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Maximizing your practice time seems to be a hot topic now.

The chart below is taken from The


Ultimate Warm-Up Book.
PRACTICE SCHEDULE
Part 1. Getting Your Air Moving
Part 2. Lip Buzzing
Part 3. Mouthpiece Work
Part 4. Long Tones
Part 5. Tonguing
Part 6. Flexibility
Part 7. Scales
Part 8. Range Study
Part 9. Flow Studies
Part 10. Etudes, Studies, Major Pieces and Trumpet
Repertoire

30
60
Minutes Minutes
2
1 Minute
Minutes
2
4
Minutes Minutes
2
4
Minutes Minutes
2
4
Minutes Minutes
3
6
Minutes Minutes
2
4
Minutes Minutes
3
6
Minutes Minutes
2
4
Minutes Minutes
3
6
Minutes Minutes
10
20
Minutes Minutes

90
Minutes
3
Minutes
6
Minutes
6
Minutes
6
Minutes
9
Minutes
6
Minutes
9
Minutes
6
Minutes
9
Minutes
30
Minutes

2/3 thirds of your time should be spent working on Basic Skills.


30 minute practice session: 20 minutes on Basic Skills.
60 minute practice session: 40 minutes on Basic Skills.
90 minute practice session: 1 hour on Basic Skills.
The other 1/3 of your time should be used wisely on etudes, studies, major pieces and trumpet
repertoire.

The Trumpet can be found in ALL languages


en: Trumpet, is: Trompet, es: Trompeta, fr: Trompette, it: Tromba, de: Trompete, pt: Trompete
Some notable trumpet method books include:
Arban, Jean-Baptiste (1894, 1936, 1982). Arban's Complete Conservatory Method for TRUMPET.
Carl Fischer, Inc. ISBN 0-8258-0385-3.
Kingston, Matt (2006) One Hundred and One
Callet, Jerome, and Bahb Civiletti (2002). Trumpet Secrets: The Secrets of the Tongue-Controlled
Embouchure. New York: Royal Press Printing Company.
Herbert L. Clarke (1984). TECHNICAL STUDIES FOR THE CORNET. Carl Fischer, Inc. ISBN
0-8258-0158-3.
Colin, Charles. Advanced Lip Flexibilities.
Schlossberg, Max. Daily Drills & Technical Studies. You can find these on the method book page.
Through years of teaching, Mr. Droste came to the realization that students are trying to bypass
Basic Skills to play songs. He wrote this book to teach others how to master all aspects of trumpet
technique. With these Basic Skills mastered, one can successfully play all types and styles of music.
The Following passages are taken From The Ultimate Warm-Up for Trumpet by: Michael
Droste. This 100 page, 10 chapter book goes through all aspects of Warming Up / Basic Skills.
Included are: air exercises, lip buzzing, mouthpiece work, long tones, tonguing, flexibility
exercises, scales, range and phrase studies, it's all there, with all of the information sequenced
appropriately to optimize your practicing! This 100 page book is printed on 24lb. 25% Cotton Fiber
Writing Paper. (archival quality, acid free) The book also contains a complete set of all the articles
from TrumpetStudio.com. It is made to last the test of time.
The Ultimate Warm Up: Practice Guide
The first step in determining a practice schedule is to define your goals and level of commitment.

The more time you are willing to devote towards improvement, the greater your results.
It is my firm belief that many of us were never taught correctly. We were taught to concentrate on
individual pieces of music for concerts, or exercises from band method books, and not on the basic
skills that are required to play the trumpet! You must do the work from the following chapters in
this specific order to obtain the highest rewards from your practice efforts. Above all, practice as
consistently as possible and try to never skip more than one day of practice.
The warm up can also be adjusted to meet your various needs. You might have a weak area, and you
may wish to increase time in that section. For example, your tone may be somewhat lacking in
richness and warmth. As ALL sound is created through vibrations, your first method of attack would
be to increase the minutes from the lip buzzing chapter until the desired results were achieved.
Use of a metronome - There are metronome markings on each warm up in this book. Use them! The
metronome is an invaluable tool and will help you to improve your internal rhythm. It will also
allow you to gauge your progress. In the beginning, some of the long tones may be difficult to
perform at 60 beats per minute. As time goes on and you are building endurance, it will be easier. A
metronome will provide a consistent point of reference.
The Ultimate Warm Up
Table Of Contents
Part 1. Getting Your Air Moving
Part 2. Lip Buzzing
Part 3. Mouthpiece WorkA. Mid-range to pedal tones buzzing
B. Slow slides from medium to low to medium high
Part 4. Long TonesA. Mid-range to lowest possible notes
B. Mid-range to medium high notes
Part 5. TonguingA. Mid-range to lowest possible notes
B. Mid-range to highest possible notes
Part 6. FlexibilityA. Mid-range to low lip slurs
B. Low to medium high lip slurs extended
Download Chapter 7 for FREE!
Part 7. Scales (All Keys)A. Major Scale (Two octave)
B. Minor Scale (Two octave)
C. Harmonic Minor (Two octave)
D. Melodic Minor (Two octave)
E. Brief Major exercise and one octave review
Part 8. Range Study
Part 9. Flow Studies
Part 10. Addendum
A. ALL articles from TrumpetStudio.com
B. Fingering Chart

The Ultimate Warm Up


How To Use This Warm Up Book
The entire book should be played at each practice session. If time does not permit playing the entire
book, then play as much of each section as time permits. Do not skip any sections. You must do the
exercises in order from beginning to end. (If the Ultimate Warm Up contains exercises to high for
you, skip that section until your able and go to the next exercise.)
Part 1. Getting Your Air Moving
Set your metronome to 60 bpm for these warm-ups. Air is the secret to great tonguing, range and
tone production. It is THE most important aspect of playing any wind instrument. Think of your air
as a continual stream of water flowing through your kitchen faucet. Always constant never
stopping!
Air Tips!
-Low notes require a greater volume of air to produce a great tone. Imagine making an ah sound in
your mouth and directing the air into a large tube. Always constant never stopping.
-High notes require fast air. Imagine saying an e sound in your mouth and directing the air super
fast into a small straw! Always constant never stopping.
Part 2. Lip Buzzing
Set your metronome to 60 bpm for these warm-ups. For these exercises try to get a nice full, rich
sound that is full of tone. What is done here is amplified by the mouthpiece and horn. Do not spend
more than 5 minutes on this section. Go for the most beautiful sound that you can create. Listen to
yourself, tape record your playing. Is your sound full, rich, warm, musical, and pleasing?
Part 3. Mouthpiece Work
Set your metronome to 60 bpm for these warm-ups. Hold the mouthpiece with the thumb and
forefinger at the end of the mouthpiece. This is to keep you from putting pressure on your
embouchure. The key is to keep the air constantly flowing. Go for a great sound! Listen to yourself,
tape record your playing. Go for a warm, rich sound with a lot of tone. What you produce now is
simply amplified by your instrument. If your sound is thin, this is the place to devote more work
and energy. Play the exercises in a relaxed fashion, not loud or soft, but with a nice full tone slowly
moving higher and lower as directed.
Part 4. Long Tones
Set your metronome to 60 bpm for these warm-ups. Again, the key is to keep the air constant,
always flowing. Go for the most beautiful sound that you can create. Listen to yourself, tape record
your playing. Is your sound full, rich, warm, musical, and pleasing? You can make beautiful music
by simply playing long tones, it is possible!
Part 5. Tonguing
Set your metronome to 80 bpm for these warm-ups. The key is to keep the air constantly flowing.
Think of the kitchen faucet analogy again, while the faucet is constantly flowing, imagine flicking a
butter knife quickly through the stream of water. The butter knife quickly separates the water and
the stream of water continues never stopping. The air flows on, but is lightly separated by the
tongue. When playing these warm-ups use different syllables for tonguing. Use as directed: da, dee,
do, ta, tee, to. Go for the most beautiful sound that you can create. Listen to your sound, tape record
your playing. Is your sound full, rich, warm, musical, and pleasing?
Part 6. Flexibility
Set your metronome between 60 and 80 bpm for these warm-ups. Another key to playing the

trumpet is flexibility. The ability to move from 2nd valve F# to 2nd valve B quickly and smoothly is
essential. Along with other valve combinations, these simply have to be mastered. The key for
successful lip slurs is to keep the air constantly flowing. When doing the extended slurs change the
air flow! The low notes require a greater volume of air to produce a great tone. Imagine making an
ah sound in your mouth and directing the air into a large tube. Always constant never stopping.
The high notes require fast air. Imagine saying an e sound in your mouth and directing the air
super fast into a small straw! Always constant never stopping. Go for the most beautiful sound that
you can create. Listen to yourself, tape record your playing. Is your sound full, rich, warm, musical,
and pleasing?
Part 7. Scales (All Keys) Download Chapter 7 for FREE!
Set your metronome between 60 and 80 bpm for these scales. The key to this chapter is to be Very
Fluid. Keep the air constantly flowing as you pass between the different octaves. The air flows on,
but is lightly separated by the tongue. Try sluring each scale, and experiment with different
tounguing syllables from the chapter on tonguing. Go for the most beautiful sound that you can
create. Listen to your sound, tape record your playing. Is your sound full, rich, warm, musical, and
pleasing?
Part 8. Range Study
Set your metronome between 60 and 80 bpm for these warm-ups. I believe that the type of air
needed to play lead is most closely related to a High Pressure Air Tank. You must tank up on the air
and release the valve, releasing the Super Fast Air Stream. When playing lead one should ride this
high pressure air stream and not force the lips. Let the High Pressure Air Tank and the subsequent
Super Fast Air Stream do the work, NOT THE LIPS! Go for the most beautiful sound that you can
create. Listen to yourself, tape record your playing. Is your sound full, rich, warm, musical, and
pleasing?
Part 9. Flow Studies
Set your metronome between 60 and 80 bpm for these warm-ups. These studies are meant to make
your playing as musical as possible. Sing the music, yes sing it! Imagine the most beautiful voice
singing the passage in your mind. Now go to the music and reproduce exactly what you hear in your
mind. Exactly! Think of each line as a separate musical idea. The goal is to think across the bar line
to the end of the musical phrase. This is why musicians play and practice! Why play the trumpet if
you are not receiving a musical experience? Music is full of feelings and emotions, play all your
music this way and youll never want to stop. Go for the most beautiful sound that you can create.
Listen to yourself, tape record your playing. Is your sound full, rich, warm, musical, and pleasing?
New Music Added to Chapter 9:
Piano And Trumpet
1. Bridal Chorus from Lohengrin - Richard Wagner
2. Rondeau Theme from Masterpiece Theater - Jean Mouret
3. Wedding March - Felix Mendelssohn
4. Trumpet Voluntary - Henry Purcell
5. Trumpet Tune - Henry Purcell
Trumpet Part Only
1. Hunters Chorus (duet) - Weber
2. Hungarian Dance No. 5 - Brahms
3. Minuet - Luigi Boccherini
4. Sonata No. 8 in C minor - Beethoven
5. Bach Horn Duet - J.S. Bach
6. Introduction to Third Act form Lohengrin
7. Waltz in Ab - Johannes Brahms
More...

Part 10. Addendum


Complete article reproduction from TrumpetStudio.com Topics include: Skill Building - How To
Play High Consistently - Mouthpiece Selection is Critical for Success - Double Tonguing and
Single Tonguing - Lip Buzzing - Practicing For A Performance - Finding Time To Practice Equipment - Synthetic Oil: Use With Caution - Braces - Endurance - Popular Method Books Recommended Discography - Fingering Chart.
EQUIPMENT
There are many different horns out there, at many different price levels. I started in 1970s on a
Holton student model, then owned a Schilke B1 through high school and college and then switched
to a Calicchio R32. I am currently in search of a new horn and want to try something different.
WARNING: Stay away from the cheap Chinese made horns - they make good lamps or can be sold
for scrap metal - but thats about it. If its not on this list DONT WASTE your money.
Beginner Horns: $500 - $1000
A beginner horn is PERFECT for those starting out. You DO NOT need to spend a lot to get started.
A beginner horn can last a good two to four years. THIS is where YOU START. (also see used
horns at the bottom)
Conn - Example: Conn 23B "USA"
Getzen - Example: Getzen 390
Holton - Example: Holton T602
Blessing
Amati
Intermediate Horns: $900 - $1900
An intermediate horns can be a fine lifetime horn when maintenance issues are addressed.
Amati
Bach - Example: Bach TR200
Jupiter - Example: Jupiter 1200S
Getzen - Example: Getzen 590S Capri Intermediate
Benge/Conn
Leblanc
Holton
Blessing
Stomvi
Pro Level Horns: $2000 +
Bach - Example: Bach 180S37
Schilke - Example: Schilke B Series
Yamaha - Example: Yamaha YTR9445CHS Chicago Artist Orchestra
Monette
Calicchio - Example: Calicchio R32
Taylor - Example: Taylor Trumpet Chicago Standard
Wild Thing
Kanstul
Used Horns / EBAY:
They are some great deals to be found. Things to consider:
How many sales does the seller have? (at least 50+)
Is their feedback rating above 95%?

What is their return policy?


How many musical instruments have they sold?
How is the finish? Are there dents? Other issues?
Why are they selling?
Keep these questions in your mind as you search, and you can get a good deal on used horn.
Whatever you purchase, I recommend a chemical cleaning from The Brass Bow in Arlington
Heights. IL. It is worth it for the cleaning and fixing of dents and/or problems with used horns.
Below is a review of the Calicchio R32:
Construction
The horn is very well constructed and will last over the long haul. The left thumb U hook and right
third valve loop are slightly oversized in width and really make the horn comfortable to hold.
Through trial and error, I have found that large bore horns are not for me. I like the resistance of the
smaller bore horns and want the horn to help play in the upper register. The Calicchio R32 has the
smaller specialized Studio 2 Lead pipe that makes playing in the upper register, very easy, with no
strain. The five inch R3 bell produces great projection from minimal player effort. Through its
construction and the increase of copper in the horn, it has a very consistent feel as one plays from
the lower octave through the upper octaves, very smooth.
Valves
The R32 valves are FANTASTIC! They are extremely fast. Due to the flat oversized finger buttons,
I can actually play faster. The valves slot well, yet also allow for flexibility in jazz situations.
Intonation
The horn slots well in a very smooth fashion. It allows for flexibility, but also locks in the pitch
easily. The intonation is excellent and has not been an issue.
Tone Quality
Because of the higher copper content, this horn gravitates towards a beautiful warm rich tone.
The R32 projects well and is extremely smooth and pleasing to the ear. It is very versatile for many
musical styles. The sound blends well with other instruments: piano, organ and brass players.
Conclusion:
The Calicchio R32 has all the features you have always wanted. It seems as though everyones wish
list came together to make this one. It is a very flexible horn with a warm rich sound that you will
enjoy playing for many years.
ENDURANCE
Many older players returning to the trumpet have lost it from what they remember being able to
play in their teens and 20s.
A) What are your intentions?
1. Playing for fun (were done, keep practicing and have a good time!)
2. Playing for a goal or purpose in mind, continue reading...
B) What kind of goal?
1. Are you trying out for a dance band or group?
2. Do you want to play professionally?

3. Do you want to join an orchestra?


C) What time commitment is involved to achieve your goal?
GENERALLY SPEAKING, to have any level of skill when you go to the horn, you have to have a
solid base of practicing for many months/years. If you are starting over again, GIVE YOURSELF
TIME to get your chops back. IT WILL TAKE LONGER for your lips and body to adjust to the
new demands. Lets face the facts, it gets harder to play, the older we get. A general rule for
practicing is this: decide upon your goal and determine what it will take to reach that level of
playing. You must practice every day, or you will loose it. As stated by many: The first day you
miss practicing - you know it. The second day - the band leader knows it. The third day, the
audience knows it!
My personal practice routine is the following:
A) One half to two thirds of my time is spent warming up (from my book)
B) The Clarke Technical Studies Many exercises from chapter 2, 3, 4, and 5 - Great chop and finger
calisthenics, (I especially need these as I am left handed)
C) Standard trumpet repertoire: Etudes, Pieces and Songs
TRUMPET METHOD BOOKS
Below are a listing of popular method books:
Arban: Complete Conservatory Method, ed. Goldman and Smith (C. Fischer)
Arban: Methode complete, ed. Maire, 3 vols. (A. Leduc)
Clodomir: Methode complete, ed. Job (A. Leduc)
Saint-Jacome: Grand Method (C. Fischer)
Elementary Methods
Clarke: Elementary Studies (C. Fischer)
Gordon: Physical Approach to Elementary Brass Playing (C. Fischer)
Longinotti: l'Etude de la trompette (Editions Henn)
Ridgeon: Brass for Beginners (Boosey & Hawkes)
Robinson: Rubank Elementary Method (Rubank)
Wiggins: First Tunes & Studios (Oxford)
Studies
MEDIUM TO MEDIUM-DIFFICULT
Bordogni: 24 Vocalises, trans. Porret (transposition) (A. Leduc)
Bousquet: 36 Celebrated Studies, ed. Goldman (C. Fischer)
Brandt: 34 Studies and 24 Last Studies, ed. Vacchiano (Belwin-Mills)
Broiles: Have Trumpet . . . Will Transpose (transposition) (C. Colin)
Chavanne: 25 Characteristic Studies, ed. Voisin (International)
Clarke: Technical Studies (C. Fischer)
Clarke: Setting Up Drills (C. Fischer)
Colin: Advanced Lip Flexibilities (C. Colin)
Endresen: Supplementary Studies (Rubank)
Gallay: 22 Exercises, ed. Maire (A. Leduc)
Glantz: The Complete Harry Glantz (C. Colin)
Goldman: Practical Studies (C. Fischer)
Gower and Voxman (ed.): Rubank Advanced Method (Rubank)
Hering: 32 Etudes (C. Fischer)
Hovaldt: Lip Flexibility (R. King)

Kopprasch: 60 Studies, ed. Gumbert and Herbst, 2 vols. (C. Fischer)


Laurent: Etudes pratiques, 3 vols. (A. Leduc)
Maniscalco: Leonardo Maniscalco, trumpet player with the Rome Opera House orchestra, has
published two books of trumpet etudes. La sonorit e la tecnica, vols 1 and 2. I really like these!!!
Pares: Scales (Rubank)
Salvation Army: 101 Technical Exercises (Salvation Army)
Schlossberg: Daily Drills and Technical Studies (M. Baron)
Skornicka: Rubank Intermediate Method (Rubank)
Smith: Lip Flexibility (C. Fischer)
Staigers: Flexibility Studies, 2 vols. (C. Fischer)
Stamp: Warm-ups plus Studies (Editions Bim)
Vacchiano: Trumpet Routines (C. Colin)
Zauder: Embouchure & Technique Studies (C. Colin)
DIFFICULT
Andre: 12 Etudes caprices dans le style baroque (piccolo trumpet) (Editions Billaudot)
Balasanyan: 20 Studies, ed. Foveau (International)
Balay: 15 Etudes (A. Leduc)
N. Bizet: 12 Grandes etudes de perfectionnement (A. Leduc)
Bodet: 16 Etudes de virtuosite d'apres J.S. Bach (A. Leduc)
Broiles: Trumpet Baroque, 2 vols. (piccolo trpt.) (Queen City)
Charlier: Etudes transcendantes (A. Leduc)
Clarke: Characteristic Studies (C. Fischer)
Duhem: 24 Etudes (C. Fischer)
Gallay: 12 Grand caprices, ed. Maire (A. Leduc)
Gallay: 39 Preludes, ed. Maire (A. Leduc)
Harris: Advanced Studies (C. Colin)
Hickman: The Piccolo Trumpet (Tromba Publications)
Longinotti: Studies in Classical and Modern Style (International)
Petit: 15 Etudes techniques et melodiques (A. Leduc
Petit: Grandes etudes (A. Leduc)
Sachse: 100 Etudes (transposition) (International)
Smith: Top Tones (C. Fischer)
Webster: Method for Piccolo Trumpet (Brass Press)
PLAYING IN THE UPPER REGISTER
There is a systematic approach to playing high notes on a consistent basis. The four most important
aspects are: (1) High Pressure Air Tank (2) Tongue Position (3) Lip Position (4) Super Fast Air
Stream
(1) First, you must have air the reserves ready to be called up at a moments notice. I believe that the
type of air needed to play lead is most closely related to a High Pressure Air Tank. You must tank up
on the air and release the valve, releasing the Super Fast Air Stream. When playing lead one should
ride this high pressure air stream. Let the High Pressure Air Tank and the subsequent Super Fast Air
Stream help do the work. It's not the QUANTITY of air, but the SPEED of the air stream. Playing
high notes actually requires quite a small quantity of air.
(2) Next, Tongue Position should also be addressed. Saying ah lowers the tongue and increase the
VOLUME of air. We don't want volume, but a Super Fast Air Stream. Saying ee arches the
tongue and 'INCREASES AIR SPEED' for high note playing.
(3) Lip Position. Imagine you have a tennis ball in your fingertips - now squeeze! This squeeze or
pushing of your lips together is needed to play high. I personally use what people have called the

Superchop Method I pivot to push the lips over the top teeth and arch my tongue to alter the air
stream. My lower lip curls in over the top of the bottom teeth. The top lip slightly overlaps the
lower lip. The lip compression comes from pulling all of the muscles in toward the center.
(4) Finally, one must use a Super Fast Air Stream. The key is to achieve an incredible velocity of
air, not quantity. The velocity must be so fast that it screams through the horn like a Mach 4 fighter
jet. I mean fast! You should not puff your cheeks at anytime, check in a mirror. If you are puffing
your cheeks, take your hand and literally hold your checks in, until your muscles are strong enough
to do it on its own. Your goal is to obtain this Super Fast Air Stream INSTANTLY. It is the air
speed, combined with lip and tongue position, that will give you success in the upper register.
Using the Air Tank, Tongue Position, Lip Position, and Air Speed YOU must also practice high note
playing EVERYDAY. I often take the Clarke Studies up to the next octave for practicing. Or
perhaps you could practice the leads to your favorite big band or pop charts. Either way, nothing
happens without practice and hard dedicated work.

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