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Immaculate Conception Parochial School

272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

THE ROLE OF PARENTS AND TEACHERS IN THE ACADEMIC


MOTIVATION OF SELECTED HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS OF IMMACULATE
CONCEPTION PAROCHIAL SCHOOL DURING THE S.Y. 2016-1017

A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of ICPS

In Partial Fulfilment in English 10

Submitted by:

RUFIELLE AVELINO
AUDREY DELA CRUZ
ALEXANDRA GERONIMO
MARIE ANGELICA ISIDRO
TRISHA MAE RAMIREZ
MICAH ADRIANNE ROMERO
ROBINAIRE DOMINGO
SYRON JAY JARABA
KEN ONILE PAGSANJAN

RESEARCH ADVISER:
MR. RICKY JOHN M. RANIDO

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

CHAPTER I
THE PROBLEM AND ITS SETTING
This chapter presents the background of the study,
statement of the problem and purpose, conceptual framework,
scope,
limitation
and
delimitations,
and
definition
of
terminologies.

INTRODUCTION
Encouraging students is the most effective way or
strategy for them to excel in their studies. The term
motivation is defined as the general desire or willingness
of someone to do something. Where there is no, or low
motivation in a student, there is little or no learning;
and when student motivation is high, students can overcome
most difficulties, many task or activities and some other
matters.
Student motivation affects every aspect of school
life, from attendance, to academic performance, to extracurricular activities. Promoting the students academic
motivation is extremely important for every teacher in
grades K-12, especially in today's generation where
schools are continuously under pressure to improve test
scores, responsibility, and accountability.
Students with learning disabilities encounter bigger
challenges every day because of their struggles of
performing tasks given by their teachers. As a result of
these pressures, teachers shower students with rewards,
and of all the rewards given, grades are the most common
reward (Seoane and Smink, 1991). When rewards are given,
children don't perceive themselves in control of learning,
they approach and complete tasks differently than when
rewards are not given, and their work is judged as less
creative (Amabile and Gitomer, 1984; Condry, 1977; Ryan
and Grolnick, 1986).
There are two primary types of motivation, intrinsic
and extrinsic motivation. Intrinsic motivation involves
engaging in a behavior because it is personally rewarding;

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

essentially, performing an activity for its own sake


rather than the desire for some external reward, while
extrinsic motivation on the other hand occurs when
students are motivated to perform a behavior or engage in
an activity to earn a reward (e.g. stickers for good
behavior, treats for completing assignments, lunches for
turning in homework, etc.) or to avoid punishment.
Most people suggest that those children with
internal motivation may achieve greater success, but it is
not always possible in every situation. In some cases,
students simply have no internal desire to engage in an
activity. Excessive rewards may be problematic, but when
used appropriately, extrinsic motivators can be a useful
tool. On the other way around, some studies have
demonstrated that offering excessive external rewards for
an already internally rewarding behavior can lead to a
reduction in intrinsic motivation, a phenomenon known as
the overjustification effect.
It's an absolute fact that the students need to
perform their great cooperation with their studies, thus
they need to have motivation from the people that
surrounds them. It affects every aspect of their academic
performances and other personal activities by the way on
how they get those motivations from their families,
particularly their parents, teachers, and other things
they can get motivation. Inch by inch, the researchers
would like to determine the relationship between the role
of parents and teachers between the students academic
motivation
and
how
it
affects
his/her
academic
performance.
This study aims to pursue and to employ strategies
that demand more effort towards learning. The students
will experience their classroom and house as a caring and
supportive place, where there is a sense of belonging and
everyone is valued that will tend to participate more
fully in the process of learning.

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM


The study aims to determine if the parents and teachers have a
significant role in the academic motivation of high school
students
at
ICPS,
during
the
school
year
2016-2017.
Specifically, this study sought to answer the following
questions:
1. How does the role of the parents and teachers affect the
students academic motivation?
2. Is there a significant relationship
motivation and of the following:
2.1.

Parents Involvement

2.2.

Parenting Styles

2.3.

Teaching Styles

between

academic

3. What is the relationship between the students academic


motivation and the following:
3.1.

Students Academic Performance

3.2.

Students Academic Achievement

3.3.

Students Productivity

4. What can be the implications to shape


academic motivation with the help of:
4.1.

Parents Role

4.2.

Teachers Role

the

students

HYPOTHESIS
On the basis of the questions proposed in this study, these
hypotheses were tested:
1. The motivation of the students will grow if they have a
close relationship with both of the parents and teachers.
2. A good teacher-student and parent-student relationship
gives students a significant boost of motivation.
3. The students will perform well if they are well-motivated
by both of their parents and teachers.

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

ASSUMPTIONS
The study is based on the following assumptions:
1. The respondents answered the instruments as accurate and
as honestly as possible.
2. A written survey is given to the selected high school
students of ICPS to gather their response and actions.

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE SUDY


The findings in this study will be most valuable to the
following:

Teachers - This study can help teachers to have new ideas


on how they can motivate their students and have a good
relationship as well.
Students - This study can help the students to learn basic
information about academic motivation and on how to
improve it.
Future Researchers The entire thesis will serve as a
guide for future reference, thus this thesis can also be
used for further validation of data and results.

DEFINITION OF TERMS
The following terms are operationally defined based on how
it is used in the study:
1. Academic Motivation - is a students desire regarding
academic subjects when the students competence is judged
against a standard of performance or excellence
2. Intrinsic Motivation - refers to behavior that is driven by
internal rewards.
3. Extrinsic Motivation refers to behavior that is driven by
external rewards such as money, fame, grades, and praise.
4. Parent Involvement - is any action taken by a parent that
can theoretically be expected to improve student performance or
behavior.

THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
The primary basis of this research is the study being
conducted last August 2012 by C. Cheung and E. Pomerantz

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

entitled Why Does Parents' Involvement Enhance Children's


Achievement? The Role of Parent-Oriented Motivation whereas
they stated the importance of the parents involvement when it
comes to the students academic motivation. Their research
examined the idea that children's parent-oriented motivation
underlies the benefits of parents' involvement on children's
engagement and ultimately achievement in school.
The article made by M. Barberos, A. Gozalo, and
E.Padayogdog entitled The Effect Of The Teacher's Teaching
Style On Students' Motivation is also the inspiration of the
study for stating the relationship between the teachers
teaching style and the academic motivation of the students.
Lastly, the journal Whole brain teaching in the
Philippines: Teaching strategy for addressing motivation and
academic performance written by V. Torio, sums up the idea of
this study wherein fact according to him, The importance of
motivation of students has been found in research to have an
impact on the academic achievement of students.
The more involved parents in their children's learning,
the more motivated children were to do well in school for
parent-oriented
reasons,
which
contributed
to
children's
enhanced self-regulated learning and thereby grades. Although
children's parent-oriented motivation was associated with their
controlled and autonomous motivation in school, it uniquely
explained the positive effect of parents' involvement on
children's grades.
Also, teachers also play an important role in the academic
motivation of their students. If students are not wellmotivated, they will not learn effectively and they wont
retain information, participate and some of them may even
become disruptive. While motivating students can be a difficult
task, the rewards are more than worth it. Motivated students
are more excited to learn and participate.
The importance of motivation of students has been found in
research to have an impact on the academic achievement of
students. Therefore, parents and teachers must execute all
their efforts in performing their roles in order for them to
respond to the needs of the student.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

INPUT

PROCESS

OUTPUT

To what extent
on how the
respondents
consider these
factors (teaching
styles, parenting
styles, parent
involvement,) on
their academic
performance

SCOPE AND DELIMITATION


The study is limited among selected Grade 7 to Grade 10
students of Immaculate Conception Parochial School because
their population represented the sample desired. The study
focuses on the effect of academic motivation given by each
students parents and teachers as well.
The researchers did not include students in the elementary
level since they desire to focus on the high school students as
they were high school students themselves and can relate well
with the situation.
The researchers did not include school administrators and
non-academic personnel in the study since the study is all
about the effects of the role of the parents and teachers in
the academic motivation of the students.

CHAPTER II
REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES
This chapter indicates the ideas relevant to the
present subject relating to the other studies and is briefly
discussed to provide the foundation of the proposed study. In

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

order to develop new methods and procedures, careful review of


literature and studies must be done for the development of the
study.
RELATED LITERATURE
Local literature
According to Lai, Motivation refers to reasons that
underlie behavior that is characterized by willingness and
decision. There are two types of motivation, namely the
intrinsic
motivation
and
extrinsic
motivation.
Intrinsic
motivation was defined by Oudeyer and Kaplan (2008) as the
driver
of
spontaneous
exploration
and
curiosity.
While
extrinsic motivation on the other hand was defined by Ryan and
Deci (2000) as a construct that pertains whenever an activity
is done in order to attain some separable outcome.
According to Centre for Child Well-Being (2010), parental
involvement in their childrens learning not only improves a
childs morale, attitude, and academic achievement across all
subject areas, but it also promotes better behavior and social
adjustment. It further says that family involvement in
education helps children to grow up to be productive,
responsible members of the society. This means that if we
involve the parents in educating their children, it is
tantamount to saying that the school is proactive in
implementing changes or development among the students. As
parents
involvement
is
increased,
teachers
and
school
administrators also raise the chance to realize quality reform
in education.
Teachers are considered the light in the classroom. It is
very necessary that we need to understand the need to be
motivated in doing our work well, so as to have motivated
learners in the classroom. When students are motivated, then
learning will easily take place. However, motivating students
to learn requires a very challenging role on the part of the
teacher. It requires a variety of teaching styles or techniques
just to capture students' interests. Above all, he needs to
exert effort to lead children or students into a life that is
large, full, stimulating and satisfying. Some students seem
naturally enthusiastic about learning, but many need or expect
their instructors or teachers to inspire, challenge or
stimulate them. "Effective learning in the classroom depends on
the teacher's ability to maintain the interest that brought
students to the course in the first place (Erickson, 1978). Not
all students are motivated by the same values, needs, desires

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

and wants. Some students are motivated


others or by overcoming challenges.

by

the

approval

of

Motivation has been regarded as the driving force to learn


a language. Aside from the notion that motivation is an
influential facet to language learning, motivation can also be
regarded as varied among learners gender, socioeconomic status
and perception towards the language learning task. The success
or failure of language learners to use and further effectively
acquire a language is said to be relative to the motivation
they put in learning or studying a language. It was/is believed
in the past (and until the recent times) that when a student is
motivated to learn a subject matter, he /she has the highest
chances to learn and acquire the language. Moreover, motivation
is said to be related to the other areas concerning language
learning. Motivation is also a multi-faceted component of
acquiring and learning a language (Drnyei, 1998).
Decades of research in goal theory have confirmed that
students academic engagement in school is determined, to a
large extent, by their goals (Maehr & Zusho, 2009). This
indicates the important role played by students goals, which
are defined as the reasons for engagement or non-engagement in
school-related tasks (Maehr, 1984; Pintrich, 2000). However,
some
researchers
have
pointed
out
the
limitations
of
achievement goal theory and proposed that there are other types
of goals (e.g. extrinsic goals and social goals) that are
relevant in the school setting. This issue became especially
relevant when educational psychologists started investigating
students from different cultural contexts, where they found
that mastery and performance goals were unable to fully capture
the complexity of students goals.
Foreign literature
To understand academic motivation, educational researchers
have adopted a number of theoretical approaches including the
expectancy-value model, attribution theory, goal orientation
theory, and self-determination theory (Opdenakker, Maulana &
den Brok, 2012). Among these, Self Determination Theory (SDT)
of academic motivation by Deci and Ryan (1985) is viewed as a
sound framework for explaining the differences among students
in terms of learning strategies, persistence and performance
and for linking motivation to educational environments such as
the classroom climate (Opdenakker, Maulana & den Brok, 2012;
Vansteenkiste, Lens & Deci, 2006).
Motivation has recently been included in discussions of
student engagement (Wolters & Taylor, 2012 ). Shernoff (2013)
defines student engagement as the heightened simultaneous

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

experience of
task at hand.
be successful
motivational
learning.

concentration, interest, and enjoyment in the


Students beliefs about whether or not they can
in school, or self-efficacy, is considered a
construct
within
models
of
self-regulated

Several motivational factors are found in recent educational


research
from
the
social
cognitive
approach
including:
Intrinsic Goal Orientation, Extrinsic Goal Orientation, Task
Value, Control of Learning Beliefs, and Self-Efficacy for
Learning and Performance. These factors are defined as:

Intrinsic Goal Orientation is having a goal orientation


toward an academic task that indicates the students'
participation in the task is an end all to itself rather
than participation being a means to an end. (Garcia,
McKeachie, Pintrich, & Smith, 1991).

Extrinsic Goal Orientation concerns the degree to which


students perceive themselves to be participating in a task
for
reasons
such
as
grades,
rewards,
performance
evaluation of others and competition. (Garcia et al.,
1991).

Task Value refers to students' evaluation of how


interesting, how important, and how useful the task is; it
is also the students' perceptions of the course material
in terms of interest, importance, and utility (Garcia et
al., 1991)

Self-Efficacy for Learning and Performance comprises two


aspects of expectancy: expectancy for success and selfefficacy. Expectancy for success refers to performance
expectations,
and
relates
specifically
to
task
performance. Self-efficacy is a self appraisal of one's
ability to accomplish a task and one's confidence in
possessing the skills needed to perform that task (Garcia
et al., 1991).

Test Anxiety has been found to be negatively related to


expectancies as well as to academic performance. Training
in the use of effective learning strategies and testtaking skills should help reduce the degree of anxiety
(Garcia et al., 1991).

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

Teachers can help meet young adolescents basic and


developmental needs and promote positive adjustment by engaging
in need-supportive teaching and providing students with
appropriate
levels
of
autonomy
support,
structure,
and
involvement. According to Juvonen (2007), teacher involvement
is associated with the need for relatedness, care, and
connection to others and is critical to supporting young
adolescents motivation, engagement, and belonging.
Family, especially parents, play a central role on the
better and effective academic performance of adolescents and it
is found that it has significant relationship with the academic
tasks, accomplishments and academic achievement (Wintre and
Yaffe 2000). Strage and Brandt (1999) also found that parenting
supportiveness,
demandingness
and
autonomy
granting
have
positive
relationship
with
the
academic
performance
of
students.
Study
Local study
The present study is an attempt to take a closer look into
the state of Math and Science education in the Philippines, and
in particular, the motivation of students. Results showed that
Students had more favorable attitudes towards Math than
Science, claiming to enjoy the subject and seeing it as
important, while they perceive Science as very challenging.
Lastly, highly motivated Science teachers were found to have
highly motivated Science students, but this relationship was
not found for Math. More importantly, in both Science and Math,
highly motivated teachers did not produce students with better
academic achivement. Overall, the findings suggest that other
teacher and student factors in the public school system
influence student achievement, and that sometimes, motivation
is not enough.
More recent research has shown the predominance of social
goals among Filipino students.
Research showed the importance
of accounting for the diverse aspects of the college
experience.
Data from five focus group discussions among
students
in
Philippine
universities
showed
that
beyond
students valuing of education for the professional competence
it builds, students value education as a means of fulfilling
filial and familial responsibilities.
The findings that
parents and family are a main source of motivation and that
positive relationships with peers and teachers are major
facilitators
of
learning
show
the
primacy
of
personal

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

relationships in students valuing of and working towards their


college degrees.
Researchers have long noted that parental involvement can
substantially influence children's academic performance. There
is a paucity of research which has focused on this relationship
in developing nations. Using data from two surveys of parents,
one sample from the Philippines, and one sample from the United
States, this study examines the nature of parental involvement,
and how it affects the school success of elementary students.
Among American parents, direct involvement (e.g., helping with
homework) yields positive benefits for children's grade
performance.
Among
Filipino
parents,
indirect
forms
of
involvement (e.g., volunteering at their children's schools)
are associated with higher grade performance. Overall, Filipino
parents are shown to be more active in their children's school
activities.
The
influence
of
parental
involvement
upon
children's performance in school is shown to vary substantially
between the two countries, depending upon the type of parental
involvement and household characteristics.
Motivation has been regarded as the driving force to learn
a language. Aside from the notion that motivation is an
influential facet to language learning, motivation can also be
regarded as varied among learners gender, socioeconomic status
and perception towards the language learning task. The success
or failure of language learners to use and further effectively
acquire a language is said to be relative to the motivation
they put in learning or studying a language. The present study
makes use of an instrument based on the initial questionnaire
made by Noels, et al., 2000 to measure the motivational levels
of the students. To prove the reported motivation of the
respondents, they were also tasked to judge the grammaticality
of sentences in the second instrument. After the gathering of
data and the subsequent analyses, it was found that motivation
may not be greatly related to language learning success of the
respondents.
The research attempts to identify how the sub components
of motivation impact on academic performance utilising an
established tool, MSLQ. The results provide an empirical basis
for linking self-reported Asian students measurements to
performance and in comparison with contemporary results from
western results. Self efficacy (MSLQSE) was positively related
to academic performance for all culture and socio economic
variables. Students self-reported self-efficacy did influence
their overall academic performance. This relationship is
consistent with historical results from educational research
performed in western based studies where a clear relationship
is
established
between
high
self-efficacy
results
and

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

performance (Robbins et al, 2004). The relationship between


self-efficacy and self- awareness is established and cultural
variations have been recorded in non- academic spheres (Ryan
2000) and directly for Confucian cultures underestimation of
self-efficacy
(Ku
2002).
Intrinsic
value
(MSLQIN)
was
positively related to academic performance for all culture and
socio economic variables tested. This indicates students with a
positive motivation towards the curriculum content, students
who were motivated to learn the content are more engaged in
deeper level comprehension. This linkage indicates that
students who are either interested in the subject material, or
believe it is important to them, develop higher levels of selfcontrol and ultimately higher performance. The finding is
consistent with historical results from western tertiary level
students (Kosnin, 2007).
This study determined and analysed the problems and
difficulties encountered by Bachelor of Elementary Education
sophomore students towards mastering learning competencies in
mathematics. The problems and difficulties are categorized into
personal problems, emotional problems, problems on teachers
instruction, problems with school adjustment, problems in
adjusting to classmates and boardmates, and problems arising
from over-extended schedule/workloads for practice in different
competitions. Using the descriptive-survey method and frequency
count and percentage, findings revealed that, in general, the
respondents encountered personal problems relating to school
expenses, lack of interest and negative attitude towards the
subject. The emotional problems encountered are excessive
stress in doing academic tasks and low self-esteem or not
believing in ones capabilities. On problems relating to
teachers instruction, these are no effective motivation and
introduction, and not creative enough to adapt his/her method
to the learners capability. As to problems with school
adjustment, the most frequent are difficulty in adjusting to
life/role of a college student, and not doing the tasks well.
The problems in adjusting to classmates/boardmates are how to
be
accepted
by
classmates
and
boardmates,
and
working
effectively with different kinds of classmates. With regard to
problems arising from over-extended schedule/workloads for
practice in different competitions, the most common problems
are too many academic tasks and projects assigned, and studying
and reviewing too many subjects every day.

Foreign study
In 2014, the motivation and learning were assessed by
selected students, their teacher and two non-participant

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

observers in three types of schools in Bangkokpublic, private


and demonstration schools. The findings showed that most
students had a relatively high level of motivation and many
reported having internal interests in learning English;
however, the level of learning was not assessed to be as high.
Furthermore, a few students in almost every class showed a lack
of motivation. The teachers were found to employ a variety of
motivational
strategies,
including
autonomy-support
and
controlling styles. While autonomy controlling strategies were
commonly used in these classes, autonomy-support strategies
were found only in highly motivated and high performing
classrooms. The findings from this study suggest the use of
strategies that do not only initialize but also nurture
students internal motivation in order to enhance sustainable
learning of English in and outside the classroom.
Teachers have long offered incentives for directing
student behavior, but research shows that extrinsic rewards can
also undermine students intrinsic motivation for learning. For
example, in an oft-cited 1973 study, preschoolers were promised
and received a reward for drawing. The children later chose to
spend less of their free time drawing than they had prior to
receiving the reward. The findings dont mean, however, that
incentives have a universally negative effect on intrinsic
motivation. In the same study, students who initially showed
little inherent interest in drawing, and who then received an
unexpected reward for doing so, later chose to spend more of
their free time on that activity.
Motivating students is importantwithout it, teachers have
no point of entry. But it is engagement that is critical,
because the level of engagement over time is the vehicle
through
which
classroom
instruction
influences
student
outcomes. For example, engagement with reading is directly
related to reading achievement (Guthrie, 2001; Guthrie &
Wigfield, 2000). Engagementwith sports, hobbies, work, or
readingresults in opportunities to practice. Practice provides
the opportunity to build skills and gain confidence.
This research examined the idea that children's parentoriented
motivation
underlies
the
benefits
of
parents'
involvement on children's engagement and ultimately achievement
in school. Beginning in the fall of 7th grade, 825 American and
Chinese children (mean age = 12.73 years) reported on their
parents' involvement in their learning as well as multiple
dimensions of their motivation in school every 6 months until
the end of 8th grade. Information on children's self-regulated
learning strategies and grades was also obtained. Over time,
the more involved parents were in children's learning, the more
motivated children were to do well in school for parent-

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

oriented reasons, which contributed to children's enhanced


self-regulated learning and thereby grades. Although children's
parent-oriented motivation was associated with their controlled
and autonomous motivation in school, it uniquely explained the
positive effect of parents' involvement on children's grades.
Parent involvement is any action taken by a parent that
can theoretically be expected to improve student performance or
behavior. Many studies find positive, negative, and/or no
associations
between
parent
involvement
and
academic
achievement (e.g. Crosnoe 2001; Domina 2005; Ho Sui-Chu &
Willms 1996; McNeal 1999; Muller 1995; Reynolds 1992).
Surprisingly,
the
contradictory
findings
are
remarkably
consistent and cut across grade level, measure of academic
achievement, and time (spanning the middle 1970s to the late
2000s).

BIBLIOGRAPHY
RELATED LITERATURE
Local Literature
Journal Vibulphol, Jutarat (2015) Students Motivation and
Learning and Teachers Motivational Strategies in English
Classrooms in Thailand
Link: http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1092756
Article McKay, Sarah (2015) Using New Research to Improve
Student Motivation
Link:
https://www.carnegiefoundation.org/blog/using-newresearch-to-improve-student-motivation/
E-book - Irvin, Judith, Meltzer, Julie and
(2007) Taking Action on Adolescent Literacy

Dukes,

Melinda

Link:
http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/107034/chapters/studentmotivation,-engagement,-and-achievement.aspx
Journal - Cheung, Cecilia Sin-Sze and Pomerantz, Eva M (2012)
Why Does Parents' Involvement Enhance Children's Achievement?
The Role of Parent-Oriented Motivation
Link:
http://eric.ed.gov/?q=student%20academic%20motivation
%20teacher%20and%20parents%20role&id=EJ993895

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

Article - McNeal, Ralph B. (2014) Parent Involvement, Academic


Achievement and the Role of Student Attitudes and Behaviors as
Mediators
Link: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1053945.pdf
Foreign Literature
Journal Bedel, Emine (2014) Exploring Academic Motivation,
Academic Self-efficacy and Attitudes toward Teaching in Preservice Early Childhood Education Teachers
Link: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1078499.pdf
E-book Macklem, Gayle L. (2015) Boredom in the Classroom:
Addressing Student Motivation, Self-Regulation, and Engagement
in Learning
Link: http://bookzz.org/book/2486768/9aedec
Article Howey,
Motivation

Steven

C.

(2008)

Factors

in

Student

Link:
https://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Clearinghouse/ViewArticles/Motivation.aspx
Journal - Kiefer, Sarah M., Alley, Kathleen M. and Ellerbrock,
Cheryl R. (2015) Teacher and Peer Support for Young
Adolescents Motivation, Engagement, and School Belonging
Link: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1074877.pdf
Journal - Masud, Hamid,
Ahmad, Muhammad Shakil, Jan, Farzand
Ali and Jamil, Ahmad (2015) Relationship between parenting
styles and academic performance of adolescents: mediating role
of self-efficacy
Link: http://booksc.org/book/48704324
Local Sudy
Published Thesis - Reyes, Melissa L., Galang, Adrianne John R.
(2009) Motivational and Social Aspects of the Filipino College
Experience

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

Link:
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236270200_Motivational
_and_social_aspects_of_the_Filipino_college_experience
Journal Blair, Sampson Lee (2014) Parental Involvement and
Children's Educational Performance: A Comparison of Filipino
and U.S. Parents
Link:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/24339542?
seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
Journal Guerra, July M. (2014) A Study on the Relationship
between Motivation and Language Learning Achievement among
Tertiary Students
Link:
http://www.journals.aiac.org.au/index.php/IJALEL/article/viewFi
le/1164/1217
Journal - D. Darbyshire , R. Haarms (2015) Student Motivation
In Asian Countries And Its Impact On Academic Success For
Second Language University Students
Link:http://www.multidisciplinaryjournals.com/wpcontent/uploads/2015/04/STUDENT-MOTIVATION-IN-ASIAN-COUNTRIESAND-ITS-IMPACT-ON-ACADEMIC-SUCCESS-FOR-SECOND-LANGUAGEUNIVERSITY-STUDENTS.pdf
Journal - Nicette N. Ganal, Marissa R. Guiab (2014) Problems
And Difficulties Encountered By Students Towards Mastering
Learning Competencies In Mathematics
Link: http://www.researchersworld.com/vol5/issue4/Paper_03.pdf

Foreign Study
Journal Vibulphol, Jutarat (2015) Students Motivation and
Learning and Teachers Motivational Strategies in English
Classrooms in Thailand
Link: http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1092756

Immaculate Conception Parochial School


272 Gen. Luna St. Concepcion Malabon

Article McKay, Sarah (2015) Using New Research to Improve


Student Motivation
Link:
https://www.carnegiefoundation.org/blog/using-newresearch-to-improve-student-motivation/
E-book - Irvin, Judith L., Meltzer, Julie and Dukes, Melinda S.
(2007) Taking Action on Adolescent Literacy
Link:
http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/107034/chapters/studentmotivation,-engagement,-and-achievement.aspx
Journal - Cheung, Cecilia Sin-Sze; Pomerantz, Eva M (2012) Why
Does Parents' Involvement Enhance Children's Achievement? The
Role of Parent-Oriented Motivation
Link:
http://eric.ed.gov/?q=student%20academic%20motivation
%20teacher%20and%20parents%20role&id=EJ993895
Article McNeal, Ralph B. (2014) Parent Involvement, Academic
Achievement and the Role of Student Attitudes and Behaviors as
Mediators
Link: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1053945.pdf