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11/14/2016

United States presidential election, 2016 ­ Wikipedia

United States presidential election, 2016 ­ Wikipedia United States presidential election, 2016

United States presidential election, 2016

FromWikipedia,thefreeencyclopedia

131.7 million Americans cast a ballot in 2016, out of 231 million eligible voters—a turnout rate of 56.9

percent. [5][6]

2016 was the fifth election since 1820 in which the recipient of a plurality of the popular vote did not become president, after 1824, 1876, 1888, and 2000. [a][3] Voters selected presidential electors, who in turn will vote, based on the results of their jurisdiction, for a new president and vice president through the Electoral College on December 19, 2016. [10] Clinton was the first woman in the history of the United States to win the nomination of a major party and a plurality of the popular vote, with 47.8% of ballots cast while Trump received 47.3%. Trump is expected to take office as the 45th President on January 20, 2017; Pence is expected to take office as the 48th Vice President.

The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses took place between February and June 2016, staggered among the 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories. This nominating process was also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots for a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who in turn elected their party's presidential nominee. Businessman and reality television personality Donald Trump became the Republican Party's presidential nominee on July 19, 2016, after defeating U.S. Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, and 15 other major candidates in the Republican primary elections. [11] Former Secretary of State and U.S. Senator from New York Hillary Clinton became the Democratic Party's presidential nominee on July 26, 2016, after defeating U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont. [12]

A total of 29 third party and independent presidential candidates appeared on the ballot in at least one

state. Former Governor of New Mexico Gary Johnson and physician Jill Stein repeated their 2012 roles

as the nominees for the Libertarian Party and Green Party, respectively. [13] With ballot access to the

entire electoral college, Johnson won 4.1 million votes, the highest vote share for a third party candidate

By early morning November 9, 2016, initial vote counts indicated that Donald Trump was projected to obtain over 270 electoral votes, a majority of the 538 electors in the electoral college required to make him the president­elect of the United States. [15][16] The victory, considered unlikely by most pre­ election forecasts, [17][18] was characterized by the media as an "upset" and the most "shocking" since

1948. [19][20] The main states that secured the victory of Trump are situated in the Great Lakes/Rust Belt

region, where working­class whites shifted their traditional alliance from the Democratic Party; Wisconsin went Republican for the first time since 1984, while Pennsylvania and Michigan went Republican for the first time since 1988. [21][22][23] Maine split its electoral votes for the first time since

1828. [24]

Contents

1 Background

1 Background

 
1.1 2008 presidential election

1.1 2008 presidential election

1.2 2010 midterm elections

1.2 2010 midterm elections

1.3 2012 presidential election

1.3 2012 presidential election

1.4 2014 midterm elections

1.4 2014 midterm elections

2 Republican Party

2 Republican Party

 
2.1 Primaries

2.1 Primaries

2.2 Nominees

2.2 Nominees

2.3 Other major candidates

2.3 Other major candidates

2.4 Vice presidential selection

2.4 Vice presidential selection

3 Democratic Party

3 Democratic Party

 
3.1 Primaries

3.1 Primaries

3.2 Nominees

3.2 Nominees

3.3 Other major candidates

3.3 Other major candidates

3.4 Vice presidential selection

3.4 Vice presidential selection

4 Major third parties and independents

4 Major third parties and independents

4.1 Libertarian Party

4.1 Libertarian Party

4.1.1 Nominees

4.1.1

Nominees

4.2 Green Party

4.2 Green Party

4.2.1 Nominees

4.2.1

Nominees

4.3 Evan McMullin

4.3 Evan McMullin

4.4 Constitution Party

4.4 Constitution Party

4.4.1 Nominees

4.4.1

Nominees

4.5 Ballot access

4.5 Ballot access

5 Other third parties and independents

5 Other third parties and independents

6 Swing states

6 Swing states

 
7 Party conventions

7 Party conventions

8 Campaign finance

8 Campaign finance

9 Debates

9 Debates

 

UnitedStatespresidentialelection,2016

November8,2016 538membersofthe ElectoralCollege 270electoralvotesneededtowin Turnout TBD   Nominee

November8,2016

538membersoftheElectoralCollege

270electoralvotesneededtowin

Turnout

TBD

 
 
 

Nominee

Party

Homestate

Runningmate

Projected

306 [1][2][3]

232 [1][2][3]

electoralvote

Statescarried

30+ME­02

20+D.C.

Popularvote

60,350,241 [4]

60,981,118 [4]

Percentage

47.30%

47.79%

60,981,118 [ 4 ] Percentage 47.30% 47.79% Presidentialelectionresultsmap. Red
60,981,118 [ 4 ] Percentage 47.30% 47.79% Presidentialelectionresultsmap. Red

Presidentialelectionresultsmap. ReddenotesstatesprojectedforTrump/Pence; BluedenotesthoseprojectedforClinton/Kaine; Numbersindicateelectoralvotesallottedtothewinnerofeach

state.TheelectoralcollegewillvoteonDecember19,2016.

Presidentbeforeelection

(Projected)ElectedPresident

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United States

presidential election, 2016 ­ Wikipedia

9.1 Primary election debates

9.1 Primary election debates

9.2 General election debates

9.2 General election debates

10 Newspaper endorsements

10 Newspaper endorsements

11 Forecasting

11 Forecasting

12 Maps

12 Maps

13 Results

13 Results

13.1 Results by state

13.1 Results by state

13.2 Close races

13.2 Close races

13.3 Reactions

13.3 Reactions

14 Voter demographics

14 Voter demographics

15 See also

15 See also

16 References

16 References

17 External links

17 External links

Background

Article Two of the United States Constitution provides that the President and Vice President of the United States must be natural­born citizens of the United States, at least 35 years old, and a resident of the United States for a period of at least 14 years. Candidates for the presidency typically seek the nomination of one of the political parties of the United States, in which case each party devises a method (such as a primary election) to choose the candidate the party deems best suited to run for the position. Traditionally, the primary elections are indirect elections where voters cast ballots for a slate of party delegates pledged to a particular candidate. The party's delegates then officially nominate a candidate to run on the party's behalf. The general election in November is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots for a slate of members of the Electoral College; these electors in turn directly elect the President and Vice President.

President Barack Obama, a Democrat and former U.S. Senator from Illinois, is ineligible to seek reelection to a third term due to restrictions of the Twenty­second Amendment; in accordance with Section I of the Twentieth Amendment, his term expires at 12 noon on January 20, 2017.

2008presidentialelection

In the 2008 election, Obama was elected president, defeating the Republican nominee, Senator John McCain of Arizona, with 53% of the popular vote and 68% of the electoral vote, [25][26] succeeding two­term Republican President George W. Bush, the former Governor of Texas. Since the end of 2009, Obama's first year in office, polling companies such as Gallup have found Obama's approval ratings to be between 40–50%. [27][28]

2010midtermelections

FinalpollclosingtimesonElection Day. 7p.m.EST[00:00UTC](6) 7:30p.m.EST[00:30UTC](3) 8p.m.EST[01:00UTC] (15+DC)
FinalpollclosingtimesonElection
Day.
7p.m.EST[00:00UTC](6)
7:30p.m.EST[00:30UTC](3)
8p.m.EST[01:00UTC]
(15+DC)
8:30p.m.EST[01:30UTC](1)
9p.m.EST[02:00UTC](15)
10p.m.EST[03:00UTC](4)
11p.m.EST[04:00UTC](5)
1a.m.EST[06:00UTC](1)

In the 2010 midterm elections, the Democratic Party suffered significant losses in Congress; the Republicans gained 63 seats in the House of Representatives – taking back control of the chamber in the process – and six seats in the Senate, though short of achieving a majority. As a result of the Republicans' recapture of the House after losing it to the Democrats in the 2006 midterm elections, John Boehner became the 53rd Speaker of the House of Representatives, making Obama the first President in 16 years to lose the House of Representatives in the first half of his first term, in an election that was characterized by the economy's slow recovery, and the rise of the Tea Party movement. [29]

Ageneralelectionballot,listingthe presidentialandvicepresidential candidates
Ageneralelectionballot,listingthe
presidentialandvicepresidential
candidates

2012presidentialelection

In the 2012 presidential election, Obama defeated former Governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney with 51% of the popular vote and 62% of the electoral vote. [30] Meanwhile, despite minor losses, Republicans retained their majority of seats in the House of Representatives while Democrats increased their majority in the Senate. [26]

Speculation about the 2016 campaign began almost immediately following the 2012 campaign, with New York magazine declaring the race had begun in an article published on November 8, two days after the 2012 election. [31] On the same day, Politico released an article predicting the 2016 general election would be between Clinton and former Governor of Florida Jeb Bush, while a The New York Times article named Governor of New Jersey Chris Christie and New Jersey Senator Cory Booker as potential candidates. [32][33]

2014midtermelections

In the 2014 midterm elections, voter turnout was the lowest since 1942: 36% of eligible voters voted. [34] The Republicans retained control of the House of Representatives, increasing their majority to its largest since March 4, 1929, [35] and gained a

Republican Party

Primaries

Prior to the Iowa caucuses on February 1, 2016, Perry, Walker, Jindal, Graham and Pataki withdrew due to low polling numbers. Despite leading many polls in Iowa, Trump came in second to Cruz, after which Huckabee, Paul and Santorum withdrew due to poor performances at the ballot box. Following a sizable victory for Trump in the New Hampshire primary, Christie, Fiorina and Gilmore abandoned the race. Bush followed suit after scoring fourth place to Trump, Rubio and Cruz in South Carolina. On March 1, 2016, the first of four "Super Tuesday" primaries, Rubio won his first contest in Minnesota, Cruz won Alaska, Oklahoma and his home of Texas

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and Trump won the other seven states that voted. Failing to gain traction, Carson suspended his campaign a few days later. [38] On March 15, 2016, the second of four "Super Tuesday" primaries, Kasich won his only contest in his home state of Ohio and Trump won five primaries including Florida. Rubio suspended his campaign after losing his home state, [39] but retained a large share of his delegates for the national convention, which he released to Trump. [39]

Between March 16 and May 3, 2016, only three candidates remained in the race: Trump, Cruz and Kasich. Cruz won most delegates in four Western contests and in Wisconsin, keeping a credible path to denying Trump the nomination on first ballot with 1,237 delegates. Trump then augmented his lead by scoring landslide victories in New York and five Northeastern states in April and he grabbed all 57 delegates in the Indiana primary of May 3, 2016. Without any further chances of forcing a contested convention, both Cruz [40] and Kasich [41] suspended their campaigns. Trump remained the only active candidate and was declared the presumptive Republican nominee by Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus on the evening of May 3, 2016. [42]

Nominees

 
   
 

Republican Party ticket, 2016

 

forPresident

 

forVicePresident

  MikePence forPresident   forVicePresident Chairmanof   50th TheTrumpOrganization
  MikePence forPresident   forVicePresident Chairmanof   50th TheTrumpOrganization

Chairmanof

 

(1971–present)

(2013–present)

   
GovernorofIndiana (1971– present ) (2013– present )   Campaign     [43][44][45]  
 

[43][44][45]

 

Othermajorcandidates

Major candidates were determined by the various media based on common consensus. The following were invited to sanctioned televised debates based on their poll ratings.

Trump received 14,010,177 total votes in the primary. He, Cruz, Rubio and Kasich each won at least one primary.

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Candidatesinthissectionaresortedbyreversedateofwithdrawalfromtheprimaries

 
JebBush JimGilmore Carly Fiorina ChrisChristie       Dir.ofPediatric    
JebBush JimGilmore Carly Fiorina ChrisChristie       Dir.ofPediatric    
JebBush JimGilmore Carly Fiorina ChrisChristie       Dir.ofPediatric    
JebBush JimGilmore Carly Fiorina ChrisChristie       Dir.ofPediatric    
JebBush JimGilmore Carly Fiorina ChrisChristie       Dir.ofPediatric    
JebBush JimGilmore Carly Fiorina ChrisChristie       Dir.ofPediatric    
JebBush JimGilmore Carly Fiorina ChrisChristie       Dir.ofPediatric    
JebBush JimGilmore Carly Fiorina ChrisChristie       Dir.ofPediatric    
             

(2011–present)

fromTexas

(2013–present)

fromFlorida

(2011–present)

(1984–2013)

(1999–2007)

(1998–2002)

(1999–2005)

(2010–present)

W:May4

W:May3

W:Mar15

W:Mar4

W:Feb20

W:Feb12

W:Feb10

W:Feb10

4,287,479votes

7,811,110votes

3,514,124votes

857,009votes

286,634votes

18,364votes

40,577votes

57,634votes

[46]

[47][48][49]

[50][51][52]

[53][54][55]

[56][57]

[58][59]

[60][61]

[62][63]

BobbyJindal ScottWalker Rick Perry Graham U.S.Senator U.S.Senator 44th 53rd
BobbyJindal ScottWalker Rick Perry Graham U.S.Senator U.S.Senator 44th 53rd
BobbyJindal ScottWalker Rick Perry Graham U.S.Senator U.S.Senator 44th 53rd
BobbyJindal ScottWalker Rick Perry Graham U.S.Senator U.S.Senator 44th 53rd
BobbyJindal ScottWalker Rick Perry Graham U.S.Senator U.S.Senator 44th 53rd
BobbyJindal ScottWalker Rick Perry Graham U.S.Senator U.S.Senator 44th 53rd
BobbyJindal ScottWalker Rick Perry Graham U.S.Senator U.S.Senator 44th 53rd
BobbyJindal ScottWalker Rick Perry Graham U.S.Senator U.S.Senator 44th 53rd

45th

47th

fromKentucky

(2011–present)

(1995–2007)

(1996–2007)

(1995–2006)

(2003–present)

(2008–2016)

(2011–present)

(2000–2015)

W:Feb3

66,781votes

W:Feb3

16,622votes

W:Feb1

51,436votes

W:December29,2015

2,036votes

W:December21,

2015

W:November17,

2015

W:September21,2015

1write­invoteinNew

W:September11,2015

1write­invoteinNew

5,666votes

222votes

Hampshire

Hampshire

[64][65][66]

[67][68]

[69][70]

[71]

[72][73]

[74][75]

[76][77][78]

[78][79][80]

Vicepresidentialselection

Donald Trump turned his attention towards selecting a running mate after he became the presumptive nominee on May 4, 2016. [81] In mid­June, Eli Stokols and Burgess Everett of Politico reported that the Trump campaign was considering New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich of Georgia, Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions, and Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin. [82] A June 30 Washington Post report also included Senators Bob Corker of Tennessee, Richard Burr of North Carolina, Tom Cotton of Arkansas, Joni Ernst of Iowa, and Indiana Governor Mike Pence as individuals still being considered for the ticket. [83] Trump also stated that he was considering two military generals for the position, including retired Lieutenant General Michael Flynn. [84]

In July 2016, it was reported that Trump had narrowed his list of possible running mates down to three: Christie, Gingrich, and Pence. [85]

On July 14, 2016, several major media outlets reported that Trump had selected Pence as his running mate. Trump confirmed these reports in a message on Twitter on July 15, 2016, and formally made the announcement the following day in New York. [86][87] On July 19, the second night of the 2016 Republican National Convention, Pence won the Republican vice presidential nomination by acclamation. [88]

Democratic Party

Primaries

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who also served in the U.S. Senate and was the First Lady of the United States, became the first Democrat to formally launch a major candidacy for the presidency. Clinton made the announcement on April 12, 2015, via a video message. [89] While Nationwide opinion polls in 2015 indicated that Clinton was the front­runner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, she faced challenges from Independent Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, [90] who became the second major candidate when he formally announced on April 30, 2015, that he was running for the Democratic nomination. [91] September 2015 polling numbers indicated a narrowing gap between Clinton and Sanders. [90][92][93] On May 30, 2015, former Governor of Maryland Martin O'Malley was the third major candidate to enter the Democratic primary race. [94] On June 3, 2015, Lincoln Chafee, former Independent Governor and Republican Senator of Rhode Island, became the fourth major candidate to announce his candidacy for the Democratic nomination. [95][96] On July 2, 2015, former Virginia Senator Jim Webb became the fifth major Democratic candidate to announce his bid for the presidency. [97] On September 6, 2015, former Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig became the sixth and final major Democratic candidate to enter the race. [98]

On October 20, 2015, Webb announced his withdrawal from the Democratic primaries, and explored a potential Independent run. [99] The next day Vice­President Joe Biden decided not to run, ending months of speculation, stating, "While I will not be a candidate, I will not be silent." [100][101] On October 23, Chafee withdrew, stating that he hoped for "an end to the endless wars and the beginning of a new era for the United States and humanity". [102] On November 2, after failing to qualify for the second DNC­sanctioned debate after adoption of a rule change negated polls which before might have necessitated his inclusion in the debate, Lessig withdrew as well, narrowing the field to Clinton, O'Malley, and Sanders. [103]

On February 1, 2016, in an extremely close contest, Clinton won the Iowa caucuses by a margin of 0.2 points over Sanders. After winning no delegates in Iowa, O'Malley withdrew from the presidential race that day. On February 9, Sanders bounced back to win the New Hampshire primary with 60% of the vote. In the remaining two February contests, Clinton won the Nevada caucuses with 53% of the vote and scored a decisive victory in the South Carolina primary with 73% of the vote. [104][105] On March 1, 11 states participated in the first of four "Super Tuesday" primaries. Clinton won Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia and 504 pledged delegates, while Sanders won Colorado, Minnesota, Oklahoma and his home state of Vermont and 340 delegates. The following weekend, Sanders won victories in Kansas, Nebraska and Maine with 15–30­point margins, while Clinton won the Louisiana primary with 71% of the vote. On March 8, despite never having a lead in the Michigan primary, Sanders won by a small margin of 1.5 points and outperforming polls by over 19 points, while Clinton won

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83% of the vote in Mississippi. [106] On March 15, the second of four "Super Tuesday" primaries, Clinton won in Florida, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina and Ohio. Between March 22 and April 9, 2016, Sanders won six caucuses in Idaho, Utah, Alaska, Hawaii, Washington and Wyoming, as well as the Wisconsin primary, while Clinton won the Arizona primary. On April 19, Clinton won the New York primary with 58% of the vote. On April 26, in the third of four "Super Tuesday" primaries dubbed the "Acela primary", she won contests in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania, while Sanders won in Rhode Island. Over the course of May, Sanders accomplished another surprise win in the Indiana primary [107] and also won in West Virginia and Oregon, while Clinton won the Guam caucus and Kentucky primary.

On June 4 and 5, Clinton won two victories in the Virgin Islands caucus and Puerto Rico primary. On June 6, 2016, the Associated Press and NBC News reported that Clinton had become the presumptive nominee after reaching the required number of delegates, including pledged delegates and superdelegates, to secure the nomination, becoming the first woman to ever clinch the presidential nomination of a major United States political party. [108] On June 7, Clinton secured a majority of pledged delegates after winning primaries in California, New Jersey, New Mexico and South Dakota, while Sanders only won in Montana and North Dakota. Clinton also won the final primary in Washington, D.C. on June 14. At the conclusion of the primary process, Clinton had won 2,204 pledged delegates (54% of the total) awarded by the primary elections and caucuses, while Sanders had won 1,847 (46%). Out of the 714 unpledged delegates or "superdelegates" who were set to vote in the convention in July, Clinton received endorsements from 560 (78%), while Sanders received 47 (7%). [109]

Although Sanders had not formally dropped out of the race, he announced on June 16, 2016, that his main goal in the coming months would be to work with Clinton to defeat Trump in the general election. [110] On July 8, appointees from the Clinton campaign, the Sanders campaign, and the Democratic National Committee negotiated a draft of the party's platform. [111] On July 12, Sanders formally endorsed Clinton at a rally in New Hampshire in which he appeared with Clinton. [112] On July 22, three days before the start of the Democratic National Convention, the Clinton campaign announced that Virginia Senator Tim Kaine had been selected as her running mate. Clinton is the first female presidential candidate nominated by a major political party.

Nominees

Democratic Party ticket, 2016

Democratic Party ticket, 2016

forPresident

forVicePresident

HillaryClinton TimKaine forPresident forVicePresident 67th U.S.SecretaryofState (2009–2013) U.S.Senator from
HillaryClinton TimKaine forPresident forVicePresident 67th U.S.SecretaryofState (2009–2013) U.S.Senator from

(2009–2013)

(2013–present)

U.S.Senator from Virginia (2013– present ) Campaign [113][114][115] Othermajorcandidates The following

[113][114][115]

Othermajorcandidates

The following candidates were frequently interviewed by major broadcast networks and cable news channels, or were listed in publicly published national polls. Lessig was invited to one forum, but withdrew when rules were changed which prevented him from participating in officially sanctioned debates.

Clinton received 16,849,779 votes in the primary.

 

Candidatesinthissectionaresortedbydateofwithdrawalfromtheprimaries

 
LawrenceLessig LincolnChafee JimWebb U.S.Senator from Vermont (2007– present )
LawrenceLessig LincolnChafee JimWebb U.S.Senator from Vermont (2007– present )
LawrenceLessig LincolnChafee JimWebb U.S.Senator from Vermont (2007– present )
LawrenceLessig LincolnChafee JimWebb U.S.Senator from Vermont (2007– present )
LawrenceLessig LincolnChafee JimWebb U.S.Senator from Vermont (2007– present )
LawrenceLessig LincolnChafee JimWebb U.S.Senator from Vermont (2007– present )

(2007–present)

(1984topresent)

61st

(2009–2016)

74th

fromVirginia

(2007–2015)

(2011–2015)

(2007–2013)

LN:July26,2016

LN:July26th2016

67,457primaryvotesand0delegates

W:February1,2016

110,423votes

W:November2,2015

W:October23,2015

0votes

W:October20,2015

2write­invotesinNewHampshire

13,167,848primaryvotesand1,846

4write­invotesinNew

delegates

   

Hampshire

   

[116]

[117]

[118][119]

[103]

[120]

[121]

Vicepresidentialselection

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In April 2016, the Clinton campaign began to put together a list of 15 to 20 individuals to vet for the position of running mate, even though Sanders continued to challenge Clinton in the Democratic primaries. [122] In mid­June, the The Wall Street Journal reported that Clinton's shortlist included Representative Xavier Becerra of California, Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey, Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro of Texas, Mayor of Los Angeles Eric Garcetti of California, Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia, Labor Secretary Tom Perez of Maryland, Representative Tim Ryan of Ohio, and Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. [123] Subsequent reports stated that Clinton was also considering Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, retired Admiral James Stavridis, and Governor John Hickenlooper of Colorado. [124] In discussing her potential vice presidential choice, Clinton stated that the most important attribute she looked for was the ability and experience to immediately step into the role of president. [124]

Major third parties and independents

Parties in this section have obtained more than 100,000 votes nationally and one percent of the vote in at least one state.

LibertarianParty

Additional Party Endorsements: Independence Party of New York

Ballot access to all 538 electoral votes

Nominees

Libertarian Party ticket, 2016

Libertarian Party ticket, 2016

forPresident

Libertarian Party ticket, 2016 GaryJohnson forPresident 29th GovernorofNewMexico (1995–2003) WilliamWeld

(1995–2003)

forVicePresident

(1995–2003) WilliamWeld forVicePresident 68th GovernorofMassachusetts (1991–1997) Campaign

(1991–1997)

(1995–2003) WilliamWeld forVicePresident 68th GovernorofMassachusetts (1991–1997) Campaign [126][127]
(1995–2003) WilliamWeld forVicePresident 68th GovernorofMassachusetts (1991–1997) Campaign [126][127]

[126][127]

[126][127]

GreenParty

Ballot access to 480 electoral votes (522 with write­in): [128]

As write­in: Georgia, Indiana, North Carolina [ 1 2 9 ] [ 1 3 0 ] Georgia, Indiana, North Carolina [129][130]

Ballot access lawsuit pending: Oklahoma [ 1 3 1 ] Oklahoma [131]

No ballot access: Nevada, South Dakota [ 1 2 9 ] [ 1 3 2 ] Nevada, South Dakota [129][132]

Nominees

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Green Party ticket, 2016 JillStein forPresident Physician from Lexington,Massachusetts AjamuBaraka forVicePresident
Green Party ticket, 2016 JillStein forPresident Physician from Lexington,Massachusetts AjamuBaraka forVicePresident

Green Party ticket, 2016

Green Party ticket, 2016

forPresident

Green Party ticket, 2016 JillStein forPresident Physician from Lexington,Massachusetts AjamuBaraka forVicePresident

Physician

forVicePresident

Physician from Lexington,Massachusetts AjamuBaraka forVicePresident Activist from Washington,D.C. Campaign [133][134]

Activist

Physician from Lexington,Massachusetts AjamuBaraka forVicePresident Activist from Washington,D.C. Campaign [133][134]
Physician from Lexington,Massachusetts AjamuBaraka forVicePresident Activist from Washington,D.C. Campaign [133][134]

[133][134]

[133][134]

EvanMcMullin

Additional Party Endorsement: Independence Party of Minnesota

Ballot access to 84 electoral votes (451 with write­in): [135]

As write­in: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New

Hampshire,NewJersey,NewYork,NorthDakota,Ohio,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Tennessee,Texas,Vermont,Washington,WestVirginia,Wisconsin

[135][136][137][138][139][140][141]

No ballot access: District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Mississippi, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wyoming District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Mississippi, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Wyoming

Nathan Johnson is listed on the ballot as Evan McMullin's running mate with the intention of serving as a placeholder for Mindy Finn.

Independent ticket, 2016

forPresident

forVicePresident

EvanMcMullin MindyFinn forPresident forVicePresident Chiefpolicydirectorforthe HouseRepublicanConference
EvanMcMullin MindyFinn forPresident forVicePresident Chiefpolicydirectorforthe HouseRepublicanConference

Chiefpolicydirectorforthe

(2015–2016) [142]

Presidentof

EmpoweredWomen

[ 1 4 2 ] Presidentof EmpoweredWomen Campaign [142] ConstitutionParty Ballot access to 207 electoral votes

[142]

ConstitutionParty

Ballot access to 207 electoral votes (451 with write­in): [143][144]

As write­in: Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Montana, Nebraska, Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Oregon,

RhodeIsland,Tennessee,Texas,Vermont,Virginia [143][145][146][147][148]

No ballot access: California, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Oklahoma [ 1 4 3 ] California, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Oklahoma [143]

Nominees

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Constitution Party ticket, 2016

Constitution Party ticket, 2016

forPresident

Constitution Party ticket, 2016 DarrellCastle forPresident Attorney from Memphis,Tennessee ScottBradley forVicePresident

Attorney

forVicePresident

forPresident Attorney from Memphis,Tennessee ScottBradley forVicePresident Businessman from Utah Campaign [149]

Businessman

fromUtah

forPresident Attorney from Memphis,Tennessee ScottBradley forVicePresident Businessman from Utah Campaign [149]
forPresident Attorney from Memphis,Tennessee ScottBradley forVicePresident Businessman from Utah Campaign [149]

[149]

forPresident Attorney from Memphis,Tennessee ScottBradley forVicePresident Businessman from Utah Campaign [149]

Ballotaccess

Presidential ticket

Party

 

Votes

Percentage

States

Electors

% of voters

Trump / Pence

Republican

50

+ DC

538

100%

60,261,924

47.30%

Clinton / Kaine

Democratic

50

+ DC

538

100%

60,828,358

47.75%

Johnson / Weld

Libertarian

50

+ DC

538

100%

4,151,138

3.26%

Stein / Baraka

Green

47

+ DC

522

97.0%

1,249,970

0.98%

McMullin / Finn

Independent

41

451

83.83%

437,783

0.34%

Castle / Bradley

Constitution

46

451

83.8%

180,632

0.14%

Candidates in bold were on ballots representing 270 electoral votes, without needing write­in states.

All other candidates were on the ballots of fewer than 25 states, but had write­in access greater than 270.

Other third parties and independents

11/14/2016

United States presidential election, 2016 ­ Wikipedia

   

Vice

Electors

 

Party

Party Presidential nominee presidential nominee ( write­ in ) States with ballot access ( write­in )

Presidential

nominee

Party Presidential nominee presidential nominee ( write­ in ) States with ballot access ( write­in )

presidential

nominee

Party Presidential nominee presidential nominee ( write­ in ) States with ballot access ( write­in )

(write­

in)

Party Presidential nominee presidential nominee ( write­ in ) States with ballot access ( write­in )

States with ballot access (write­in)

Party Presidential nominee presidential nominee ( write­ in ) States with ballot access ( write­in )
       

Alaska,Colorado,Florida,Idaho,Iowa,Kentucky,Minnesota,Mississippi,Montana,Nevada,NewHampshire,New

Jersey,NewMexico,NorthDakota,RhodeIsland,Tennessee,Utah,Vermont,Wisconsin,

Lawyer from

147

(305)

Wyoming [144][150][151][152][153][154][155]

Businessman from California

map

(Alabama,Arizona,Connecticut,Delaware,Indiana,Kansas,Maryland,Missouri,Nebraska,NewYork,Oregon,

Pennsylvania,Virginia,Washington,WestVirginia) [136][137][138][140][145][147][156][157][158][159][160][161][148][162][163]

       

and

California,Colorado,Iowa,Louisiana,NewJersey,NewMexico,Vermont,Washington [166][167]

Gloria La Riva Newspaper printer and activist from California

112

Activist from

(226)

(Alabama,Connecticut,Delaware,Kansas,Maryland,Minnesota,NewHampshire,NewYork,Oregon,Pennsylvania,

Freedom [164]

map

RhodeIsland,WestVirginia) [137][138][140][147][156][157][161][163][168]

 

Party [165]

Alyson Kennedy Mineworker and Labor Leader from Illinois

70

Colorado,Louisiana,Minnesota,NewJersey,Tennessee,Utah,Washington [166]

of

(123)

(Alabama,Iowa,NewHampshire,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont) [156][161]

 

map

 

Monica Moorehead perennial candidate and political activist from Alabama [169]

   

NewJersey,Utah,Wisconsin [166]

30

Carolina [170]

(235)

map

(Alabama,Indiana,Idaho,Iowa,Kansas,Massachusetts,Michigan,Montana,NewHampshire,New,York,Ohio,

Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Texas,Vermont,Washington,West

Virginia) [138][140][156][158][162][163][171][172][173][174][175][176]

   

Colorado,Michigan,Guam [166][167][179]

25

(209)

(Alabama,Indiana,Iowa,Maryland,Minnesota,Montana,NewHampshire,NewJersey,NewYork,Oregon,

Party [177]

map

Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Texas,Utah,Vermont,Wisconsin) [140][147][156][158][161][162][168][174][176][180][181]

 

James Hedges former Tax Assessor for Thompson Township, Fulton County, Pennsylvania [182][183]

   

Arkansas,Colorado,Mississippi [166]

Bill Bayes

of

21

(116)

(Alabama,Idaho,Iowa,Kansas,Maryland,Montana,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,Rhode

map

Island,Vermont,WestVirginia) [138][147][156][161][163][171][174]

       

Colorado,Tennessee [166]

Mike Smith

20

(Alabama,Alaska,Arizona,Connecticut,Delaware,Georgia,Idaho,Iowa,Kansas,Kentucky,Maryland,Minnesota,

Independent

Lawyer, Colorado

Daniel White

(222)

Montana,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Ohio,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Utah,Vermont,Virginia,

Washington.WestVirginia) [137][138][145][147][148][156][157][161][162][163][168][171][174][175][180][184][185]

       

Ohio [186]

Richard Duncan

18

(Alabama,Alaska,Delaware,Florida,Idaho,Indiana,Iowa,Kentucky,Maryland,Minnesota,Montana,Nebraska,

Independent

of Ohio

Ricky Johnson

(173)

NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont,West

Virginia) [147][156][157][158][160][161][163][167][168][171][174][184][185]

       

Colorado,Louisiana [166]

(Alabama,Alaska,Arizona,California,Connecticut,Florida,Georgia,Idaho,Illinois,Indiana,Iowa,Kentucky,

Independent

Economics

Professor at

17

(428)

map

Maine,Maryland,Massachusetts,Michigan,Minnesota,Missouri,Montana,NewHampshire,NewJersey,North

Dakota,Ohio,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Tennessee,Texas,Utah,Vermont,Virginia,Washington,West

UCLA,

Virginia,Wisconsin)

 

[136][137][139][141][145][147][148][156][158][161][162][163][167][168][171][172][173][174][175][176][180][181][184][185][187][188][189][190]

       

Colorado,Louisiana [166][192]

(Alabama,Alaska,Arizona,Connecticut,Delaware,Georgia,Idaho,Illinois,Indiana,Iowa,Kansas,Kentucky,

Steve Schulin

17

Maryland,Michigan,Minnesota,Missouri,Montana,Nebraska,NewHampshire,NewJersey,NewYork,Ohio,

 

activist from

(369)

map

 

Iowa [191]

Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Tennessee,Texas,Utah,Vermont,Virginia,Washington,WestVirginia,

Wisconsin)

 

[137][138][139][140][145][146][147][148][156][157][158][160][161][162][163][168][171][173][174][175][176][180][181][184][185][188][190]

       

Colorado,Louisiana [166]

Chris Keniston reliability engineer from Texas [193]

Deacon Taylor of Nevada [194]

17

(Alabama,Alaska,Idaho,Iowa,Kentucky,Minnesota,Nebraska,NewHampshire,NewJersey,NewYork,Ohio,

(196)

Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont,Virginia,Washington,

 

map

Wisconsin) [140][148][156][160][161][162][168][171][175][181][184][185]

11/14/2016

United States presidential election, 2016 ­ Wikipedia

   

Vice

Electors

 

Party

Party Presidential nominee presidential nominee ( write­ in ) States with ballot access ( write­in )

Presidential

nominee

Party Presidential nominee presidential nominee ( write­ in ) States with ballot access ( write­in )

presidential

nominee

Party Presidential nominee presidential nominee ( write­ in ) States with ballot access ( write­in )

(write­

in)

Party Presidential nominee presidential nominee ( write­ in ) States with ballot access ( write­in )

States with ballot access (write­in)

Party Presidential nominee presidential nominee ( write­ in ) States with ballot access ( write­in )
 

Mark Elworth

 

Iowa,Minnesota [166]

Dan Vacek

Jr.

16

(77)

(Alabama,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont) [156][161]

       

Arkansas,Iowa [153][166]

Lynn Kahn Doctor of Clinical Psychology from Maryland

Kathleen

Independent

Monahan

of Florida

12

(160)

(Alabama,Delaware,Idaho,Kansas,Maryland,Minnesota,Montana,Nebraska,NewHampshire,NewJersey,New

York,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont,Washington,West

Virginia) [138][140][147][156][157][160][161][162][163][168][171][174]

 

Mike Maturen sales professional and magician from Michigan

   

Colorado [195]

9

Juan Muñoz

of Texas

(332)

map

(Alabama,Alaska,California,Georgia,Idaho,Iowa,Kansas,Kentucky,Maryland,Michigan,Minnesota,Nebraska,

NewHampshire,NewJersey,NewYork,NorthDakota,Ohio,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Texas,Vermont,

Virginia,Washington,Wisconsin) [136][138][140][141][146][147][148][156][160][161][162][168][171][173][175][176][181][184][185]

       

Colorado [195]

Joseph Allen

(Alabama,Alaska,Arizona,Connecticut,Delaware,Illinois,Indiana,Iowa,Kentucky,Maryland,Minnesota,

Independent

Maldonado

Douglas K.

Terranova

9

(212)

Montana,Nebraska,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Ohio,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont,Washington,

WestVirginia,Wisconsin) [137][145][147][156][157][158][160][161][162][163][168][174][175][181][184][185][188]

       

Colorado [195]

Ryan Alan Scott

 

Bruce Kendall

9

Independent

Barnard

(108)

(Alabama,Delaware,Iowa,NewHampshire,NewJersey,NewYork,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,

Vermont) [140][156][157][161]

     

SouthCarolina [196]

Michael Lacy

9

(83)

(Alabama,Connecticut,Iowa,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,

Vermont) [137][156][161]

       

Colorado [195]

Approval

Frank Atwood

Blake Huber

9

Voting Party

(76)

(Alabama,Iowa,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont) [156][161]

     

Colorado [195]

Kyle Kenle Kopitke of Michigan

Narthan R.

Sorenson

9

(76)

(Alabama,Iowa,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont) [156][161]

restaurateur from

Richard Silva

9

Colorado [195]

New Jersey [197][198]

(76)

(Alabama,Iowa,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont) [156][161]

Bradford Lyttle peace activist from Illinois

   

Colorado [195]

Hannah Walsh

9

(76)

(Alabama,Iowa,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont) [156][161]

 
       

Louisiana [199]

Jerry White peace activist from Michigan

Niles Niemuth

journalist from

8

(166)

(Alabama,California,Delaware,Iowa,Kentucky,Maryland,Minnesota,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,

Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont,WestVirginia) [136][147][156][157][161][163][168][185]

 

Princess Khadijah

   

Louisiana [199]

Independent

Jacob­Fambro

Milton Fambro

8

(75)

(Alabama,Iowa,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont) [156][161]

   

Farley

 

Utah [180]

Rocky Giordani

from California

Anderson

activist from

6

(79)

(Alabama,Iowa,Kansas,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont) [138][156][161]

Constitution

     

Idaho [200]

Party of

Idaho

Scott Copeland

of Texas

J.R. Meyers

4

(71)

(Alabama,Iowa,NewHampshire,NewJersey,Oregon,Pennsylvania,RhodeIsland,Vermont) [156][161]

Swing states

Presidential campaigns focus their resources on a relatively small number of competitive states, referred to as swing or battleground states. [201] Some potential swing states are: Florida, Iowa, Nevada, North Carolina, and Ohio. [202][203] Florida is the largest swing state and has been won by the overall winner every election since 1996. Ohio is another large swing state and has had a perfect bellwether record since 1964. The states regarded as competitive can fluctuate, as the polls fluctuate.

11/14/2016

United States presidential election, 2016 ­ Wikipedia

Some consensus among political pundits developed throughout the primary election season regarding swing states. [204] From the results of presidential elections from 2004 through to 2012, generally the Democratic and Republican parties start with a safe electoral vote count of about 150 to 200. [205][206] The margins required to constitute a swing state are vague, however, and local factors can come into play. [207][208] It was thought that left­leaning states in the Rust Belt could become more conservative, as Trump mostly appeals to blue­collar workers. [209] They represent a large portion of the American populace and were a major factor in Trump's eventual nomination. Trump's primary campaign was propelled by victories in Democratic states, and his supporters often did not identify as Republican.

In Maine and Nebraska, two electors are given to whoever has the most overall votes, and the winner of each congressional district receives one electoral vote. [210] Every other state awards all of its electoral votes to the candidate with the highest vote percentage. [211] Media reports indicated that both candidates planned to concentrate on Florida, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Ohio and North Carolina. [212][213]

Sites and individuals publish electoral predictions. These generally rate the race by the probability either of the two main parties wins each state. "Tossup" is generally used to indicate that neither party has an advantage, "lean" to indicate a party has a slight edge, "likely" to indicate a party has a clear advantage, and "safe" to indicate a party is heavily favored. Ratings from the Cook Political Report, Sabato's Crystal Ball, or the Rothenberg­Gonzales Political Report are included in the table below. The state's 2014 Cook PVI and the latest swing for each state are also listed.

         

RCP

         
 
  Electoral 2012 Cook Nov.7 Nov.6 Nov.7 Nov.7 Last 2016
  Electoral 2012 Cook Nov.7 Nov.6 Nov.7 Nov.7 Last 2016
  Electoral 2012 Cook Nov.7 Nov.6 Nov.7 Nov.7 Last 2016
  Electoral 2012 Cook Nov.7 Nov.6 Nov.7 Nov.7 Last 2016

Nov.7

  Electoral 2012 Cook Nov.7 Nov.6 Nov.7 Nov.7 Last 2016

Nov.6

  Electoral 2012 Cook Nov.7 Nov.6 Nov.7 Nov.7 Last 2016

Nov.7

  Electoral 2012 Cook Nov.7 Nov.6 Nov.7 Nov.7 Last 2016

Nov.7

  Electoral 2012 Cook Nov.7 Nov.6 Nov.7 Nov.7 Last 2016
  Electoral 2012 Cook Nov.7 Nov.6 Nov.7 Nov.7 Last 2016

2016

  Electoral 2012 Cook Nov.7 Nov.6 Nov.7 Nov.7 Last 2016

State

PVI

2016

[218]

2016

[219]

2016

[220]

2016

[221]

margin

11

9.1

R

R+7

Lean R

 

Tossup

 

Tilt R

 

Lean R

 

2000

4.4

R

9

5.4

D

D+1

Lean D

 

Tossup

 

Likely D

Likely D

2008

2.1

D

29

0.9

D

R+2

Tossup

 

Tossup

 

Tilt D

 

Lean D

 

2008

1.3

R

16

7.8

R

R+6

Lean R

 

Tossup

 

Lean R

 

Likely R

1996

5.7

R

6

5.8

D

D+1

Lean R

 

Tossup

 

Tilt R

 

Lean R

 

2008

9.6

R

2

15.3

D

D+6

Likely D

Tossup

 

Likely D

Likely D

1988

2.7

D

1

8.6

D

D+2

Tossup

 

Tossup

 

No rating

Lean R

 

1992

TBD

 

16

9.5

D

D+4

Lean D

 

Tossup

 

Lean D

 

Lean D

 

1992

0.3 R

 

10

7.7

D

D+2

Likely D

Lean D

 

Likely D

Likely D

1972

1.4 D

 

1

7.2

R

R+4

Tossup

 

Likely R

No rating [b]

Lean R

 

2012

TBD

 

5

10.2

D

D+4

Likely D

Tossup

 

Safe D

 

Likely D

2004

8.3

D

6

6.7

D

D+2

Lean D

 

Tossup

 

Tilt D

 

Lean D

 

2008

2.4

D

4

5.6

D

D+1

Lean D

 

Tossup

 

Lean D