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Review Reviewed Work(s): Untersuchungen zu den Frauenstatuen des ptolemäischen Ägypten by Sabine Albersmeier Review by: Christina Riggs

Source: The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, Vol. 92 (2006), pp. 298-301

Published by: Egypt Exploration Society Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40345927 Accessed: 10-11-2016 11:43 UTC

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298 REVIEWS JEA

92

examples.1 Spencer suggests th

either of an

official position

s

they were related to the royal fa mutually exclusive; it is very lik royal family. Spencer comes dow

is evidence of falcon

masks wit

tombs and on

the granite sarc

there is no evidence for the pr first and Twenty-second Dynas

of such jars in the Balamun bu pages devoted to 'minor investi

Chapter 4 is devoted to a catalo

is almost entirely illustrated. T

faunal, written by Joyce Filer.

elite tombs, and in her descrip Excavations at Tell el-Balamun

growth comes about simply as

statistics to the femoral meas

commentary

better site

catalogues the pottery

probably

on

the basic obje

and obje

have been

Overall this is the slimmest,

excavation

reports and the har

previous volumes. Indeed, if th

all the details, then she/he wo provides a useful addition to w

David A. Aston

Untersuchungen zu den Frauenstatuen des ptolemaischen Agypten. By SABINE ALB

Aegyptiaca Treverensia 10. Pp. 457, pls. 86, tables 32. Mainz, Philipp von Zabern, 2002

8053 2976 8 (hardback). Price €92.50.

The 'heft' of Sabine Albersmeier's Untersuchungen zu den Frauenstatuen des ptolemaischen A is not limited to its physical weight, for this study of both royal and non-royal statues of wo

adept and exhaustive work. Based on the author's doctoral thesis at Trier, the book collects

from museums and private collections, and benefits from the author's access to the Corp Egyptian Sculpture in the Brooklyn Museum of Art and to a number of unpublished stat

Egyptian Museum, Cairo. In Chapter 1, Albersmeier provides a succinct but thorough overview of previous wo Ptolemaic sculpture and defines the limits of her own study, which is based on stone s recognizable as fundamentally Egyptian in form by the inclusion of a back pillar (p. 7).

statues with the back pillar are private or royal is one of the questions that the study is t consider, rather than eliminating presumed 'royal' or 'non-royal' sculpture from the start

on statues of women narrows the topic of study - if 161 examples can be called 'narrow' -

useful comparison within the corpus as well as with male Ptolemaic sculpture. Previous

female statues have been studied as an adjunct to male royal statues, and non-royal female

has only sporadically appeared in museum catalogues and commentaries.

Chapter 2 discusses technical aspects of the corpus, from stance and arm positio

characteristics of bases and back pillars. The author also discusses the different sizes of th

feature which is not always explicitly considered in other studies but which is fundam

1 For this cemetery see M. C. Perez Die,

reutilisation de la necropole de la Troisieme Periode

'Herakleopolis Magna', Archeologia 225 (1987), 36-49;

'Excavaciones en Heracleopolis Magna (Egipto), Campana de 1987', Aula Orientalis 6 (1988), 103-4; 'Excavaciones de la Mission Arqueologia Espanola en

Intermediaire/debut de l'epoque Sai'te a Ehnasya el

Medina (Herakleopolis Magna)', in H. Guksch and D. Polz (eds), Stationen: Beitrdge zur Kulturgeschichte

Agyptens: Rattier Stadelmann gewidmet (Mainz, 1998),

Heracleopolis Magna', Archivo Espanol de Arqueologia 61

473-83; and M. C. Perez Die and P. Vernus, Excavaciones

(1988), 337-41; 'Necropola de Heracleopolis Magna del

en Ehnasya el-Medina (Heracleopolis Magna) (Madrid,

Tercer Periodo Intermedio', Geo 19 (1988), 102-16; 'La

1992).

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2006

REVIEWS

299

understanding were less than

the most common, at a

the orig

50

cm

h

90-160

of

cm

high

(30%).

the corpus, which

sacerdotal decrees for

described

b

as over-lifesi

The stones used

in

Alb

roughly

one-third

of

th

statues. The remaining

Some statues preserve

of

examples feature met

provenance, Albersmei

Egypt are all in

hard

s

'Egyptian', like the scul

Chapter

3

is devoted

t

for

queens and

goddess

previously

attested

in

t

neutral German

term

'

the left arm

used

is more common

bent acro

que

for

images of

with

Other

hand-held

attri

statues wearing

the 'Isi

of

cornucopia, a Greek sy

II, and cornucopias are

normally worn with th

Arsinoe II (cat. 137)

Chapter

4

looks at the

styles such

as the trip

variously

century

been

called

'L

BC

onwards in

as well as on

Albersmeier

royal sta

suggests t

Chapter

5

is a long

and

on

female statuary

in

traditional dress had

representations, than

traditional sheath

dres

appears on

but also

queens, for

on

many

types

some royal

the goddess

Albersmeier

proposes

a long

garment styles seems t

usurped

private sculpture. For

from

elite Theban

cache

women

wearing

for

Cleopatra I

the Karnak

families. I

the fly-whisk

attribute.

While the New

Kingd

which

is Albersmeier

speculation. Albersmeie

that the dress consist

postulated. The over-ga

and

the s

dress is related

a native Egyptian

Ptolemaic representatio

Period, the knotted

sleeves of

the tuni

to

orig

dr

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300 REVIEWS jfEA

92

two- and three-dimensional ima

cult statues, which began as early

the appearance of the 'Isis dress'

to ha

and a mantle and tunic for kings

observed elsewhere (with Martin

forms of dress where they are sho

The Ptolemaic rulers seem

Chapter 6 is devoted to the insc

that these inscriptions have been

first time, supplemented by line

of the corpus), and 33 of the

include the title 'sistrum

the Karnak cachette statues, and

bear a funerary inscription, the 'Hathor' (three examples).

27%

player'

Inscriptions on royal statues, th

marble statue of a queen in the

Cleopatra on its arm, which may

of Arsinoe II, both shortly afte

in the Petrie Museu

Arsinoe III; Albersmeier tends to

published suggestion that the cr Chapter 7 is devoted to the holy

lack of archaeological context, ins

clarify a statue's date or the identi

a necessity. How

Koptos, now

rigorously and

this method of dating; moreover, e

attribution and certainty. With

artists tended to sculpt female fa

subjects like the Ptolemaic kings.

Albersmeier begins by surveyi

corpus. Early Ptolemaic sculpture

tradition. Her ensuing discussion of

since different dating criteria

arrangement, which follows the

be seen side-by-side.

In terms of chronology, and in

alongside two recent books about

theses): Paul E. Stanwick's Portrai

2003), and Sally-Ann Ashton's Pto

and Egyptian Traditions Oxford, 20

chronological distinctions, but th

single statue, testify to the difficu

Jose (Albersmeier cat. 127) is pla

Cleopatra III by Stanwick, and fi

in Leiden (Albersmeier cat. 82), rea

the first century BC (Stanwick),

Arsinoe II (Ashton). Elsewhere

(Albersmeier cat. 114) sits comfo

and does not appear in Ashton. G discussions in support of their ar by marking their proposed identi

1 S. Albersmeier and M. Minas, 'Ein

2.7), where the inscription is presented in translation only.

die vergottlichte The Cleopatra Arsinoe VII identification is IT, based on the in appear- W. Cla

and H. Willems (eds), Egyptian Religion: The Last

ance of three uraei on the head-dress.

Thousand Years. Studies Dedicated to the Memory of Jan

3 See also S.-A. Ashton, 'Identifying the Egyptian-

Quaegebeur (Leuven, 1998), I, 3-29.

style Ptolemaic Queens', in S. Walker and P. Higgs (eds), Cleopatra of Egypt: From History to Myth (London,

2001), 148-55.

2 S.-A. Ashton, Ptolemaic Royal Sculpture from Egypt:

The Interaction between Greek and Egyptian Traditions

(BAR International Series 923; Oxford, 2001), 67 (no.

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2006

REVIEWS 301

The attribution

of

roya

'key' to identifying and beleaguered modern sch

queens can

sport singl

Kingdom

triple uraeus is more co

parallels (inclu

crown from

44-52) argues against pr

Koptos, and

or

that the three uraei ha

assertion

that the triple

assigns the six

core statue

group

VI I -attributed

to Cleopatra III a

statues

105

- the MMA's 'Kleopa

the third

century

BC, i.

Cleopatra III, plus cat.

steatite statue in

in

drawing

informed

the Lo

the first century

fire,6

by

her

BC,

but Albe

focus on

links the queens to Egy

support of

this argumen

three uraei (pl. 86a), and

them

(pl. 86b).

If

there is a weak

spot in

statues were used, in

point; he devotes one ch

par

geographic distribution

an

royal sculpture. In

this

complements Albersmeie

The book

includes a cat

order

by

the city

where

personal name, Greek

and

painting

a

infor

summarizing

(3); find

spots (

to 13); crowns and

head-

(25

to 30); and

illustrate many

inscript

of

the s

Untersuchungen

zu

den

F

private statuary

scholarly

necessary

exhibition

observations and

as well

detail and

high

to advance th

catalogues, wi

ideas, w

Christina Riggs

4 B. V. Bothmer, H. De Meulenaere, and H. W.

intaglio that Ashton identifies as Cleopatra VII wearing

three uraei, and uses as the crux of her triple-uraei argu-

Miiller, Egyptian Sculpture of the Late Period (Brooklyn,

1960), 146.

ment, instead depicts an Egyptian composite crown. I

would add that the gem is too small (1.3 cm L) to con-

tribute much to any interpretation: see Walker and Higgs

(eds), Cleopatra of Egypt, 156 (no. 153).

6 Cf. S.-A. Ashton, review of Stanwick, Portraits of the

Ptolemies, in EA 23 (Autumn 2003), 42, and S.-A. Ashton,

'The Ptolemaic Royal Image and the Egyptian Tradition',

in J. Tait (ed.), 'Never Had the Like Occurred': Egypt's

View of its Past (London, 2002), 223 (on an error substi-

5 H. Maehler, 'Ptolemaic Queens with a Triple

Uraeus', CdE 78 (2003), 294-303, favours Bothmer's pro-

posal that the three uraei represent a triple regency; thus

all statues with triple uraei would be identified as either

Cleopatra II (with her two brothers) or Cleopatra III (with her mother and uncle). Albersmeier does not

embrace this explanation, and in any case it is probably

unhelpful to substitute one iron-clad iconographic argu-

ment for another. Maehler also suggests that the glass

tuting 'Vatican' for 'Alexandrian').

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