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22nd March 13th July 2014

CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING


Visual Communication Design

What will you see today?

Amazing work!
Student folios from the Communication,
Environmental and Industrial Design fields
A range of folio topics and presentation
formats
The design process shown in thorough and
creative ways

And what else will you


see?

Inspiration for your folio topic


Starting points for your research

2014 SAT folio

2014 SAT folio


Is made up of 3 Outcomes:
Unit 3 Outcome 3: Developing a brief and
generating ideas
Unit 4 Outcome 1: Development of design concepts
Unit 4 Outcome 2: Final Presentations

Unit 3 Outcome 3: Developing a brief and


generating ideas
Apply design thinking skills in preparing a brief, undertaking
research and generating a range of ideas relevant to the brief.
TASK: A brief that identifies the contexts, constraints, clients
needs and target audience, and a folio generating ideas relevant
to the brief. The development folio for each need will include
evidence of:
use of design process and design thinking strategies
annotated research for information and inspiration
observational and visualisation drawings
generation of a wide range of design ideas.

Outcome 1: Development of design concepts


Develop distinctly different design concepts for each need, and
select and refine for each need a concept that satisfies each of
the requirements of the brief.
TASK: A folio of conceptual developments for each need. The
conceptual development folio for each need will include
evidence of:
use of design process and design thinking strategies
application of manual and digital methods, media, materials,
design elements, design principles, presentation formats
development and refinement of concepts
reasons for selection of preferred concepts for each need.

Unit 4 Outcome 2: Final Presentations


Produce final visual communication presentations that satisfy
the requirements of the brief.
TASK: Two distinct final presentations in two separate
presentation formats that fulfil the communication needs of
the client as detailed in the brief developed in Unit 3.

Dont forget!
Need to show evidence of use of design thinking
To include observational drawing for research
purposes
To include digital and manual methods
To acknowledge the source of all imagery,
including research and inspiration
To show a clear difference between your
development and refinement stages
Need to address typography and layout
Need to use correct terminology

How will you be assessed?

The design process and assessment criteria


Brief

Research

Generation of
ideas

Development of
concepts

Refinement

Resolution of
presentations

Design thinking
Criterion 1: Brief

you need to complete TWO


separate design processes, one for
Presentation 1 and another for
Presentation 2

Criterion 2:
observational and visualisation
drawings
Criterion 3: Design process & design thinking

Criterion 4:
Methods Materials Media
Criterion 5:
Design elements and principles
Criterion 6:2 finals
effective, appropriate to brief
you need to complete TWO
separate final presentations
labelled on back
Presentation 1 and
Presentation 2

Criterion 7: 2 finals
thoughtful decisions and
imagination

Criterion 8: 2 finals
technical competence

Things we want you


to think about

Design thinking

Design process

Design thinking incorporates:


Creative thinking which requires a
curious, open-minded, flexible,
divergent, explorative, investigative
approach
Critical thinking which requires
questioning, clarifying, planning,
analysing, examining and testing
information and ideas
Reflective thinking which requires
a metacognitive approach, seeking
and considering feedback,
reflecting on progress and
processes, making links and
connections with broader issues
and the work of others.

Design thinking will be evident through your


use of thinking routines such as brainstorms,
mind maps, SCAMPER, What if, PMI, SWOT,
POOCH, surveys of target audience etc.
Many of you will have used these techniques
before, possibly in other subjects.
They provide a way of focussing and
structuring problem solving and can be
applied to all areas of your life and study.

Its about investigation, being open minded and


exploring ideas.really stretching the brain

Examples of Creative thinking

Brainstorming

Go beyond brainstorming!
Try SCAMPER, what if, brain
dump, forced associations, see
think wonder, action verbs

Ashlee Warren
Example of Brainstorming

SCAMPER

SCAMPER by Ripley Callahan

De Bono & TOWS

Critical thinking by Michael Gibbon

Its about asking questions, testing,


checkingWhat else can I do? The kind of
thinking that involves problem solving.

Examples of Critical thinking

PMI Chart

PMI Chart by Jacob Jess

POOCH

POOCH by Chandler Neill

Its about collecting any feedback, reflecting


upon solutionsis it right? Does it fulfil the
requirements of the brief? Its about looking back
over what has been done

Examples of Reflective thinking

Survey
This student used a survey
to gather feedback

by Olivia Goodliffe

PMI Chart

By Ella Fenton

Benjamin Fraser

Assists in monitoring
progress and
authentication issues
throughout folio.
Two design processes: one
for each presentation

Records observations of
student progress and
when written feedback /
formative assessment
provided
Student signature
acknowledging that all
resource materials and
assistance has been
acknowledged
http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Documents/vce/visualcomm/SBA_viscomm.pdf

Annotations
Annotations should be completed in real time, as the folio
progresses. Students should use whichever form is
appropriate to the process and complimentary to the method
being employed at the time.
The majority of annotations will therefore be handwritten.
However, some may be typed, for example during analysis of
research and inspiration imagery.

ASSESSMENT
CRITERIA

CRITERION 1
The brief

Brief
This needs to be written before you commence the
design process and placed at the front of your
development folio.
Ensure you have a single client and 2 separate and
distinctly different needs, different purposes or
audiences (if appropriate), different intentions and
different presentation formats.
Constantly refer back to your BRIEF to make sure
you dont lose focus or direction.
Use Visual Communication Design Study Design
language.

TIP: Avoid using


language from
another study.
Areas such as Studio
Art or Product
Design &
Technology have a
different language
code.

Brief - Olivia
GODLIFFE

Client
Audience
Presentation 1
Need
Constraints & expectations
Purpose
Context
final presentation
Presentation 2
Need
Constraints & expectations
Purpose
Context
final presentation

Note teachers signature


and date, signing off
BEFORE start of folio

Remember
One client
and two
distinctly different
communications needs

One client
and two
communication
needs

Emily Engel
Heart Foundation
1. Logo ,infographics
2. Poster: fun run

CRITERION 2
Observational &
Visualisation Drawing

Research

By Olivia Goodliffe

Research can be collected by looking and


drawing existing objects.

Acknowledgement
When you are collecting imagery to
use for inspiration or as starting
points.you MUST acknowledge
EVERYTHING!

Dont just write


Google images!
Place near image.
Edwards, Brian. 2012 Organ Donation Poster. Australia
http://positive-posters.com/posters/profiles/?pid=4671
Retrieved 13.02.2013

Serious stuff
You are required to acknowledge all sources of
inspiration throughout the design process. This can
be done by noting specific titles and publication
dates of texts and/or magazines and/or URL
addresses for websites where images have been
sourced. When your folios are assessed any images
that are not acknowledged will be ignored.

Acknowledgement
Providing references:
Acknowledges the ideas or information
of others.
Gives the reader the information needed
to locate the sources you have used.

Clear example of
referencing
Image used for
inspiration

Enya Ferreira

Bryden Singleton

By Olivia Goodliffe

Using photos of different postures to assist


With ergonomic considerations.

By Bianca Guest

Researching colour psychology

By Bianca Guest

Research:
observational drawings

Georgia Thamm

Jacob Jess

Observational

Visualisation

Nicholas Rose

Ashlee Warren

Use observational drawings to understand


form, materials, function of existing products.
Draw mainly from DIRECT observation rather
than photos.

Observational Drawing by
Lachlan Chomley

Observational Drawing by
Jacob Jess

Observational Drawing by
Georgia Thamm

The drawing in the


Centre is from
Observation.
Enya uses this
Drawing as a starting
Points for other ideas

Enya Ferreira

Visualisation Drawing

Bianca Guest

Visualisation Drawing

Bianca Guest

Generating ideas

Michael Gibbon

Inspiration can come from


the most amazing places

Lachlan Chomley

Charlene Le

CRITERION 3
Design process &
design thinking

Concept development
and refinement
Development of concepts:
selecting the preferred ideas and
applying a range of methods,
materials, media, design
elements, design principles and
presentation formats to create
two- and three-dimensional
visual communications that
address the brief.
Both visualisation and
presentation drawing methods
are relevant to this stage.

Refinement:
modifying visual communications
in response to feedback and
evaluation against the
brief.

Developmental drawings

Ella Fenton

3D sketching

Ella Fenton

Discusses
layout possibilities
linking image and text.

Use of critical
thinking

Bryden Singleton

Development of concepts

Michael Gibbon

Development then refinement

Bridget Slater

Close up drawing of hinge to explore how


this functions (using drawing to solve
problems and explain thinking).

Ripley Callahan

Instructional drawings used in further refinement stage by Nicholas Rose

Instructional drawings used in further refinement stage by Nicholas Rose

CRITERION 4
Methods, Materials &
Media

Methods

Media

refers to the technical process


used to make the visual
communication

refers to the applications refers to the surface or


used to make the visual substrate that the visual
communication
communication is applied
to or constructed from

Drawing
Observational, Visualisation
Presentation
Types of drawing include:
3D, 2D
Painting
Printing
Monotype, relief, intaglio,silk screen,
offset
Digital:
-laser
-inkjet
Photography
Analogue, Digital
Computer
Collage
3-D Process
Construction, Modelling, Digital

pencil
ink
marker
pastel
crayon
charcoal
acrylic paint
watercolour gouache
dye
toner
film
digital applications
- vector based programs
- raster based programs

Materials

paper
card
wood
glass
metal
clay
stone
plastic
textile
screen

Ref: P. 39 Study Design

Methods, Materials & Media


Digital and manual methods must be explored
2D and 3D methods must be explored
2D: Printing, painting, drawing, collage
3D: 3D process, also 3D drawing / painting,
photography

Methods, Materials & Media


If using formal 2D drawing methods, ensure that
you use the conventions that are appropriate to
your design field.
Industrial design: orthogonal drawing
Environmental design : plans & elevations

Use of relief printmaking to develop


concept for logo

Nadia Bogatzke

Using photography to develop ideas for a Typeface for logo

Sunjuri Sun

3D methods in the
refinement stage

Ashlee Warren

Computer methods in the


refinement stage

Ashlee Warren

3 fields of design

Communication
design:
packaging nets

Ashlee Warren

Environmental design:
Plans and elevations.
Uses different layout
and dimensioning
conventions.

Charlene Le

One client and two communication needs

Lachlan Chomley : Point Impossible Golf


Club
1. Branding for Point Impossible Golf
Club : Signage, score card, flag,
membership tags
2. Club House Design

Olivia Goodliffe

Industrial design:
Orthogonal drawings.
Uses different layout
and dimensioning
conventions.

CRITERION 5
Design elements &
principles

Marco Due

Looking at SHAPE during the refinement stage


Ella Fenton

Jacob Jess

Pattern, shape and type

CRITERION 6, 7 & 8
2 Finals that are:
effective, appropriate to brief
thoughtful decisions & imagination
technical competence

Presentation 1
Brand Identity features on tickets
and visual merchandise

Chandler Neill

Presentation 2
Poster

Chandler Neill

A note on final presentations


Drawings and/or 3D models can be used in the presentation of design
solutions; however, the manufacture of functional prototypes is not
required. Students must have creative control over technical
processes used in the production and final presentation of their visual
communications and design solutions.
If students opt to have presentations printed professionally,
then it must be possible for them to oversee this process and to have
prepared their own files to a print-ready stage. This process must be
thoroughly documented as part of their development work.

This student is in
control of the printing
process.
They discuss paper
choices (gloss), paper
weight 210GSM versus
80 GSM) AND Laser
printer versus inkjet.

Thien-An Vu

A last wordthe folios in Top Designs


Not all folios are perfect (nobody is perfect,
also can be very high/high and have dropped
a few marks), but each one offers something
to teach you. The folios chosen are
deliberately broad in scope, complexity, use
of manual and digital methods and design
fields.