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Training Manual Article 1.

02, SCBA
Table of Contents
1.02.00 Terminology ........................................................................................................................................... 2
1.02.01 Introduction and Purpose ........................................................................................................................ 3
1.02.02 General Information and Limitations ...................................................................................................... 4
1.02.03 Components of Breathing Apparatus ...................................................................................................... 9
1.02.04 Donning Procedures ............................................................................................................................. 14
1.02.05 Cold Weather Operations ...................................................................................................................... 18
1.02.06 Emergency Procedures ......................................................................................................................... 18
1.02.07 Routine Checks and Maintenance ......................................................................................................... 20
APPENDIX A: SCBA Instruction Manuals ....................................................................................................... 22

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1.02.00 Terminology
Backpack (Carrier): That part of the breathing apparatus that is worn on the back by the user, and
contains the cylinder and strap mechanism, shoulder straps, first and second stage regulators, PASS
device, pressure gauge, and connecting hoses
Breathing Apparatus: Any type of respirator designed to protect the user from specific respiratory or
atmospheric hazards
Buddy Check: The act of checking a fellow team FF for exposed skin or other problems with the manner
that safety equipment is worn and that equipment is fully operational before entering a hazardous area.
This check should be very quick and not unnecessarily delay entry into the building.
Bypass Valve: A valve that controls a direct airline from the cylinder in the event that the regulator fails or
to clear a fogged mask. It is controlled by the red knob located on the mask mounted regulator (MMR). Its
normal operating position is closed.
CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear): Recognized as an industry standard for fire
departments. (Note: This upgrade makes our breathing apparatus compliant with all NFPA and ANSI
standards.)
Carbon Dioxide (CO): An odorless, colorless, but toxic gas, produced by the complete combustion of
fossil fuels (natural gas, LPG, oil, wood, charcoal, etc.)
Contaminant: A harmful, irritating, nuisance material foreign to the normal atmosphere.
Donning/Doffing: Putting on (donning) and removing (doffing) a breathing apparatus
Entry Position: This donning stage is where the FF is wearing full protective clothing, including the SCBA
backpack and facepiece, mask mounted regulator (MMR) attached with air on, and hood and helmet are in
place. The FF is ready to enter a hazardous area.
Clear Command Communications Systems: A voice amplifier appliance that is mounted on the
facepiece
Facepiece: That portion of a respirator that covers the wearers nose and mouth and chin in a half-mask
facepiece or that covers the nose, mouth, and eyes in a full facepiece. It is designed to make a gas-tight or
particle-tight fit with the face and includes the headbands, exhalation valve(s), and connections for an airpurifying device or respirable gas source, or both.
Fit Check: A test conducted by the wearer to determine if the respirator is properly seated to the face.
Also known as Test for Tightness.
Fit Test: A qualitative test to determine the appropriate size and type of respirator, and to assure an
appropriate seal
Hazardous Atmosphere: Any atmosphere that is oxygen deficient, generating particulate matter (smoke)
has high heat or contains a toxic or disease producing contaminant. A hazardous atmosphere may or may
not be immediately dangerous to life and health.
Heads-up Display: The Nightfighter heads-up display allows a user to clearly and easily see air cylinder
content while wearing an SCBA equipped with the Ultra Elite Facepiece.
ICM Tx: An MSA personal alert safety system (PASS) built into the SCBA
Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH): An IDLH exposure condition is one that poses a threat
of exposure to airborne contaminants when that exposure is likely to cause death or immediate or delayed
permanent adverse health effects or prevent escape from such an environment. (NIOSH definition)
MMR: Mask Mounted Regulator. The second stage regulator that connects to the wearers facepiece.
NIOSH: National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health.
Overhaul: The act of performing a thorough search for and extinguishment of fire that may exist within the
structure or area of operations.

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Oxygen Deficient Atmosphere: An atmosphere in which the oxygen concentration is less than that
required to sustain unimpaired physical and mental activities (less than 19.5 percent oxygen by volume or
has a partial pressure of 148 millimeters of mercury or less.)
Particulate Matter: A suspension of fine solid or liquid particles in air, such as dust, fog, fume, mist,
smoke, or spray
Personal Alert Safety System (PASS): A device that provides life-safety protection by emitting a loud
shriek if the FF should collapse or remain motionless for approximately 30 seconds
Post Fire Operations: All operations occurring at the scene of a fire after extinguishment, including but
not limited to salvage, overhaul, investigations, and fire watch
Ready Position: An intermediate donning stage in which a FF is wearing full protective clothing, including
the SCBA backpack and facepiece with hood, gloves, and helmet in place. However, the MMR is not yet
connected and work in contaminated atmospheres is not allowed.
Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA): An apparatus that protects the face and lungs from toxic
smoke and products of combustion
Standby Position: An intermediate donning stage in which a FF is wearing full protective clothing,
including the SCBA backpack with the bottle open and PASS device activated, and the facepiece is
stowed in the chest bag or hanging by the neck-strap
Stow: The act of returning the breathing apparatus to service and storing on the apparatus or other
storage area

1.02.01 Introduction and Purpose


A. Introduction
The proper use of various types of breathing apparatus is critical to the health of fire service personnel
as well as the effectiveness of operations at emergency scenes. In addition, fire service personnel
need to possess technical knowledge in the operation of the specific equipment used and its
limitations. Finally, knowledge regarding the statutory requirements and internal policies that govern the
use of breathing apparatus is essential for the user of that equipment.
B. Purpose
This Article is intended to provide fundamental information regarding the use of breathing apparatus,
manufacturers recommendations, terminology essential to the user, and fundamental maintenance
procedures. Detailed language regarding policies and procedures is contained in those references.
C. References
IFSTA ESSENTIALS OF FIRE FIGHTING AND FIRE DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS, 5TH ED

MANUFACTURERS SPECIFICATIONS & LITERATURE MSA


NFPA STANDARDS
WAC 296-305
WAC 296-62 PART E
WAC 296-842

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1.02.02 General Information and Limitations
A. General Information
1) Specifications

Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) is certified by the National Institute of Occupational


Safety and Health (NIOSH) and is specifically designed to comply with National Fire Protection
Association (NFPA) standards for use in firefighting applications. It will perform as designed only
if used and maintained according to the manufacturers instructions.

The SCBA is designed for respiratory protection during entry into and escape from oxygendeficient or contaminated atmospheres, gases, and vapors.

The SCBA is approved for use at temperatures above minus 25 F. The SCBA is not designed
for nor should be used as an underwater device.

The SCBA is designed to be worn by individuals who are clean-shaven. Heavy mustaches are
discouraged, as they may impact the operation of the exhalation valve, thereby reducing the
efficiency of the mask unit as each exhalation valve is calibrated (uses additional air or does not
properly exhale, and therefore CO build-up may result).

The Vancouver Fire Department utilizes the MSA MMR with Firehawk pressure-demand
regulator SCBA (hereinafter referred to as an MSA MMR) with a 30-minute, 4,500 psig
cylinder. A 30-minute cylinder is rated for 20 minutes by NIOSH. However, a user can expect a
bottle will last only approximately 15 minutes during heavy work. (Fig. 1)

(Fig. 1) The MSA MMR with Firehawk Regulator Ensemble

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The cylinder and SCBA components weigh approximately 30 pounds and are designed to be
used with the balance of the personal protective ensemble helmet, turnouts, hood, and gloves.

2) Storage
a. The SCBA must be secured by a positive mechanical means if stowed within an enclosed
seating of fire department vehicles or in a compartment with a positive latching door.
b. The method of holding the SCBA in place must be designed to minimize injury to persons in the
vehicle in the event of an accident, rapid deceleration, or acceleration. Note that the SCBA units
have a positive latching and the release mechanism is accessible to the user while seated
(yellow cord). The restraint strap must be behind the shoulder straps of the SCBA while stored
in the jump seat. When SCBAs are stored in a compartment, a restraint strap is not required.

SCBA Mounted in Jump Seat

SCBA Mounted in Compartment

3. Fit Testing
a. FFs engaged in fire suppression activities are required to wear an SCBA and have an annual fit
test. This assures that the mask issued to a FF fits properly and has no defects not already
detected on daily checks.
b. Any FF experiencing a loss or gain of weight exceeding 10 pounds must be fit-tested again.

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4. Maintenance
a. The SCBA must be checked on a daily basis per the Vertical Standards (WAC 296-305).
5. Proficiency
a. Department personnel will normally be evaluated quarterly on SCBA competence by Training
Division personnel.
b. The evaluation will include donning and emergency procedures.
6. Cylinder Carrying Procedures
a. Based on the manufacturers recommendations and concern for safety, members shall not carry
or handle SCBA cylinders by the hand wheel (Fig. 1) or the gauge (Fig. 2). The potential for injury
outweighs the convenience of grasping the hand wheel. The gauge is not engineered to be
utilized as a carrying point.
b. Cylinders may be carried by grasping the neck of the cylinder under the entire valve assembly
with the palm on the relief valve side, opposite the pressure gauge (Fig. 3). Fingers should
straddle the cylinder neck. Prior to lifting the cylinder, turn the wrist 180-degrees so that the
palm and gauge are facing down (Fig. 4). This positioning prevents the valve hand wheel from
inadvertently opening during the lifting process (Fig. 5). This method can be used with or without
gloves, left-handed or right-handed. Cylinders can then be easily carried at the members side
(Fig. 6).
c. Utility straps may also be used to carry SCBA cylinders. Start with a hose knot at each end (Fig.
7). Place the hose knot around the cylinder valve assembly as shown. Drape and cinch the loop
around the relief valve side of the valve, capturing the assembly behind both the hand wheel
and the threaded air connection (Fig. 8).
d. MSA recommends handling the SCBA cylinder by grasping or cradling the cylinder body. This is
the most secure method and it should be used whenever practical.

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SCBA CYLINDER HANDLING WARNING AND PRECAUTIONS

Fig. 1

Fig. 2

Recommended SCBA Cylinder Carrying and Handling Procedures

Fig. 3

Fig. 5

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Fig. 4

Fig. 6

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Fig. 7

Fig. 8

B. Limitations of SCBA and Wearers


The SCBA and our ability to work is restricted by the capacity of the cylinder, the condition of the
breathing apparatus, the wearers physical fitness and reaction to stress, the physical limitations when
working in full protective clothing, and the work being performed. In addition, the FFs training and
experience with working in environments of limited visibility and their familiarity with the equipment will
have a direct impact on the amount of time the air cylinder will last.
1. SCBA Limitations
a. The 30-minute cylinder can be expected to offer 20 minutes of work under ideal conditions and
about 15 minutes during extremely heavy work.
b. In conjunction with personal protective clothing, the SCBA completes the personal protective
ensemble (PPE) as required by the Vertical Standards (WAC 296-305). Our PPE only offers
limited protection, especially when not used in conjunction with a protective hose line.
2. Wearer Limitations
a. FFs wearing an SCBA have a tendency to enter areas so hazardous that their lives may be in
extreme danger. FFs do, because the SCBA and protective clothing allow them to do so
comfortably.
b. When entering a structure or space, FFs should keep in mind that a hasty retreat may be
needed. FFs should note means of egress as they enter: windows; exit doors; stairways; etc.
An excellent method when not utilizing a hose line is to utilize the rope bag attached to the
SCBA.
c. FFs entering contaminated atmospheres must be decontaminated when exiting the
contaminated area. In some cases this may also include the decontamination of any patients
that may have been removed.

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1.02.03 Components of Breathing Apparatus
The following section provides an overall description and specific components of the type of Breathing
Apparatus currently employed by the Vancouver Fire Department.
A. MSA MMR SCBA
1. Description General
The MMR breathing apparatus consists of the following eight major sub-assemblies:
a. Air cylinder and valve
b. Carrier and harness
c. Audible alarm
d. First stage regulator
e. Mask-mounted regulator (second stage)
f. Facepiece with voice amplifier and heads-up display.
g. Redundant alarm
h. Integrated PASS ICM Tx.
2. Air Cylinder and Valve
a. The air cylinder and valve (Fig. 1) consists of a tank and a cylinder valve assembly. The cylinder
valve includes a valve body, cylinder valve inlet tube, handwheel, safety disc (burst disc), and
pressure gauge. The cylinder is composed of aluminum fully wrapped in carbon fiber and
fiberglass.
b. The pressure gauge shows the air pressure in the cylinder continuously. The gauge is calibrated
in 100 psig (pounds per square inch gauge [absolute]) increments. For example, a gauge
reading of 20 is read as 20 x 100 or 2,000 psig. A handwheel is used to open and close the
cylinder valve.

Fig. 1

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3. Carrier and Harness
a. The carrier or backpack (Fig. 2) consists of a backplate, backpad, a cylinder band and latch to
hold the cylinder, and a harness, consisting of shoulder pads, a chest strap, adjustable pullstraps, and a waist strap.

Fig. 2

4. Audible Alarm
a. The Audi-Alarm Audible Alarm (Fig. 3): The Audi-Alarm audible alarm rings when there is
approximately 25% of the SCBAs rated service time remaining.
b. The alarm also rings when the cylinder valve is first opened, providing an audible indication that
the alarm is properly cocked. A high pressure hose delivers air at cylinder pressure from the
alarm to the first stage regulator.
c. Our 30-minute, 4,500 psig bottles have approximately 7 minutes of remaining service air when
the audible alarm begins.

Fig. 3

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5. First Stage Regulator
a. The first stage regulator (Fig. 4) is a balanced-type pressure reducer that keeps the pressure to
the mask-mounted regulator at approximately 80 psig throughout the entire operating pressure
range of the cylinder. The regulator has a redundancy feature to minimize the possibility of a
first stage failure.
b. The regulator uses a large sintered filter which is easy to replace. The filter captures particulates
that may be in the air stream. The regulator also incorporates a pressure relief that vents firststage pressure automatically if the normal operating pressure range is exceeded.

Fig. 4

6. Second Stage (Mask-Mounted) Regulator


a. The Second Stage Regulator (Fig. 5) is a pressure-demand regulator, which keeps a positive
pressure in the face-piece all the time.
b. Pushing both gray standby buttons on the regulator stops air flow when the facepiece or
regulator is removed. To restart the regulator, inhale sharply. The buttons automatically
disengage the diaphragm, allowing air to flow to the facepiece.
c. The second stage regulator attaches to the facepiece by sliding the regulator down the rail and
inserting the regulator into the facepiece adaptor by pushing inward. The red bypass knob on
the regulator is oriented so that the knob is pointing to the right, and the gray slide button is on
top.

Fig. 5

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7. Facepiece
a. The facepiece (Fig. 6) is available in three sizes. The facepiece lens is super-hardcoated to meet
the requirements of NFPA 1981. This process gives the clear polycarbonate lens superior
abrasion and chemical protection.
b. The rubber facepiece has a low-resistance, pressuredemand exhalation valve designed for easy cleaning. An
inhalation check valve in the inlet housing keeps moisture
out of the mask-mounted regulator. The facepiece has a
speaking diaphragm for clear, short-range
communication. The ClearCommand Communications
System is a voice amplifier system attached to the
facepiece.
c. The facepiece is stocked with the standard four-point
adjustable elasticized straps (sometimes referred to as
spider web) adjustment head harness. The harness is
made of flame- and heat-resistant materials and features a five-point suspension. Four points
use adjusting elasticized straps.
d. Heads-up display.
e. Clear Command voice amplifier.
8. Redundant Alarm
a. The ICM Tx (Fig. 7) is a multi-mode, battery-powered, low-pressure warning device which gives
audible and visual warnings that air cylinder pressure has reached a level indicating
approximately 25% of service life remains. There are two (2) warning indicators:
i. RED LEDs blink in the window.
ii. An audible alarm repeats single-tone bursts.
b. The purpose of the redundant alarm feature (repeated tones alarm) is to provide the user an
additional lower pressure warning.
9. Integrated PASS ICM Tx
a. The Integrated PASS ICM Tx is a Personal Alert Safety System
(PASS) built into the SCBA. The ICM 2000 is designed to detect little
or no motion, and includes both audible and visual alarms.
b. The PASS function uses RED, YELLOW and GREEN light-emitting
diodes (LEDs) to visually display its status.
i.

GREEN: LEDs start to flash when the cylinder valve is


opened and shows that the device is operational.
ii.
YELLOW: LEDs indicate the cylinder is at 50%.
iii.
RED: LEDs flash slowly when the device is in pre-alarm. LEDs flash rapidly
when the device is in full alarm.

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c. The ICM Tx has two (2) control buttons one for the Reset/Off mode and one manual alarm
during emergency conditions.
iii. The YELLOW RESET/OFF button resets the PASS from the full alarm mode. It also
shuts off the unit after the cylinder valve is closed and air is bled from the system.
iv. The RED ALARM button activates the full alarm mode with or without air pressure.
The YELLOW/RED lights flash on the front panel.
d. If the user is motionless for approximately 18 seconds, the ICM Tx goes into pre-alarm. If the
user remains motionless for 12 more seconds (approximately), the ICM Tx goes into full
alarm. During pre-alarm, the PASS sounds three (3) progressively louder tones, and the RED
lights flash slowly. The first four (4) seconds will have an audible indicator of a low volume rising
tone. The second four (4) seconds will have a medium volume Buzz and the last four (4)
seconds will have a high volume rising tone followed by Buzz. Movement of the unit cancels the
pre-alarm. During full alarm, the PASS repeatedly sounds two high-pitched tones followed by a
Buzz. During full alarm the RED lights also flash rapidly.
e. The unit utilizes four (4) AA batteries which must be NEDA 1604A approved.

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1.02.04 Donning Procedures

A. SCBA Donning Cabinet Mount


Step #1
Open cabinet and inspect SCBA for obvious
defects or missing components.
Step #2
Open main cylinder valve fully. Verify low air
alarm operation, redundant alarm, and
PASS.
Step #3
Verify that working area is clear. Grasp top
straps using hand-over-hand grip. Remove
SCBA from cabinet while stepping away and
rotating counterclockwise and pull the SCBA
onto your back.
Step #4
Position shoulder straps while in a slightly
bent over position. Grasp and connect the
waist straps and snug up waist strap. Grasp
both shoulder straps and remove excess
slack in shoulders. Do not overly tighten the
shoulder straps. Connecting the chest strap
is optional.

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1.02.04 DONNING PROCEDURES cont.
Step #5
Push the helmet and hood back and place head
harness low on the back of the head. (The neck
strap should be looped around the wearers neck
at the time of donning the turnout coat.) Position
the facepiece evenly on the face and snug head
harness for fit.
Step #6
Test for tightness by placing hand over inhalation
valve and inhale, holding pressure for 10 seconds
to verify seal. Test exhalation valve by blocking
the inlet connection with the palm of your hand. If
the exhalation valve is stuck, you may feel a rush
of air around the facepiece.
Step #7
Using both hands, bring hood up and over head
and place it so that all skin is covered and the
hood overlaps the edge of the facepiece. Slide
the helmet back onto your head. You will need to
loosen the helmet tension slightly to
accommodate the extra bulk from the head
harness and hood.
Step #8
Grasp regulator with one hand. Push both gray
standby buttons to remove regulator from belt
mount. Grasp regulator and orient regulator so that
red bypass knob is pointing to the right and slide
button is on top. Slide regulator onto rail (fast track)
of facepiece cover. Slide regulator down the rail
cover until regulator stops. Insert regulator into
facepiece adaptor by pushing inward. Check proper
engagement by pulling on the regulator to ensure
regulator is securely attached to facepiece adaptor.
Step #9
Inhale sharply to start the air flow.
Step #10
Activate the ClearCommand voice amplifier on
facepiece.
Step #11
Prior to entry a buddy check should be done.

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B. Donning SCBA Ground
Step #1
Stand up and place the SCBA upright, with the cylinder facing you. Grasp the top of the shoulder straps
with both hands, one on either side.
Step #2
Sling the SCBA over your left shoulder and onto your back. Follow steps as above starting at #4
through to completion.
C. Doffing MSA MMR
Step #1
Disconnect the regulator by pushing both gray standby
buttons and pulling regulator away from facepiece.
Step #2
Slide regulator up rail (fast track) into ready position.
Step #3
Close the cylinder valve fully and turn the red bypass valve
to release pressure in system (can be left attached to
facepiece or removed from belt mount).

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Step #4
When the pressure falls below 200
psig, turn the device off by pressing
the yellow reset button two (2)
times in rapid succession. The
ICM Tx will beep one (1) time
when the button is pressed once.
Pressing the button a second time
will then sound three (3) beeps to
indicate that the unit is turned off.
The lights will also stop flashing.

Step #5
Stow the regulator in the belt mount or attached to facepiece when not in use.

Step #6
Remove the facepiece, fully loosen the lower straps and pull the facepiece up and away.
Step #7
The SCBA can be removed from the wearers back. A system check shall be completed prior to stowing on
the apparatus.

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1.02.05 Cold Weather Operations
Moisture can cause problems in our MSA MMR SCBAs if it freezes. However, moisture can cause freezing
problems, even if the surrounding air is above freezing. This is because air flowing from the cylinder
through the regulator drops cylinder pressure too near to atmospheric pressure very quickly. As this
happens, it expands, causing the air and regulator to become colder. Although the surrounding
o

temperature may be warmer than 32 F, the temperature inside the regulator may be lower, and any water
inside the regulator could turn to ice and restrict air flow.
A. Actions to Avoid Freezing in the Regulator
1. To keep moisture from entering the mask-mounted regulator,
stow the regulator in the Standby belt mount
2. Keep the SCBA facepiece facing up. When the facepiece faces
down, it can act as a funnel, catching and directing water into the
regulator
3. When the MSA is away from heat, water spray can freeze on the
regulator surface. Unless it affects the air flow, it is not an
emergency condition.
4. Ice can build up and freeze the shut-off button, by-pass valve,
and the quick-connect release tabs. Before entering or re-entering a
hazardous atmosphere, make sure the shut-off button, quickconnect release tabs, and by-pass valve are ice-free and operating properly. Periodically, check the bypass to be sure it is ice-free.
5. Moisture can enter through the cylinder valve or coupling nut when cylinders are replaced on the MSA.
When replacing a cylinder, be careful to prevent moisture or contamination from entering the system.
Remove any ice from these fittings. Wipe the coupling nut threads and cylinder valve threads dry before
disconnecting the cylinder. Water can contaminate the system or freeze.
o

6. NIOSH certification requires a nose cup at temperatures below 32 F. The nose cup reduces lens
fogging and must be used whenever freezing conditions are encountered.
7. During clean-up at the station, be careful to keep water from entering the facepiece or mask-mounted
regulator when washing the apparatus.
8. Thoroughly dry the facepiece and mask-mounted regulator after cleaning and disinfecting.

1.02.06 Emergency Procedures


The Vancouver Fire Department presently uses the MSA MMR breathing apparatus. The mask has a face
(mask) mounted regulator and as such does not offer as many contingency options should a wearer get
low or run out of air. Only a FFs training, familiarity with, and knowledge of the equipment will allow them
to remain coolheaded and act appropriately.
As a general rule, FFs shall seek replacement or return to the outside air before their low air audible bell
sounds. During emergency activity, this shall be coordinated through the Incident Commander.
Note: If it ever becomes necessary to physically remove a down or injured firefighter from a hazardous
atmosphere, whenever possible, it should be done head first. When removing a FF feet first, you must
ensure the FF is not on his/her right side. If a FF is removed on their right side, the cylinder may close and
shut off the FFs air supply.

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A. Free Flow Condition Emergency Conditions
There is a chance that a FF may experience a free flow condition. This may be caused by a faulty
facepiece, failure of a pressure relief, a broken hose, or damaged regulator.
Step #1
Communicate with team FF regarding status of air supply. It is important to stay calm and not panic.
Step #2
Turn on emergency bypass.
Step #3
Turn down cylinder at valve to reduce air flow into system.
Step #4
Leave area/building via fastest known safe method/direction and notify Incident Command of the
situation.
B. Audible Alarm Sounding Able to Exit Quickly
Step #1
Communicate with team FF regarding status of air supply. It is important to stay calm and not panic.
Step#2
Leave area/building via fastest known safe method/direction and notify Command.
C. Audible Alarm Sounding Unable to Exit Quickly
Step #1
Communicate with team FF regarding status of air supply. It is important to stay calm and not panic.
Step #2
Consider transfilling.
Step #3
Notify Incident Command (IC) of situation.
Step #4
Activate manual alarm on integrated PASS device and leave area/building via fastest known safe
method/direction.
D. Failure of Mask Mounted Regulator (MMR) Second Stage
Step #1
Open emergency bypass valve located on the MMR (second stage regulator).
Step #2
Close valve on cylinder, and then open and close to breathe as necessary. Skip breathing may be
appropriate. To skip breathe, take a normal breath, and hold it as long as it would take to exhale it.
Take an additional breath before exhaling slowly. Repeat the process.
Step #3
Notify Incident Command (IC) you have a mask failure and manually activate the PASS device.
Step #4
If problem still exists, check to ensure that the second stage regulator is fully connected and the
cylinder valve is fully opened.
Step #5
Leave area/building via fastest know safe method/direction.

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1.02.07 Routine Checks and Maintenance
A. Policy
It shall be the responsibility of all suppression personnel to become knowledgeable in and follow the
daily, weekly, and after-use inspection and maintenance procedures for the care of self-contained
breathing apparatus.
All members relieving another member shall perform the daily check of their assigned breathing
apparatus before relief is completed.
The daily check shall be performed after any use of the breathing apparatus.
B. Daily Checks
Step #1
Verify that the rubber gauge protector on the air cylinder is properly positioned.
Step #2
Check that the air cylinder pressure is over 4,000 psi.
Step #3
Open air cylinder valve to charge the system with air.
Step #4
Verify that the redundant alarm air gauge pressure corresponds with the air cylinder pressure.
Step #5
Close the air cylinder gauge and push the second stage regulator demand button and verify air flow.
Step #6
Operate the emergency by-pass valve to verify that it is operational.
Step #7
Bleed the air out of the system slowly and verify that the low air warning bell and the redundant alarm
go into operation at approximately 25% volume. The redundant alarm should flash alternatively side to
side and beep continuously, even after all the air has bled out.
Step #8
Verify operation of the Integrated PASS ICM Tx (Fig. 1) device by letting it sit for approximately 18
seconds, at which point it will go through three pre-alarm stages of increasing intensity over a period of
12 seconds.
Step #9
Verify operation of the panic (MANUAL) button.
Step #10
High pressure hose shall be inspected. When changing air cylinders, inspect the o-ring located inside
the coupling nut (Fig.1). Replace if damaged or missing.
Note: Spare facepieces shall be inspected on a daily basis for first-line apparatus. This will include a
visual check for cracks, tears or holes in the rubber; check the straps for rips, frays, loss of elasticity, or
missing buckles; check lens for cracks, scratches, and a tight seal.
C. Weekly Checks
1. Gauges are checked on a weekly basis or after use. Visually inspect the air cylinder pressure gauge
and confirm it corresponds to the regulator pressure gauge.
2. The inspection should include a visual inspection of the outside of the air cylinder. Make note of any
large cuts or significant scuffing marks. Close monitoring of our air cylinders is required to avoid a
catastrophic event .

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D. After-Use Inspections
1. Exhalation Valve: Inspected after every use
a. If it is suspected that debris may have gotten in to the facepiece, the exhalation valve should be
flushed with water. The exhalation valve has a stem that can be manually depressed from inside the
facepiece to check function and help clear out foreign matter.
b. Check the speaking diaphragm for damage and ensure that the internal microphone is in the center
area of the diaphragm.
c. Personal/Spare facepieces: See B, Step #10, NOTE.
E. Cleaning and Sanitizing
Step #1
Cleaning and sanitizing is performed after each use. Alcohol should not be used because it will
deteriorate the rubber.
Step #2
Thoroughly wash the mask in MSAs Confidence Plus solution.
a. Remove the ClearCommand voice amplifier and heads-up display.
b. Never submerge ClearCommand modules or heads-up display in water or any other liquid.
c. ClearCommand and heads-up display are cleaned with a damp cloth.
d. A mild brush can be used if heavily soiled.
e. Check battery compartment after heavy water exposure.
Step #3
Rinse mask thoroughly in water that is less than 120 degrees.
Step #4
Allow the mask to air dry or pat dry with towel.
Step #5
Do not use compressed air.
Step #6
Use a dry brush or damp towel to remove loose soil from harness. Avoid soaking harness.
Step #7
After cleaning, reassemble the breathing apparatus, check all connections, and test all systems.
F. Battery Change
1) ClearCommand Communication System
a. Replace the battery as voice quality and volume diminish to an unacceptable level.
b. Replace with two AAA batteries.
2) ICM Tx
a. Batteries are replaced by an authorized SCBA technician on bi-annual basis.
b. If batteries decrease to a certain level the device will chirp. Te unit then should be taken out of
service and sent to an SCBA technician.

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APPENDIX A: SCBA Instruction Manuals


A. Nightfighter Heads up display Manual
..\Instruction Manuals for Articles\ICM Tx Unit nightfighter HUD System.pdf
B. Firehawk Air Mask Manual
..\Instruction Manuals for Articles\Firehawk Air Mask - Instruction Manual.pdf
C. Firehawk Operation Manual
..\Instruction Manuals for Articles\Firehawk Operation - Instruction Manual.pdf

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