The folklore of the Averones is rife with
stories of magical weapons usually
swords believed to convey enhanced
combat prowess or magical powers to
their wielders.
Most magical weapons found in
Averoigne will only provide bonuses to
Hit and Damage rolls, with other
properties being very rare.
POTIONS
Potions are among the most common
magical items found in Averoigne,
ranging from the herbal remedies and
tonics of apothecaries and the Romani
to the magical concoctions prepared
by witches and used to bewitch the
unwary.
RELIQUARY
A reliquary is a holy vessel containing
the bones of a Christian Saints that is
said to bestow holy blessings upon its
bearer and those nearby.
The bearer of a reliquary and any
allies within a 10 radius are affected
as if by a Bless spell, improving their
morale by +1 and giving the
recipients a +1 bonus on all to-hit and
damage rolls.
ROSARY
More commonly known as prayer
beads, the Rosary is the primary
device used by clerics to commune
with God and receive His blessings.
The Rosary is anathema to evil spirits
and the undead.

The Rosary is a ceremonial device


used as the material component in the
casting of all cleric spells. Clerics
cannot cast spells unless they have a
rosary.
SCROLLS
Scrolls are widely used in Averoigne as
vessels for recording religious rites
and prayers as well as arcane rituals
and spells. The Benedictine monks of
Perigon have gone to great lengths to
secure whatever scrolls they can,
storing them in a great vault beneath
their Abbey.

STOUP
A stoup is a holy water font located
near the entrance of a church. The
holy water within is used for
ceremonial purposes and to provide
protection from evil.

Variant Rules
This section details the House rules
used in the campaign.

THAC0
THAC0 is an anagram meaning To Hit
Armor Class 0 and was first
introduced in the Advanced Dungeons
& Dragons 2nd Edition rules. Although
THAC0 replaces the standard Hit Roll
chart, the mechanic still works the
same.

To determine the die roll needed to hit


a target, subtract the targets AC from
your THAC0. This will give you the
number needed to hit the target with
your attack. For example, if your
THAC0 is 17 and your target has an AC
of 7, you will need to roll a 7 or greater
to hit that target.
Table 1: THAC0
Level
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

Fighte
r*
19
19
19
17
17
17
15
15
15
13
13
13
11
11
11
9
9
9
7
7

THAC0
Cleric*
*
19
19
19
19
17
17
17
17
15
15
15
15
13
13
13
13
11
11
11
11

Magic
User
19
19
19
19
19
17
17
17
17
17
15
15
15
15
15
13
13
13
13
13

* Also Dwarves, Elves, Halflings


** Also Thieves
A natural roll of 1 will always miss,
regardless of any modifiers applied.
Likewise, a natural roll of 20 will
always hit.

Fear, Horror, and Madness


This mechanic is adapted from the
Ravenloft Campaign Setting for AD&D.

Averoigne is a land beset by monsters


and forces the human mind was
simply not designed to comprehend
things that reek of the macabre and
supernatural.
Fear is the least of the mental
conditions a character must endure.
Characters may become frightened
when confronted by a truly powerful
monster, upon learning of a terrible
evil, or upon finding themselves alone
and vulnerable in a dangerous place.
More intense than fear, horror causes
a character to reject what their senses
tell them. Characters may become
horrified
when
confronted
with
circumstances that confound logic and
common sense. The situation might be
terribly gruesome; in others, it could
just be something the character
believes impossible.
Beyond fear and horror lies the realm
of madness. Unlike those lesser states,
madness is not a passing phase.
Characters experience madness when
their mind has been exposed to things
beyond its ability to accept or
understand.
While
a
resourceful
character can cope with fear and
come to terms with horror, they will
find madness a most debilitating state.
When a character is confronted by a
situation that inspires fear, horror, or
madness, he or she receives a special
saving throw to resist the effects of
the situation. Roll 1d20 and compare
the result to your Wisdom score,
adding or subtracting any applicable
modifiers from the table below. If you
roll equal to or less than your Wisdom
score, you resist the effects of the
situation.

Table 2: Modifiers for Fear, Horror, and Madness Checks


Modifier

Condition
Character has an Intelligence
score of:

Character is a:

Fear

Horror

-3

-3

Madne
ss
-3

4-5
6-8
9-12
1315
1617
18

-2
-1
0
+1

-2
-1
0
+1

-2
-1
0
+1

+2

+2

+2

+3

+3

+3

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
-1
0
-2
-2
-2
-2

-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4

Cleric
Fighter
Magic User
Thief
Dwarf
Elf
Halfling

Note: These modifiers are cumulative. Thus, a Magic User with an Intelligence
score of 16 has a +2 bonus to Fear and Horror checks, and a -2 penalty to
Madness checks.
EFFECTS OF FEAR
Characters whom succumb to fear will
immediately attempt to flee from
whatever situation is causing them
fear. Characters that cannot flee the
area will be affected as if overcome by
horror (see below).
Once removed from the situation, the
character is no longer affected by fear
and will be able to function normally.
However, if the character is exposed
to the same (or similar) situation
again, the character will automatically
fail their Fear check.
EFFECTS OF HORROR
Characters
overcome
by
horror
become paralyzed with fear, either
attempting to flee the situation,
viciously attacking anything blocking
their escape even allies, or cowering
in terror until the situation passes.

Once the situation passes or the


character escapes, the effects of the
horror will continue to linger for 6 +
1d4 days. During this time, the
character suffers a -2 penalty to all
Fear, Horror, and Madness checks and,
if confronted by the same (or similar
situation),
the
character
will
automatically fail their Horror check.
Once the lingering effects of horror
have passed, the character will forever
more suffer a -2 penalty to any Fear,
Horror, or Madness checks related to
the same (or similar) situations.
EFFECTS OF MADNESS
Characters overcome by madness are
no longer capable of acting of their
own free will. Completely succumbing
to the horrors they have witnessed,
the character retreats into their own
mind,
incapable
of
functioning

normally until the


madness are cured.

effects

of

the

Characters overcome by madness, for


all intents and purposes, become NPCs
under the control of the DM.

Corruption
The greatest danger to those who
battle the horrors plaguing Averoigne
is not death, but the seductive,
corrupting force of evil. Indeed, it is all
too easy for even the most noble and
valiant of heroes to gradually become
that which he has devoted his entire
life to destroying.
In most cases, characters behave in
the heroic fashion expected of them.
However, from time to time, players
opt for their character to undertake
actions of questionable morality. In
most campaigns, they could easily get
away with such things, provided that
the character did not perform an
action so heinous as to require an
alignment change. In Averoigne,
things are not so simple.
WHAT IS A CORRUPTION CHECK?
According
to
Romani
traditions,
unknown entities collectively known as
the Dark Powers maintain constant
vigil over the actions of every living
thing in Averoigne. No evil deed goes
unnoticed, the shadowy gaze of the
Dark Powers falling upon the wrongdoer.
In order to determine whether or not a
given act draws the attention of the
Dark Powers, the DM makes use of a
special game mechanic called a
Corruption check. A Corruption check
is, quite simply, a means of prodding
characters away from acts of evil.
Characters who follow the course of
heroes and champions will never have

to make a Corruption check; whereas


those who are less pure of heart, often
treading the gray edges of Hell, will
make frequent checks.
While the chance of failing a given
Corruption check is low, those who
must make them repeatedly will surely
fail sooner or later, sinking into a mire
of evil that only the purest of heart
can ever hope to escape.
WHEN TO MAKE A CORRUPTION
CHECK
Whenever a character undertakes an
action that might be considered evil, a
Corruption check may be required.
Exactly what sorts of actions require
Corruption checks, however, is at the
sole discretion of the DM.
As a general rule, the DM should only
require a Corruption check when a
character
willingly
commits
a
premeditated act of evil. If the
character is suffering from some form
of mental domination, no check is
required. If the deed is a necessity
forced upon the character by his
current situation, no check is required.
The DM will decide on a case by case
basis whether or not a Corruption
check is required.
HOW TO MAKE A CORRRUPTION
CHECK
A Corruption check is nothing more
than a percentile roll. When the DM
decides to require a check, he assigns
a chance of failure and then rolls
1d1OO. If the roll is above the chance
of failure, the attention of the Dark
Powers was focused elsewhere, and
the character does not draw their
attention.
If the roll is equal to or less than the
chance of failure, however, the
character has attracted the attention

of the Dark Powers. In recognition of


his misdeeds, the character is granted
a new special ability but not without
a price. In addition to this new ability,
the character is burdened with some
manner of disadvantage or weakness.
DETERMINING THE CHANCE OF
FAILURE
Once the DM decides that an act
requires a Corruption check, he
assigns a chance of failure. Evil acts
range
from
petty
crimes
to

unspeakable deeds of debauchery,


and the nature of the act mandates
the severity of the check.
Table 3 indicates chances of failure
associated with common acts of evil. A
particularly vile deed should have its
chance of failure increased by half.
Mitigating circumstances which played
a part in the character's decision to do
evil, may reduce the chance of failure,
but remember, the DM has final say in
all such cases.

Table 3: Recommended Corruption Checks


Evil NPC
or
Monster
1%
1%
3%
2%

Victim is a/an
Neutral
Good
NPC or
NPC or
Monster
Friend
1%
2%
2%
4%
3%
6%
1%
3%
2%
5%
6%
10%
3%
6%

PC,
Family, or
Innocent
3%
6%
9%
6%
8%
1%
+
10%

4%
10%

1%
1%
7%
+

5%
4%
3%
1%
+
+

7%
7%
6%
2%
+
+

Unholy Acts

Evil Faith

Breaking a tenet
Breaking an oath
Breaking a solemn vow
Defilement
Desecration

Neutral
Faith
1%
2%
4%
5%
8%

Good
Faith
2%
5%
8%
10%
+

Own
Faith
5%
10%
+
+
+

Laying a Curse

Frustratin
g
1%
2%
4%

Troubleso
me
2%
4%
8%

Dangerou
s
4%
8%
16%

Lethal

Crime or Act of Violence


Assault, unprovoked
Assault, grievous
Betrayal, minor
Betrayal, major
Extortion
Lying
Murder, brutal
Murder, pre-meditated (nonbrutal)
Theft, grave robbing
Theft, major
Theft, minor
Threats of violence
Torture, routine
Torture, sadistic

Highly Justified
Justified
Unjustified

Other Acts
Casting an Evil Spell (Caster is of
Good Alignment)
Casting an Evil Spell (Caster is of
Neutral Alignment)
Casting an Evil Spell (Caster is of Evil
Alignment)

8%
16%
32%

2% chance per level of the spell


1% chance per level of the spell
-

- No Corruption check is required for such an act.


+ These acts draw the attention of the Dark Powers. When a player commits such
an act, the DM is free to assign any chance of failure. As a general rule, the
minimum value selected for such a check should be 50%. In extreme cases, the
DM might even mandate a 100% chance of failure.

THE EFFECTS OF CORRUPTION


Once a Corruption check is failed, the
character's spirit becomes tainted with
evil and a gradual process of decay
begins. If left unchecked, this gradual
decay will result in the ultimate
corruption of the character. The DM
will provide details about exactly
which powers and flaws are gained
through the process of corruption,
although some examples have been
provided below.
DESCENT INTO DARKNESS
It is said no man is born into evil and
that each person makes his own way
in the world, choosing for himself the
path of light or the path of darkness.
Although the Dark Powers eagerly
welcome evildoers, theirs is a cold and
deadly embrace.
Many different paths lead to the
ultimate destruction resulting from an
evil life. Although the final effect of
each path is the same, the road
traveled
varies
from
the
truly
depraved to the tragic.

lycanthropy, or otherwise transform its


victim into a copy of itself. Vampires,
lycanthropes, ghouls, and spirits force
people down the path of darkness in
this way.
Curses: Curses and magical afflictions
sometimes drag characters into the
darkness of absolute corruption. In
most cases, the character has
received the curse in response to evil
acts he has perpetrated upon another.
Romani traditions speak of rare and
extremely powerful curses that can
transform
their
victims
into
lycanthropes or undead creatures.
Dark Pacts: From time to time, a dark
and terrible entity will respond to the
entreaties of a lesser being, but the
price for its services almost always
leaves a mark on the petitioner's
spirit. Even those requesting beneficial
or charitable services soon discover
some horrible twist entwined within
such pacts.

Seduction: By far the most tragic route


to darkness is the way by which an
innocent is lured into committing
increasingly evil acts, drifting further
and further from possible redemption
with each new crime.
The mysterious Dark Powers never
engage in this practice. Whatever they
might be, the Dark Powers do not lead
the innocent astray. No person comes
to their attention unless he willingly
commits an act of evil.
Preying: This fall from grace is all the
more lamentable because the victims
commit no wrong. These characters
have been attacked by some creature
able to sap its victims life force,
convey
the
dread
disease
of

Malevolence: Those who fall into this


category seldom feel any remorse for
their heinous deeds. Whether their
actions
are
dictated
by
cold,
calculating logic or spawned in the
wild frenzy of passion makes no
difference. They commit evil solely for
the pleasure derived through the
suffering of their victims.

THE THIRTEEN STEPS


Traditional gallows have thirteen steps
leading from the firm soil of life to the
gaping maw of death. The same
number of strides will carry one from
the ranks of the pure and wholesome
Table 4: Steps of Corruption
Level of
Steps
Failed
Corruption
Checks
I
0
Pure
II
0
Clean
III
0
Redeeemed
IV
1
Unclean
V
2
Corrupted
VI
3
Accursed
VII
4
Beast
VIII
5
Creature
IX
6
Monster
X
7
Demilord
XI
8
Lord
XII
9
Overlord
XIII
10
Darklord
Pure: A pure character is one whom
has never been called upon to make a
Corruption check. As soon as a
character makes their first Corruption
check (even if the check is passed),
this purity is lost and the character
descends to clean. While all are born
into this group, few possess the moral
stamina to resist corruption.
Clean: Characters who have been
called upon to make a Corruption
check, but never failed one, fall into
this category.
Redeemed: Although one can turn
away from the twisting path of evil,
even after traveling upon it, few are
strong enough to withstand evils
seductive promises.
Redeemed characters have failed
Corruption checks in the past and
been touched by the Dark Powers, but
they have torn themselves free from

to the gruesome cadre of the damned.


Table 4: Steps of Corruption indicates
the thirteen stages of corruption that
the unwary can pass through as they
descend deeper into darkness.

Minor
Changes

Moderate
Changes

Major
Changes

1
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

1
2
3
3
3
3
3

1
2
3
4

the wicked embrace of evil and


regained a state of grace. While they
can never again be pure or clean, they
have, at least for now, saved
themselves from the perils of eternal
torment at the hands of the Dark
Powers.
Unclean: When begins taking their first
steps down the road to corruption and
ultimate darkness, salvation is still in
sight. During this stage, a person is
deemed to be unclean, and,
although they have strayed from the
path of good, they have not yet
traveled too far down the trail of
damnation.
An unclean character has failed one
Corruption check. His soul bears the
mark of darkness like the kiss of a hot
branding iron. He has received some
singular gift (a minor change, as
described below in the Changes

section) from the Dark Powers. At the


same time, however, his evil has
brought him a curse. Usually, no
outward change manifests in the
appearance of an unclean character.
Redeeming oneself at this stage is still
not overly difficult.
Corrupted: Upon failing a second
powers check, a character passes from
unclean to corrupted. At this point, it
becomes apparent that he is either
unable
or
unwilling
to
seek
redemption. Because of this, it is very
difficult to return to a state of grace.
Accursed: If a corrupted character
continues in his vile actions, he passes
from corrupted to accursed. At this
point,
redemption
is
almost
impossible; even powerful magic and
priestly intervention can do little to
help.
Accursed characters stand a fair
chance of becoming NPCs. When a
character sinks to this level of
corruption,
the
DM
should
roll
percentile dice for him. If the result is
25% or less, the character is
consumed by darkness and becomes
an NPC under control of the DM.
Beast: When a character progresses to
this level and undergoes his first
moderate change, he can no longer
hide his mutations. With great effort, a
beastly character might pass for a
normal man at a distance, but even
the most casual of examinations
reveal something is amiss.
Upon reaching this level of corruption,
the character's alignment becomes
neutral (if it is not already neutral),
and all penalties for involuntary
alignment changes apply.

Characters who have followed the


path of destruction this far are almost
never able to redeem themselves. The
DM should again roll percentile dice
and, if the result is 50% or less, the
character becomes an NPC.
Creature: The changes that overcome
a character at this point are truly
terrible. The character has proven
himself to be utterly evil and unworthy
of redemption, and decent people
avoid all contact with him.
At this point, the Dungeon Master
should again roll percentile dice, a roll
of 75% or less indicating that the
character becomes an NPC.
Monster: Upon descending to this level
of corruption, the character is fully
transformed into a creature of evil and
becomes an NPC under the control of
the DM.
Demilord,
Lord,
and
Darklord:
Characters
that
have
advanced
beyond the stage of monster are
beyond any hope of redemption,
having been fully embraced by the
Dark Powers. They are true paragons
of evil, irrevocably damned.
Note: These higher stages are only
included for the further development
of the character as an NPC.
MINOR CHANGES
Minor changes are not immediately
obvious and the corrupted character
can generally conceal such changes
from others. Some examples of minor
changes are provided, but the DM will
determine the exact nature of any
changes which occur.
1. The character develops infravision
equal to that of an elf, but he finds the
light of day so bright that he suffers a

-2 penalty to all saving throws while


exposed to it.
2. The character develops acute
hearing, giving him a +25% chance to
hear noises. However, loud sounds
require him to make a saving throw vs.
paralysis or be dazed for 1d4 rounds.
3. One of the character's physical
ability scores (Strength, Dexterity, or
Constitution) increases by one point.
At the same time, however, one of his
mental scores (Intelligence, Wisdom,
or Charisma) decreases by one point.
MODERATE CHANGES
Moderate changes are more obvious
than minor ones. A character must
take fairly drastic measures to conceal
such changes from those around him.
In any case, a close examination of the
character will reveal that something is
clearly amiss.
1) The characters vision becomes so
acute that he can see clearly in the
dark; however, his eyes have been
transformed to look like those of a cat.
His Charisma drops by one point.
2) The character can scale and move
along walls and vertical surfaces as if
he were a spider, moving at his normal
speed. However, the strange spines
and suckers on his hands and feet
drop his Charisma by one point.
3) The character's face becomes
distorted and grotesque, causing his
Charisma to drop by half and forcing
all those who look into his eyes to
make a saving throw vs. spells or be
overcome with fear.
MAJOR CHANGES
Major changes are so readily apparent
that it is impossible for the character
to conceal them.

1) The character's skin becomes a


pale, deathly gray. Sunlight now
inflicts him with 1d4 points of damage
per round, but he is unaffected by
cold- and ice-based attacks.
2) The character becomes a conduit
for negative energy, enabling him to
drain one life-energy level with a
successful unarmed melee attack. The
character can be affected by holy
water and may be turned as if he were
undead.
3) The character becomes a hulking,
feral beast. All three of his physical
ability scores (Strength, Dexterity, and
Constitution) increase by two points,
but his mental scores (Intelligence,
Wisdom, or Charisma) drop by an
equal number of points.
REDEMPTION
The longer someone treads the path of
darkness, the harder it becomes to
return to a state of grace. Still, if
someone who was momentarily led or
drawn astray acts quickly to change
his ways, redemption is possible.
Characters can attempt redemption
only so long as they have not
undergone a moderate change. As
soon as a character fails his fourth
powers check, he passes into the
darkness, and only the most potent of
efforts can save him from final
consumption by the Dark Powers (see
"Final Corruption" below).
Repentance: The most common way in
which a character can attempt to
reverse the effects of a failed
Corruption check is by reliving the
events that led him down the dark
path. In this case, the character must
confront a situation similar to the one
that brought about his failed check,
but this time, he must choose the

correct path. If the DM allows it, the


character could even undertake an
epic quest in order to make amends
for his own failings.
A single act of redemption is seldom
sufficient to cleanse the taint from a
character's soul. In order to reverse
the corruption, the character must
repeat this process a number of times
equal to the percentage chance of the
Corruption check failed. Once the
character accomplishes this, he can
attempt a new Corruption check. The
chance of failing that check is the
same as that of the previously failed
check. If the character succeeds, the
effects of his most recent failure are
reversed.
Exactly what happens when a
character
attains
redemption
is
determined by his level of corruption.
For an unclean character, the taint of
evil is lifted from him, and he becomes
redeemed. He no longer has the
special power or the curse bestowed
upon him by the Dark Powers.
If the character has progressed
beyond the first stage of corruption,
his status improves by one level. Thus,
if he was classified as corrupt, he
becomes unclean. If he wants to
further redeem himself, he must begin
the process again, working to reverse
the failed powers check that caused
him to originally become unclean. The
ability and curse associated with the

most recently failed powers check


dissipate.
Atonement: A Rite of Atonement can
be used to reverse the failed
Corruption check caused by an unholy
act. However, the rite must be
accepted by a cleric of the offended
deity, and convincing such a cleric to
absolve the character may actually be
harder than repentance. Furthermore,
even though a cleric may agree to
perform the rite, it is still no guarantee
the deity will absolve the offender.
Final Corruption: In most cases, a
character who has only undergone
minor changes can still save himself
from ultimate collapse, although the
feat will require exceptional effort.
Once a character has undergone a
moderate or major change, however,
it is almost impossible to restore him
to a state of grace. The character has
become so tainted by evil that
redemption can only be accomplished
through incredible means.
Exactly what powers might be invoked
to restore a character so far lost is a
matter for individual DMs to decide.
However,
even
though
powerful
methods may have been used, their
maximum possible effect can only
remove one level of corruption from
the character, making the restoration
of a character who has failed four,
five, or six Corruption checks an
incredibly difficult task.

Appendix A: Cleric Spells


Table A.1 Cleric Spells by Level
1st Level Cleric Spells

2nd Level Cleric Spells

3rd Level Cleric


Spells

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Bless**
Cure Light Wounds**
Detect Evil
Detect Magic
Light*
Protection from Evil**
Purify Food and
Water**
8. Remove Fear*
4th Level Cleric Spells
1. Cure Serious
Wounds**
2. Dispel Magic
3. Divination
4. Exorcise
5. Neutralize Poison**
6. Protection from Evil
10 radius**

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Augury
Chant
Find Traps
Hold Person*
Resist Cold
Resist Fire
Silence 15 Radius
Slow Poison

5th Level Cleric Spells


1. Commune
2. Create Food and
Water
3. Cure Critical
Wounds**
4. Dispel Evil**

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Continual Light*
Cure Blindness**
Cure Disease**
Prayer
Remove Curse**
Speak with the
Dead

6th Level Cleric Spells


1. Barrier*
2. Heal**
3. Find the Path
4. Truesight

* This spell is reversible.


** This spell is reversible; however, casting its reversed form risks invoking the
Dark Powers.
Purify Food and Water
Cleric Spell Descriptions
This spell functions as described in the
Use the updated spell descriptions
Players Manual, except that the spell
provided in the Players Manual, the
is now reversible. The reverse of this
Expert Rulebook, or the Players
spell, Putrefy Food and Water will spoil
Companion: Book One, taking note of
or poison a like amount of food or
the addendums provided below. New
water, making them unsafe to eat or
spells are fully described below.
drink.
1ST LEVEL SPELLS
2ND LEVEL SPELLS
Bless
The casting level of this spell has been
reduced from 2nd level to 1st level;
otherwise, the spell functions as
described in the Expert Rulebook.
Protection from Evil
This spell functions as described in the
Players Manual, except that the spell
is now reversible. The reverse of this
spell, Protection from Good, works
identically to Protection from Evil,
except that it only affects good
aligned creatures.

Augury
Range: 0 (Cleric Only)
Duration: Special
Effect: Cleric Only
The cleric seeks to determine whether
an action in the immediate future
(within 3 turns) will be for the benefit
of, or harmful to, themselves and any
allies they are with. The base chance
for correctly divining the augury is
70%, plus 1% for each level of the
cleric casting the spell.

Chant

Range: 0 (Cleric Only)

Range: 0 (Cleric Only)

Duration: 1 Turn
Effect: 30 radius

Duration: Time of chanting


Effect: 30 radius

The cleric brings into being a special


favor upon himself or herself and his
or her party, and causes harm to his or
her enemies. Once the spell is
completed, all to-hit, damage and
saving throw rolls made by those in
the area of effect who are friendly to
the cleric are at +1, while those of the
cleric's enemies are at -1. The spell
continues as long as the cleric remains
stationary
and
chants.
Any
interruption, however, such as an
attack which damages the cleric,
grappling the cleric, or magical silence
will break the spell.
Resist Cold
The level of this spell has been
increased from 1st level to 2nd level;
otherwise, the spell functions as
described in the Players Manual.
Slow Poison
Range: Touch
Duration: 1 day
Effect: Creature touched
This spell greatly slows the effects of
any poison affecting the creature
touched. While this spell does not
neutralize the poison, it does prevent
it from substantially harming the
victim for the duration of its magic,
preventing them from suffering any
additional damage or ill effects.
3RD LEVEL SPELLS
Prayer

This spell exactly duplicates the


effects of a Chant with regard to
bonuses of +1 for friendly attacks and
saving throws and -1 on like enemy
dice. However, once the Prayer is
uttered, the cleric does not need to
continue to chant in order for the
effects of the spell to continue.
4TH LEVEL SPELLS
Divination
Range: 0 (Cleric Only)
Duration: Special
Effect: Special
Similar to an Augury spell, a Divination
spell is used to determine information
regarding an area. The area must be
generally known to the cleric casting
the spell; however, specific knowledge
is not necessary. The divination will
reveal the general strength of
creatures in the area and if potent
magics protect it. The base chance for
correct divination is 60%, plus 1% for
each level of experience of the cleric
casting the spell. The DM will make
adjustments to this base chance
considering the facts regarding the
actual area being divined. If the result
is not correct, inaccurate information
will be obtained.
Exorcism
Range: Touch
Duration: Permanent
Effect: One creature or object

This spell will negate possession of a


creature by any supernatural force,
including magical charms, curses, and
possession by demonic entities or
spirits. Once begun, the exorcism
cannot be interrupted, or else the spell
is spoiled and the exorcism will
automatically
fail.
The
base
percentage chance for success is
equal to the clerics level, modified by
+1% per level of difference between
the cleric's level of experience and the
level of the possessor or possessing
magic (if the clerics level is higher), or
-1% (if the clerics level is lower).
During each turn of the exorcism the
dice are rolled, and if the number
rolled is equal to or less than the base
chance number, the exorcism is
successful and the possessing entity is
driven out. The DM may modify the
base chance according to existing
circumstances.
Exorcism is physically draining for the
creature being possessed. If the
Exorcise spell continues past 12 turns,
the creature possessed by the
supernatural force must make a
successful saving throw vs. Death Ray
or die. If the Exorcise spell continues
past this point, then the possessed
creature must make a saving throw at
the end of each turn. For every 12
turns that the exorcism continues, the
possessed
creature
suffers
a
cumulative -1 penalty to their saving
throw.

Recovery from an exorcism takes


several days of complete bed rest. The
minimum amount of time is 10 days,
modified by the possessed creatures
Constitution modifier.
Note: The death of a possessed
creature during the course of an
exorcism will not draw the attention of
the Dark Powers at least the first
time. However, such an event may
have moral repercussions for the
cleric.
Protection from Evil 10 radius
This spell functions as described in the
Players Manual, except that the spell
is now reversible. The reverse of this
spell, Protection from Good 10 radius,
works identically to Protection from
Evil 10 radius, except that it only
affects good aligned creatures.
5TH LEVEL SPELLS
Create Food and Water
Range: 10
Duration: Permanent
Effect: Special

This spell creates enough food and


water to feed 12 men and their
mounts for one day. For every level of
the cleric above 8th, food and water
for 12 additional men and mounts is
created.
Dispel Evil
This spell functions as described in the
Expert Rulebook, except that the spell
is now reversible. The reverse of this
spell, Dispel Good, works identically to
Dispel Evil, except that it only affects
good aligned creatures. This spell, and
its reverse, cannot be used to negate
possession of a creature.
6TH LEVEL SPELLS
Barrier
Range: 60
Duration: 12 turns
Effect: Creates a magical barrier

This spell creates an invisible barrier


comprised entirely of magical energy
up to 30 high and 30 in diameter. The
barrier will repel undead and any
creature of evil alignment; however,
other creatures can pass through the
barrier as if it did not exist. If the spell
is cast by an evil cleric, the barrier will
repel any creature of good alignment,
but not undead.
The reverse of this spell, Remove
Barrier, will destroy any one barrier
created by a cleric. It can will also
destroy a magic users Wall of Ice,
Wall of Fire, or Wall of Stone. It will not
affect a magic users Wall of Iron.
Truesight
This spell functions as described in the
Players Companion: Book One, except
that this spell will not reveal a
creatures alignment.

Appendix B: Weapons & Equipment

The following weapon and equipment tables replace those in the Players Manual
and Expert Rulebook.

Table B.1 Weapons


Item
Axes:
*Battle Axe
Hand Axe
Black Powder Weapons:
*Harquebus
Pistolet
20 balls (w/ case and
powder)
Bows:
Light Crossbow
*30 quarrels (w/ case)
Long Bow
Short Bow
*20 arrows (w/ quiver)
Silver-tipped arrow
Daggers:
Dirk
Silver Dirk
Swords:
Broadsword
Rapier
*Claymore
Other Weapons:
Mace
Club
Javelin
Lance
*Polearm
*Quarterstaff
Sling (w/ 30 stones)
Spear
War Hammer
Oil (1 flask)
Holy Water (1 vial)
Torch (6)

Maximum Ranges
(ft)
S
M
L ((+1)
1)

Dama
ge

Cost in
gp

Encumbra
nce

d8
d6

7
4

60
30

10

20

30

d10
d8
-

80
50
10

50
20
a*

50
20

100
40

150
60

d6
d6
d6

30
10
40
25
5
5

50
a*
30
20
a*
a*

60

120

180

70
50

140
100

210
150

d4
d4

3
30

10
10

10
10

20
20

30
30

d6
d8
d10

7
10
15

30
60
100

d6
d6
d4
d10
d10
d6
d4
d6
d6
d6 c*
d6 d*
d4 c*

5
3
1
10
7
2
2
3
5
2
25
6

30 b*
50 b*
20
180
150
20 b*
20 b*
30
50 b*
10
1
120 (20
each)

20
40
20
10
10
-

40
80
40
30
30
-

60
160
60
50
50
-

* This weapon requires two hands for use. Attacker may not use a shield and
always loses initiative.

a* Ammunition is included in encumbrance.


b* This weapon is permitted for clerics.
c* This weapon deals fire damage.
d* This weapon only damages undead creatures.

Table B.2 Normal Equipment


Item
Backpack
Bedroll1
Cloak
Clothing:
Simple
Fancy
Rich
Garlic (1 bunch)
Grappling Hook
Grimoire2
Hammer (small)
Holy Symbols:3
Crux Immissa
Rosary
Holy Water (1 vial)
Iron Spikes (12)

Cost in
gp
5
1
1

Encumbra
nce
20
5
15

1
20
100
5
25
25
2

20
20
20
1
80
100
10

15
10
25
1

Lantern
Mirror, hand-sized steel
Oil (1 flask)
Pole, Wooden (10 long)
Pouch, Belt
Rations:
Iron
Standard
Rope (50 length)
Sacks:
Small
Large
Stakes (3) and Mallet
Tent1
Thieves Tools
Tinderbox
Torches (6)

10
5
2
1
1

1
1
1
60 (5
each)
30
5
10
100
2

15
5
1

70
200
50

1
2
3
10
25
3
1

Wine (1 quart)
Wineskin (1 quart)
Wolfsbane (1 bunch)

1
1
10

1
5
10
20
10
5
120 (20
each)
30
5
1

Capacities:
Backpack

400 cn

Pouch,

50 cn

Belt
Sack,

200 cn

Sack,

600 cn

small
large
1 Encumbrance listed is for the item when in stowage.
2 The cost listed is for when creating a character; grimoires cannot be purchased
normally.
3 Clerics will need to purchase both a Crux Immissa and a Rosary.

Table B.3 Armor


Item
No Armor
Padded Armor
Leather Armor
Barding (for horses)
Chainmail Armor
Plate Armor
Shield
* Subtract 1 from the AC if a shield is used.

AC
10
8
7
5
5
3
(-1)*

Cost in
gp
5
20
150
40
60
10

Encumbra
nce
100
200
600
400
500
100