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Applied Technology High School

Programming Excel using


VBA
G 10 ATHS Regular & ASP
CSC 50

Basics

Functions

Data Analysis

VBA

Applied Technology High School

2015-2016

Contents
1. Microsoft Excel fundamentals
1.1. Setting up workbook
1.1.1 Modifying the Display of the Ribbon
1.1.1.1

Minimize the Ribbon

1.1.1.2

Customize the Ribbon

1.1.2 Create and modify workbooks


1.1.2.1

Open an Existing Workbook

1.1.2.2

Close a Workbook

1.1.2.3

Create a New Workbook

1.1.3 Modifying Worksheets


1.1.3.1

Select a Worksheet

1.1.3.2

Rename a Worksheet

1.1.3.3

Insert a Worksheet

1.1.3.4

Move a Worksheet

1.1.3.5

Delete a Worksheet

1.1.3.6

Copy a Worksheet

1.1.4 Create a workbook based on a template.


1.1.4.1

Create a workbook based on an existing template

1.1.4.2

Create your own template

1.1.5 Change the appearance of a data


1.1.5.1 Apply a number format
1.1.5.2 Change the cell Alignment
1.1.5.3 Change the Font and Font Color
1.1.5.4 Apply Cell Border
1.2. Working with Data and Excel Tables
1.2.1 Use Excel's Find and Replace feature to quickly find specific text
and replace and use Excel's Go To Special feature.
1.2.1.1 Find specific text

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1.2.1.2 Find specific text and replace it


1.2.1.3 Go To Special feature
1.2.2 Use data validation in Excel to make ensure entering certain
values into a cell.
1.2.2.1 Define Data Validation
1.2.2.2 Create Data Validation Rule
1.2.2.3 Use Input Message
1.2.2.4 Show Error Alert
1.2.2.5 Remove Data Validation
1.3. Maintain the output file
1.3.1 Print a worksheet and change some important print settings in
Excel.
1.3.1.1

Print a Worksheet

1.3.1.2

Print the current selection

1.3.1.3

Print multiple copies

1.3.1.4

Change the Orientation

1.3.1.5

Change the Page Margins

1.3.2 Share Excel data with Word documents and other files.
1.3.2.1 Paste static Excel data in a Word document.
1.3.2.2 Link the source data in Excel with the destination data in
Word
1.3.3 Protect the Excel file
1.3.3.1 Encrypt an Excel file with a password
1.3.3.2 Protect Workbook
1.3.3.3 Protect Sheet

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2. Employ Excel functions and the set of preset formulas to perform various
operations on the data.
2.1. Perform Math functions to reference mathematical calculations
2.1.1 Use the SUM function to sum a range of cells,.
2.1.2 Use the SUMIF function to sum cells based on one criteria.
2.1.3 Use the SUMIFS function to sum cells based on multiple criteria.
2.1.4 Use the Round function to round a number to a specific number
of decimal places.
2.1.5 Use ROUNDDOWN function to rounds a number down.
2.1.6 Utilize the Array formula
2.2. Use the Statistical functions to facilitate the calculation of statistical
studies and models.
2.2.1 Use the Count function to count the number of cells that contain
number
2.2.2 Use the Countif function to count cells based on one criteria.
2.2.3 Use the Countifs function to count cells based on multiple
criteria
2.2.4 Use the AVERAGE function to calculate the average of a range of
cells.
2.2.5 Use the AVERAGEIF function to calculate the average of a range
of cells based on one criteria,
2.2.6 Use the MEDIAN function to find the median (or middle
number).
2.2.7 Use the MODE function to find the most frequently occurring
number.
2.2.8 Use the MIN function to find the minimum value.
2.2.9 Use the MAX function to find the maximum value.
2.2.10 Use the LARGE function to find the X largest number.
2.2.11 Use the SMALL function to find the X smallest number.
2.3. Use the Logical Excel functions to establish conditions for calculations.

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2.3.1 Use the IF function to checks whether a condition is met, and


returns one value if TRUE and another value if FALSE.
2.3.2 Use the AND Function to returns TRUE if all conditions are true
and returns FALSE if any of the conditions are false.
2.3.3 Use the OR function to returns TRUE if any of the conditions are
TRUE and returns FALSE if all conditions are false.
2.4. Use the Date and time functions for managing and calculating dates in
Excel spreadsheets.
2.4.1 Enter a date in Excel.
2.4.2 Use the YEAR function to get the year of a date.
2.4.3 Add a number of days to a date.
2.4.4 Get the current date and time by use the NOW function.
2.4.5 Use the HOUR, Minute or Second function to return the hours,
minutes or seconds of a specific time
2.4.6 Add a number of hours, minutes and/or seconds, by using the
TIME function.
2.5. Use the Text functions to manipulate, convert and calculate strings.
2.5.1 Join strings by using the & operator.
2.5.2 Use the LEFT function to extract the leftmost characters from a
string.
2.5.3 Use the RIGHT function to extract the rightmost characters from
a string.
2.5.4 Extract a substring, starting in the middle of a string by using the
MID function.
2.5.5 Get the length of a string by using the LEN function
2.5.6 Find the position of a substring in a string by using the FIND
function.
2.5.7 Replace existing text with new text in a string by using the
SUBSTITUTE function.
2.6. Demonstrate understanding to the difference between relative,

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absolute and mixed reference.


2.6.1 Define and uses relative reference.
2.6.2 Define and create absolute reference.
2.6.3 Use the mixed reference to make combination of relative and
absolute reference
2.7. Manipulate and find information within Excel spreadsheets by using
Lookup & Reference function
2.7.1 Use the VLOOKUP (Vertical lookup) function to looks for a value
in a column of a table, and then returns a value in the same row
from another column you specify.
2.7.2 Use the HLOOKUP (Horizontal lookup) function to looks for a
value in a row of a table, and then returns a value in the same
column from another row you specify.
2.7.3 Use the MATCH function to return the position of a value in a
given range.
2.7.4 Use the INDEX function to return a specific value in a twodimensional or one-dimensional range.
2.7.5 Use the CHOOSE function to return a value from a list of values,
based on a position number.
2.8. Recognize and deal with some common formula errors in Excel.
2.8.1 ##### error
2.8.2 #NAME? error
2.8.3 #VALUE! error
2.8.4 #DIV/0! error
2.8.5 #REF! error

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3. Utilize the Excel data analysis tools to perform processes of inspecting,


cleaning, transforming, and modeling data.
3.1. Reordering and filtering data in the Excel sheet
3.1.1 Execute sorting on one column.
3.1.2 Execute sorting on multiple columns.
3.1.3 Use the Filter tool to display records that meet certain criteria.
3.2. Highlight cells with a certain color, depending on the cell's value by
using the Conditional Formatting tool
3.2.1 Highlight Cells Rules
3.2.2 Clear Rules
3.2.3 Use the Top/Bottom Rules
3.3. Represent the data graphically
3.3.1 Create a Chart
3.3.2 Change Chart Type
3.3.3 Switch Row/Column
3.3.4 Add a chart title
3.3.5 Change the Legend Position
3.3.6 Use data labels to focus your readers' attention on a single data
series or data point.
3.4. Use the pivot table to extract the significance from a large, detailed
data set.
3.4.1 Insert a Pivot Table
3.4.2 Drag fields
3.4.3 Sort the pivot table.
3.4.4 Filter the data
3.4.5 Change Summary Calculation
3.4.6 Create Two-dimensional Pivot Table
3.5. Utilize Tables to analyze your data in Excel quickly and easily
3.5.1 Insert a Table
3.5.2 Sort a Table

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3.5.3 Filter a Table


3.5.4 Display a total row
3.6. Use the What-If Analysis in Excel to try out different values (scenarios)
for formulas.
3.6.1 Create Different Scenarios
3.6.2 Compare the results of these scenarios
3.6.3 Perform Goal Seek
4. Make an integration of the Microsoft's event-driven programming language
Visual Basic with Microsoft Excel to build customized solutions and
programs to enhance the capabilities of Excel.
4.1. Create macros.
4.1.1 Turn on the Developer tab
4.1.2 Place a command button
4.1.3 Assign a Macro
4.1.4 Open the Visual Basic Editor
4.1.5 Create MsgBox
4.1.6 Workbook and Worksheet Object
4.1.7 Record Macro
4.2. Use the Range object & variables
4.2.1 Assign value to a cell
4.2.2 Assign value to a range of cells
4.2.3 Use the Cell to assign value
4.2.4 Declare a Range Object
4.2.5 Use the Select method to selects a range
4.2.6 Use the Rows and Column property to access to a specific row or
column of a range.
4.2.7 Use the Copy and Paste method
4.2.8 Use the ClearContents method.
4.2.9 Use the Count property

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4.2.10 Declare, initialize and display a variable in Excel VBA


4.3. Use the If Then Statement & Loops to execute code lines if a specific
condition is met and loop through a range of cells
4.3.1 Use the If Then statement in Excel VBA to execute code lines if a
specific condition is met
4.3.2 Use a single For - Nest loop to loop through a one-dimensional
range of cells.
4.3.3 Use a double For- Nest loop to loop through a two-dimensional
range of cells.
4.3.4 Use a triple loop to loop through two-dimensional ranges on
multiple Excel worksheets.
4.3.5 Use the Do While Loop
4.4. Manipulate strings and Date & Time in Excel VBA.
4.4.1 Join Strings
4.4.2 Extract the leftmost and rightmost characters from a string by
using Left and Right commands
4.4.3 Use the Mid, Len, Instr
4.4.4 Gets the year of a date.
4.4.5 Add a number of days to a date
4.4.6 Get the current date and time
4.4.7 Get the Hour, Minute, Second of a time
4.4.8 Use the TimeValue function to converts a string to a time serial
number.
4.4.9 Compare Dates and Times
4.5. Work with Events and Array
4.5.1 Define and create Workbook Open Event
4.5.2 Define and create Workbook Change Event
4.5.3 Create a one-dimensional array
4.5.4 Create Two-dimensional Array
4.6. Create Functions ,Sub and Application object

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4.6.1 Differentiate between a function and a sub


4.6.2 Create Function
4.6.3 Create Sub
4.6.4 Define the use of the Application object
4.6.5 Use the WorksheetFunction property in to access Excel
functions.
4.6.6 Disable screen updating
4.6.7 Display alerts while executing code.
4.6.8 Turn On and Off the automatic calculation option
4.7. Create and use Active X control and UserForm
4.7.1 Create ActiveX controls
4.7.2 Create an Excel VBA Userform.
4.7.3 Add the Controls to the Userform
4.7.4 Show the Userform
4.7.5 Assign the Macros
4.7.6 Test the Userform

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1. Microsoft Excel Fundamentals

1.1.

Setting up workbook

1.2.

Working with Data and Excel Tables

1.3.

Maintain the output file

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1.1

Setting up Workbook

1.1.1 Modifying the Display of the Ribbon


1.1.2 Create and modify workbooks
1.1.3 Modifying Worksheets
1.1.4 Create a workbook based on a template.
1.1.5 Change the appearance of a data

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1.1.1 Modifying the Display of the Ribbon


Excel selects the ribbon's Home tab when you open it. Learn how to minimize
and customize the ribbon.

Tabs
The tabs on the ribbon are: File, Home, Insert, Page layout, Formulas, Data, Review and
View. The Home tab contains the most frequently used commands in Excel.

Note: the File tab in Excel 2010 replaces the Office Button in Excel 2007.

1.1.1.1

Minimize the Ribbon

The Ribbon, which is part of the Microsoft Office Fluent user interface, is designed to help
you quickly find the commands that you need to complete a task. Commands are organized
in logical groups that are collected together under tabs. Each tab relates to a type of
activity, such as writing or laying out a page. To reduce screen clutter, some tabs are shown
only when they are needed. When the Ribbon is minimized, you see only the tabs
You can minimize the ribbon to get extra space on the screen. Right click anywhere on the
ribbon, and then click Minimize the Ribbon (or press CTRL + F1).

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Result.

1.1.1.2

Customize the Ribbon

You can customize the Ribbon by creating your own tabs with whichever commands you
want. Commands are always housed within a group, and you can create as many groups as
you want in order to keep your tab organized. If you want, you can even add commands to
any of the default tabs, as long as you create a custom group in the tab.
Excel 2010 makes it possible to easily create your own tab and add commands to it.
1. Right click anywhere on the ribbon, and then click Customize the Ribbon.

2. Click New Tab.


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3. Add the commands you like.

4. Rename the tab and group.


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Note: you can also add new groups to existing tabs. To hide a tab, uncheck the
corresponding check box. Click Reset, Reset all customizations, to delete all ribbon and
Quick Access Toolbar customizations.
Result.

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1.1.2 Create and modify workbooks

Excel workbooks can have several pages or worksheets. Each page is identified using a
worksheet tab. This lesson will review how to add and remove worksheets, how to rename
worksheets and how to change the color of the tab fill.

Workbook vs. Worksheet


Just like in Microsoft Word or Microsoft PowerPoint, you can have multiple pages in
Microsoft Excel. Sometimes the two terms, workbook and worksheet, can be confusing.
A workbook is the entire Excel file. Some refer to their Excel file as a spreadsheet, but
technically, a spreadsheet is one page in a workbook. And, did you know you can have
multiple spreadsheets within a workbook? A worksheet is a single page or sheet within the
workbook.
A workbook is another word for your Excel file. Excel automatically creates a blank
workbook when you open it.

1.1.2.1

Open an Existing Workbook

To open a workbook you've created in the past, execute the following steps.
1. Click on the green File tab.

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What you see next is called the backstage view and it contains all the workbook related
commands.
2. Recent shows you a list of your
recently used workbooks. You can
quickly open a workbook from here.
3. Click Open to open a workbook that
is not on the list.

1.1.2.2

Close a Workbook

If you are new to Excel, it's good to know the difference between closing a workbook and
closing Excel. This can be confusing in the beginning.
1. To close an Excel workbook, click the
lower X.

2. If you have multiple workbooks open,


clicking the upper right X closes the active
workbook. If you have one workbook
open, clicking the upper right X closes
Excel.

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1.1.2.3

Create a New Workbook

Although Excel creates a blank workbook when you open it, sometimes you want to start
all over again.
1. To create a new workbook, click New and then click Create.

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1.1.3 Modifying Worksheets


Excel Worksheets
The worksheet is also referred to as the spreadsheet. Think of a workbook as a regular
book, in that one book is the entire story, but each page contains a part of the story.
Another example would be your personal budget. The entire workbook contains your
budget, but you might have one page or worksheet for each month of the year.The
worksheet tabs appear at the bottom of the page. Clicking on the tab takes you directly to
that page of your workbook. You can add more worksheets, delete them, change the
worksheet title and add a color fill to the tab.
A worksheet is a collection of cells where you keep and manipulate the data. By default,
each Excel workbook contains three worksheets.

1.1.3.1

Select a Worksheet

When you open Excel, Excel automatically selects Sheet1 for you. The name of the
worksheet appears on its sheet tab at the bottom of the document window.

To select one of the other two worksheets, simply click on the sheet tab of Sheet2 or
Sheet3.
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1.1.3.2

Rename a Worksheet

By default, the worksheets are named Sheet1, Sheet2 and Sheet3. To give a worksheet a
more specific name, execute the following steps.
1. Right click on the sheet tab of Sheet1.
2. Choose Rename.

3. For example, type Sales 2010.

1.1.3.3

Insert a Worksheet

You can insert as many worksheets as you want. To quickly insert a new worksheet, click
the Insert Worksheet tab at the bottom of the document window.

Result:

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1.1.3.4

Move a Worksheet

To move a worksheet, click on the sheet tab of the worksheet you want to move and drag it
into the new position.
1. For example, click on the sheet tab of Sheet4 and drag it before Sheet2.

Result:

1.1.3.5

Delete a Worksheet

To delete a worksheet, right click on a sheet tab and choose Delete.


For example, delete Sheet4, Sheet2 and Sheet3.

Result:

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1.1.3.6

Copy a Worksheet

Imagine, you have got the sales for 2010 ready and want to create the exact same sheet for
2011, but with different data. You can recreate the worksheet, but this is time-consuming.
It's a lot easier to copy the entire worksheet and only change the numbers.
1. Right click on the sheet tab of Sales 2010.
2. Choose Move or Copy...

The 'Move or Copy' dialog box appears.


3. Select (move to end) and check Create a copy.

4. Click OK.
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Result:

Note: you can even copy a worksheet to another Excel workbook by selecting the specific
workbook from the drop-down list (see the dialog box shown earlier).

1.1.4 Create a workbook based on a template.


Instead of creating an Excel workbook from scratch, you can create a workbook based on
a template. There are many free templates available, waiting to be used

1.1.4.1

Create a workbook based on an existing template

To create a workbook based on an existing template, execute the following steps.


1. On the green File tab, click New.
2. To choose a template from one of the sample templates (these are already
installed on your computer), click on Sample templates.

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3. To choose a template from the Office.com Templates, click a category. For


example, click Calendars.

4. To download a template, select a template and then click Download.

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Excel creates a workbook (UniversalCalendar1.xlsx) based on this template. Excel also


stores the template (UniversalCalendar.xltx) in the Templates folder. You can access this
folder by clicking on My templates (see first picture). Read on for more information about
the Templates folder.
Tips: To obtain more workbook templates, you can download them from Microsoft Office
Online. In the New Workbook dialog box, under Microsoft Office Online, click a specific
template category, click the template that you want to download, and then click Download.

1.1.4.2

Create your own template

If you create your own template, you can safely store it in the Templates folder. As a result,
you can create new workbooks based on this template without worrying that you
overwrite the original file.
To create a template, execute the following steps.
1. Create a workbook.
2. On the green File tab, click Save As.
3. Enter a file name.
4. Select Excel Template (*.xltx) from the drop-down list.

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Excel automatically activates the Templates folder. Notice the location of the Templates
folder on your computer. It's usually located here:
C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Templates
5. Click Save.

To create a workbook based on this template, execute the following steps.


1. On the green File tab, click New.
2. Click My Templates.

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3. Select WeddingBudget.
4. Click OK.

Excel creates a workbook (WeddingBudget1.xlsx) based on this template.


Note: to edit a template, on the green File tab, click Open to open the template. Edit the file
and save the file to its original location.

1.1.5 Change the appearance of a data

1.1.5.1

Apply a number format

Excel provides many options for displaying numbers as percentages, currency, dates, and
so on. If these built-in formats do not meet your needs, you can customize a built-in
number format to create your own.
When we format cells in Excel, we change the appearance of a number without changing
the number itself. We can apply a number format (0.8, $0.80, 80%, etc) or other formatting
(alignment, font, border, etc).
1. Enter the value 0.8 into cell B2.

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By default, Excel uses the General format (no specific number format) for numbers. To
apply a number format, use the 'Format Cells' dialog box.
2. Select cell B2.
3. Right click, and then click Format Cells (or press CTRL + 1).

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The 'Format Cells' dialog box appears.


4. For example, on the Number tab, select Currency.

Note: Excel gives you a life preview of how the number will be formatted (under Sample).
5. Click OK.

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Cell B2 still contains the number 0.8. We only changed the appearance of this number, not
the number itself. The most frequently used formatting commands are available on the
Home tab.
6. On the Home tab, in the Number group, click the Percentage symbol to apply a
Percentage format.

Navigate the different number formats

1.1.5.2

Change the cell Alignment

For the optimal display of the data on your worksheet, you might want to reposition the
data in a cell. You can change the alignment of the cell contents, use indentation for better
spacing, or display the data at a different angle by rotating it
On the Home tab, in the Alignment group, center the number.

Navigate the other alignment options


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1.1.5.3

Change the Font and Font Color

You can change the color of the text in cells and the cell's background color. For the
background color, you can use a solid color, or you can apply special effects, such as
gradients, textures, and pictures.
On the Home tab, in the Font group, change the Font color.

Try changing the background color

1.1.5.4

Apply Cell Border

By using predefined border styles, you can quickly add a border around cells or ranges
(range: Two or more cells on a sheet. The cells in a range can be adjacent or nonadjacent.)
of cells. If predefined cell borders do not meet your needs, you can create a custom border.
Note

Cell borders that you apply appear on printed pages. If you do not use cell borders

but want worksheet gridline borders for all cells to be visible on printed pages, you can
display the gridlines.

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1. On the Home tab, in the Font group, add borders.

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1.2

1.2.1

Working with Data and Excel Tables

Use Excel's Find and Replace feature to quickly find specific text and replace and use

Excel's Go To Special feature.


1.2.2

Use data validation in Excel to make ensure entering certain values into a cell.

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1.2.1 Use Excel's Find and Replace feature to quickly find specific
text and replace and use Excel's Go To Special feature.
You can use Excel's Find and Replace feature to quickly find specific text and
replace it with other text. You can use Excel's Go To Special feature to quickly
select all cells with formulas, comments, conditional formatting, constants, data
validation, etc

1.2.1.1

Find specific text

To quickly find specific text, execute the following steps.


1. On the Home tab, click Find & Select, Find...

The 'Find and Replace' dialog box appears.


2. Type the text you want to find. For example, type Ferrari.
3. Click 'Find Next'.

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Excel selects the first occurrence.

4. Click 'Find Next' to select the second occurrence.

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5. To get a list of all the occurrences, click 'Find All'.

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1.2.1.2 Find specific text and replace it


To quickly find specific text and replace it with other text, execute the following steps.
1. On the Home tab, click Find & Select, Replace...

The 'Find and Replace' dialog box appears (with the Replace tab selected).
2. Type the text you want to find (Veneno) and replace it with (Diablo).
3. Click 'Find Next'.

Excel selects the first occurrence. No replacement has been made yet.
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4. Click 'Replace' to make a single replacement.

Note: use 'Replace All' to replace all occurrences.

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1.2.1.3 Go To Special feature


Go To Special is a tool within Microsoft Excel that enables you to quickly select cells of a
specified type within your Excel worksheet. Once you get to grips with this function and
what it can be used for you will wonder how you ever lived without it.
You can use Excel's Go To Special feature to quickly select all cells with formulas,
comments, conditional formatting, constants, data validation, etc. For example, to select all
cells with formulas, execute the following steps.
1. Select a single cell.
2. On the Home tab, click Find & Select, Go To Special...

Note: Formulas, Comments, Conditional formatting, Constants and Data Validation are
shortcuts. They can also be found under Go To Special.
3. Select Formulas and click OK.

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Note: you can search for cells with formulas that return Numbers, Text, Logicals (TRUE and
FALSE) and Errors. These check boxes are also available if you select Constants.
Excel selects all cells with formulas.

General note: if you select a single cell before you click Find, Replace or Go To Special, Excel
searches the entire worksheet. To search a range of cells, first select a range of cells.

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1.2.2 Use data validation in Excel to make ensure entering certain


values into a cell.
1.2.2.1 Define Data Validation
You use data validation to control the type of data or the values that users enter into a
cell. For example, you may want to restrict data entry to a certain range of dates, limit
choices by using a list, or make sure that only positive whole numbers are entered.
Use data validation in Excel to make sure that users enter certain values into a cell.
In this example, we restrict users to enter a whole number between 0 and 10.

1.2.2.2 Create Data Validation Rule


To create the data validation rule, execute the following steps.
1. Select cell C2.
2. On the Data tab, click Data Validation.

On the Settings tab:


3. In the Allow list, click Whole number.
4. In the Data list, click between.
5. Enter the Minimum and Maximum values.
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1.2.2.3 Use Input Message


To help people know what data should be entered in a cell, you can set up an Input Message
that appears when the user selects the cell and tell the user what to enter.
On the Input Message tab:
1. Check 'Show input message when cell is selected'.
2. Enter a title.
3. Enter an input message.

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1.2.2.4

Show Error Alert

When you add data validation to a cell, the Error Alert feature is automatically turned on. It
blocks the users from entering invalid data in the cell.
If users ignore the input message and enter a number that is not valid, you can show them
an error alert.
On the Error Alert tab:
1. Check 'Show error alert after invalid data is entered'.
2. Enter a title.
3. Enter an error message.

5. Click OK.

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1.2.2.5

Remove Data Validation.

You can remove validation on a cell in Excel so that users are no longer required to enter
information or information formatted in specific way
1. Select cell C2.

2. Try to enter a number higher than 10.


Result:

Note: to remove data validation from a cell, select the cell, on the Data tab, click Data
Validation, and then click Clear All. You can use Excel's Go To Special feature to quickly
select all cells with data validation.

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1.3

Maintain the output file

1.3.1 Print a worksheet and change some important print settings in Excel.
1.3.2 Share Excel data with Word documents and other files.
1.3.2 Protect the Excel file

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1.3.1 Print a worksheet and change some important print


settings in Excel.
You can print entire or partial worksheets and workbooks, one at a time, or
several at once. And if the data that you want to print is in a Microsoft Excel
table, you can print just the Excel table.
You can also print a workbook to a file instead of to a printer. This is useful
when you need to print the workbook on a different type of printer from the one
that you originally used to print it.
This chapter teaches you how to print a worksheet and how to change some
important print settings in Excel.

1.3.1.1

Print a Worksheet

Excel prints all the information in active worksheets in your workbook. Normally, this
means printing just the data in the current worksheet. To print additional worksheets in
the workbook, hold down the Ctrl key while you click the sheets' tabs.
To print a worksheet in Excel 2010, execute the following steps.
1. On the File tab, click Print.
2. To preview the other pages that will be printed, click 'Next Page' or 'Previous Page' at the
bottom of the window.

Page | 46

3. To print the worksheet, click the big Print button.

1.3.1.2

Print the current selection

Select this option to have Excel print just the cells that are currently selected in your
workbook. (Remember to select these cells before opening the Print panel and choosing
this printing option.)

Page | 47

Depending on what is selected in the worksheet when you display the Print panel, you may
see additional options in this menu, including Print Selected Table or Print Selected Chart.
Choose the desired option based on what you want to print.
Instead of printing the entire worksheet, you can also only print the current selection.
1. First, select the range of cells you want to print.
2. Next, under Settings, select Print S election.

3. To print the selection, click the big Print button.

Page | 48

Note: you can also print the active sheets (first select the sheets by holding down CTRL and
clicking the sheet tabs) or print the entire workbook. Use the boxes next to Pages (see first
screenshot) to only print a few pages of your document. For example, 2 to 2 only prints the
second page.

1.3.1.3

Print multiple copies

To print multiple copies, execute the following steps.


1. Use the arrows next to the Copies box.
2. If one copy contains multiple pages, you can switch between Collated and Uncollated. For
example, if you print 6 copies, Collated prints the entire first copy, then the entire second
copy, etc. Uncollated prints 6 copies of page 1, 6 copies of page 2, etc.

Page | 49

1.3.1.4

Change the Orientation

By default, Excel prints worksheets in portrait orientation (taller than wide). You can
change the page orientation to landscape (wider than tall) on a worksheet-by-worksheet
basis. If you always want to print worksheets in landscape orientation, you can create a
template, change the page orientation from portrait to landscape, and then use that
template as the basis for all future workbooks.
You can switch between Portrait Orientation (more rows but fewer columns) and
Landscape Orientation (more columns but fewer rows).

Page | 50

1.3.1.5

Change the Page Margins and scaling

To better align a Microsoft Excel worksheet on a printed page, you can change margins,
specify custom margins, or center the worksheet horizontally or vertically on the page.
Page margins are the blank spaces between the worksheet data and the edges of the
printed page. Top and bottom page margins can be used for some items, such as headers,
footers, and page numbers.
To adjust the page margins, execute the following steps.
1. Select one of the predefined margins (Normal, Wide or Narrow) from the Margins dropdown list.
2. Or click the 'Show Margins' icon at the bottom right of the window. Now you can drag the
lines to manually change the page margins.

Page | 51

If you want to fit more data on one page, you can fit the sheet on one page. To achieve this,
execute the following steps.
1. Select 'Fit Sheet on One Page' from the Scaling drop-down list.

Note: you can also shrink the printout to one page wide or one page high. Click Custom
Scaling Options to manually enter a scaling percentage or to fit the printout to a specific
number of pages wide and tall. Be careful, Excel doesn't warn you when your printout
becomes unreadable.
Page | 52

1.3.2 Share Excel data with Word documents and other files.
Learn how to share Excel data with Word documents and other files.

1.3.2.1

Paste static Excel data in a Word document.

There may be times when you want to present your Microsoft Office Excel worksheet data,
or a chart that you created in Excel, in a Microsoft Office Word document. You can simply
copy selected data or charts in Excel and then use the Paste or Paste Special commands in
Word to insert the data or charts into a document.
Most of the time, you'll simply need to paste static Excel data in a Word document.
1. Select the Excel data.

2. Right click, and then click Copy (or press CTRL + c).
3. Open a Word document.
4. On the Home tab, click Paste Special...

Page | 53

5. Click Paste, HTML Format.


6. Click OK.

Note: instead of executing steps 4 to 6, simply press CTRL + v.


7. Click the icon in the upper left corner of the table and add borders.
Result.

Note: To delete the table, right click the icon in the upper left corner, and then click Delete
Table.

Page | 54

1.3.2.2

Link the source data in Excel with the

destination data in Word


You can also link the source data in Excel with the destination data in Word. If you change
the data in Excel, the data in Word is updated automatically.
1. Repeat steps 1 to 4 above.
2. Click Paste link, HTML Format.
3. Click OK.

4. Click the icon in the upper left corner of the table and add borders.
Result.

Page | 55

5. Change the Excel data.

Result.

Note: In Word, on the File tab, click Info, and then click Edit Links to files (in the lower right
corner) to launch the Links dialog box. Here, you can break a link, change the location of the
Excel file, etc.
Page | 56

1.3.3 Protect the Excel file


1.3.3.1

Encrypt an Excel file with a password

In Microsoft Office system, you can use passwords to help prevent other people from
opening or modifying your documents, workbooks, and presentations. Keep in mind that
Microsoft cannot retrieve forgotten passwords.
Encrypt an Excel file with a password so that it requires a password to open it.
1. Open a workbook.
2. On the green File tab, click Save As.

3. Click on the Tools button and click General Options.

Page | 57

4. In the Password to open box, enter a password and click OK.

5. Reenter the password and click OK.

Note: this feature also encrypts your Excel file. If you lose or forget the password, it cannot
be recovered.
6. Enter a file name and click Save.

It requires a password to open this Excel file now. The password for the downloadable
Excel file is "easy".
Page | 58

1.3.3.2

Protect Workbook

Excel gives you several ways to protect a workbook. You can require a password to open it,
a password to change data, and a password for changing the file's structureadding,
deleting, or hiding worksheets.
Remember, though, that this type of protection doesn't encrypt your files. Users can still
use third-party tools to read your data.
This example teaches you how to protect the workbook structure and windows in Excel.
If you protect the workbook structure, users cannot insert, delete, rename, move, copy,
hide or unhide worksheets anymore.
1. Open a workbook.
2. On the Review tab, click Protect Workbook.

3. Check Structure, enter a password and click OK.

4. Reenter the password and click on OK.

Page | 59

Users cannot insert, delete, rename, move, copy, hide or unhide worksheets anymore.

If you protect the workbook windows, users cannot move, change the size and close
windows anymore.
1. Open a workbook.
2. On the Review tab, click Protect Workbook.

3. Check Windows, enter a password and click OK.

Page | 60

4. Reenter the password and click on OK.

Users cannot move, change the size and close windows anymore.

Page | 61

To unprotect the workbook, click Protect Workbook and enter the password. The password
for the downloadable Excel file is "easy". The structure and window of this workbook are
protected.

1.3.3.3

Protect Sheet

When you share a file with other users, you may want to protect a worksheet to help
prevent it from being changed.
1. Right click a worksheet tab.
2. Click Protect Sheet.

3. Enter a password.
4. Check the actions you allow the users of your worksheet to perform.
5. Click OK.

Page | 62

Note: if you don't check any action, users can only view the Excel file!
6. Confirm the password and click OK.

Your worksheet is protected now. To unprotect a worksheet, right click on the worksheet
tab and click Unprotect Sheet. The password for the downloadable Excel file is "easy".

Page | 63

2. Employ Excel functions and the


set of preset formulas to perform
various operations on the data.

2.1 Perform Math functions to reference mathematical calculations


2.2 Use the Statistical functions to facilitate the calculation of statistical studies and models.
2.3 Use the Logical Excel functions to establish conditions for calculations.
2.4 Use the Date and time functions for managing and calculating dates in Excel spreadsheets.
2.5 Use the Text functions to manipulate, convert and calculate strings.
2.6 Demonstrate understanding to the difference between relative, absolute and mixed
reference.
2.7 Manipulate and find information within Excel spreadsheets by using Lookup & Reference
function
2.8 Recognize and deal with some common formula errors in Excel.

Page | 64

2.1

Perform Math functions to reference mathematical calculations

2.1.1 Use the SUM function to sum a range of cells,.


2.1.2 Use the SUMIF function to sum cells based on one criteria.
2.1.3 Use the SUMIFS function to sum cells based on multiple criteria.
2.1.4 Use the Round function to round a number to a specific number of decimal
places.
2.1.5 Use ROUNDDOWN function to rounds a number down.
2.1.6 Utilize the Array formula

Page | 65

2.1.1 Use the SUM function to sum a range of cells,.


To sum a range of cells, use the SUM function.

Excel Sum Function Examples


The following spreadsheets show the Excel Sum function used to calculate the sum of the
numbers 5, 6, 7, 8 & 9. In each of the five examples, the numbers are supplied to the Sum
function in a different way.
Formulas:

Results:

5 =SUM( 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 )

35

6 =SUM( {5,6,7}, 8, 9 )

35

7 =SUM( A1, A2, A3, A4, A5 )

35

8 =SUM( A1, A2, A3, "8", "9" )

35

9 =SUM( A1:A5 )

35

2.1.2 Use the SUMIF function to sum cells based on one criteria.
You use the SUMIF function to sum the values in a range that meet criteria that you specify.
To sum cells based on one criteria (for example, higher than 9), use the following SUMIF
function (two arguments).
Page | 66

To sum cells based on one criteria (for example, green), use the following SUMIF function
(three arguments, last argument is the range to sum).

Excel Sumif Function Examples


Example 1
The spreadsheet below shows three examples of the Excel Sumif function used with text
based criteria.
For each call to the Excel Sumif function the range argument (to be tested against
the criteria) is either the cell range A2 - A9 or the cell range B2 - B9, and
the [sum_range] argument (containing the values to be summed) is the cell range C2 - C9.
Formulas:

1
2
3
4

A
Month
Jan
Jan
Jan

B
Team
North 1
North 2
South 1

Results:

C
Sales
$36,693
$22,100
$53,321

1
2
3
4

A
Month
Jan
Jan
Jan

B
Team
North 1
North 2
South 1

C
Sales
$36,693
$22,100
$53,321
Page | 67

5
Jan
South 2
$34,440
6 Feb
North 1
$29,889
7 Feb
North 2
$50,090
8 Feb
South 1
$32,080
9 Feb
South 2
$45,500
1
0
1
1
=SUMIF( A2:A9, "Feb", C2:C9 )
1 =SUMIF( B2:B9, "North 1", C2:C9
2
)
1
3 =SUMIF( B2:B9, "North*", C2:C9 )

5
6
7
8
9
1
0
1
1
1
2
1
3

Jan
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb

South 2
North 1
North 2
South 1
South 2

$34,440
$29,889
$50,090
$32,080
$45,500

$157,559

- sum of cells C6-C9

$66,582

- sum of cells C2 & C6

$138,772 - sum of cells C2, C3, C6 & C7

Note that, in the example above:


The function in cell A13 uses the wildcard * and so finds cells in the range B2-B9
that begin with the text string "North". This is satisfied by the values "North 1" and
"North 2".
In all three examples, the text based criteria (including the wildcard) are encased in
quotes.

Example 2
The following example shows the Excel Sumif function using criteria based on numeric
values.
Formulas:

A
1
2
1
2
1

B
200
45
550
450
20

Results:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7 =SUMIF( A1:A5, 1, B1:B5 )
8 =SUMIF(B1:B5, ">100" )

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

A
1
2
1
2
1

B
200
45
550
450
20

770 - sum of cells B1, B3 & B5


1200 - sum of cells B1, B3 & B4

Note that, in the above spreadsheet:


The criteria in cell A8 is an expression, and so, is enclosed in quotes.
The [sum_array] argument is omitted from the function in cell A8 and so the range array
(i.e. cells B2-B6) is used as the [sum_range].
Page | 68

2.1.3 Use the SUMIFS function to sum cells based on multiple


criteria.
The Microsoft Excel SUMIFS function adds all numbers in a range of cells, based on a single
or multiple criteria.
To sum cells based on multiple criteria (for example, blue and green), use the following
SUMIFS function (first argument is the range to sum).

General note: in a similar way, you can use the AVERAGEIF and AVERAGEIFS function to
average cells based on one or multiple criteria.

Excel Sumifs Function Examples


The spreadsheet below shows the quarterly sales figures for 3 sales representatives.
The Sumifs function can be used to find total sales figures for any combination of quarter,
area and sales rep.
This is shown in the examples below.
A
1 Quarter
2 1
3 1

B
Area
North
North

C
Sales Rep.
Jeff
Chris

D
Sales
$223,000
$125,000
Page | 69

4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

1
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4

South
North
North
South
North
North
South
North
North
South

Carol
Jeff
Chris
Carol
Jeff
Chris
Carol
Jeff
Chris
Carol

$456,000
$322,000
$340,000
$198,000
$310,000
$250,000
$460,000
$261,000
$389,000
$305,000

Example 1
To find the sum of sales in the North area during quarter 1:
=SUMIFS( D2:D13, A2:A13, 1, B2:B13, "North" )

which gives the result $348,000.


In this example, the Excel Sumifs function identifies rows where:
The value in column A is equal to 1
and
The entry in column B is equal to "North"
and calculates the sum of the corresponding values from column D.
I.e. this formula finds the sum of the values $223,000 and $125,000 (from cells D2 and D3).

2.1.4 Use the Round function to round a number to a specific


number of decimal places.
This chapter illustrates three functions to round numbers in Excel. The
ROUND, ROUNDUP and ROUNDDOWN function.
Before your start: if you round a number, you lose precision. If you don't want this, show
fewer decimal places without changing the number itself.

Page | 70

Round
The ROUND function rounds a number to a specified number of digits.

1. Round a number to two decimal places.

Note: 1, 2, 3, and 4 get rounded down. 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 get rounded up. In this example,
114.7211, 114.7221, 114.7231 and 114.7241 get rounded down to 114.72 and 114.7251,
114.7261, 114.7271, 114.7281 and 114.7291 get rounded up to 114.73.
2. Round a number to one decimal place.

3. Round a number to the nearest integer.

4. Round a number to the nearest 10.

Page | 71

5. Round a number to the nearest 100.

RoundUp
The ROUNDUP function always rounds a number up (away from zero). For example, round
a number up to one decimal place.

2.1.5 Use ROUNDDOWN function to rounds a number down.


The ROUNDDOWN function always rounds a number down (toward zero). For example,
round a number down to the nearest integer.

Page | 72

2.1.6 Utilize the Array formula


This chapter helps you understand array formulas in Excel. Single cell array formulas
perform multiple calculations in one cell.

Without Array Formula


Without using an array formula, we would execute the following steps to find the greatest
progress.
1. First, we would calculate the progress of each student.

2. Next, we would use the MAX function to find the greatest progress.

Page | 73

With Array Formula


We don't need to store the range in column D. Excel can store this range in its memory. A
range stored in Excel's memory is called an array constant.
1. We already know that we can find the progress of the first student by using the formula
below.

2. To find the greatest progress (don't be overwhelmed), we add the MAX function, replace
C2 with C2:C6 and B2 with B2:B6.

Page | 74

3. Finish by pressing CTRL + SHIFT + ENTER.

Note: The formula bar indicates that this is an array formula by enclosing it in curly braces
{}. Do not type these yourself. They will disappear when you edit the formula.
Explanation: The range (array constant) is stored in Excel's memory, not in an range. The
array constant looks as follows:
{19;33;63;48;13}
This array constant is used as an argument for the MAX function, giving a result of 63.

F9 Key
When working with array formulas, you can have a look at these array constants yourself.
1. Select C2:C6-B2:B6 in the formula.

Page | 75

2. Press F9.

That looks good. Elements in a vertical array constant are separated by semicolons.
Elements in a horizontal array constant are separated by commas.

Page | 76

2.2

Use the Statistical functions to facilitate the calculation of


statistical studies and models.

2.2.1

Use the Count function to count the number of cells that contain number

2.2.2

Use the Countif function to count cells based on one criteria.

2.2.3

Use the Countifs function to count cells based on multiple criteria

2.2.4

Use the AVERAGE function to calculate the average of a range of cells.

2.2.5

Use the AVERAGEIF function to calculate the average of a range of cells based on one
criteria,

2.2.6

Use the MEDIAN function to find the median (or middle number).

2.2.7

Use the MODE function to find the most frequently occurring number.

2.2.8

Use the MIN function to find the minimum value.

2.2.9

Use the MAX function to find the maximum value.

2.2.10 Use the LARGE function to find the X largest number.


2.2.11 Use the SMALL function to find the X smallest number.

Page | 77

2.2.1 Use the Count function to count the number of cells that
contain number
The COUNT function counts the number of cells that contain numbers, and counts numbers
within the list of arguments. Use the COUNT function to get the number of entries in a
number field that is in a range or array of numbers.
The most used functions in Excel are the functions that count and sum. You can count and
sum based on one criteria or multiple criteria.
To count the number of cells that contain numbers, use the COUNT function.

Which Values are Counted as Numeric Values?


Numbers and dates are always counted as numeric values by the Excel Count function.
However, text representations and logical values are counted differently, depending on
whether they are supplied as a value in a range of cells, or if they are supplied directly to
the function.
The table below summarises which values are and which are not treated as numeric values
by the Excel Count function:
Value Within a

Value Supplied

Range of Cells

Directly to Function

Numbers

ARE counted

ARE counted

Dates

ARE counted

ARE counted

Page | 78

Logical Values

NOT counted

ARE counted

Text Representations of

NOT counted

ARE counted

Other Text

NOT counted

NOT counted

Errors

NOT counted

NOT counted

Numbers & Dates

Count Function Examples


Example 1 - Values Supplied from a Range of Worksheet Cells
In the following spreadsheet, the Count function is used to return the number of numeric
values in one or more supplied ranges of cells.
Formulas:

Results:

A
1
5
2 text
3
FALSE
4 01/01/2015
5
#N/A

C
0 =COUNT( A1:A5 )
=COUNT( A1:A5, B1 )
=COUNT( A1:B5 )

10

A
1
5
2 text
3
FALSE
4 01/01/2015
5
#N/A

C
0 2
3
4

10

Note that, in the above example:


The numbers and the date 01/01/2015 are counted by the function.
The text value "text", the logical value FALSE, and the error value #N/A are not counted by the
function.
The empty cells are not counted by the function.
Example 2 - Values Supplied Directly to the Excel Count Function
In the following spreadsheet, the Excel Count function is used to count the number of numeric
values in sets of values supplied directly to the function.

Page | 79

Formulas:

Results:

A
1 =COUNT( 100, DATE(2015,1,1) )
2 =COUNT( "100", "01/01/2015", FALSE )
3 =COUNT( "text", #N/A )

A
1 2
2 3
3 0

Note, in the above example:


The number 100 and the date 01/01/2015 are counted by the function.
The text representations of the number "100" & the date, "01/01/2015", and the logical value
FALSE, are counted by the function.
The text string "text" and the error #N/A are not counted by the function.

2.2.2 Use the Countif function to count cells based on one criteria.
To count cells based on one criteria (for example, higher than 9), use the following
COUNTIF function.

2.2.3 Use the Countifs function to count cells based on multiple


criteria
To count cells based on multiple criteria (for example, green and higher than 9), use the
following COUNTIFS function.

Page | 80

2.2.4 Use the AVERAGE function to calculate the average of a range


of cells.
Returns the average (arithmetic mean) of the arguments. For example, if the range A1:A20
contains numbers, the formula =AVERAGE(A1:A20) returns the average of those numbers.
To calculate the average of a range of cells, use the AVERAGE function.

2.2.5 Use the AVERAGEIF function to calculate the average of a


range of cells based on one criteria,
The Excel AVERAGEIF function finds the values in a supplied array that satisfy a specified
criteria, and returns the average (ie. the statistical mean) of the corresponding values in a
second supplied array.

Page | 81

To average cells based on one criteria, use the AVERAGEIF function. For example, to
calculate the average excluding zeros.

Note: <> means not equal to. The AVERAGEIF function is similar to the SUMIF function.

2.2.6 Use the MEDIAN function to find the median (or middle
number).
To find the median (or middle number), use the MEDIAN function.

Check:

2.2.7 Use the MODE function to find the most frequently occurring
number.
The Excel MODE function returns the statistical mode (the most frequently occurring
value) of a list of supplied numbers. If there are 2 or more most frequently occurring values
in the supplied data, the function returns the lowest of these values.
To find the most frequently occurring number, use the MODE function.
Page | 82

2.2.8 Use the MIN function to find the minimum value.


The Excel MIN function returns the smallest value from a supplied set of numeric values.
To find the minimum value, use the MIN function.

2.2.9 Use the MAX function to find the maximum value.


The Excel MAX function returns the largest value from a supplied set of numeric values.
To find the maximum value, use the MAX function.

2.2.10

Use the LARGE function to find the X largest number.

The Excel LARGE function returns the largest value from an array of numeric values.
To find the third largest number, use the following LARGE function.

Page | 83

Check:

2.2.11

Use the SMALL function to find the X smallest number.

The Excel SMALL function returns the smallest value from an array of numeric values.
To find the second smallest number, use the following SMALL function.

Check:

Tip: Excel can generate most of these results with the click of a button.

Page | 84

2.3

Use the Logical Excel functions to establish conditions for


calculations.

2.3.1

Use the IF function to checks whether a condition is met, and returns one value if
TRUE and another value if FALSE.

2.3.2

Use the AND Function to returns TRUE if all conditions are true and returns FALSE if
any of the conditions are false.

2.3.3

Use the OR function to returns TRUE if any of the conditions are TRUE and returns
FALSE if all conditions are false.

Page | 85

2.3.1 Use the IF function


The IF function checks whether a condition is met, and returns one value if TRUE and
another value if FALSE.
1. Select cell C2 and enter the following function.

The IF function returns Correct because the value in cell A1 is higher than 10.

2.3.2 Use the AND Function.


The AND Function returns TRUE if all conditions are true and returns FALSE if any of the
conditions are false.
1. Select cell D2 and enter the following formula.

The AND function returns FALSE because the value in cell B2 is not higher than 5. As a
result the IF function returns Incorrect.

2.3.3 Use the OR function.


The OR function returns TRUE if any of the conditions are TRUE and returns FALSE if all
conditions are false.
1. Select cell E2 and enter the following formula.
Page | 86

The OR function returns TRUE because the value in cell A1 is higher than 10. As a result the
IF function returns Correct.
General note: the AND and OR function can check up to 255 conditions.

Page | 87

2.4

Use the Date and time functions for managing and calculating
dates in Excel spreadsheets.

2.4.1

Enter a date in Excel.

2.4.2

Use the YEAR function to get the year of a date.

2.4.3

Add a number of days to a date.

2.4.4

Get the current date and time by use the NOW function.

2.4.5

Use the HOUR, Minute or Second function to return the hours, minutes or seconds of
a specific time

2.4.6

Add a number of hours, minutes and/or seconds, by using the TIME function.

Page | 88

2.4.1 Enter a date in Excel.


he DATE function returns the sequential serial number that represents a particular
date.
To enter a date in Excel, use the "/" or "-" characters. To enter a time, use the ":" (colon).
You can also enter a date and a time in one cell.

Note: Dates are in US Format. Months first, Days second. This type of format depends on
your windows regional settings.

2.4.2 Use the YEAR function to get the year of a date.

Year, Month, Day


The Excel Year function returns an integer representing the year of a supplied date.

To get the year of a date, use the YEAR function.

Note: use the MONTH and DAY function to get the month and day of a date.

2.4.3 Add a number of days to a date.


1. To add a number of days to a date, use the following simple formula.

Page | 89

2. To add a number of years, months and/or days, use the DATE function.

Note: the DATE function accepts three arguments: year, month and day. Excel knows that 6
+ 2 = 8 = August has 31 days and rolls over to the next month (23 August + 9 days = 1
September).

2.4.4 Get the current date and time by use the NOW function.

Current Date & Time


The Excel NOW function returns the current date and time. The function receives no arguments.

To get the current date and time, use the NOW function.

Note: use the TODAY function to get the current date only. Use NOW()-TODAY() to get the
current time only.

2.4.5 Use the HOUR, Minute or Second function to return the hours,
minutes or seconds of a specific time

Page | 90

Hour, Min, Sec


The Excel HOUR function returns an integer representing the hour component of a supplied Excel
time.

To return the hour, use the HOUR function.

Note: use the MINUTE and SECOND function to return the minute and second.

2.4.6 Add a number of hours, minutes and/or seconds, by using the


TIME function.

Time Function
To add a number of hours, minutes and/or seconds, use the TIME function.

Note: Excel adds 2 hours, 10 + 1 = 11 minutes and 70 - 60 = 10 seconds.

Page | 91

2.5

Use the Text functions to manipulate, convert and calculate


strings.

2.5.1

Join strings by using the & operator.

2.5.2

Use the LEFT function to extract the leftmost characters from a string.

2.5.3

Use the RIGHT function to extract the rightmost characters from a string.

2.5.4

Extract a substring, starting in the middle of a string by using the MID function.

2.5.5

Get the length of a string by using the LEN function

2.5.6

Find the position of a substring in a string by using the FIND function.

2.5.7

Replace existing text with new text in a string by using the SUBSTITUTE function.

Page | 92

2.5.1 Join strings by using the & operator.


In Excel 2010, you can use the ampersand (&) operator to concatenate (or join) separate text
strings together.

To join strings, use the & operator.

Note: to insert a space, use " "

2.5.2 Use the LEFT function to extract the leftmost characters from
a string.
To extract the leftmost characters from a string, use the LEFT function.

Left Function Examples


The spreadsheet below shows three examples of the Excel Left function.
Formulas:

A
1 Original Text
2 Original Text
3 Original Text

Results:

B
=LEFT( A1 )
=LEFT( A2, 4 )
=LEFT( A3, FIND( " ", A3 ) - 1 )

A
1 Original Text
2 Original Text
3 Original Text

B
O
Orig
Original

Page | 93

2.5.3 Use the RIGHT function to extract the rightmost characters


from a string.
To extract the rightmost characters from a string, use the RIGHT function.

Right Function Examples


The spreadsheet below shows three examples of the Excel Right function.
Formulas:

Results:

1 Original Text

=RIGHT( A1 )

1 Original Text

2 Original Text

=RIGHT( A2, 4 )

2 Original Text

Text

3 The Number 5

=RIGHT( A3, 1 )

3 The Number 5

2.5.4 Extract a substring, starting in the middle of a string by using


the MID function.
The Excel Mid function returns a specified number of characters from the middle of a
supplied text string.
To extract a substring, starting in the middle of a string, use the MID function.

Note: started at position 5 (p) with length 3.


Page | 94

Mid Function Examples


The spreadsheet below shows three examples of the Excel Mid function.
Formulas:

Results:

1 Original Text

=MID( A1, 7, 1 )

1 Original Text

2 Original Text

=MID( A2, 4, 7 )

2 Original Text

ginal T

3 255 years

=MID( A3, 3, 1 )

3 255 years

Note that the example in cell B3 returns the text value "5" (not the numeric value).

2.5.5 Get the length of a string by using the LEN function


The Excel LEN function returns the length of a supplied text string.
Example:

To get the length of a string, use the LEN function.

Note: space (position 8) included!

Page | 95

2.5.6 Find the position of a substring in a string by using the FIND


function.
The Excel FIND function returns the position of a specified character or sub-string within a
supplied text string.
The function is case-sensitive. If you want to perform a non-case-sensitive search, use the
Excel Search function instead.
To find the position of a substring in a string, use the FIND function.

Note: string "am" found at position 3.

Find Function Examples


The following spreadsheet shows examples of the Excel Find function used to find various
characters in the text string "Original Text".
Formulas:

1
2
3
4

A
Original Text
Original Text
Original Text
Original Text

Results:

B
=FIND( "T", A1 )
=FIND( "t", A2 )
=FIND( "i", A3 )
=FIND( "i", A4, 4 )

1
2
3
4

A
Original Text
Original Text
Original Text
Original Text

B
10
13
3
5

Note that, in the above spreadsheet:


Due to the case-sensitivity of the Find function, the upper- and lower-case find_text values,
"T" and "t", return different results (see the examples in cells B1 & B2).
In cell B4, the [start_num] argument is set to 4. Therefore the search begins at the fourth
character of the within_text string and so the function finds the second occurrence of "i".

Page | 96

2.5.7 Replace existing text with new text in a string by using the
SUBSTITUTE function.
The Excel Substitute function replaces one or more instances of a given text string, within
an original text string.
To replace existing text with new text in a string, use the SUBSTITUTE function.

Substitute Function Examples


The spreadsheets below provide four examples of the Excel Substitute Function.
Formulas:

Results:

A
1 abab
2 abab
John is 5 years
3 old
John is 5 years
4 old

B
=SUBSTITUTE( A1, "a", "X" )
=SUBSTITUTE( A2, "a", "X", 2
)
=SUBSTITUTE( A3, "John",
"Jack" )

A
1 abab
2 abab
John is 5 years
3 old
John is 5 years
4 old

B
XbXb
abXb
Jack is 5 years
old
John is 6 years
old

=SUBSTITUTE( A4, "5", "6" )

Page | 97

2.6

Demonstrate understanding to the difference between relative,


absolute and mixed reference.

2.6.1

Define and uses relative reference.

2.6.2

Define and create absolute reference.

2.6.3

Use the mixed reference to make combination of relative and absolute reference

Page | 98

2.6.1 Define and uses relative reference.


By default, Excel uses relative reference. See the formula in cell D2 below. Cell D2
references (points to) cell B2 and cell C2. Both references are relative.

1. Select cell D2, click on the lower right corner of cell D2 and drag it down to cell D5.

Cell D3 references cell B3 and cell C3. Cell D4 references cell B4 and cell C4. Cell D5
references cell B5 and cell C5. In other words: each cell references its two neighbors on the
left.

2.6.2 Define and create absolute reference.


See the formula in cell E3 below.
1. To create an absolute reference to cell H3, place a $ symbol in front of the column letter
and row number of cell H3 ($H$3) in the formula of cell E3.

Page | 99

2. Now we can quickly drag this formula to the other cells.

The reference to cell H3 is fixed (when we drag the formula down and across). As a result,
the correct lengths and widths in inches are calculated.

2.6.3 Use the mixed reference to make combination of relative and


absolute reference
Sometimes we need a combination of relative and absolute reference (mixed reference).
1. See the formula in cell F2 below.

Page | 100

2. We want to copy this formula to the other cells quickly. Drag cell F2 across one cell, and
look at the formula in cell G2.

Do you see what happens? The reference to the price should be a fixed reference to
column B. Solution: place a $ symbol in front of the column letter of cell B2 ($B2) in the
formula of cell F2. In a similar way, when we drag cell F2 down, the reference to the
reduction should be a fixed reference to row 6. Solution: place a $ symbol in front of the
row number of cell B6 (B$6) in the formula of cell F2.
Result:

Note: we don't place a $ symbol in front of the row number of B2 (this way we allow the
reference to change from B2 (Jeans) to B3 (Shirts) when we drag the formula down). In a
similar way, we don't place a $ symbol in front of the column letter of B6 (this way we
allow the reference to change from B6 (Jan) to C6 (Feb) and D6 (Mar) when we drag the
formula across).

Page | 101

3. Now we can quickly drag this formula to the other cells.

The references to column B and row 6 are fixed.

Page | 102

2.7

Manipulate and find information within Excel spreadsheets by


using Lookup & Reference function

Learn all about Excel's lookup & reference functions such as the VLOOKUP,
HLOOKUP, MATCH, INDEX and CHOOSE function

2.7.1

Use the VLOOKUP (Vertical lookup) function to looks for a value in a column of a
table, and then returns a value in the same row from another column you specify.

2.7.2

Use the HLOOKUP (Horizontal lookup) function to looks for a value in a row of a
table, and then returns a value in the same column from another row you specify.

2.7.3

Use the MATCH function to return the position of a value in a given range.

2.7.4

Use the INDEX function to return a specific value in a two-dimensional or onedimensional range.

2.7.5

Use the CHOOSE function to return a value from a list of values, based on a position
number.

Page | 103

2.7.1 Use the VLOOKUP (Vertical lookup) function.


The Excel VLOOKUP function 'looks up' a given value in the left-hand column of a data
array (or table), and returns the corresponding value from another column of the array.
The VLOOKUP (Vertical lookup) function looks for a value in the leftmost column of a table,
and then returns a value in the same row from another column you specify.
1. Insert the VLOOKUP function shown below.

Explanation: the VLOOKUP function looks for the ID (104) in the leftmost column of the
range $E$4:$G$7 and returns the value in the same row from the third column (third
argument is set to 3). The fourth argument is set to FALSE to return an exact match or a
#N/A error if not found.
2. Drag the VLOOKUP function in cell B2 down to cell B11.

Page | 104

Note: when we drag the VLOOKUP function down, the absolute reference ($E$4:$G$7)
stays the same, while the relative reference (A2) changes to A3, A4, A5, etc.

Vlookup Examples
Example 1 - Vlookup Requiring an Exact Match
In the spreadsheet below, columns A and B list an inventory of grocery items, and their
prices, and cell E2 of the spreadsheet shows a simple example of the Vlookup function
being used to look up the price of an item from the inventory.
A
1 Item Description

Cost ($)

2 Tinned Tomatoes

$0.90

3 Tinned Tuna

$1.50

4 Cornflakes

$3.50

5 Shortcake Biscuits

$1.00

6 Toothpaste

$4.10

Tinned Baked
7 Beans

$0.99

White Sliced
8 Bread

$0.80

.
.
.

Current
Item:

Current Item Cost ($)

Cornflakes

=VLOOKUP( D2, A:B, 2,


FALSE )

- returns the
value $3.50

.
.
.

The above Vlookup function returns the price for "Cornflakes", which is $3.50.
In this example:
The lookup_value is the text string "Cornflakes", which is located in cell D2;
The table_array is columns A-B of the spreadsheet;
The col_index_num is set to 2, to denote that the value returned should be taken from
column 2 of thetable_array;
The [range_lookup] argument is set to FALSE, to indicate that we only want a result to be
returned if an exact match to the lookup_value is found.
Page | 105

Example 2 - Vlookup Requiring the Closest Match


In the spreadsheet below, columns A-C list the grades that are assigned to examination
marks lying within the ranges 0-44%, 45%-54%, etc.
Cell F2 shows the score of 52% that was achieved by the student "Anne" in an examination.
The Vlookup function in cell G2 looks up this score in column A of the spreadsheet and
returns the associated grade from column C. Note that, in this example, if the exact score of
52% is not found in column A, we want, instead, to use the nearest valuebelow this score.
A

Low
1 er

Upp
er

C
Grad
e

0%

44% F

45%

54% E

55%

64% D

65%

74% C

75%

84% B

85%

100
%A

E
Nam
e
Ann
e

F
Scor
e

G
Grade

52 =VLOOKUP( F2, A2:C7, 3,


% TRUE )

- returns the
value "E"

The above Vlookup function returns the grade for the score 52%, which is E.
In this example:
the lookup_value is the value 52%, which is located in cell F2;
the table_array is the range A2-C7 of the spreadsheet;
the col_index_num is set to 3, to denote that the value returned should be taken from
column 3 of thetable_array;
the [range_lookup] argument is set to TRUE, to indicate that, if an exact match to
the lookup_value is not found, we want to use the closest value below the lookup_value.

Page | 106

2.7.2 Use the HLOOKUP (Horizontal lookup) function to looks for a


value in a row of a table, and then returns a value in the same
column from another row you specify.
In a similar way, you can use the HLOOKUP (Horizontal lookup) function.
The Excel Hlookup function 'looks up' a given value in the top row of a data array (or table),
and returns the corresponding value from another row of the array.

Hlookup Function Examples


Hlookup Example 1
Cells A2-F6 of the spreadsheet below, show the exam scores for 5 students in 4 different
subjects. If you want to look up a specific score (eg. Biology) for one of the students (eg.
Ed), this can be done using the Hlookup function, as shown in cell B10 of the spreadsheet.
Formulas:

Results:

In the above example, the Hlookup function searches through the top row of
the table_array (the range A2-F2), to find a match for the lookup_value (the name "Ed").
Page | 107

When the the name 'Ed' is found, the function returns the corresponding value from the 5th
row of the lookup_table.

This is illustrated in the spreadsheet on the right. The function finds the name 'Ed' in the
top row of the table_array and then returns the value from the 5th row of the table_array.
If we change the name in cell A10 of the spreadsheet from 'Ed' to 'Cara', the Hlookup
functions would automatically recalculate the function to display the exam results for Cara.

Hlookup Example 2
Cells A1-F3 of the spreadsheet below, show body types relating to body mass index (BMI),
for the ranges 0 - 18.4, 18.5 - 24.9, 25.0 - 29.9 and over 30.
Cell C6 shows the user's current BMI, which is 23.5, and cell C7 shows the Hlookup function
that is used to look up the body type that relates to this BMI.

The Hlookup function in the above spreadsheet returns the result "Normal Weight", which
is the correct body type for a BMI of 23.5.
Note that, in this example, the [range_lookup] argument is set to TRUE, to tell that function
that, if it cannot find an exact match to the supplied lookup_value, it should use the closest
match below this value. Therefore, for all BMIs up to and including 18.4 the function would
return "Underweight", for all BMIs between 18.5 and 24.9, the function would return
"Normal Weight", etc.
Page | 108

2.7.3 Use the MATCH function.


The Excel Match function looks up a value in an array, and returns the position of the value
within the array.
The user can specify that the function should only return a result if an exact match is found,
or that the function should return the position of the closest match (above or below), if an
exact match is not found.

Note: Yellow found at position 3 in the range E4:E7. The third argument is optional. Set this
argument to 0 to return the position of the value that is exactly equal to lookup_value (A2)
or a #N/A error if not found.

Excel Match Function Example 1


The following spreadsheet shows the Excel Match function used with
the [match_type] argument set to 0. Therefore, in these examples, the function only returns
a result if an exact match to the lookup_value is found. Otherwise, the function returns an
error.
In each case, the lookup_array is the range of cells A1 - A5.
Formulas:

A
1 cccc

Results:

B
=MATCH( "aaaa", A1:A5,

A
1 cccc

B
C
3 - matches "aaaa" so returns
Page | 109

2
3
4
5

dddd
aaaa
bbbb
eeee

0)
=MATCH( "?eee", A1:A5, 0
)
=MATCH( "*b", A1:A5, 0 )

position 3
- matches "eeee" so returns position
55
- matches "bbbb" so returns
4 position 4

ddd
2d
3 aaaa
bbb
4b
5 eeee

Note that, in the above examples, as the [match_type] argument is set to 0, the text strings
in the lookup_array (cells A1-A5) do not need to be ordered.

Match Function Example 2


The following spreadsheet also shows the Excel MATCH function used with
the [match_type] argument set to 0, but in this case the function is used to look up numeric
values.
In each of these examples, the lookup_array is the range of cells A1 - A6.
Formulas:

Results:

A
1
2
3
4
5
6

B
7 =MATCH( 4, A1:A6, 0 )
2 =MATCH( 8, A1:A6, 0 )
4 =MATCH( 10, A1:A6, 0 )
1
8
11

A
1
2
3
4
5
6

7
2
4
1
8
11

C
3 - returns position 3
5 - returns position 5
#N/A - no exact match - returns error

As in the previous examples, as the [match_type] argument is set to 0, the values in


the lookup_array (cells A1-A6) do not need to be ordered.

2.7.4 Use the INDEX function to return a specific value in a twodimensional or one-dimensional range.
The Excel Index function returns a reference to a cell that lies in a specified row and
column of a range of cells.
The INDEX function returns a specific value in a two-dimensional or one-dimensional
range.
Page | 110

Note: 92 found at the intersection of row 3 and column 2 in the range E4:F7.

Note: 97 found at position 3 in the range E4:E7.

Excel Index Function (Array Format) Examples


Example 1
In the following example, the Index function returns a reference to row 5 of the range
C1:C5, which is cell C5. This evaluates to the value 8.
Formula

Result

Page | 111

Example 2
In the following example, the Index function returns a reference to row 5 and column 2 of
the range C1:D5, which is cell D5. This evaluates to the value 3.
Formula

Result

2.7.5 Use the CHOOSE function.


The Excel Choose function returns a value from an array, that corresponds to a supplied
index number (position).
It may help to think of the Choose function as a function that returns the nth entry in a
given list.
The CHOOSE function returns a value from a list of values, based on a position number.

Note: Boat found at position 3.

Excel Choose Function Examples


Example 1
Imagine you are working on the spreadsheet below and you want to set the cells in Column
B, to have the following values, depending on the value of the corresponding cell in Column
A.

Page | 112

1 - red; 2 - blue; 3 - green; 4 - brown

The Excel Choose function can be used to assign the correct value to the cells of Column B,
as shown below:
Formulas:

1
2
3
4

A
4
2
3
1

B
=CHOOSE( A1, "red", "blue", "green", "brown" )
=CHOOSE( A2, "red", "blue", "green", "brown" )
=CHOOSE( A3, "red", "blue", "green", "brown" )
=CHOOSE( A4, "red", "blue", "green", "brown" )

Results:

1
2
3
4

A
4
2
3
1

B
brown
blue
green
red

Example 2
The Excel Choose function can also return cell references, as shown in the following
example. In this case, the reference that is returned from the Choose function is then
provided to the Excel SUM Function.
Formulas:

1
2
3
4

A B
C
10 3 =SUM( CHOOSE( B1, A1, A1:A2, A1:A3, A1:A4 ) )
11
12
13

Results:

1
2
3
4

A B
10 3
11
12
13

C
33

In the example above, the Choose function returns the cell reference A1:A3. This is then
passed to the SUM function which calculates the sum of the values in the cell range A1:A3
and returns the value 33.

Page | 113

2.8

Recognize and deal with some common formula errors in Excel.

his chapter teaches you how to deal with some common formula errors in Excel.

2.8.1

##### error

2.8.2

#NAME? error

2.8.3

#VALUE! error

2.8.4

#DIV/0! error

2.8.5

#REF! error

Page | 114

2.8.1 ##### error


When your cell contains this error code, the column isn't wide enough to display the value.

1. Click on the right border of the column A header and increase the column width.

Tip: double click the right border of the column A header to automatically fit the widest cell
in column A.

2.8.2 #NAME? error


The #NAME? error occurs when Excel does not recognize text in a formula.

Simply correct SU to SUM.


Page | 115

2.8.3 #VALUE! Error


Excel displays the #VALUE! error when a formula has the wrong type of argument.

a. Change the value of cell A3 to a number.


b. Use a function to ignore cells that contain text.

Page | 116

2.8.4 #DIV/0! Error


Excel displays the #DIV/0! error when a formula tries to divide a number by 0 or an empty
cell.

a. Change the value of cell A2 to a value that is not equal to 0.


b. Prevent the error from being displayed by using the logical function IF.

Explanation: if cell A2 equals 0, an empty string is displayed. If not, the result of the formula
A1/A2 is displayed.

2.8.5 #REF! error


Excel displays the #REF! error when a formula refers to a cell that is not valid.
1. Cell C1 references cell A1 and cell B1.

Page | 117

2. Delete column B. To achieve this, right click the column B header and click Delete.

3. Select cell B1. The reference to cell B1 is not valid anymore.

4. To fix this error, you can either delete +#REF! in the formula of cell B1 or you can undo
your action by clicking Undo in the Quick Access Toolbar (or press CTRL + z).

Page | 118

3 Utilize the Excel data analysis tools


to perform processes of
inspecting, cleaning, transforming,
and modeling data.
This section illustrates the powerful features Excel has to offer to analyze data.

3.1 Highlight cells with a certain color, depending on the cell's value by using the Conditional
Formatting tool
3.2 Reordering and filtering data in the Excel sheet
3.3 Represent the data graphically
3.4 Use the pivot table to extract the significance from a large, detailed data set.
3.5 Utilize Tables to analyze your data in Excel quickly and easily
3.6 Use the What-If Analysis in Excel to try out different values (scenarios) for formulas.

Page | 119

3.1

Reordering and filtering data in the Excel sheet

3.1.1

Execute sorting on one column.

3.1.2

Execute sorting on multiple columns.

3.1.3

Use the Filter tool to display records that meet certain criteria.

Page | 120

3.1.1 Execute sorting on one column.


Sorting data is an integral part of data analysis. You might want to put a list of names in
alphabetical order, compile a list of product inventory levels from highest to lowest, or
order rows by colors or icons. Sorting data helps you quickly visualize and understand your
data better, organize and find the data that you want, and ultimately make more effective
decisions.
You can sort your Excel data on one column or multiple columns. You can sort in ascending
or descending order.
To sort on one column, execute the following steps.
1. Click any cell in the column you want to sort.

2. To sort in ascending order, on the Data tab, click AZ.

Page | 121

Result:

Note: to sort in descending order, click ZA.

3.1.2 Execute sorting on multiple columns.


To sort on multiple columns, execute the following steps.
1. On the Data tab, click Sort.

The Sort dialog box appears.


2. Select Last Name from the 'Sort by' drop-down list.
Page | 122

3. Click on Add Level.


4. Select Sales from the 'Then by' drop-down list.

5. Click OK.
Result. Records are sorted by Last Name first and Sales second.

Page | 123

3.1.3 Use the Filter tool.


Filter your Excel data if you only want to display records that meet certain criteria.
1. Click any single cell inside a data set.
2. On the Data tab, click Filter.

Arrows in the column headers appear.

3. Click the arrow next to Country.


4. Click on Select All to clear all the check boxes, and click the check box next to USA.

Page | 124

5. Click OK.
Result. Excel only displays the sales in the USA.

6. Click the arrow next to Quarter.


7. Click on Select All to clear all the check boxes, and click the check box next to Qtr 4.

Page | 125

8. Click OK.
Result. Excel only displays the sales in the USA in Qtr 4.

9. To remove the filter, on the Data tab, click Clear. To remove the filter and the arrows,
click Filter.

Page | 126

3.2

Highlight cells with a certain color, depending on the cell's value


by using the Conditional Formatting tool

3.2.1

Highlight Cells Rules

3.2.2

Clear Rules

3.2.3

Use the Top/Bottom Rules

Page | 127

3.2.1 Highlight Cells Rules


Conditional formatting quickly highlights important information in a spreadsheet. But
sometimes the built-in formatting rules dont go quite far enough. Adding your own
formula to a conditional formatting rule gives it a power boost to help you do things the
built-in rules cant do.
Conditional formatting in Excel enables you to highlight cells with a certain color,
depending on the cell's value

To highlight cells that are greater than a value, execute the following steps.
1. Select the range A1:A10.

2. On the Home tab, click Conditional Formatting, Highlight Cells Rules, Greater Than...

Page | 128

3. Enter the value 80 and select a formatting style.

4. Click OK.
Result. Excel highlights the cells that are greater than 80.

5. Change the value of cell A1 to 81.


Result. Excel changes the format of cell A1 automatically.

Note: you can also highlight cells that are less than a value, between a low and high value,
etc.
Page | 129

3.2.2 Clear Rules


To clear a conditional formatting rule, execute the following steps.
1. Select the range A1:A10.

2. On the Home tab, click Conditional Formatting, Clear Rules, Clear Rules from Selected
Cells.

Page | 130

3.2.3 Use the Top/Bottom Rules


To highlight cells that are above the average of the cells, execute the following steps.
1. Select the range A1:A10.

2. On the Home tab, click Conditional Formatting, Top/Bottom Rules, Above Average...

Page | 131

3. Select a formatting style.

4. Click OK.
Result. Excel calculates the average (42.5) and formats the cells that are above this average.

Note: you can also highlight the top 10 items, the top 10 %, etc. The sky is the limit!

Page | 132

3.3

Represent the data graphically

A simple chart in Excel can say more than a sheet full of numbers. As you'll see, creating
charts is very easy.

3.3.1

Create a Chart

3.3.2

Change Chart Type

3.3.3

Switch Row/Column

3.3.4

Add a chart title

3.3.5

Change the Legend Position

3.3.6

Use data labels to focus your readers' attention on a single data series or data point.

Page | 133

3.3.1 Create a Chart


Charts are used to display series of numeric data in a graphical format to make it easier to
understand large quantities of data and the relationship between different series of data.
To create a chart in Excel, you start by entering the numeric data for the chart on a
worksheet. Then you can plot that data into a chart by selecting the chart type that you
want to use on the Office Fluent Ribbon (Insert tab, Charts group).
To create a line chart, execute the following steps.
1. Select the range A1:D7.
2. On the Insert tab, in the Charts group, choose Line, and select Line with Markers.

Page | 134

Result:

3.3.2 Change Chart Type


For most 2-D charts, you can change the chart type of the whole chart to give the chart a
different look, or you can select a different chart type for any single data series, which turns
the chart into a combination chart.
You can easily change to a different type of chart at any time.
1. Select the chart.
2. On the Insert tab, in the Charts group, choose Column, and select Clustered Column.

Page | 135

Result:

3.3.3 Switch Row/Column


If you want the animals, displayed on the vertical axis, to be displayed on the horizontal
axis instead, execute the following steps.
1. Select the chart. The Chart Tools contextual tab activates.
2. On the Design tab, click Switch Row/Column.

Result:

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3.3.4 Add a chart title.


You can add titles to an Excel 2010 chart to help describe its purpose. By default, titles are
not added when you create a basic chart, but you can add them later manually. In addition
to a main chart title that is generally displayed above a chart, you can add descriptive titles
to the x-axis (category axis) and the y-axis (value axis).
To add a chart title, execute the following steps.
1. Select the chart. The Chart Tools contextual tab activates.
2. On the Layout tab, click Chart Title, Above Chart.

3. Enter a title. For example, Population.


Result:

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3.3.5 Change the Legend Position.


By default, the legend appears to the right of the chart. To move the legend to the bottom of
the chart, execute the following steps.
1. Select the chart. The Chart Tools contextual tab activates.
2. On the Layout tab, click Legend, Show Legend at Bottom.

Result:

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3.3.6 Use data labels.


You can use data labels to focus your readers' attention on a single data series or data
point.
1. Select the chart. The Chart Tools contextual tab activates.
2. Click an orange bar to select the Jun data series. Click again on an orange bar to select a
single data point.
3. On the Layout tab, click Data Labels, Outside End.

Result:

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3.4

Use the pivot table to extract the significance from a large,


detailed data set.

3.4.1

Insert a Pivot Table

3.4.2

Drag fields

3.4.3

Sort the pivot table.

3.4.4

Filter the data

3.4.5

Change Summary Calculation

3.4.6

Create Two-dimensional Pivot Table

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Pivot tables are one of Excel's most powerful features. A pivot table allows you to extract
the significance from a large, detailed data set.
Our data set consists of 214 rows and 6 fields. Order ID, Product, Category, Amount, Date
and Country.

3.4.1 Insert a Pivot Table.


To insert a pivot table, execute the following steps.
1. Click any single cell inside the data set.
2. On the Insert tab, click PivotTable.

The following dialog box appears. Excel automatically selects the data for you. The default
location for a new pivot table is New Worksheet.
3. Click OK.

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3.4.2 Drag fields.


The PivotTable field list appears. To get the total amount exported of each product, drag
the following fields to the different areas.
1. Product Field to the Row Labels area.
2. Amount Field to the Values area.
3. Country Field to the Report Filter area.

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Below you can find the pivot table. Bananas are our main export product. That's how easy
pivot tables can be!

3.4.3 Sort the pivot table.


To get Banana at the top of the list, sort the pivot table.
1. Click any cell inside the Total column.
2. The PivotTable Tools contextual tab activates. On the Options tab, click the Sort Largest
to Smallest button (ZA).

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Result.

3.4.4 Filter the data.


Because we added the Country field to the Report Filter area, we can filter this pivot table
by Country. For example, which products do we export the most to France?
1. Click the filter drop-down and select France.
Result. Apples are our main export product to France.

Note: you can use the standard filter (triangle next to Product) to only show the totals of
specific products.

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3.4.5 Change Summary Calculation.


By default, Excel summarizes your data by either summing or counting the items. To
change the type of calculation that you want to use, execute the following steps.
1. Click any cell inside the Total column.
2. Right click and click on Value Field Settings...

3. Choose the type of calculation you want to use. For example, click Count.

4. Click OK.
Result. 16 out of the 28 orders to France were 'Apple' orders.

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3.4.6 Create Two-dimensional Pivot Table.


If you drag a field to the Row Labels area and Column Labels area, you can create a twodimensional pivot table. For example, to get the total amount exported to each country, of
each product, drag the following fields to the different areas.
1. Country Field to the Row Labels area.
2. Product Field to the Column Labels area.
3. Amount Field to the Values area.
4. Category Field to the Report Filter area.

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Below you can find the two-dimensional pivot table.

To easily compare these numbers, create a pivot chart and apply a filter. Maybe this is one
step too far for you at this stage, but it shows you one of the many other powerful pivot
table features Excel has to offer.

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3.5

Utilize Tables to analyze your data in Excel quickly and easily

3.5.1

Insert a Table

3.5.2

Sort a Table

3.5.3

Filter a Table

3.5.4

Display a total row

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Tables allow you to analyze your data in Excel quickly and easily. Learn how to insert,
sort and filter a table, and how to display a total row at the end of a table.

3.5.1 Insert a Table.


To insert a table, execute the following steps.
1. Click any single cell inside the data set.

2. On the Insert tab, click Table.

3. Excel automatically selects the data for you. Check 'My table has headers' and click on
OK.

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Result. Excel creates a nicely formatted table for you. This may still seem like a normal data
range to you but many powerful features are now just a click of a button away.

Note: the Table Tools contextual tab (with the underlying Design tab selected) is the
starting point for working with tables. If at any time you lose this tab, simply click any cell
within the table and it will activate again. Choose a table style you like. Hover over a table
style and Excel gives you a life preview.

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3.5.2 Sort a Table.


To sort by Last Name first and Sales second, first sort by Sales, next sort by Last Name (the
exact opposite).
1. Click the arrow next to Sales and click Sort Smallest to Largest.
2. Click the arrow next to Last Name and click Sort A to Z.
Result.

3.5.3 Filter a Table.


To filter a table, execute the following steps.
1. Click the arrow next to Country and only check USA.
Result.

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3.5.4 Display a total row.


To display a total row at the end of the table, execute the following steps.
1. On the Design tab, in the Table Style Options group, check Total Row.

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2. Click any cell in the last row to calculate the Total (Average, Count, Max, Min, Sum etc.) of
a column. For example, calculate the sum of the Sales column.

Note: in the formula bar see how Excel uses the SUBTOTAL function to calculate the sum.
109 is the argument for Sum if you use the SUBTOTAL function. Excel uses this function
(and not the standard SUM function) to correctly calculate table totals of filtered tables.

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3.6

Use the What-If Analysis in Excel to try out different values


(scenarios) for formulas.

3.6.1

Create Different Scenarios

3.6.2

Compare the results of these scenarios

3.6.3

Perform Goal Seek

Page | 154

What-If Analysis in Excel allows you to try out different values (scenarios) for formulas.
The following example helps you master what-if analysis quickly and easily.
Assume you own a book store and have 100 books in storage. You sell a certain % for the
highest price of $50 and a certain % for the lower price of $20.

If you sell 60% for the highest price, cell D10 calculates a total profit of 60 * $50 + 40 * $20
= $3800.

3.6.1 Create Different Scenarios.


But what if you sell 70% for the highest price? And what if you sell 80% for the highest
price? Or 90%, or even 100%? Each different percentage is a different scenario. You can
use the Scenario Manager to create these scenarios.
Note: You can simply type in a different percentage into cell C4 to see the corresponding
result of a scenario in cell D10. However, what-if analysis enables you to easily compare the
results of different scenarios. Read on.
1. On the Data tab, click What-If Analysis and select Scenario Manager from the list.

Page | 155

The Scenario Manager dialog box appears.


2. Add a scenario by clicking on Add.

3. Type a name (60% highest), select cell C4 (% sold for the highest price) for the Changing
cells and click on OK.

4. Enter the corresponding value 0.6 and click on OK again.


Page | 156

5. Next, add 4 other scenarios (70%, 80%, 90% and 100%).


Finally, your Scenario Manager should be consistent with the picture below:

Note: to see the result of a scenario, select the scenario and click on the Show button. Excel
will change the value of cell C4 accordingly for you to see the corresponding result on the
sheet.

3.6.2 Compare the results of these scenarios.


Scenario Summary
To easily compare the results of these scenarios, execute the following steps.
1. Click the Summary button in the Scenario Manager.
2. Next, select cell D10 (total profit) for the result cell and click on OK.
Page | 157

Result:

Conclusion: if you sell 70% for the highest price, you obtain a total profit of $4100, if you
sell 80% for the highest price, you obtain a total profit of $4400, etc. That's how easy whatif analysis in Excel can be.

3.6.3 Perform Goal Seek


What if you want to know how many books you need to sell for the highest price, to obtain
a total profit of exactly $4700? You can use Excel's Goal Seek feature to find the answer.
1. On the Data tab, click What-If Analysis, Goal Seek.

Page | 158

The Goal Seek dialog box appears.


2. Select cell D10.
3. Click in the 'To value' box and type 4700.
4. Click in the 'By changing cell' box and select cell C4.
5. Click OK.

Result. You need to sell 90% of the books for the highest price to obtain a total profit of
exactly $4700.

Page | 159

4 Make an integration of the Microsoft's


event-driven programming language Visual
Basic with Microsoft Excel to build
customized solutions and programs to
enhance the capabilities of Excel.

5.1. Create macros.


5.2. Use the Range object & variables
5.3. Use the If Then Statement & Loops to execute code lines if a specific condition is met and
loop through a range of cells
5.4. Manipulate strings and Date & Time in Excel VBA.
5.5. Work with Events and Array
5.6. Create Functions ,Sub and Application object
5.7. Create and use Active X control and UserForm

Page | 160

4.1

Create macros.

4.1.1

Turn on the Developer tab

4.1.2

Place a command button

4.1.3

Assign a Macro

4.1.4

Open the Visual Basic Editor

4.1.5

Create MsgBox

4.1.6

Workbook and Worksheet Object

4.1.7

Record Macro

Page | 161

With Excel VBA you can automate tasks in Excel by writing so called macros. In this
chapter, learn how to create a simple macro which will be executed after clicking on a
command button. First, turn on the Developer tab.

4.1.1 Turn on the Developer tab


To turn on the Developer tab, execute the following steps.
1. Right click anywhere on the ribbon, and then click Customize the Ribbon.

2. Under Customize the Ribbon, on the right side of the dialog box, select Main tabs (if
necessary).
3. Check the Developer check box.

Page | 162

4. Click OK.
5. You can find the Developer tab next to the View tab.

4.1.2 Place a command button


To place a command button on your worksheet, execute the following steps.
1. On the Developer tab, click Insert.
2. In the ActiveX Controls group, click Command Button.

3. Drag a command button on your worksheet.

Page | 163

4.1.3 Assign a Macro


To assign a macro (one or more code lines) to the command button, execute the following
steps.
1. Right click CommandButton1 (make sure Design Mode is selected).
2. Click View Code.

The Visual Basic Editor appears.


3. Place your cursor between Private Sub CommandButton1_Click() and End Sub.
4. Add the code line shown below.

Page | 164

Note: the window on the left with the names Sheet1, Sheet2 and Sheet3 is called the Project
Explorer. If the Project Explorer is not visible, click View, Project Explorer. To add the Code
window for the first sheet, click Sheet1 (Sheet1).
5. Close the Visual Basic Editor.
6. Click the command button on the sheet (make sure Design Mode is deselected).
Result:

Congratulations. You've just created a macro in Excel!

Page | 165

4.1.4 Open the Visual Basic Editor


To open the Visual Basic Editor, on the Developer tab, click Visual Basic.

The Visual Basic Editor appears.

4.1.5 Create MsgBox


In VBA, MsgBox function is used for displaying a dialog box with a predefined message. It
returns an integer value based on the button clicked by the user, this helps to keep a track
of the option selected by the user.
Page | 166

The MsgBox is a dialog box in Excel VBA you can use to inform the users of your program.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
1. A simple message.
MsgBox "This is fun"
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

2. A little more advanced message. First, enter a number into cell A1.
MsgBox "Entered value is " & Range("A1").Value
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Note: we used the & operator to concatenate (join) two strings. Although
Range("A1").value is not a string, it works here.
3. To start a new line in a message, use vbNewLine.
MsgBox "Line 1" & vbNewLine & "Line 2"
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Page | 167

4.1.6 Workbook and Worksheet Object.


Learn more about the Workbook and Worksheet object in Excel VBA.

Object Hierarchy
In Excel VBA, an object can contain another object, and that object can contain another
object, etc. In other words, Excel VBA programming involves working with an object
hierarchy. This probably sounds quite confusing, but we will make it clear.
The mother of all objects is Excel itself. We call it the Application object. The application
object contains other objects. For example, the Workbook object (Excel file). This can be
any workbook you have created. The Workbook object contains other objects, such as the
Worksheet object. The Worksheet object contains other objects, such as the Range object.
The Create a Macro chapter illustrates how to run code by clicking on a command button.
We used the following code line:
Range("A1").Value = "Hello"
but what we really meant was:
Application.Workbooks("create-a-macro").Worksheets(1).Range("A1").Value = "Hello"
Note: the objects are connected with a dot. Fortunately, we do not have to add a code line
this way. That is because we placed our command button in create-a-macro.xls, on the first
worksheet. Be aware that if you want to change things on different worksheets, you have to
include the Worksheet object. Read on.

Page | 168

Collections
You may have noticed that Workbooks and Worksheets are both plural. That is because
they are collections. The Workbooks collection contains all the Workbook objects that are
currently open. The Worksheets collection contains all the Worksheet objects in a
workbook.

You can refer to a member of the collection, for example, a single Worksheet object, in three
ways.
1. Using the worksheet name.
Worksheets("Sales").Range("A1").Value = "Hello"
2. Using the index number (1 is the first worksheet starting from the left).
Worksheets(1).Range("A1").Value = "Hello"
3. Using the CodeName.
Sheet1.Range("A1").Value = "Hello"
To see the CodeName of a worksheet, open the Visual Basic Editor. In the Project Explorer,
the first name is the CodeName. The second name is the worksheet name (Sales).

Page | 169

Note: the CodeName remains the same if you change the worksheet name or the order of
your worksheets so this is the safest way to reference a worksheet. Click View, Properties
Window to change the CodeName of a worksheet. There is one disadvantage, you cannot
use the CodeName if you reference a worksheet in a different workbook.

Properties and Methods


Now let's take a look at some properties and methods of the Workbooks and Worksheets
collection. Properties are something which an collection has (they describe the collection),
while methods do something (they perform an action with an collection).
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the code lines:
1. The Add method of the Workbooks collection creates a new workbook.
Workbooks.Add

Note: the Add method of the Worksheets collection creates a new worksheet.
2. The Count property of the Worksheets collection counts the number of worksheets in a
workbook.
MsgBox Worksheets.Count

Page | 170

Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Note: the Count property of the Workbooks collection counts the number of active
workbooks.

4.1.7 Record Macro.


The Macro Recorder, a very useful tool included in Excel VBA, records every task you
perform with Excel. All you have to do is record a specific task once. Next, you can execute
the task over and over with the click of a button. The Macro Recorder is also a great help
when you don't know how to program a specific task in Excel VBA. Simply open the Visual
Basic Editor after recording the task to see how it can be programmed.
Unfortunately, there are a lot of things you cannot do with the Macro Recorder. For
example, you cannot loop through a range of data with the Macro Recorder. Moreover, the
Macro Recorder uses a lot more code than is required, which can slow your process down.

Record a Macro
1. On the Developer tab, click Record Macro.

Page | 171

2. Enter a name.
3. Select This Workbook from the drop-down list. As a result, the macro will only be
available in the current workbook.

Note: if you store your macro in Personal Macro Workbook, the macro will be available to
all your workbooks (Excel files). This is possible because Excel stores your macro in a
hidden workbook that opens automatically when Excel starts. If you store your macro in
New Workbook, the macro will only be available in an automatically new opened
workbook.
4. Click OK.
5. Right mouse click on the active cell (selected cell). Be sure not to select any other cell!
Next, click Format Cells.

Page | 172

6. Select Percentage.

Page | 173

7. Click OK.
8. Finally, click Stop Recording.

Congratulations. You've just recorded a macro with the Macro Recorder!

Run a Recorded Macro


Now we'll test the macro to see if it can change the number format to Percentage.
1. Enter some numbers between 0 and 1.
2. Select the numbers.

3. On the Developer tab, click Macros.

Page | 174

4. Click Run.

Page | 175

Result:

See the Macro


To take a look at the macro, open the Visual Basic Editor.

Note: the macro has been placed into a module called Module1. Code placed into a module
is available to the whole workbook. That means, you can select Sheet2 or Sheet3 and
change the number format of cells on these sheets as well. Remember, code placed on a
sheet (assigned to a command button) is only available for that particular sheet.

Page | 176

4.2

Use the Range object & variables

4.2.1

Assign value to a cell

4.2.2

Assign value to a range of cells

4.2.3

Use the Cell to assign value

4.2.4

Declare a Range Object

4.2.5

Use the Select method to selects a range

4.2.6

Use the Rows and Column property to access to a specific row or column of a range.

4.2.7

Use the Copy and Paste method

4.2.8

Use the ClearContents method.

4.2.9

Use the Count property

4.2.10 Declare, initialize and display a variable in Excel VBA

Page | 177

The Range object, which is the representation of a cell (or cells) on your worksheet, is the
most important object of Excel VBA. This chapter gives an overview of the properties and
methods of the Range object. Properties are something which an object has (they describe
the object), while methods do something (they perform an action with an object).

4.2.1 Assign value to a cell.

Range Examples
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code line:
Range("B3").Value = 2
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

4.2.2 Assign value to a range of cells.


Code:
Range("A1:A4").Value = 5
Result:

Page | 178

Code:
Range("A1:A2,B3:C4").Value = 10
Result:

Note: to refer to a named range in your Excel VBA code, use a code line like this:
Range("Prices").Value = 15

4.2.3 Use the Cell to assign value.

Cells
Instead of Range, you can also use Cells. Using Cells is particularly useful when you want
to loop through ranges.
Code:
Cells(3, 2).Value = 2
Result:

Explanation: Excel VBA enters the value 2 into the cell at the intersection of row 3 and
column 2.
Page | 179

Code:
Range(Cells(1, 1), Cells(4, 1)).Value = 5
Result:

4.2.4 Declare a Range Object.


You can declare a Range object by using the keywords Dim and Set.
Code:
Dim example As Range
Set example = Range("A1:C4")
example.Value = 8
Result:

Page | 180

4.2.5 Use the Select method to selects a range.


An important method of the Range object is the Select method. The Select method simply
selects a range.
Code:
Dim example As Range
Set example = Range("A1:C4")
example.Select
Result:

4.2.6 Use the Rows and Column property to access to a specific row
or column of a range.
The Rows property gives access to a specific row of a range.
Code:
Dim example As Range
Set example = Range("A1:C4")
example.Rows(3).Select
Result:

Page | 181

Note: border for illustration only.


The Columns property gives access to a specific column of a range.
Code:
Dim example As Range
Set example = Range("A1:C4")
example.Columns(2).Select
Result:

Note: border for illustration only.

4.2.7 Use the Copy and Paste method.


The Copy and Paste method are used to copy a range and to paste it somewhere else on the
worksheet.
Code:
Range("A1:A2").Select
Selection.Copy
Page | 182

Range("C3").Select
ActiveSheet.Paste
Result:

Although this is allowed in Excel VBA, it is much better to use the code line below which
does exactly the same.
Range("C3:C4").Value = Range("A1:A2").Value

4.2.8 Use the ClearContents method.


To clear the content of an Excel range, you can use the ClearContents method.
Range("A1").ClearContents
or simply use:
Range("A1").Value = ""

Note: use the Clear method to clear the content and format of a range. Use the
ClearFormats method to clear the format only.

Page | 183

4.2.9 Use the Count property.


With the Count property, you can count the number of cells, rows and columns of a range.

Note: border for illustration only.


Code:
Dim example As Range
Set example = Range("A1:C4")
MsgBox example.Count
Result:

Code:
Dim example As Range
Set example = Range("A1:C4")
MsgBox example.Rows.Count
Result:

Page | 184

Note: in a similar way, you can count the number of columns of a range.

4.2.10

Declare, initialize and display a variable in Excel VBA.

This chapter teaches you how to declare, initialize and display a variable in Excel VBA.
Letting Excel VBA know you are using a variable is called declaring a variable. Initializing
simply means assigning a beginning (initial) value to a variable.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the code lines below. To execute the
code lines, click the command button on the sheet.

Integer
Integer variables are used to store whole numbers.
Dim x As Integer
x=6
Range("A1").Value = x
Result:

Explanation: the first code line declares a variable with name x of type Integer. Next, we
initialize x with value 6. Finally, we write the value of x to cell A1.

String
String variables are used to store text.
Code:

Page | 185

Dim book As String


book = "bible"
Range("A1").Value = book
Result:

Explanation: the first code line declares a variable with name book of type String. Next, we
initialize book with the text bible. Always use apostrophes to initialize String variables.
Finally, we write the text of the variable book to cell A1.

Double
A variable of type Double is more accurate than a variable of type Integer and can also store
numbers after the comma.
Code:
Dim x As Integer
x = 5.5
MsgBox "value is " & x
Result:

Page | 186

But that is not the right value! We initialized the variable with value 5.5 and we get the
value 6. What we need is a variable of type Double.
Code:
Dim x As Double
x = 5.5
MsgBox "value is " & x
Result:

Note: Long variables have even larger capacity. Always use variables of the right type. As a
result, errors are easier to find and your code will run faster.

Boolean
Use a Boolean variable to hold the value True or False.
Code:
Dim continue As Boolean
continue = True
If continue = True Then MsgBox "Boolean variables are cool"
Result:

Page | 187

Explanation: the first code line declares a variable with name continue of type Boolean.
Next, we initialize continue with the value True. Finally, we use the Boolean variable to
only display a MsgBox if the variable holds the value True.

4.3

Use the If Then Statement & Loops to execute code lines if a


specific condition is met and loop through a range of cells

4.3.1

Use the If Then statement in Excel VBA to execute code lines if a specific condition is
met

4.3.2

Use a single For - Nest loop to loop through a one-dimensional range of cells.

4.3.3

Use a double For- Nest loop to loop through a two-dimensional range of cells.

4.3.4

Use a triple loop to loop through two-dimensional ranges on multiple Excel


worksheets.

4.3.5

Use the Do While Loop

Page | 188

4.3.1 Use the If Then statement in Excel VBA.


Use the If Then statement in Excel VBA to execute code lines if a specific condition is met.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
Dim score As Integer, result As String
score = Range("A1").Value
If score >= 60 Then result = "pass"
Range("B1").Value = result
Explanation: if score is greater than or equal to 60, Excel VBA returns pass.
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Note: if score is less than 60, Excel VBA places the value of the empty variable result into
cell B1.

Else Statement
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
Dim score As Integer, result As String
score = Range("A1").Value
If score >= 60 Then
result = "pass"
Else
result = "fail"
Page | 189

End If
Range("B1").Value = result
Explanation: if score is greater than or equal to 60, Excel VBA returns pass, else Excel VBA
returns fail.
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Note: only if you have one code line after Then and no Else statement, it is allowed to place
a code line directly after Then and to omit (leave out) End If (first example). Otherwise
start a new line after the words Then and Else and end with End If (second example).

4.3.2 Use a single For - Next loop.


Looping is one of the most powerful programming techniques. A loop in Excel VBA enables
you to loop through a range of cells with just a few codes lines.
You can use a single loop to loop through a one-dimensional range of cells.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
Dim i As Integer
For i = 1 To 6
Cells(i, 1).Value = 100
Next i
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Page | 190

Explanation: The code lines between For and Next will be executed six times. For i = 1,
Excel VBA enters the value 100 into the cell at the intersection of row 1 and column 1.
When Excel VBA reaches Next i, it increases i with 1 and jumps back to the For statement.
For i = 2, Excel VBA enters the value 100 into the cell at the intersection of row 2 and
column 1, etc.
Note: it is good practice to always indent (tab) the code between the words For and Next.
This makes your code easier to read.

4.3.3 Use a double For- Next loop.


You can use a double loop to loop through a two-dimensional range of cells.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
Dim i As Integer, j As Integer
For i = 1 To 6
For j = 1 To 2
Cells(i, j).Value = 100
Next j
Next i
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Page | 191

Explanation: For i = 1 and j = 1, Excel VBA enters the value 100 into the cell at the
intersection of row 1 and column 1. When Excel VBA reaches Next j, it increases j with 1
and jumps back to the For j statement. For i = 1 and j = 2, Excel VBA enters the value 100
into the cell at the intersection of row 1 and column 2. Next, Excel VBA ignores Next j
because j only runs from 1 to 2. When Excel VBA reaches Next i, it increases i with 1 and
jumps back to the For i statement. For i = 2 and j = 1, Excel VBA enters the value 100 into
the cell at the intersection of row 2 and column 1, etc.

4.3.4 Use a triple loop .


You can use a triple loop to loop through two-dimensional ranges on multiple Excel
worksheets.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
Dim c As Integer, i As Integer, j As Integer
For c = 1 To 3
For i = 1 To 6
For j = 1 To 2
Worksheets(c).Cells(i, j).Value = 100
Next j
Next i
Next c

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Explanation: The only change made compared to the code for the double loop is that we
have added one more loop and added Worksheets(c). in front of Cells to get the twodimensional range on the first sheet for c = 1, the second sheet for c = 2 and the third sheet
for c = 3. Download the Excel file to see this result.

4.3.5 Use the Do While Loop.


Besides the For Next loop, there are other loops in Excel VBA. For example, the Do While
Loop. Code placed between Do While and Loop will be repeated as long as the part after Do
While is true.
1. Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
Dim i As Integer
i=1
Do While i < 6
Cells(i, 1).Value = 20
i=i+1
Loop
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Explanation: as long as i is lower than 6, Excel VBA enters the value 20 into the cell at the
intersection of row i and column 1 and increments i by 1. In Excel VBA (and in other
programming languages), the symbol '=' means becomes. It does not mean equal. So i = i +
Page | 193

1 means i becomes i + 1. In other words: take the present value of i and add 1 to it. For
example, if i = 1, i becomes 1 + 1 = 2. As a result, the value 20 will be placed into column A
five times (not six because Excel VBA stops when i equals 6).
2. Enter some numbers in column A.

3. Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
Dim i As Integer
i=1
Do While Cells(i, 1).Value <> ""
Cells(i, 2).Value = Cells(i, 1).Value + 10
i=i+1
Loop
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

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Explanation: as long as Cells(i, 1).Value is not empty (<> means not equal to), Excel VBA
enters the value into the cell at the intersection of row i and column 2, that is 10 higher
than the value in the cell at the intersection of row i and column 1. Excel VBA stops when i
equals 7 because Cells(7, 1).Value is empty. This is a great way to loop through any number
of rows on a worksheet.

Page | 195

4.4

Manipulate strings and Date & Time in Excel VBA.

4.4.1

Join Strings

4.4.2

Extract the leftmost and rightmost characters from a string by using Left and Right
commands

4.4.3

Use the Mid, Len, Instr

4.4.4

Gets the year of a date.

4.4.5

Add a number of days to a date

4.4.6

Get the current date and time

4.4.7

Get the Hour, Minute, Second of a time

4.4.8

Use the TimeValue function to converts a string to a time serial number.

4.4.9

Compare Dates and Times

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4.4.1 Join Strings.


We use the & operator to concatenate (join) strings.
Code:
Dim text1 As String, text2 As String
text1 = "Hi"
text2 = "Tim"
MsgBox text1 & " " & text2
Result:

Note: to insert a space, use " "

4.4.2 Extract the leftmost and rightmost characters from a string


by using Left and Right commands.

Left
To extract the leftmost characters from a string, use Left.
Code:
Dim text As String
text = "example text"

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MsgBox Left(text, 4)
Result:

Right
To extract the rightmost characters from a string, use Right. We can also directly insert text
in a function.
Code:
MsgBox Right("example text", 2)
Result:

4.4.3 Use the Mid, Len, Instr.

Mid
To extract a substring, starting in the middle of a string, use Mid.
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Code:
MsgBox Mid("example text", 9, 2)
Result:

Note: started at position 9 (t) with length 2. You can omit the third argument if you want to
extract a substring starting in the middle of a string, until the end of the string.

Len
To get the length of a string, use Len.
Code:
MsgBox Len("example text")
Result:

Note: space (position 8) included!

Instr
To find the position of a substring in a string, use Instr.
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Code:
MsgBox Instr("example text", "am")
Result:

Note: string "am" found at position 3.

4.4.4 Gets the year of a date.


Learn how to work with dates and times in Excel VBA.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the code lines below. To execute the
code lines, click the command button on the sheet.

Year, Month, Day of a Date


The following macro gets the year of a date. To declare a date, use the Dim statement. To
initialize a date, use the DateValue function.
Code:
Dim exampleDate As Date
exampleDate = DateValue("Jun 19, 2010")
MsgBox Year(exampleDate)
Result:

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Note: Use Month and Day to get the month and day of a date.

4.4.5 Add a number of days to a date.

DateAdd
To add a number of days to a date, use the DateAdd function. The DateAdd function has
three arguments. Fill in "d" for the first argument to add days. Fill in 3 for the second
argument to add 3 days. The third argument represents the date to which the number of
days will be added.
Code:
Dim firstDate As Date, secondDate As Date
firstDate = DateValue("Jun 19, 2010")
secondDate = DateAdd("d", 3, firstDate)
MsgBox secondDate
Result:

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Note: Change "d" to "m" to add a number of months to a date. Place your cursor on DateAdd
in the Visual Basic Editor and click F1 for help on the other interval specifiers. Dates are in
US Format. Months first, Days second. This type of format depends on your windows
regional settings.

4.4.6 Get the current date and time.


To get the current date and time, use the Now function.
Code:
MsgBox Now
Result:

4.4.7 Get the Hour, Minute, Second of a time.

Hour, Minute, Second


The get the hour of a time, use the Hour function.
Code:
MsgBox Hour(Now)

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Result:

Note: Use Minute and Second to get the minute and second of a time.

4.4.8 Use the TimeValue function to converts a string to a time


serial number.

TimeValue
The TimeValue function converts a string to a time serial number. The time's serial number
is a number between 0 and 1. For example, noon (halfway through the day) is represented
as 0.5.
Code:
MsgBox TimeValue("9:20:01 am")
Result:

Now, to clearly see that Excel handles times internally as numbers between 0 and 1, add
the following code lines:

Page | 203

Dim y As Double
y = TimeValue("09:20:01")
MsgBox y
Result:

4.4.9 Compare Dates and Times.


This example teaches you how to compare dates and times in Excel VBA. Dates and times are
stored as numbers in Excel and count the number of days since January 0, 1900. What you see
depends on the number format.

1. Enter some numbers in column A.

2. These numbers are dates. This is a perfect way to enter some dates without worrying
about the Date format. Change the format to Date (Right click on the column A header,
Format Cells and choose Date).
Result:

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Note: Dates are in US Format. Months first, Days Second. This type of format depends on
your windows regional settings.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
3. Declare the variable i of type Integer.
Dim i As Integer
4. Add a For Next loop.
For i = 1 To 5
Next i
5. The Date function returns the current date without the time. Add the following code line
to the loop, to highlight all the cells containing the current date (12/22/2013).
If Cells(i, 1).Value = Date Then Cells(i, 1).Font.Color = vbRed
Result:

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6. Add the following code line to the loop, to highlight all the dates earlier than
04/19/2011.
If Cells(i, 1).Value < DateValue("April 19, 2011") Then Cells(i, 1).Font.Color = vbRed
Result:

7. But what about times, we hear you say. They are the decimals. Switch back to General
format and change the numbers to decimal numbers.

8. Now change the format to 'Date and Time' format.

Page | 206

Result:

9. If you want to highlight all cells containing the current date, we cannot use the code line
at 5 anymore. Why not? Because the numbers in column A are decimal numbers now.
Comparing it with Date (a whole number) would not give any match. (It would only give a
match with 12/22/2013 at midnight exactly!) The following code line does work:
If Int(Cells(i, 1).Value) = Date Then Cells(i, 1).Font.Color = vbRed
Page | 207

Explanation: we simply use the Int function. The Int function rounds a number down to the
nearest integer. This way we can get the dates without the times and compare these dates
with Date.
Result:

10. Add the following code line to highlight all the cells containing times in the morning.
If (Cells(i, 1).Value - Int(Cells(i, 1).Value)) < 0.5 Then Cells(i, 1).Font.Color = vbRed
Explanation: we only need the decimals so therefore we subtract the integer part. Noon
(halfway through the day) is represented as 0.5. Decimals lower than 0.5 are the times in
the morning.
Result:

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4.5

Work with Events and Array

4.5.1

Define and create Workbook Open Event

4.5.2

Define and create Workbook Change Event

4.5.3

Create a one-dimensional array

4.5.4

Create Two-dimensional Array

Page | 209

4.5.1 Define and create Workbook Open Event


Events are actions performed by users which trigger Excel VBA to execute code.
Code added to the Workbook Open Event will be executed by Excel VBA when you open the
workbook.
1. Open the Visual Basic Editor.
2. Double click on This Workbook in the Project Explorer.
3. Choose Workbook from the left drop-down list. Choose Open from the right drop-down
list.

4. Add the following code line to the Workbook Open Event:


MsgBox "Good Morning"
5. Save, close and reopen the Excel file.
Result:

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4.5.2 Define and create Workbook Change Event


Code added to the Worksheet Change Event will be executed by Excel VBA when you
change a cell on a worksheet.
1. Open the Visual Basic Editor.
2. Double click on a sheet (for example Sheet1) in the Project Explorer.
3. Choose Worksheet from the left drop-down list. Choose Change from the right dropdown list.

Add the following code lines to the Worksheet Change Event:


4. The Worksheet Change Event listens to all changes on Sheet1. We only want Excel VBA to
do something if something changes in cell B2. To achieve this, add the following code lines:
If Target.Address = "$B$2" Then
End If
5. We only want Excel VBA to show a MsgBox if the user enters a value greater than 80. To
achieve this, add the following code line between If and End If.
If Target.Value > 80 Then MsgBox "Goal Completed"
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6. On Sheet1, enter a number greater than 80 into cell B2.

Result:

4.5.3 Create a one-dimensional array.

Array
An array is a group of variables. In Excel VBA, you can refer to a specific variable (element)
of an array by using the array name and the index number.

One-dimensional Array
To create a one-dimensional array, execute the following steps.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
Dim Films(1 To 5) As String
Films(1) = "Lord of the Rings"
Films(2) = "Speed"
Films(3) = "Star Wars"

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Films(4) = "The Godfather"


Films(5) = "Pulp Fiction"
MsgBox Films(4)
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Explanation: the first code line declares a String array with name Films. The array consists
of five elements. Next, we initialize each element of the array. Finally, we display the fourth
element using a MsgBox.

4.5.4 Create Two-dimensional Array.


To create a two-dimensional array, execute the following steps. This time we are going to
read the names from the sheet.

Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:

Page | 213

Dim Films(1 To 5, 1 To 2) As String


Dim i As Integer, j As Integer
For i = 1 To 5
For j = 1 To 2
Films(i, j) = Cells(i, j).Value
Next j
Next i
MsgBox Films(4, 2)
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Explanation: the first code line declares a String array with name Films. The array has two
dimensions. It consists of 5 rows and 2 columns. Tip: rows go first, then columns. The other
two variables of type Integer are used for the Double Loop to initialize each element of the
array. Finally, we display the element at the intersection of row 4 and column 2.

Page | 214

4.6

Create Functions ,Sub and Application object

4.6.1

Differentiate between a function and a sub

4.6.2

Create Function

4.6.3

Create Sub

4.6.4

Define the use of the Application object

4.6.5

Use the WorksheetFunction property in to access Excel functions.

4.6.6

Disable screen updating

4.6.7

Display alerts while executing code.

4.6.8

Turn On and Off the automatic calculation option

Page | 215

4.6.1 Differentiate between a function and a sub.


The difference between a function and a sub in Excel VBA is that a function can
return a value while a sub cannot. Functions and subs become very useful as
program size increases.

4.6.2 Create Function.


If you want Excel VBA to perform a task that returns a result, you can use a function. Place a
function into a module (In the Visual Basic Editor, click Insert, Module). For example, the
function with name Area.
Function Area(x As Double, y As Double) As Double
Area = x * y
End Function
Explanation: This function has two arguments (of type Double) and a return type (the part
after As also of type Double). You can use the name of the function (Area) in your code to
indicate which result you want to return (here x * y).
You can now refer to this function (in other words call the function) from somewhere else
in your code by simply using the name of the function and giving a value for each argument.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code lines:
Dim z As Double
z = Area(3, 5) + 2
MsgBox z
Explanation: The function returns a value so you have to 'catch' this value in your code. You
can use another variable (z) for this. Next, you can add another value to this variable (if you
want). Finally, display the value using a MsgBox.
Page | 216

Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

4.6.3 Create Sub.


If you want Excel VBA to perform some actions, you can use a sub. Place a sub into a
module (In the Visual Basic Editor, click Insert, Module). For example, the sub with name
Area.
Sub Area(x As Double, y As Double)
MsgBox x * y
End Sub
Explanation: This sub has two arguments (of type Double). It does not have a return type!
You can refer to this sub (call the sub) from somewhere else in your code by simply using
the name of the sub and giving a value for each argument.
Place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code line:
Area 3, 5
Result when you click the command button on the sheet:

Page | 217

Can you see the difference between the function and the sub? The function returned the
value 15. We added the value 2 to this result and displayed the final result. When we called
the sub we had no more control over the result (15) because a sub cannot return a value!

4.6.4 Define the use of the Application object


The mother of all objects is Excel itself. We call it the Application object. The
application object gives access to a lot of Excel related options

4.6.5 Use the WorksheetFunction property in to access Excel


functions.
You can use the WorksheetFunction property in Excel VBA to access Excel functions.
1. For example, place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code
line:
Range("A3").Value = Application.WorksheetFunction.Average(Range("A1:A2"))
When you click the command button on the worksheet, Excel VBA calculates the average of
the values in cell A1 and cell A2 and places the result into cell A3.

Note: instead of Application.WorksheetFunction.Average, simply use


WorksheetFunction.Average. If you look at the formula bar, you can see that the formula
itself is not inserted into cell A3. To insert the formula itself into cell A3, use the following
code line:

Page | 218

Range("A3").Value = "=AVERAGE(A1:A2)"

4.6.6 Disable screen updating


Sometimes you may find it useful to disable screen updating (to avoid flickering) while
executing code. As a result, your code will run faster.
1. For example, place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code
lines:
Dim i As Integer
For i = 1 To 10000
Range("A1").Value = i
Next i
When you click the command button on the worksheet, Excel VBA displays each value a
tiny fraction of a second and this can take some time.

2. To speed up the process, update the code as follows.


Dim i As Integer
Application.ScreenUpdating = False
For i = 1 To 10000
Range("A1").Value = i
Next i

Page | 219

Application.ScreenUpdating = True
As a result, your code will run much faster and you will only see the end result (10000).

4.6.7 Display alerts while executing code.


You can instruct Excel VBA not to display alerts while executing code.
1. For example, place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code
line:
ActiveWorkbook.Close
When you click the command button on the worksheet, Excel VBA closes your Excel file and
asks you to save the changes you made.

2. To instruct Excel VBA not to display this alert while executing code, update the code as
follows.
Application.DisplayAlerts = False
ActiveWorkbook.Close
Application.DisplayAlerts = True
As a result, Excel VBA closes your Excel file, without asking you to save the changes you
made. Any changes are lost.

Page | 220

4.6.8 Turn On and Off the automatic calculation option


By default, calculation is set to automatic. As a result, Excel recalculates the workbook
automatically each time a value affecting a formula changes. If your workbook contains
many complex formulas, you can speed up your macro by setting calculation to manual.
1. For example, place a command button on your worksheet and add the following code
line:
Application.Calculation = xlCalculationManual
When you click the command button on the worksheet, Excel VBA sets calculation to
manual.
2. You can verify this by clicking on File, Options, Formulas.

Page | 221

3. Now when you change the value of cell A1, the value of cell B1 is not recalculated.

You can manually recalculate the workbook by pressing F9.


4. In most situations, you will set calculation to automatic again at the end of your code.
Simply add the following code line to achieve this.
Application.Calculation = xlCalculationAutomatic

Page | 222

4.7

Create and use Active X control and UserForm

4.7.1

Create ActiveX controls

4.7.2

Create an Excel VBA Userform.

4.7.3

Add the Controls to the Userform

4.7.4

Show the Userform

4.7.5

Assign the Macros

4.7.6

Test the Userform

Page | 223

4.7.1 Create ActiveX controls.


Learn how to create ActiveX controls such as command buttons, text boxes, list boxes etc.
To create an ActiveX control in Excel VBA, execute the following steps.
1. On the Developer tab, click Insert.
2. For example, in the ActiveX Controls group, click Command Button to insert a command
button control.

3. Drag a command button on your worksheet.


4. Right click the command button (make sure Design Mode is selected).
5. Click View Code.

Page | 224

Note: you can change the caption and name of a control by right clicking on the control
(make sure Design Mode is selected) and then clicking on Properties. Change the caption of
the command button to 'Apply Blue Text Color'. For now, we will leave CommandButton1
as the name of the command button.
The Visual Basic Editor appears.
6. Add the code line shown below between Private Sub CommandButton1_Click() and End
Sub.

Page | 225

7. Select the range B2:B4 and click the command button (make sure Design Mode is
deselected).
Result:

Page | 226

4.7.2 Create an Excel VBA Userform.


This chapter teaches you how to create an Excel VBA Userform. The Userform we are going
to create looks as follows:

4.7.3 Add the Controls to the Userform


To add the controls to the Userform, execute the following steps.
1. Open the Visual Basic Editor. If the Project Explorer is not visible, click View, Project
Explorer.

Page | 227

2. Click Insert, Userform. If the Toolbox does not appear automatically, click View, Toolbox.
Your screen should be set up as below.

3. Add the controls listed in the table below. Once this has been completed, the result
should be consistent with the picture of the Userform shown earlier. For example, create a
text box control by clicking on TextBox from the Toolbox. Next, you can drag a text box on
the Userform. When you arrive at the Car frame, remember to draw this frame first before
you place the two option buttons in it.
4. Change the names and captions of the controls according to the table below. Names are
used in the Excel VBA code. Captions are those that appear on your screen. It is good
practice to change the names of controls. This will make your code easier to read. To
change the names and captions of the controls, click View, Properties Window and click on
each control.

Page | 228

Control

Name

Caption

Userform

DinnerPlannerUserForm Dinner Planner

Text Box

NameTextBox

Text Box

PhoneTextBox

List Box

CityListBox

Combo Box

DinnerComboBox

Check Box

DateCheckBox1

June 13th

Check Box

DateCheckBox2

June 20th

Check Box

DateCheckBox3

June 27th

Frame

CarFrame

Car

Option Button

CarOptionButton1

Yes

Option Button

CarOptionButton2

No

Text Box

MoneyTextBox

Spin Button

MoneySpinButton

Command Button OKButton

OK

Command Button ClearButton

Clear

Command Button CancelButton

Cancel

7 Labels

Name:, Phone Number:, etc.

No need to change

Note: a combo box is a drop-down list from where a user can select an item or fill in his/her
own choice. Only one of the option buttons can be selected.

Page | 229

4.7.4 Show the Userform


To show the Userform, place a command button on your worksheet and add the following
code line:
Private Sub CommandButton1_Click()
DinnerPlannerUserForm.Show
End Sub
We are now going to create the Sub UserForm_Initialize. When you use the Show method
for the Userform, this sub will automatically be executed.
1. Open the Visual Basic Editor.
2. In the Project Explorer, right click on DinnerPlannerUserForm and then click View Code.
3. Choose Userform from the left drop-down list. Choose Initialize from the right dropdown list.
4. Add the following code lines:
Private Sub UserForm_Initialize()
'Empty NameTextBox
NameTextBox.Value = ""
'Empty PhoneTextBox
PhoneTextBox.Value = ""
'Empty CityListBox
CityListBox.Clear
'Fill CityListBox
With CityListBox
Page | 230

.AddItem "San Francisco"


.AddItem "Oakland"
.AddItem "Richmond"
End With
'Empty DinnerComboBox
DinnerComboBox.Clear
'Fill DinnerComboBox
With DinnerComboBox
.AddItem "Italian"
.AddItem "Chinese"
.AddItem "Frites and Meat"
End With
'Uncheck DataCheckBoxes
DateCheckBox1.Value = False
DateCheckBox2.Value = False
DateCheckBox3.Value = False
'Set no car as default
CarOptionButton2.Value = True
'Empty MoneyTextBox
MoneyTextBox.Value = ""
'Set Focus on NameTextBox
NameTextBox.SetFocus
End Sub

Page | 231

Explanation: text boxes are emptied, list boxes and combo boxes are filled, check boxes are
unchecked, etc.

4.7.5 Assign the Macros


We have now created the first part of the Userform. Although it looks neat already, nothing
will happen yet when we click the command buttons on the Userform.
1. Open the Visual Basic Editor.
2. In the Project Explorer, double click on DinnerPlannerUserForm.
3. Double click on the Money spin button.
4. Add the following code line:
Private Sub MoneySpinButton_Change()
MoneyTextBox.Text = MoneySpinButton.Value
End Sub
Explanation: this code line updates the text box when you use the spin button.
5. Double click on the OK button.
6. Add the following code lines:
Private Sub OKButton_Click()
Dim emptyRow As Long
'Make Sheet1 active
Sheet1.Activate
'Determine emptyRow
Page | 232

emptyRow = WorksheetFunction.CountA(Range("A:A")) + 1
'Transfer information
Cells(emptyRow, 1).Value = NameTextBox.Value
Cells(emptyRow, 2).Value = PhoneTextBox.Value
Cells(emptyRow, 3).Value = CityListBox.Value
Cells(emptyRow, 4).Value = DinnerComboBox.Value
If DateCheckBox1.Value = True Then Cells(emptyRow, 5).Value = DateCheckBox1.Caption
If DateCheckBox2.Value = True Then Cells(emptyRow, 5).Value = Cells(emptyRow, 5).Value
& " " & DateCheckBox2.Caption
If DateCheckBox3.Value = True Then Cells(emptyRow, 5).Value = Cells(emptyRow, 5).Value
& " " & DateCheckBox3.Caption
If CarOptionButton1.Value = True Then
Cells(emptyRow, 6).Value = "Yes"
Else
Cells(emptyRow, 6).Value = "No"
End If
Cells(emptyRow, 7).Value = MoneyTextBox.Value
End Sub
Explanation: first, we activate Sheet1. Next, we determine emptyRow. The variable
emptyRow is the first empty row and increases every time a record is added. Finally, we
transfer the information from the Userform to the specific columns of emptyRow.
7. Double click on the Clear button.

Page | 233

8. Add the following code line:


Private Sub ClearButton_Click()
Call UserForm_Initialize
End Sub
Explanation: this code line calls the Sub UserForm_Initialize when you click on the Clear
button.
9. Double click on the Cancel Button.
10. Add the following code line:
Private Sub CancelButton_Click()
Unload Me
End Sub
Explanation: this code line closes the Userform when you click on the Cancel button.

4.7.6 Test the Userform


Exit the Visual Basic Editor, enter the labels shown below into row 1 and test the Userform.
Result:

Page | 234