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Technical Assistance Consultants Report

Project Number: 41598


July 2010

India: Capacity Development of the National Capital


Region Planning Board
(Financed by the TA Special Fund)

Prepared by:
Wilbur Smith Associates, India

For National Capital Region Planning Board

This consultants report does not necessarily reflect the views of ADB or the Government concerned, and
ADB and the Government cannot be held liable for its contents.

NCR Planning Board


Asian Development Bank

Capacity Development of the National


Capital Region Planning Board
(NCRPB) Component B
(TA No. 7055-IND)

FINAL REPORT
Volume V-A1: DPR for Flyover at Mohan Nagar Junction in
Ghaziabad
Main Report
July 2010

Abbrevations
ADB
DFR
DPR
FR
TA
NCR
NCRPB
NH
MORT&H
BIS
IRC
IS
KMPH
SP
RCC
CBR
LCV
MAV
CMSA
BC
DL
BOQ
INR

Asian Development Bank


Draft Final Report
Detailed Project Report
Final Report
Technical Assistance
National Capital Region
National Capital Region Planning Board
National Highway
Ministry of Road Transport and Highways
Bearue of Indian Standard
Indian Road Congress
Indian Standard
Kilometer per Hour
Standard Procedure
Reinforced Cement Concrete
California Bearing Ratio
Light Commercial Vehicle
Multi-axle Vehicle
Cumulative number of Million Standard Axles
Bitumen Concrete
Deal Load
Bill of Quantities
Indian Rupees

Contents
1.

INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................... 1
A. BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................................................ 1
B. OVERVIEW OF THIS ADB TA ..................................................................................................................... 2
C. ABOUT THE FINAL REPORT ........................................................................................................................ 3
D. STRUCTURE OF VOLUME V REPORT ........................................................................................................... 4
1. Structure of this Volume V-A Report ..................................................................................................... 4

2.

TRAFFIC SCENARIO................................................................................................................................ 5
A. TRAFFIC SCENARIO AT MOHAN NAGAR JUNCTION .................................................................................... 5

3.

ENGINEERING SURVEYS & INVESTIGATIONS ............................................................................... 7


A. GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................... 7
B. TOPOGRAPHICAL SURVEYS ........................................................................................................................ 7
1. Detailed Survey of Topographical Features ......................................................................................... 7
C. TRIAL PIT/ SUBSOIL INVESTIGATIONS ........................................................................................................ 8
1. For Pavement Design ............................................................................................................................ 8
2. Soil Testing for Embankments ............................................................................................................. 11
D. GEO TECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR FOUNDATION OF STRUCTURE...................................................... 11
E. MATERIAL SURVEY AND ANALYSIS ......................................................................................................... 12
1. Cement, Bitumen and Steel ................................................................................................................. 12
2. Water Quality ...................................................................................................................................... 12
F. IDENTIFICATION OF UTILITIES .................................................................................................................. 13

4.

IMPROVEMENT PROPOSALS AND DESIGN STANDARDS .......................................................... 14


A. GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................. 14
B. GEOMETRIC AND STRUCTURAL DESIGN STANDARDS ............................................................................... 14
1. Geometric Standards ........................................................................................................................... 14
2. Road Signage and Markings ............................................................................................................... 15
C. STRUCTURAL DESIGN STANDARDS .......................................................................................................... 15
D. DETAILS OF IMPROVEMENT PROPOSALS ................................................................................................... 16
E. IMPROVEMENTS TO EXISTING TRAFFIC REGULATIONS ............................................................................. 19
F. RIGHT OF WAY ......................................................................................................................................... 19
G. SALIENT FEATURES OF PROPOSED FLYOVER ............................................................................................ 19
1. Superstructure ..................................................................................................................................... 20
2. Substructure ........................................................................................................................................ 20
3. Foundation .......................................................................................................................................... 20
H. AT GRADE ROADS .................................................................................................................................... 20
I. UTILITY RELOCATION PLAN ..................................................................................................................... 21

5.

DESIGN REPORT .................................................................................................................................... 22


A. GENERAL ................................................................................................................................................. 22
B. STRUCTURAL ARRANGEMENT OF FLYOVER ............................................................................................. 22
C. AT GRADE ROADS .................................................................................................................................... 22
D. DESIGN METHODOLOGY .......................................................................................................................... 23
1. Geometric Design Standards .............................................................................................................. 23
2. Proposed Geometry............................................................................................................................. 23
E. PAVEMENT DESIGN .................................................................................................................................. 26
1. Design of Flexible Pavement for New Pavement as per IRC: 37-2001............................................... 26
2. Existing Sub grade and Design CBR................................................................................................... 27
3. Pavement Design................................................................................................................................. 28
4. Structural Design Standards ............................................................................................................... 28
F. DESIGN OF SUPERSTRUCTURE .................................................................................................................. 29
1. Post tensioned Girders ........................................................................................................................ 29
G. DESIGN OF SUBSTRUCTURE AND FOUNDATION ........................................................................................ 34

6.

BILL OF QUANTITIES COST ESTIMATES ....................................................................................... 38

ii

A. BILL OF QUANTITIES ................................................................................................................................ 38


B. RATES ANALYSIS ..................................................................................................................................... 39
C. ESTIMATED COSTS ................................................................................................................................... 39

List of Tables
Table 2-1: Projected Traffic at Mohan Nagar Junction .......................................................................... 5
Table 3-1: Laboratory Test Results for Sub grade Area Soil ............................................................... 10
Table 3-2: Details of Existing Utilities................................................................................................. 13
Table 5-1: Geometric Design Standards .............................................................................................. 23
Table 5-2: Summary of Horizontal Alignment Report......................................................................... 24
Table 5-3: Summary of Vertical Alignment Report ............................................................................. 25
Table 5-4: Summary of Commercial Vehicles Average Daily Traffic (ADT) in 2008........................ 26
Table 5-5: Estimated traffic at the end of construction period ............................................................. 27
Table 5-6: Cumulative number of Million Standard Axles (CMSA)................................................... 27
Table 5-7: Proposed Design of Flexible Pavement for a Design Life Period of 15 Years ................... 28
Table 6-1: Summary of Cost Estimates ................................................................................................ 39

List of Figures
Figure 2-1: Projected Traffic at Mohan Nagar Junction ........................................................................ 5
Figure 2-2: Location of Proposed Flyover ............................................................................................. 6
Figure 2-3: Orientation of Grade-Separator ........................................................................................... 6
Figure 4-1: Typical cross section of flyover ........................................................................................ 17
Figure 4-2: Typical cross section at pier .............................................................................................. 17
Figure 4-3: Plan at Pier ........................................................................................................................ 18
Figure 4-4: Typical Cross-section at Abutment ................................................................................... 18
Figure 4-5: Plan at Abutment ............................................................................................................... 19
Figure 5-1: Typical Cross Section showing layers of Pavement Composition ................................... 28
Figure 5-2: Typical End Girder Section ............................................................................................... 29
Figure 5-3: Typical Mid Girder Section............................................................................................... 30
Figure 5-4: Grillage model for superstructure analysis ........................................................................ 31
Figure 5-5: Details of Expansion Joint................................................................................................. 37

List of Appendices
Appendix 1: Geotechnical Investigation Report

Compendium Volumes
Besides this Volume V-A1, DPR for Mohan Nagar Flyover in Ghaziabad has following Volumes
appended separately.
Volume V-A2: Detailed Designs
Volume V-A3: Detailed Drawings
Volume V-A4: Detailed Estimates
Volume V-A5: Financial & Economic Analysis
Volume V-A6: Initial Environmental Examination
Volume V-A7: Resettlement Plan

iii

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

1.

INTRODUCTION

A.

Background

1.

The National Capital Region Planning Board, constituted in 1985 under the provisions of
NCRPB Act, 1985, is a statutory body functioning under the Ministry of Urban
Development, Government of India. NCRPB has a mandate to systematically develop the
National Capital Region (NCR) of India. It is one of the functions of the Board to arrange
and oversee the financing of selected development projects in the NCR through Central
and State Plan funds and other sources of revenue.

2.

On Government of Indias request, Asian Development Bank (ADB) has formulated the
technical assistance (TA) to enhance the capacities of National Capital Region Planning
Board and its associated implementing agencies. The TA has been designed in three
components: Component A relates to improving the business processes in NCRPB;
Component B relates to improving the capacity of the implementing agencies in project
identification, feasibility studies and preparing detailed engineering design; and
Component C relates to urban planning and other activities.

3.

ADB has appointed M/s Wilbur Smith Associates to perform consultancy services
envisaged under Component B. In the context of this contract, the first deliverable
Inception Report, was submitted in October 2008. The second deliverable Interim Report
comprising Master Plan for sewerage in Hapur, Master Plan for Water Supply for Panipat,
Master Plan for Drainage for Hapur, Master Plan for Solid Waste management for
Ghaziabad, Traffic and Transport analysis for Ghaziabad, Socio-Economic base line
survey result in 3 sample project towns and proceedings of workshop 1 was submitted in
January 2009. The four Master Plans as stated above are also made available on NCRPB
web site for use of the implementing agencies.

4.

The third deliverable Draft Final Report (DFR) comprising Detailed Project Report (DPR)
for water supply in Panipat, DPR for sewerage in Hapur, DPR for drainage in Hapur, DPR
for drainage in Sonipat, DPR for solid waste management in Ghaziabad, DPR for four
selected transport components (Flyover, Road widening, Multi-level Parking and Bus
Terminal) in Ghaziabad, and a Report on Capacity Building Activities were submitted.

5.

Now, this is the Final Report (FR) and is the fourth and final deliverable. The
comments/feedback on Draft Final Report received from ADB, NCRPB and respective
implementing agencies were duly incorporated and final DPRs for components of Water
Supply, Sewerage, Drainage, Solid Waste Management, and Transport are submitted as
part of this Final Report. This is the Detailed Project Report for Transport Component of
Flyover (at Mohan Nagar Junction) in Ghaziabad.

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

B.

Overview of this ADB TA

6.

Objectives. The objective of this TA is to strengthen the capacity at NCRPB, state-level


NCR cells, and other implementing agencies in the area of planning for urban
infrastructure and to impart necessary skills to conceive, design, develop, appraise and
implement good quality infrastructure projects for planned development of NCR. The
increased institutional capacity of the NCRPB and the implementing agencies will lead to
effective and time scaling-up of urban infrastructure to (i) improve quality of basic urban
services in the NCR; (ii) develop counter magnet towns; (iii) reduce in migration into
Delhi and orderly development of NCR; and (iv) accelerate economic growth in the NCR.

7.

The TA Capacity Development of the NCRPB, Component B focuses on strengthening


the capacities of NCRPB and implementing agencies relating to project feasibility studies
and preparation, and detailed engineering design in the implementing agencies.
Specifically, this component B of the TA will support the project preparation efforts of the
implementing agencies by preparing demonstration feasibility studies that include all due
diligence documentation required for processing of the project in accordance with best
practices, including ADBs policies and guidelines.

8.

Scope of Work. According to the terms of reference of the TA assignment, the following
activities are envisaged in component B of the TA:
(i)

Conduct technical, institutional, economic and financial feasibility analysis of


identified subprojects in the six sample implementing agencies;
(ii) Conduct safeguards due diligence on the subprojects, including environmental
assessment report and resettlement plan for all subprojects covered in the sample
implementing agencies;
(iii) Prepare environmental assessment framework and resettlement framework; and
(iv) Develop a capacity building and policy reform program for the implementing
agencies, including governance strengthening, institutional development and
financial management.
9.

Besides, this component of the TA will also:


(i)

help in assessing the current practices and procedures of project identification and
preparation of detailed project reports including technical, financial, economic and
social safeguard due diligence;
(ii) support preparation of standard procedure manuals for project identification and
preparation of detailed project reports including technical, financial, economic and
social safeguard due diligence;
(iii) train the implementing agencies in the preparation of detailed project reports by
using the sample subprojects, reports on deficiency of current practices and standard
protocol manuals; and
(iv) help in developing a user-friendly web-page where different manuals and guidelines
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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

for preparation of DPRs will be made available for the implementing agencies.

C.

About the Final Report

10.

At Interim Report stage of the TA, the Master Plans for Water Supply in Panipat,
Sewerage system in Hapur, Drainage for Hapur and Municipal Solid Waste Management
for Ghaziabad were prepared. The Master Plans provided 100 percent coverage of
population and the area likely to be in planning horizon year 2031/2041. All works
required up to planning horizon year were conceptualized, broadly designed and block
cost was estimated. The Master Plans also provided phasing of investment such that under
phase 1 works required to cover present spread of city were proposed.

11.

At draft final report stage of the TA the Detailed Project Reports (DPRs) were prepared
for Phase 1 works as suggested in the Master Plans. For preparation of DPRs, engineering
surveys and investigations were conducted and various possible and feasible alternatives
evaluated. Finally for the selected options the DPRs prepared with detailed designs, item
wise detailed cost estimate, work specifications, implementation process and proposed
implementation arrangements. Further, according to ADB procedures these DPRs in
addition to technical analysis included institutional, financial and economic feasibility
analysis and environmental and social safeguards due diligence environmental
assessment and resettlement plans.

12.

The DPR's submitted as part of Draft Final Report was reviewed by the implementing
agencies, NCRPB and the ADB. Now this Final Report comprising DPR's modified in
light of comments of IA's is being submitted. The draft DPR for water supply in Panipat
was reviewed by PHED Haryana. Detailed discussions were held with Superintending
Engineer (Urban), Executive Engineer (Urban), Superintending Engineer (Karnal) and
Executive Engineer Panipat. The comments made by PHED have been suitably
incorporated in this Final Report.

13.

These DPRs are proposed to be made available to the ULBs and other implementing
agencies of the state governments as model DPRs so that they may replicate the
methodology/approach in the future DPRs prepared by them for obtaining finances from
the NCRPB.

14.

Organization of this Final Report. The Final Report of the TA Component B is organized
in following Seven Volumes:
Volume I: Detailed Project Report for Water Supply System in Panipat
Volume II: Detailed Project Report for Rehabilitation and Augmentation of
Sewerage System in Hapur
Volume III: Detailed Project Report for Rehabilitation of Major Drains in Hapur
Volume IV: Detailed Project Report for Improvement of Solid Waste Management
System in Ghaziabad
Volume V: Detailed Project Reports for Four Transport Components in Ghaziabad

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

Volume VI: Capacity Building Activities


Volume VII: Detailed Project Reports Rehabilitation of Drainage in Sonipat

D.

Structure of Volume V Report

15.

The DPRs for all four transport components are compiled in Volume V. This is Volume V
is presented four volumes:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)

Volume V-A: DPR for Mohan Nagar Flyover


Volume V-B: DPR for Road Widening
Volume V-C: DPR for Bus Terminal
Volume V-D: DPR for Multi-level Parking

1.

Structure of this Volume V-A Report

16.

This DPR for Mohan Nagar Flyover in Ghaziabad is compiled in following seven subvolumes (Volumes V-A1 to V-A7) including this Main Report:
Volume V-A1: Main Report:

Section 1 Introduction
Section 2 presents traffic scenario at Mohan Nagar Junction
Section 3 provides details of engineering surveys and investigations carried out
Section 4 presents details on the proposed improvements and design standards
Section 5 presents detailed design
Section 6 presents estimate and costing

Volume V-A2: Detailed Designs


Volume V-A3: Detailed Drawings
Volume V-A4: Detailed Estimates
Volume V-A5: Financial & Economic Analysis
Volume V-A6: Initial Environmental Examination
Volume V-A7: Resettlement Plan

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

2.

TRAFFIC SCENARIO

A.

Traffic Scenario at Mohan Nagar Junction

17.

Patel Chowk (Mohan Nagar Junction) intersection on NH 24 is one of the critical locations
that carry a high volume of traffic. The speed survey conducted on this stretch of the
highway also indicated a peak hour average speed of 19 kmph. The study has mandated a
flyover to be built at this junction (NH24/Madan Mohan Malviya/Loni Road) by 2015.
Location and proposed orientation of flyover is presented in Figure 2 and Figure 3.

18.

From the traffic analysis carried out, it can be seen that a flyover is mandated at this
location in 2015.

Table 2-1: Projected Traffic at Mohan Nagar Junction


S. No
Year
1
2010
2
2015
3
2020
4
2025
5
2030

PCU
6,867
9,299
11,893
13,816
14,632

Figure 2-1: Projected Traffic at Mohan Nagar Junction

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

Figure 2-2: Location of Proposed Flyover

Existing and Proposed Flyover Locations


Location Selected for DPR (Mohan Nagar or Patel Chowk)

MohanNagar (PatelChowk)

Existing Flyovers
Proposed Flyovers

Figure 2-3: Orientation of Grade-Separator

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

3.

ENGINEERING SURVEYS & INVESTIGATIONS

A.

General

19.

Various engineering surveys have been carried out for the proper planning and design of
the grade separator at the proposed junction. Following surveys have been carried out:

Topographical survey
Trial pit/subsoil investigations
Geotechnical investigations for foundations
Material survey

B.

Topographical Surveys

20.

The basic objective of the topographic survey was to collect the essential ground features
of the proposed junction using Total Station to develop a Digital Terrain Model (DTM), to
take care of design requirements of grade separated facility, identifying areas of restriction
and their remedies. The data collected will result in the final design and is also used for the
computation of earthwork and other quantities required.

21.

As first step of the field study, satellite imagery maps of the location were collected and
examined thoroughly to have first hand information about the area and to decide on the
possible improvement options. It also helped out in finalizing the extent of topographical
survey.

1.

Detailed Survey of Topographical Features

22.

Topographical survey using total station has been carried out to collect sufficient data to
form the digital terrain model and to prepare the map of the physical features of the area.
Following existing features have been captured during the survey:

Building lines, type of buildings (shops or houses, number of stories), trees and
Right of Way boundary if available at site by presence of boundary stones.
Road edges, centerline, shoulders/footpaths, median etc
Identifying all religious places, its locations, boundary lines and clear dimensions
of compound walls and entrances.
All service lines both above and below ground such as OFC cables, water and
sewer pipes, gas pipes, electrical poles and cables, telephone poles and lines etc.
Location of traffic islands, median, rotaries, dividers etc.
Location of road side drains, clearly identifying the type (open/close), width of

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

23.

drain, including the beginning and end of drains.


Positions of transformers, mast, towers etc
Apart from the above, the names of intersecting roads and other landmarks are also
recorded and incorporated in the drawing.

Topographic survey was carried out using Total Station of 5-sec accuracy for detailed
mapping and with higher accuracy total station during the traversing (min 3 sec). As part
of the survey, the following activities were carried out
(i)

Installation of Bench Mark Pillars: As first step of the survey, Bench mark pillars
were installed as described below:
Bench mark pillars were constructed at every 250m interval. The pillars are in the
form of concrete blocks of size 15 X 15 X 45 cm with a nail fixed at the center of
the top surface were embedded up to a depth of 30cm in to the ground. The BM
pillars were painted in yellow and details such as BM number and reduced level
were clearly marked. Logical numbering sequence was followed.

(ii)

Cross Sections: Cross sections along the road have been taken at every 10 m
interval in longitudinal direction for a minimum width of 15m or up to the building
lines from the centerline of the existing carriageway on either side of the road. Cross
section levels were taken at
Centerline of existing carriageway and median edges
Points between centerline and edge of carriageway
Shoulder/Footpath edges/carriageway edges
Additional points at locations of change in ground/critical points
Longitudinal Section: Longitudinal section levels along the centerline were taken at
every 10m interval. Where curves or important features were encountered, this
interval was suitably reduced. Cross sections points for the required width was taken
corresponding to each point in the longitudinal section.
Map Plotting: The existing features surveyed were directly imported into Computer
Aided Software and the details of the same has been plotted and presented for ready
reference.

(iii)

(iv)

C.

Trial Pit/ Subsoil Investigations

1.

For Pavement Design

24.

Objective. The objective of the investigations is to provide basis for design of pavement
for the service roads keeping in view the composition and characteristics of the existing
pavement/sub grade. The scope of work, thus, includes collection of information regarding
the existing pavement crust composition and characteristics and existing sub grade type
and sub-soil conditions.

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

25.

Sub-grade Soil Testing. Necessary sub soil investigations to understand the physical
particulars of soil at site to enable proper pavement designs were carried out. All
investigations were executed in conformation with IRC, BIS codes and MORT&H
specifications. Test pits were taken along the road stretch at specified locations for the
evaluation of physical properties of the sub grade soil to enable pavement design. The size
of the test pit was kept as 1m x 1m x 1m. The representative samples of excavated soil
from each trial pit at depth intervals GL to 0.25m, 0.25m to 0.5m, 0.5m to 0.75m and
0.75m to 1m were collected in airtight bags and properly packed and were sent to the
laboratory for the required laboratory tests on these samples. The following tests were
carried out to ascertain the properties of the sub-grade, base and sub-base layers of the
existing road including thickness of different layers of pavement.

Grain Size Analysis


Atterberg Limits
Modified Proctor
CBR Values
Field Density and Moisture Content

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

Table 3-1: Laboratory Test Results for Sub grade Area Soil
Sieve & hydrometer analysis
Depth
TP
Gravel
Sand
Silt
Clay
No
Content
Content
Content
Content
(m)
%
%
%
1
GL-0.25
5
53
42
0
1
0.25-0.50
2
57
41
0
1
0.50-0.75
4
58
38
0
1
0.75-1.00
2
59
39
0
2
GL-0.25
4
53
43
0
2
0.25-0.50
3
52
45
0
2
0.50-0.75
7
48
45
0
2
0.75-1.00
7
58
35
0
3
GL-0.25
5
56
39
0
3
0.25-0.50
4
55
41
0
3
0.50-0.75
2
55
43
0
3
0.75-1.00
3
54
43
0
4
GL-0.25
0
54
46
0
4
0.25-0.50
0
58
42
0
4
0.50-0.75
0
57
43
0
4
0.75-1.00
2
60
38
0
5
GL-0.25
3
52
45
0
5
0.25-0.50
3
53
44
0

P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P

Optimum
Moisture
Content
%
10.2
9.5
9.2
9.4
9.7
9.5
10.1
9.3
9.5
9.1
9.9
9.6
9.8
9.2
9.3
9.1
9.7
9.7

Max.
Dry
Density
g/cm3
1.88
1.91
1.88
1.92
1.87
1.92
1.92
1.925
1.89
1.89
1.9
1.86
1.88
1.89
1.92
1.94
1.875
1.86

LL
%
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN-

PL
%

CBR
value

%
8.5
8.4
8.6
8.5
8.2
8.4
8.7
8.7
8.2
8.5
7.7
8.1
8.3
7.9
8.3
8.6
8.3
8.2

2.63
2.64
2.62
2.63
2.61
2.6
2.65
2.63
2.64
2.62
2.65
2.64
2.64
2.63
2.62
2.62
2.64
2.63

0.50-0.75

62

38

0 N-

9.1

1.93

8.8

2.62

0.75-1.00

52

46

0 N-

9.6

1.86

8.4

2.64

d
g/cm3
1.52
1.56
1.54
1.55
1.49
1.51
1.54
1.56
1.5
1.52
1.54
1.5
1.54
1.54
1.55
1.54
1.54
1.56
1.49
1.54
1.56

NMC
%
4.55
4.62
4.48
4.56
4.66
4.55
5.06
5.12
4.3
4.8
5.45
5.35
5.42
4.35
5.66
4.38
5.35
5.62
4.38
4.62
5.14

10

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

2.

Soil Testing for Embankments

26.

Additional tests were performed on identified borrow area materials, located at reasonable
distance from the project site to ensure suitability of fill material and stability of
embankment. Investigations to locate borrow areas for soil preceded the testing
programmed. Test pits were excavated in borrow areas from where material for
embankment was collected. The depth of each test pit did not exceed the likely depth of
the borrow pit by more than 15 cm as per clause 10.3.2 of IRC 19. Samples of soil to be
used in embankment were tested in the laboratory for the following properties

Sieve Analysis
Liquid Limit / Plasticity Index
Moisture Content - dry density relationship using modified Proctors Compaction
Soaked CBR at Modified Proctor Density

27.

The tests mentioned above are being carried out in accordance with the procedures laid
down in IS 2720 Methods of Tests for Soils. The test results of soil samples are
presented as per IS: 1498-1959. In addition to tests already mentioned, samples of soil to
be used in the top 50 cm of the embankment shall be tested in the laboratory for
determination of C.B.R. Value at 100 per cent standard Proctor Density and Optimum
Moisture Content, soaking the samples in water for 96 hrs. Samples of similar materials
shall be molded at different densities by giving different number of blows namely 25, 45,
55 and 65 following modified Proctors Compaction test procedure in a C.B.R mould and
soaked C.B.R. tested at different densities to develop Density Vs C.B.R curve. From this
curve C.B.R. at 98% modified Proctor Density shall be worked out. The C.B.R at 98%
modified Proctor Density shall be used for the design of pavement as per IRC: 37-2001
Guidelines for the Design of Flexible Pavement.

D.

Geo Technical Investigations for Foundation of Structure

28.

The geotechnical investigations were carried out to appreciate the subsoil layers and their
properties to facilitate finalizing the foundation type, depth, size and configuration.
Subsoil condition is analyzed along with evaluation of field and laboratory data for
determination of necessary physical and chemical characteristic of the in-situ soil strata.
Bore holes were taken at four locations within the stretch where pier/foundations are
planned. The bore logs details, test results and recommendations are given in Appendix 1
(Geotechnical Investigation Report).

29.

Objective. The objective of Geo-technical Investigations is to evaluate the following:


To ascertain the sub-soil strata at foundation locations
To study standing Ground Water Level
To study the physical and engineering properties of soil strata and rock strata (if
encountered).

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

To evaluate allowable safe bearing capacity and settlements of soils/rock to design


foundations for structure.
To recommend type and depth of foundation
To recommend improvements to the weak soil strata if any.

30.

Scope and Methodology of the Work. The scope of work includes taking bore holes at the
proposed flyover location and conducting the following Field (in situ) investigations and
Laboratory Tests.

31.

Field (In-situ) Investigations.


(i)

Drilling bore holes of 150 mm diameter to a maximum depth of 25m or minimum of


3m in rock if rock is encountered earlier.
(ii) Collecting disturbed and undisturbed soil samples at regular depth intervals
(iii) Conducting field-testing such as Standard Penetration Tests as per IS 2131-1981 at
every 1.5m depth intervals or wherever strata change is observed to determine N
values as well as relative density and stiffness of the soil strata.
(iv) To study and record the standing Ground Water Table Level.
(v) To ascertain the sub-soil strata and ground topography.
32.

All the details of geotechnical investigations are presented in the geotechnical report.

E.

Material Survey and Analysis

33.

As part of material investigation, source of construction materials like sand, aggregates etc
have been identified. The approved quarry details have been collected from the UP PWD.
Information on the source of construction materials and their properties were also
collected from the sites where construction work is under progress. Accordingly, it was
understood that, Yamuna Nagar in Haryana about 200 km away is a known source for
stone aggregates, Ghaghar, 180 km away and Haridwar, 160 km away are sources for sand
and Noida, 30 km away for soil.

1.

Cement, Bitumen and Steel

34.

Cement and steel with IS certification are available in abundance from the local market or
can be purchased from the manufacturers. Bitumen of 80/100, 60/70, 30/40-penetration
grades, Crumb Rubbiser Modified Bitumen - 55 grade and Polymer Modified Bitumen
SBS 70 grade are available from HPCL and HINCOL in Delhi.

2.

Water Quality

35.

Water used for construction shall be potable. Potable water is available around 1 km away
the junction location.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

F.

Identification of Utilities

36.

During site studies, the presence of following utilities in the area of proposed development
has been identified.

Table 3-2: Details of Existing Utilities


S. No
Utilities
1
Lamp post
2
Transformer
3
Telephone pole
4
Tree
5
Man hole
6
Electric pole

Number
33
7
1
36
22
51

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

4.

IMPROVEMENT PROPOSALS AND DESIGN STANDARDS

A.

General

37.

The junction caters for highly congested and crammed traffic throughout the day
especially during peak hours. Based on the results of the surveys and investigations
described in chapter 2 and 3 an arrangement best suiting to the traffic pattern is proposed
for improving the situation. Proposal is evolved giving due consideration to minimize land
acquisition. All the site constraints have been taken care while formulating the
improvement scheme. The main objective is to improve the present state of affairs
immensely and make the movement of traffic manageable to the possible extend, though a
fully conflict free situation cannot be realized.

B.

Geometric and Structural Design Standards

38.

Geometry of NH 24 has a mild curve in this stretch and hence the elevated structure also
follows a geometry having mild curve.

39.

As this project road falls within urban limits, relevant IRC design standards with due
consideration to the latest directive and guidelines of MOSRTH/IRC were followed, as far
as possible, while formulating the design standards. Other National and International
standards were also referred to wherever found relevant. Standards for the various
components are briefed below.

1.

Geometric Standards
IRC: 86 1983, Geometric Design Standards for Urban Roads in Plains.
IRC: 92-1985, Guidelines for the design of interchanges in Urban areas

40.

Design Speed: The ruling design speed of 100 Kmph is adopted for the flyover and at
grade roads.

41.

Carriageway Width. Based on the traffic requirement as per projections, four lane
configuration is proposed for the flyover and two lane width is proposed for the service
roads. Foot cum drain of 2m is proposed.

42.

Camber. Camber of 2.5% is proposed for carriageway of flyover as well as service roads.

43.

Super Elevation. A maximum super elevation of 5.6% is adopted.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

44.

Horizontal Geometry. A design speed of 100 kmph is proposed for the flyover and at
grade roads. The minimum horizontal curve radius proposed is 800m. The radius beyond
which super elevation is not required is 1800m.

45.

Vertical Geometry. Vertical alignment is designed based on the provision of IRC SP: 23.
Design of vertical geometry has two components, viz. design of gradients, and design of
vertical curves. Vertical curves were designed using a minimum K-value of 74 for crest
and 42 for sag for speed 100 kmph. A gradient of 3% is proposed at the location of
obligatory spans. Care was taken to limit the start and end gradients of the vertical curves
within the ruling gradient.

2.

Road Signage and Markings

46.

Proper signage and markings are vital for safety and guidance of the drivers. Junction
improvement drawings shall show warning and regulatory signs at appropriate locations.
The signs are of reflector type to be noted easily at night. All road signs are in conformity
with the provisions of IRC 67 2001- Code of Practice for Road Signs and IRC SP 31
1992 - New Traffic Signs.

47.

Roadside lighting is provided for the flyover as well as service roads. Lamp poles are fixed
at the edges of flyover. The road markings are in conformity with IRC 35 1997 Code of
Practice for Road Markings with Paint and other IRC Standards.

C.

Structural Design Standards

48.

The basic design standards adopted for the structural designs are as per the requirements
laid down in the latest editions of IRC codes of practices & standard specifications and
guidelines of Ministry of Road Transport & Highways. Additional technical references are
used wherever the provisions of IRC/IS codes are found inadequate.

49.

Following IRC/IS Codes are followed in the design


IRC:5 -1998
Standard Specifications & code of Practice for Road Bridges
Section -I. General Features of Design
IRC:6-2000
Standard Specifications & code of Practice for Road Bridges,
Section -II. Loads and Stresses
IRC:18-2000
Design Criteria for Pre-stressed Concrete Road Bridges (PostTensioned Concrete) (Third Revision)
IRC:21-2000
Standard Specifications & code of Practice for Road Bridges,
Section -III. Cement concrete (Plain and reinforced )
IRC:22-1986
Standard Specifications and Code of Practice for Road Bridges,
Section VI -Composite Construction (First Revision)
IRC:78-2000
Standard Specifications & code of Practice for Road Bridges, Foundations & Substructure.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

IRC:69-2005
Guidelines and Specifications of Expansion joint
IRC:83(Part-III)-2002 Standard Specifications and codes of Practices for Road
Bridges, Section IX Bearing , Part II: POT Bearings
IS 2911-1979
Code of practice for design and construction of pile foundations
50.

For the items not covered in the above specifications, provisions of following standards
are followed in the given order of priority:
Provisions of IS codes of Practices:
Relevant Provisions of BS codes of practices
Sound Engineering Practices, technical Literature/ Papers & Provisions of relevant
codes of advanced and developing countries.

D.

Details of Improvement Proposals

51.

Taking into consideration the volume of traffic and pattern of movement, for decongesting
the junction, it is proposed to provide a flyover along NH 24 which carries major share of
traffic. This also segregates the through traffic from cross traffic. In view of high volume
of traffic along this route, dual 2 lane carriageway separated by a central median is
proposed for the flyover structure. Each 2 lane carriageway, intended for each direction of
traffic, has a width of 7.5m with crash barriers of 0.5m width on extreme outer ends. The
central median has a width of 1m. The existing alignment of NH 24 is followed for the
flyover.

52.

The flyover is on structure except for a small length on either ends. Earthen ramps with
earth retaining structures on sides are proposed beyond the abutments on either side.
Minimum vertical clearance of 5.5m is proposed from the at grade road top to the bottom
of deck at the obligatory span locations at the junction.

53.

The proposed flyover has total length of 640m with 16 numbers of spans of 40 m each, 5
numbers on Shahadra Border side and 9 numbers on Chandra Shekhar Chowk side apart
from the two obligatory spans at the centre. The length of earthen ramp shall be 350 m and
200 m on Shahadra Border side and Chandra Shekhar Chowk side respectively. Thus the
flyover and approaches including ramp portion shall have a total length of 1190 m. The
obligatory spanso) at the junction shall have a length of 80 m (2 spans of 40m each).

54.

At grade road of 7.5m width is proposed on either side of the flyover as service road for
local and turning traffic. Footpath cum drains is also proposed at the outer edges of these
roads on both sides. The typical cross sections are shown below.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

Figure 4-1: Typical cross section of flyover

500

Foot path

2000

Service road

7500

7500

17000
1000

500

7500

500

500

Service road

Foot path

7500

2000

Figure 4-2: Typical cross section at pier

500

7500
CARRIAGE WAY

17000
1000

7500
CARRIAGE WAY

500

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

Figure 4-3: Plan at Pier


750

3600

3600

750

1200

8700

Figure 4-4: Typical Cross-section at Abutment


17000
500

7500
CARRIAGE WAY

1000

7500
CARRIAGE WAY

500

1200

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

Figure 4-5: Plan at Abutment

3600

3600

3500

3500

750

300
1

5100

3600

1600

750

750

750

00
12

E.

Improvements to Existing Traffic Regulations

55.

The proposal of flyover requires improvement and reorganization of the traffic


arrangement existing at the junction. The traffic shall be channalized ensuring proper
turning radius. To avoid conflicts between right turning traffic from Madan Mohan
Malavya Marg and Loni Road, signal control is proposed at the junction. Traffic
regulation arrangements like islands, signals etc. now present is reorganized to facilitate
smooth turning of vehicles.

F.

Right of Way

56.

The available ROW along NH 24 in the project site location varies from 36m to 39m as
per revenue records. The Right of Way requirement for the proposed improvement is
worked out to be about 40m.

G.

Salient Features of Proposed Flyover

57.

Various structural arrangement options were studied for the proposed flyover based on:
Functional requirement
Characteristics of subsoil
Facilities to be provided at grade
Ease in construction
Economy etc.

58.

Accordingly, the structural system was planned taking into account suitability of the same
at the proposed location, constructability, level of impact on traffic movement during
construction etc. Based on subsoil report and preliminary design it is estimated that a span

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

length of 35 to 40m will be economical. Considering the distance of coverage required for
obligatory spans, a span length of 40m is adopted there and the same span length is
followed for the entire length of the flyover. Thus, a total of 16 spans of 40 m length are
proposed for the elevated structure. The remaining portion is on earthen ramps on either
side.

1.

Superstructure

59.

As longer spans are proposed, pre-stressed concrete superstructure is adopted. The four
lane deck shall consists of 8 numbers of pre-cast post tensioned I- girders with in-situ RCC
slab. The girders are spaced at 2.2 m. Cross diaphragms are proposed at support locations.
The superstructure is supported by POT-PTFE bearings.

2.

Substructure

60.

The substructure proposed is RCC hammer headed piers with shaft flaring towards top
portion and straight portion below is proposed. Single pier arrangement is proposed for the
four line superstructure. Pier cap is cantilevered out to accommodate the girders. Height of
pier is based on the clearance requirement. Where vehicles are to cross below, the
minimum vertical clearance requisite of 5.5 m is ensured. At other support locations, the
pier height varies in line with the road profile.

3.

Foundation

61.

The foundation type depends on the subsoil nature and condition at the location. Four bore
holes were taken at 100m interval to get a fair idea of the subsoil composition and to
decide on the suitable founding levels. Various tests were conducted at the field and
laboratory to assess the subsoil composition and nature. Soil samples were collected from
different levels of the bore holes and tested in the laboratory to obtain the soil parameters
and properties. Based on the test results, it is found that deep foundation is required at the
location. As such pile foundation is proposed to be taken to an average depth of 25 m from
the ground level. The piles shall be of 1.2m diameter.

H.

At Grade Roads

62.

At grade roads with 7.5 m wide carriageway and 2.0 m wide footpath cum drains at the
outer ends are proposed on either side of the flyover to cater for the turning traffic from
cross roads. These roads are to be formed widening the existing pavement of NH 24; the
existing road level is kept for the widened portion also. The sub grade soil investigation
shows good top soil with 8% CBR where the pavement layers can be laid directly.

63.

The width of footpath has been derived from the volume of pedestrian traffic at the
location. The drain shall have a width of 1.5m and is placed at the extreme end of the road.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

64.

The pavement design is carried out in accordance with the guidelines of IRC 37 2002.
The results of the traffic survey and the projected traffic volume worked out in Chapter 3
are made use of in the pavement design. The design traffic is considered in terms of the
cumulative number of standard axles to be carried by the pavement during the design life
of the road and is derived from the initial volume of commercial vehicles per day, growth
rate, design life in years and the vehicle damage factor (number of standard axle per
commercial vehicle) to convert commercial vehicles to standard axles.

65.

20 MSA and 15 MSA are adopted for the pavement design of flyover and at grade road
respectively to arrive at the pavement layer composition.

I.

Utility Relocation Plan

66.

Proposal for shifting the utilities which fall within the project alignment have been
prepared. The details of utilities falling along the project alignment are mentioned in
Chapter 2. There are 33 lampposts present along the project alignment, which have been
removed, and lighting arrangement have been proposed in the flyover portion for both
flyover and at grade roads. The cost for new lighting has been included in the cost
estimates. There are 36 trees falling along the proposed flyover alignment, which have to
be felled during the construction phase. As a compensatory measure, it is proposed to plant
thrice the number of trees to be felled with site specific indigenous species and also to
transplant the small trees wherever possible. For all the remaining utilities, shifting
proposal is given in a separate drawing.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

5.

DESIGN REPORT

A.

General

67.

Detailed design of the proposed flyover has been carried out based on the data collected
during various surveys like topographical survey, geotechnical survey and also as
specified in the traffic study findings. Apart from different survey outcomes, the urban
environment of the area also played a major role in deciding the span length, type of
superstructure, shape of substructure etc. Latest versions of relevant standard codes of
practices published by Indian Roads Congress (IRC) and MoSRTH standard specifications
have generally been followed in finalizing the design concept and in the design of various
structural components.

B.

Structural Arrangement of Flyover

68.

The 4 lane elevated structure is proposed to have a total width of 17.0 m consisting of 7.5
m carriageway for each direction of traffic, 0.5 m wide crash barriers on either outer ends
and 1.0 m wide median at the centre. The alignment of the existing road is followed for the
flyover structure also. Vertical clearance varying from 5.8m to 6.8m is provided for the
obligatory spans at the junction proper. The obligatory span consists of two numbers of 40
m each. Post-tensioned I-girders with cast in situ deck slab is proposed as superstructure.
The girders shall be spaced at 2.2 m apart with cross diaphragms at supports. The cross
diaphragms shall be resting on POT-PTFE bearings. RCC hammer headed piers with shaft
flaring towards top portion and straight portion below is proposed. Pier cap shall be
cantilevered out to accommodate the girders. RCC trestle abutments are proposed.
Reinforced earth walls are proposed to retain earth behind the abutment and on sides of
ramp portion.

69.

The foundation system consists of bored cast in situ pile groups of 1.2m diameter with
average founding levels about 25 m below the existing ground level. Six numbers of piles
are proposed for the abutments and 8 numbers are proposed for piers.

C.

At Grade Roads

70.

The at- grade roads on either side of the flyover shall be of two lane configuration with
carriageway width of 7.5 m. Footpaths and drains having width 2m are provided on the
outer edges. Typical arrangement of flyover and at grade road is given in the previous
section.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

D.

Design Methodology

1.

Geometric Design Standards

71.

The geometric designs of the improvement proposal have been carried out following
relevant standards of IRC. The adopted design standards from the code are given in Table
5-1.

Table 5-1: Geometric Design Standards


S. No
Description
1
Design speed (Kmph)
100 Kmph
2
Lane width
3.5 m
4
Service Road
7.5m
5
Footpath cum Drain
2m
Cross-slopes
6
Structure portion
Carriageway
Road portion
Carriageway
7
Maximum super elevation
Plain terrain
Minimum horizontal curve
8
800m
radius
Radii beyond which super
9
1800m
elevation not required
10
Gradient
Max. gradient
Vertical curve K values
Crest
Sag
11
Crest curve/Sag curve
74
42
12
Vertical clearance
5.8m to 6.8m

Standard

2.5 %
2.5%
5.6%

3%

2.

Proposed Geometry

72.

Horizontal Geometry. A design speed of 100 kmph is adopted for the flyover proposed at
Mohan Nagar Chowk. The detailed Horizontal Alignment Report is given below in Table
5-2.

73.

Vertical Geometry. Design of vertical geometry has two components, viz. design of
gradients, and design of vertical curves. Vertical curves were designed using a minimum
K-value of 74 for crest and 42 for sag for speed 100 kmph. Care was taken to limit the
start and end gradients of the vertical curves within the ruling gradient. Details of
proposed vertical curves are given in Table 5-3.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

Table 5-2: Summary of Horizontal Alignment Report


S No Curve
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

1/1 (L)
1/2 (R)
1/3 (L)
1/4 (R)
1/5 (L)
2/1 (R)
2/2 (R)

Side

Ch Start

Ch End

Left
Right
Left
Right
Left
Right
Right

0+150.648
0+241.342
0+497.973
0+548.576
0+735.318
0+878.041
1+439.708

0+178.461
0+304.661
0+548.576
0+622.362
0+760.580
1+178.041
1+612.597

Easting

731849.108
731957.219
732206.865
732206.865
732430.94
732710.513
733208.391

Northing

3174648.163
3174656.694
3174674.406
3174679.593
3174690.751
3174710.882
3174683.084

Deflection
Radius Length of Tangent
Apex
Preceding Following Speed
Angle (Deg Min (m)
Arc (m) Length Distance Transition Transition (kpH)
Sec)
(m)
(m)
Length (m) Length (m)
0001907.388
5000 27.813
13.907
0.019
0
0
100
0002712.559
8000 63.319
31.66
0.063
0
0
100
0004329.433
4000 50.604
25.302
0.08
0
0
100
0005043.863
5000 73.785
36.893
0.136
0
0
100
0001051.335
8000 25.262
12.631
0.01
0
0
100
0701851.677
2350
300 150.204
4.795
0
0
100
1202256.023
800 172.889
86.782
4.693
0
0
100

24

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

Table 5-3: Summary of Vertical Alignment Report


Sl
No.

Element Start
Chainage (km)

Element End
Chainage (km)

Curve Start
Gradient (%)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

0+000
0+290
0+370
0+620
0+700
0+810
1+290
1+630
1+710
1+910
1+970

0+290
0+370
0+620
0+700
0+810
1+290
1+630
1+710
1+910
1+970
2+170

0
1.5
0
0.3
0
3
0
-3
0
-0.6
0

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

0+000
0+095
0+155
0+250
0+400
0+490
0+590
0+860
0+960
1+710
2+010

0+095
0+155
0+250
0+400
0+490
0+590
0+860
0+960
1+710
2+010
2+170

0
1.069
0
2.000
0
-0.3
0
0.6
0
-1
0

Curve End
Straight
Gradient (%) Gradient (%)
Flyover
0
1.5
0.3
0
0.3
3
0
3
-3
0
-3
-0.6
0
-0.6
0.3
0
0.3
At Grade Road
0
1.069
2.000
0
2.000
-0.3
0
-0.3
0.6
0
0.6
-1
0
-1
0.3
0
0.3

Algebraic
Length of Curve/ K
Difference (%)
Straight
value

Curve Design Speed


Type
(kmph)

0
1.2
0
-2.7
0
6
0
-2.4
0
-0.9
0

289.691
80
247.209
80
114.1
480
339.106
80
199.528
60
168.93

0
-66.66
0
29.62
0
-80
0
33.33
0
66.66
0

hog
sag
hog
sag
sag
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

0
0.931
0
2.300
0
-0.9
0
1.6
0
-1.3
0

95.745
60
92.168
150
92.643
100
267.44
100
749.308
300
168.93

0
64.42
0
-65.21
0
111.11
0
-62.5
0
230.76
0

sag
hog
sag
hog
sag
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

E.

Pavement Design

1.

Design of Flexible Pavement for New Pavement as per IRC: 37-2001

74.

Traffic Forecast and Design Traffic. Traffic data obtained from traffic survey and analysis
have been used for design of pavements. Out of the various types of vehicles encountered
during classified traffic volume counts LCV, Bus, 2-Axle and multi axle trucks have been
considered as commercial vehicles in pavement design. Table 5-4 gives the summary of
ADT obtained from the traffic survey for the proposed approaches to grade separators.

Table 5-4: Summary of Commercial Vehicles Average Daily Traffic (ADT) in 2008
S. No
Road Section
No. Of Commercial Vehicles per day
LCV
BUS
2 Axle
MAV Total
1
Approach roads to flyover structure
203
701
494
170 1568
2
Adjacent roads of flyover structure
68
342
584
216 1210
75.

Design Traffic in CMSA (Cumulative Million Standard Axles). The design traffic is
considered in terms of cumulative number of standard axles to be carried during the design
life of the road. Its computations involves estimates of the initial volume of commercial
vehicles per day, lateral distribution of traffic, the growth rate, the design life in years and
the vehicle damage factor to convert commercial vehicles to standard axles.

76.

Out of the various types of vehicles encountered during traffic counts and axle load
surveys, Light Commercial Vehicles (LCVs), Buses, 2-Axle Trucks, 3 Axle Trucks and
Multi Axle Vehicles (MAVs) have been considered as commercial vehicles.

77.

The following equation is used to compute the design traffic Ns, in terms of the
cumulative number of standard axles.
Ns=365x [(1+r) n-1]xAxDxF
r

Where,
r = Annual growth rate of commercial vehicle
n = Design life in years
A = Initial Traffic in the year of completion of construction in terms of the number of
commercial vehicles per day- The traffic in the year of completion is estimated using the
following formula:
A = P (1+r)x
Where, P = Number of commercial vehicles as per last count
X = Number of years between the last count and the year of completion of construction
Assuming the construction period as 2 years for construction of flyover, including time
taken for award of work the estimated traffic, A in the year of completion of construction

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

is given in the Table 5-5.


Table 5-5: Estimated traffic at the end of construction period
S. No
Road section
1
Approach roads to flyover structure
2
Adjacent roads of flyover structure

P
1568
1210

A
1694
1334

D = Lane Distribution Factor- Since the present study is for the construction of dual two
lane, D is adopted as 75% of the total number of commercial vehicles in each direction for
dual two lane.
F = Vehicle Damage Factor (VDF) - defined as equivalent number of standard axles per
commercial vehicle. It is a multiplier to convert the number of commercial vehicles of
different axle loads and axle configuration to the number of standard axle load repetitions.
If Initial traffic volume in terms of number of commercial vehicles per day varies from 0
150, 150 1500 & more than 1500 commercial vehicles per day, national average vehicle
damage factor as per IRC: 37-2001 is taken as 1.5, 3.5 & 4.5 respectively.
Ns = Cumulative no. of Million Standard Axles (CMSA)- The design traffic in terms of
cumulative number of million standard axle load repetitions obtained as per IRC 37 for a
design period of 15 years are given in the Table 5-6.
Table 5-6: Cumulative number of Million Standard Axles (CMSA)
S.
Road section
Cumulative number of million standard axles
No
LCV
BUS
2 Axle
MAV
Total
1
Approach roads to flyover structure
1.75
6.04
6.25
2.15
16.19
2
Adjacent roads of flyover structure
0.25
2.95
7.39
2.73
13.32
78.

Thus, from the above table the design traffic in terms of cumulative number of million
standard axles (CMSA) is rounded up & taken as 20 CMSA and 15 CMSA for Approach
flyover and Adjacent roads.

2.

Existing Sub grade and Design CBR

79.

Borrow Area: The samples collected from near by borrow area and shows good quality
soil which can be used for the sub grade. The 4 days soaked CBR value of the sample
tested found to be 8% and the same is proposed to be used for sub grade.

80.

Design CBR: Keeping in view the soil characteristic as stated above, the pavement for the
project road has been designed adopting CBR value of sub grade as 8%.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

3.

Pavement Design

81.

Considering the sub grade soil CBR of 8% and design traffic as given in Table 5-6, the
new flexible pavement thicknesses obtained for a design life period of 15 years as per IRC
37 works out as under in Table 5-7.

Table 5-7: Proposed Design of Flexible Pavement for a Design Life Period of 15 Years
Road section
Pavement Design Thickness (mm) for Design Subgrade CBR 8%
Design Trafic
GSB
WMM
DBM
BC
Total
Approach roads to
20
200
250
85
40
575
flyover structure
Adjacent roads of flyover
15
200
250
75
40
565
structure
Note: Above the existing road surface adjacent to flyover, flexible overlay of 40mm BC +75mm
DBM is proposed.
Figure 5-1: Typical Cross Section showing layers of Pavement Composition
BC + DBM
WMM
GSB
SUB GRADE, CBR 8%

4.

Structural Design Standards

82.

The design methodology is mainly devised from the method of construction proposed to
be adopted. Considering the intensity of daily traffic taking this route which warrants
speedy completion of the whole work, pre- cast construction method is adopted. The post
tensioned girders shall be casted in the yard and transported to the site and thus ensuring
minimum time for construction. Designs have been done for transfer and service stages.

83.

Loading Standards. The structural system is designed for loadings as per IRC 6: 2000. The
basic loadings considered are:

Dead load constituting of self weight of structural members


Superimposed dead load constituting of weight of wearing coat, crash barrier and
median
Live load constituting of loads due to 4 lanes of IRC Class A vehicles or 2 lanes of
IRC class 70R vehicles whichever produces the worst effect
Wind load as applicable to the site based on the height

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

Seismic load as per provisions in IRC code relevant for Seismic zone IV

84.

Condition of Exposure and Grade of Concrete. Due to presence of chlorides in the


subsurface water, severe condition of exposure is considered in the design. The minimum
grade of concrete and clear cover to reinforcement proposed is based on the severe
exposure condition. Design mix is proposed for all grades of concrete.

F.

Design of Superstructure

1.

Post tensioned Girders

85.

Grillage Analysis of Girder: A grillage model of the superstructure arrangement is


prepared. The longitudinal members of the grillage are formed by the main girders. The
cross girders and deck slab form the transverse members of the grillage.

86.

Section Properties. The section properties of various members of the grillage are
calculated. Area of cross section, Moment of inertia, location of centre of gravity etc is
calculated. A small value of torsional moment of inertia is used in the analysis to get
worse effects on the members. The members in the grillage are idealized in to the
following:
(i)

Virtual members: This forms the extreme edges of the superstructures. These edge
members are given negligible properties as to include them in the analysis to
complete the form but not to include its effect.

(ii)

End girder members: This represents the end girders on either side. The property of
this member is calculated by considering a T- section. The cantilever portion of deck
slab on one side and deck slab length equal to half the spacing between the girders
on the other side together form the flange of the T-section. At the locations of the
curves, the cantilever length of the deck slab is taken as the average cantilever
length at two nodes of each member. The web portion is constituted by the I-girder.

Figure 5-2: Typical End Girder Section


Deck slab
Cantilever
portion

(iii)

Half span
between girders

Mid girder members: This represents the intermediate girder. The property of this

29

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

member is calculated by considering a T- section. The deck slab length equal to half
the spacing between the girders on the either side forms the flange of the T-section.
The web portion is constituted by the I-girder.
Figure 5-3: Typical Mid Girder Section
Deck slab
Half span
between girders

Half span
between girders

TYPIC A L M ID G IRDER SEC TIO N

(iv)

End Cross Girder Members: This represents cross girders provided at the
pier/abutment locations. The property of this member is calculated by considering a
T- section. Effective width is considered based on the longitudinal girder spacing.

(v)

Intermediate Cross Diaphragm Member: This represents diaphragms provided at the


mid span of girder. The property of this member is calculated by considering a Tsection. Effective width is considered based on the longitudinal girder spacing.

(vi)

Other Transverse Members: The span of the grillage is divided into equal number of
convenient sections.(imaginary) The property of these members are calculated based
on its position and the spacing of this imaginary sections. Accordingly following
different entities are considered

Slab Adjacent to End Cross Girder: The property of this member is calculated
considering it as a rectangular section the depth being the depth of the deck slab
and the width being the width from slab edge to the mid of the spacing between
imaginary sections. The effective width of end cross girder considered in the
design is deducted from the width calculated for this member.
Slab Adjacent to Intermediate Cross Girder: This is considered only if the
intermediate cross girder is provided. The property of this member is calculated
considering it as a rectangular section the depth being the depth of the deck slab
and the width being the spacing between imaginary sections. The effective width
of intermediate cross girder considered in the design is deducted from the width
calculated for this member.
Middle Slab: The property of this member is calculated considering it as a
rectangular section the depth being the depth of the deck slab and the width being
the spacing between imaginary sections.
Intermediate Cantilever Slab: The property of this member is calculated
considering it as a rectangular section the depth being the depth of the cantilever
portion of deck slab and the width being the spacing between imaginary sections.

30

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

87.

End Cantilever Slab: This forms the corner members of the grillage. The property
of this member is calculated considering it as a rectangular section the depth being
the depth of the cantilever portion of deck slab and the width being half the
spacing between imaginary sections.

Loading.
(i)

Dead Load: The dead weight of each component is calculated from the area of cross
section calculated for each member. The dead weight of each member is applied as
UDL. Density of concrete is taken as 25 kN/m3.

(ii)

Superimposed dead load: Load due to crash barrier, median, wearing coat and precast panels is included in this. The loads are applied locally on the members on to
which the loads are transferred (separate analysis is carried out to distribute the
footpath load on different girders). The utility load is considered separately. Density
of concrete is taken as 24 kN/m3. Density of wearing coat is considered as 22
kN/m3. Utility load is taken as 2 kN/m.

(iii)

Live Load: Moving load analysis is carried out for both Class A and Class 70R load
cases (and their combination where required). Different positions of wheels in the
transverse directions are considered as to induce maximum effect. Two typical cases
were considered
The wheel was arranged at minimum distance (as specified in IRC 6-2000) from
the crash barrier edge.
The worst effect due the live load case was combined with the Dead load and
Superimposed dead load as to arrive at the design values of moments and shear.

Figure 5-4: Grillage model for superstructure analysis


156
312
155300
288143144311
154
299
142
287
276
310
131132
298
153
286
309
275
119120
130
297
141
285107108
118
264
308
274
296
152
106
129
284
273
263
140
307
95 96
295
117
28383 84
252
306
272
262
94
294
105
72
151
282
128
71
261
82
251
305
139
271
293
116
70
93
281
240
270
260
250
104
304
59 60
292
81
150
127
249
239
280
303
269
47 48
138
259
58
291
69
115
27935 36
92
228
258
46
248
238
302
103
268
290
80
149
126
34
237
57
278
227
267
24301
257
137
247
68
23 289
114
12
45
91
216
246
277
11
236
226
266
102
256
22
33
79
148
125
225
56
10
215
255
245
136
235
265
67
113
44
90
204
234
21
224
214
254
147
101
244
32
9
78
124
135
213
55
203
243
233
146192
223
253
66
112
145
43
180134
89
168
222
20
212
133
202
242
191
100
232
123
31
8
77
179
201
54
167
231
221
111
211
122190
241
65
121
42
88
178110189
99
210
19
200
166
230
220
109
30
7
76
177
98
165
53
219
209
97
199
229
188
64
87
41
176
198
18
164
218
75
208
86 187
29
6
85175
52
63
207
74 186
197
163
217
73174
40
62
162
17
206
61
196
185
28
51
5
173
195
161
205
39
50 184
49172
16
27
38 183
194
160
4
37171
26
159
193
25
182
15
170
3
158
14 181
13169
2
157
1

88.

Design of PSC Girder. The design of PSC girder is carried out based on accepted theories.
Following losses were considered in the design

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

Initial losses
Elastic shortening
Relaxation of steel (one part IRC 18-2000 clause 11.4)
Time dependent losses
Shrinkage of concrete
Relaxation loss (remaining part) As per IRC 18:2000, (Cl 11.4), three times
1000hr value due to relaxation is considered in service condition.
Creep losses
Long term time dependant losses: 20 % of total loss due to shrinkage, creep and
relaxation losses
Other effects
Differential shrinkage: The effect of differential shrinkage is calculated
considering a differential shrinkage strain of 0.00010 and reduction factor of 0.43.
Temperature effects: The effect of rise/fall of temperature is considered as
explained in IRC 6-2000. As per code specification (IRC 18-2000) 50% of live
load is considered in arriving at the stresses while considering temperature effects.

89.

The design has been carried for the worst girder. The design at critical sections like
support, L/8 etc are also checked to arrive at the number of strands to be de-bonded at
respective locations in case of pre-tensioned girders and to arrive at the cable profile in
case of Post tensioned girders.

90.

The design is checked for ultimate strength (moment and shear) in accordance with IRC 18-2000 Clause 12.

91.

Transverse Analysis for Deck Slab Design. The transverse analysis of the deck slab is
carried out using software. The slab is treated as a continuous member supported at the
girder locations. The self weight of deck slab is applied as uniformly distributed load on
the slab. The load due to crash barrier, wearing coat and median is considered as the
superimposed dead load. This is also applied as UDL, at respective locations. For the
application of live load, various possible critical arrangements of wheel loads are
considered. For different arrangements, the effective dispersion of each wheel and the net
distributed load is calculated. This load is applied as UDL over the worked out dispersed
area. The following cases of live loads were studied:
(i)
The maximum wheel load at minimum distance from the crash barrier edge
(ii) Maximum wheel load in the central span
(iii) Maximum wheel loads equidistant from one of the girders
(iv) One span loaded and the adjacent span with no load

92.

All the above cases are checked for Class A load and Class 70R load. An impact
percentage of 10 is adopted for the live loads. Combination of different live load cases
with the Dead load and Superimposed dead load is carried out. The following design

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

moments are calculated:


(i) Maximum hogging moment at the extreme support (cantilever location)
(ii) Maximum hogging moment at the intermediate support
(iii) Maximum sagging moment at mid span between supports
93.

The design is carried for the critical moment. The design is also checked for composite
action as per IRC 22-1984.

94.

End Cross Girders: End cross girder is analyzed as a continuous beam with loads from
dead load of longitudinal girder, deck slab, superimposed dead load and live load as
pointed loads at girder ends. The self weight of the Cross girder is considered as UDL.

95.

Loadings.
(i)

Dead Load: The self weight of the superstructure is considered as the dead load. For
RCC works the density of concrete is taken as 24kN/m3. For PCC and wearing
course works, the density is taken as 22kN/m3.

(ii)

Live Load: The design is done for two lanes of live loading. Worst case of the
following combinations is considere for girder design:
Two lanes of IRC 70R - near median on either carriageway
Two lanes of IRC 70R one near crash barrier and other one near median on other
side
Four lanes of IRC Class A near crash barrier
Four lanes of IRC Class A near median
Two lanes of IRC Class A near crash barrier
Two lanes of IRC Class A near median
Two lanes of IRC Class A near crash barrier on one side and one 70R on the other
side
Two lanes of IRC Class A near median on one side and one 70R on the other side

(iii)

96.

Impact: Provision for impact or dynamic action due to live load is accounted as per
Clause211.1 of IRC 6: 2000. The live load is incremented by the impact percentage.
For Class A loading the impact percentage is calculated as per the standard formula
in Clause 211.2 or Fig 5 of IRC 6:2000. For Class 70R loading impact is considered
as per clause 211.3.

Analysis of the superstructure is carried out on a FEM model. A grid model representing
the deck slab and supporting arrangement with truss members is developed. Analysis
model for transverse analysis of deck slab is also done in FEM software. Design moments
and shear forces are taken form the output of the software.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

G.

Design of Substructure and Foundation

97.

The design of substructure and foundation of the flyover is carried out based on IRC 62000 and IRC 78-2000. The latest amendments of IRC 6:2000, IRC 78:2000 etc are
adopted in the design. RCC hammer headed piers with flaring on the top portion and
straight portion below is proposed. Pier cap is provided over the flaring. Abutments are
designed similar to piers with no earth pressure forces. The effects of load from one side
span alone are considered in the abutment design.

98.

Primary Loads considered:


(i)
Dead Load: Vertical load due to dead load of the superstructure on the abutment and
the self weight of abutment is considered. The density of concrete is taken as briefed
above.
(ii) Superimposed Dead Load: Vertical load from superstructure due to superimposed
dead load is considered under this loading.
(iii) Live Load: Effects due to following cases are studied and worst case of these is
considered in the design.
Single lane IRC 70R placed at extreme end
Two lanes of IRC 70R
Single lane of IRC class A
Four lanes of IRC class A
(iv) Braking Load: 20% of the first train load plus ten percent of the load of the
succeeding trains or part thereof is considered for two lanes of loading in
accordance with Cl. 214.2.a of IRC 6: 2000.
(v) Longitudinal force due to bearing friction: The longitudinal force on fixed and free
bearing is calculated as per Clause 214.5.1.1 in IRC 6 2000.
(vi) Seismic Load (Longitudinal and Transverse): The seismic forces are calculated
using Elastic Response Spectrum method as per latest amendment of IRC.6.2000
dated 28.05.2009. The seismic force is calculated considering the respective Zone
factor (0.24), Importance factor (1.2), Response reduction factor (2.5 for abutments
and 3.3 for piers), Fundamental period of vibration, Soil type (Type II soil) etc. The
seismic forces in longitudinal and transverse direction are found out separately. The
design seismic force resultant in longitudinal and transverse direction is adopted as
prescribed in the latest amendment. Effects of Zone IV are considered in the design.
The live load effect is not considered in the longitudinal direction where as 20% of
live load is taken in transverse direction.
(vii) Wind Load: The wind force is calculated based on the wind pressure, in accordance
with the latest amendment of IRC.6.2000 dated 31.1.2008. Wind force depends
upon several factors like hourly mean wind pressure, solid area, gust factor and drag
co-efficient. The longitudinal (25% of the transverse moment) and transverse wind
moments are found as given in the code. Separate cases for upward and downward
wind load are carried out as per codal guidelines. The effects of wind load are
supposed considered in the design of substructure. Wind load is considered at the
centroid of appropriate superstructure areas.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

(viii) Collision Load: The collision load is calculated as per clause 225 of IRC 6:2000.
With these primary loads, the following load combinations are formed:
Case 1: Both Spans On.
o Axial load = Dead load of substructure + DL and SIDL of superstructure +
live load.
o Longitudinal Moment = Moment due to braking, temperature and shrinkage
Moment due to longitudinal eccentricity of live load + Moment due to DL +
SIDL of superstructure
o Transverse Moment = Moment due to transverse eccentricity of live load,
Dead load, Superimposed dead load
Case 2: One Span dislodged condition with Class A One lane.
o Axial load = Dead load of substructure + DL and SIDL of superstructure
(from one side) + live load.
o Longitudinal Moment = Moment due to braking, temperature and shrinkage
Moment due to longitudinal eccentricity of live load + Moment due to DL +
SIDL of superstructure
o Transverse Moment = Moment due to transverse eccentricity of live load,
Dead load, Superimposed dead load
Case 3: Both Spans on under seismic in longitudinal direction.
o Axial load = Dead load of substructure + DL and SIDL of superstructure +
live load (50%).
o Longitudinal Moment = Moment due to braking(50%), temperature and
shrinkage + Moment due to longitudinal eccentricity of live load (50%) +
Moment due to seismic force
o Transverse Moment = Moment due to transverse eccentricity of dead load,
superimposed dead load, live load(50%)
Case 4: Both Spans on under seismic in transverse direction.
o Axial load = Dead load of substructure + DL + SIDL of superstructure + live
load (50%).
o Longitudinal Moment = Moment due to braking (50%), temperature and
shrinkage + Moment due to longitudinal eccentricity of live load (50%)
o Transverse Moment = Moment due to transverse eccentricity of live
load(50%) + Superimposed dead load+ Moment due to seismic force
Case 5: One Span dislodged under seismic in longitudinal direction.
o Axial load = Dead load of substructure + DL + SIDL of superstructure (from
one side) + live load (50%).
o Longitudinal Moment
= Moment due to braking(50%), temperature and
shrinkage + Moment due to longitudinal eccentricity of live load(50%) +
Moment due to DL + SIDL of superstructure + Moment due to seismic force

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

o Transverse Moment
= Moment due to transverse eccentricity of live
load (50%), Dead load, Superimposed dead load
Case 6: One Span dislodged under seismic in transverse direction.
o Axial load = Dead load of substructure + DL + SIDL of superstructure (from
one side) + live load (50%).
o Longitudinal Moment
= Moment due to braking(50%), temperature and
shrinkage + Moment due to longitudinal eccentricity of live load(50%)+
Moment due to DL + SIDL of superstructure
o Transverse Moment
= Moment due to transverse eccentricity of live
load (50%), Dead load, Superimposed dead load+ Moment due to centrifugal
force (50%) + Moment due to seismic force
Case 7a: Service condition with Wind in Transverse direction (Wind load acting
upward).
o Axial load = Dead load of substructure + DL + SIDL of superstructure + live
load + Wind load acting upwards.
o Longitudinal Moment
=Moment due to braking, temperature and
shrinkage + Moment due to longitudinal eccentricity of dead load,
superimposed dead load and live load + Moment due to DL + SIDL of
superstructure + Moment due to longitudinal wind force
o Transverse Moment
=Moment due to transverse eccentricity of live
load + Superimposed dead load+ Moment due to transverse wind force
Case 7b: Service condition with Wind in Transverse direction (Wind load acting
downward).
o Axial load = Dead load of substructure + DL + SIDL of superstructure + live
load - Wind load acting downwards.
o Longitudinal Moment
=Moment due to braking, temperature and
shrinkage + Moment due to longitudinal eccentricity of dead load,
superimposed dead load and live load + Moment due to DL + SIDL of
superstructure + Moment due to longitudinal wind force
o Transverse Moment
=Moment due to transverse eccentricity of live
load + Superimposed dead load + Moment due to transverse wind force
Case 8: Effect of collision in longitudinal direction
o Axial load = Dead load of substructure + DL + SIDL of superstructure
o Longitudinal Moment
=Moment due to collision load in longitudinal
direction
o Transverse Moment
= Moment due to collision load in transverse
direction
Case 9: Effect of collision in transverse direction
o Axial load = Dead load of substructure + DL + SIDL of superstructure

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

o Longitudinal Moment
direction
o Transverse Moment
direction

= Moment due to collision load in longitudinal


= Moment due to collision load in transverse

99.

The design of the substructure is carried out based on the theory of sections subjected to
axial force and biaxial bending. Routines available in standard references are adopted for
finding out the stresses in steel and concrete at critical sections.

100.

Foundation. Depending upon the sub soil investigations, Pile foundations are proposed at
abutment and pier locations. Foundation depth is fixed at about 25m below the ground
level.

101.

Design of Pile Foundation. From the design loads obtained for piers and abutments, the
vertical and horizontal load distribution on each pile of the pile group is evaluated using
standards methods. All the load cases considered for pier design are considered for pile
design also. The loads and moments acting on the pile cap are transferred to the piles by
the combined stress equation. The lateral load coming on each pile for all load cases is
calculated and corresponding longitudinal and transverse moments are found depending on
the depth of fixity of piles. The horizontal and vertical loads on the pile are compared
with the respective capacities of the pile. The design is carried out using Standard Charts.

102.

Miscellaneous Design.
(i)
Bearings. POT-PTFE bearings are proposed considering bearing arrangement and
the envisaged loading. Details of loading and movements for various cases are
brought out in the bearing drawings.
(ii) Expansion Joint. Strip seal expansion joints of required movement capacities are
proposed. At support/pier locations, continuity at deck slab level is achieved
adopting the arrangement shown below.

Figure 5-5: Details of Expansion Joint


CRACK-INDUCER SLOT IN
SURFACING FILLED WITH
RUBBER/BITUMEN SEAL

103.

HIGH YEILD STRENGTH


DOWEL BAR WITH
SUITABLE PROTECTIVE
COATING

Detailed analysis and design of various elements of fly over summarised in this section are
presented in Volume V-A2: Detailed Design Report. Detailed drawings are given in
Volume V-A3: Detailed Drawings

37

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

6.

BILL OF QUANTITIES COST ESTIMATES

A.

Bill of Quantities

104.

Total item wise quantities for flyover are calculated as per the detailed drawings. Separate
heads for all different items of work is included in the BOQ. The major work items
considered are:
(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

(v)

(vi)

(vii)
(viii)
(ix)

Earth work
Excavation
Approach sub grade
Landscaping
Pavement works
Granular sub base
Wet mix macadam
Bituminous works
Wearing course over Deck slab
Concrete
PCC leveling Course
Reinforced Cement concrete
Foundation
Substructure
Superstructure Deck slab & Cross girders
Crash barrier/median/footpath/Parapets
Pre-stressed concrete
Longitudinal girders
Steel
Reinforcement
o Superstructure
o Substructure
o Foundation
Pile liner plate
Traffic Signages, Road Marking and other Appurtenances
Electrical works
Miscellaneous items
Bearings
Expansion joints
RE wall structure
Drainage spouts
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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol VA-1 (15 Jul 10)

B.

Rates Analysis

105.

The unit rates shall be arrived by considering the basic rates, lead distances, man power,
machinery, and materials. The unit rate for every individual item will be arrived based on
MORTH schedule of rates applicable and standard schedule of rates for Uttar Pradesh for
the district Gaziabad 2008. For items of work with no rates specified in the schedule of
rates, market rates are obtained and used.

C.

Estimated Costs

106.

Costs summary of the proposed project of flyover construction at Mohan Nagar is present
in the following Table 6-1. The total cost is estimated as INR 513.5 million.

Table 6-1: Summary of Cost Estimates


Bill No. Bill name
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

107.

Site Clearance and Dismantling


Earthwork
Sub-base and Base-courses
Bituminous Works
Flyover
Traffic Signages, Road Marking and Other Appurtenances
Drainage and Protective Works, Ducts & Other Services
Electrical Works
Total Construction Cost

Amount (INR)
168,394.00
4,768,367.00
30,497,551.00
27,862,232.00
422,521,116.00
950,674.00
22,552,630.00
4,165,144.00
513,486,108.00

Detailed item-wise estimated, bill of quantities and rate analysis is presented in Volume
V-A4: Detailed Estimates.

39

APPENDICES

REPORT ON GEOTECHNICAL &


MATERIAL INVESTIGATION

PART-I
GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION WORK FOR
PROPOSED FLYOVER AT MOHAN NAGAR
CONTENTS
SL. No.
1.0

CHAPTER

PAGE NO.

Findings

20-24

1.3

Computations of Safe /Allowable Bearing Capacity

24-25

1.4

Conclusion with Recommendations

25-26

Bore Log Tables

27-30

SPT Curves

31-34

Grain Size Curves

35-38

Sample Calculation

39-40

Subsoil Profile

41

Chemical Test on ground water

42

Chemical Test on subsoil sample

43

19

REPORT ON GEOTECHNICAL &


MATERIAL INVESTIGATION

Summary of Borehole:
Sl.

Bore Hole

No.

No.

Ground R.L.

Depth of

Total Depth

Depth of

Overburden

(m)

Ground Water

soil

Table (m)

1.

BH-1

212.105

25.0

25.0

21.0

2.

BH-2

212.108

25.0

25.0

21.0

3.

BH-3

211.995

25.0

25.0

21.0

4.

BH-4

212.094

25.0

25.0

21.0

1.0 FINDINGS OF GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION


1.1

The classification of subsoil strata met at this site was done according to

IS:1498-1970. From the bore logs enclosed with the report, the test results can be
summarized as belowBH-1 (G.R.L. 212.105)
The subsoil strata from 0.0 to 1.50m depth consists of filled up, from 1.50m to 7.0m,
10.0m to 12.0m & 13.0m to 25.0m depths consist of silty sand classified as SM, from
7.0m to 9.0m & 12.0m to 13.0m depths consist of sandy silt classified as ML and from
9.0m to 10.0m depth consists of sandy silt with clay
classified as ML-CL.

BH-2 (G.R.L. 212.108)


The subsoil strata from 0.0 to 1.50m depth consists of filled up, from 1.50m to 4.0m,
6.0m to 7.0m, 10.0m to 12.0m & 15.0m to 18.0m depths consist of sandy silt classified
as ML, from 4.0m to 6.0m, 7.0m 10.0m, 12.0m to15.0m & 18.0m to 21.0m depths consist
of sandy silt with clay classified as ML-CL and from 21.0m to 25.0m depth consists of
clayey silt classified as CL.

20

REPORT ON GEOTECHNICAL &


MATERIAL INVESTIGATION

BH-3 (G.R.L. 211.995)


The subsoil strata from 0.0 to 1.50m depth consists of filled up, from 1.50m to 6.0m
depth consists of silty sand classified as of SM, from 6.0m to 10.0m, 12.0m to 13.0m &
18.0m to 19.0m depths consist of fine sand classified as SP-SM, from 10.0m to 12.0m &
16.0m to 18.0m depths consist of silty gravels classified as GM, from 13.0m to 15.0m
depth consists sandy silt classified as ML, from 15.0m to 16.0m & 19.0m to 21.0m
depths consist of sandy silt with clay classified as ML-CL and from 21.0m to 25.0m depth
consists of silty sand with gravels classified as SM.

BH-4 (G.R.L. 212.094)


The subsoil strata from 0.0 to 8.0m & 20.0m to 24.0m depths consists of silty sand
classified as of SM, from 8.0m to 17.0m & 24.0m to 25.0m depths consist of sandy silt
classified as ML, from 17.0m to 20.0m depth consists silty gravels classified as GM.
In general the subsoil strata at this site comprise of silty sand and sandy silt below
filled up layer. Thin Layers of sandy silt with clay, clayey silt, fine sand and silty
gravels are also present at different depths.
the subsoil strata are medium dense to dense up to the depth of exploration.
The Detail description of subsoil strata encountered along with various
laboratory test results are presented in the respective bore log enclosed with this
report.
The subsoil profile depicting the distribution of the various subsoil strata along with
N values (observed/corrected) and other strength parameters with depth are given in
subsoil profile enclosed with this report. The SPT Curves (No/Nc), Grain Size Analysis
Curves etc. are enclosed with this report.
The layer wise properties of the encountered subsoil strata at this site may be
adopted from the following table no. 1.
Table no.1 layer wise properties of subsoil strata at the site
Sl.

Depth (m)

Jeff

No.

From

To

Kg/cm2

degree

gm/cc

1.

0.0

3.0

0.05

29.0

1.60

21

K0

Ka

Kp

0.515

0.347

2.88

REPORT ON GEOTECHNICAL &


MATERIAL INVESTIGATION

2.

3.0

7.0

0.05

30.5

1.65

0.492

0.327

3.06

3.

7.0

16.0

0.0

31.5

1.68

0.477

0.314

3.19

4.

16.0

18.0

0.0

33.5

1.98

0.448

0.289

3.46

5.

18.0

21.0

0.0

33.5

1.0

0.448

0.289

3.46

6.

21.0

25.0

0.0

33.0

1.0

0.455

0.295

3.39

Where
C &  Shear Parameters
K0, Ka, Kp Earth Pressure Coefficients at rest, in active case & in passive Case.
The depth wise lowest SPT values N (observed/corrected) at the site may be
adopted from the following table no.2

Table No.2 Depth wise lowest observed/corrected SPT Values at the site

Sl. No.

Depth below
existing

Lowest SPT Values


Observed

Corrected

ground level

Effective
density
gm/cc

(m)
1

1.5

10

14.8

1.60

3.0

18

22.4

1.65

4.5

18

19.9

1.65

6.0

20

20.2

1.65

7.5

26

24.2

1.68

9.0

21

18.3

1.68

10.5

25

20.4

1.68

12.0

26

20.1

1.68

13.5

28

20.5

1.68

10

15.0

27

18.8

1.68

11

16.5

35

23.0

1.98

12

18.0

42

26.2

1.98

22

REPORT ON GEOTECHNICAL &


MATERIAL INVESTIGATION

13

19.5

48

21.8

1.98

14

21.0

51

22.3

1.0

15

22.5

56

23.3

1.0

16

24.0

54

22.4

1.0

17

25.0

68

26.0

1.0

The results of chemical analysis of subsoil sample are enclosed with this report.
The result of chemical analysis of subsoil sample indicate that the pH value,
sulphate content, chloride content are within permissible limit and the RCC work
prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement shall not be deteriorated when placed
over/within site subsoil.
The result of chemical analysis tests on ground water sample is annexed with the
report.
The results indicate that the pH Value & Sulphate Contents are within permissible
limits, the chloride content is on higher sides hence as per IS: 456, at the time of
placing the concrerte it should be ensured that total amount of chloride (Cl) of all
constituents of concrete shall be as per Table 7 of IS;456-2000.
1.2

GROUND WATER

The ground water table was encountered at 21.0m depth below existing ground level
in the borehole during boring activities at site. The measured ground water level may
fluctuate due to variation in climatic conditions and rate of surface evaporation.
However, for design purposes the ground water table may be considered at 15.0m
depth below general existing ground level as the ground water level may rise in heavy
rainy season/due to unforeseen reasons.
Depending upon the visual examination of soil & field strata, field and laboratory test
results and the type of structure proposed at this site The most feasible subsoilfoundation system for proposed structure at this site shall be Normal Bored Cast in
Situ RCC Pile Foundations. The details of these pile foundations are given as follows:

23

REPORT ON GEOTECHNICAL &


MATERIAL INVESTIGATION

a) Normal Bored Cast in Situ RCC Piles of 1.0m &1.2m diameter and of 15.0m,
18.0m, & 20.0m lengths below cut-off level with cut-off level at 2.0m below
existing ground level.
1.3 COMPUTATION OF SAFE LOAD CAPACITY OF NORMAL BORED CAST IN
SITU RCC PILE
The vertical safe load capacity of the Normal Bored Cast in situ pile foundations may
be computed as per IRC-78,2000 and IS:2911,Pt-I,sec-2-1979 using following
expression:
Qu= Qp + Qf
Qp = Ap.(c.Nc + Jeff. D. Nr + PD Nq)
n
Qf =  (Asi Ki. Pdi. tani + Di. ci)
i=1

Where, Ap = Cross sectional area of pile toe.


D = Stem diameter.
Nc, Nq, Nr = Bearing Capacity factors.
Jeff = Effective unit weight of soil at pile toe.
PD = Effective overburden pressure at pile toe
Asi = Surface area of pile stem for ith layer.
Ki = Coefficient of earth pressure.
Pdi = Effective overburden pressure at center of the ith layer
 = Angle of wall friction between soil & pile.
Soil Parameter adopted:
F.O.S. = 3.0in comp. & =2.5 in uplift
24

REPORT ON GEOTECHNICAL &


MATERIAL INVESTIGATION

and Qa, comp. = (Qp + Qf)/3.0


Qa, uplift = 0.5 x Qf /2.5
The safe lateral load capacity have been computed as per IS: 2911, Pt-I, sec-2-1979
as explained in annexed sample calculation.
1.4 CONCLUSION WITH RECOMMENDATIONS:
On the basis of above Geotechnical investigation the following recommendations are
suggested:
4.1 The subsoil strata have been described in detail in clause 1.0.
The safe load capacity of proposed Normal Bored Cast in situ RCC pile may be adopted
from the following table for design purposes.

Dia of Pile

Cut-off Level Length

(m)

below

Pile below

existing

cutoff (m)

ground (m)

of Safe Load Capacity of Pile (T)

In Uplift

In
Compression

In Lateral
Thrust

1.0

2.0

15.0

256.1

92.8

13.9

1.0

2.0

18.0

319.1

127.6

13.9

1.0

2.0

20.0

365.3

153.4

13.9

1.2

2.0

15.0

332.3

111.4

18.7

1.2

2.0

18.0

398.5

161.3

18.7

1.2

2.0

20.0

452.0

191.4

18.7

However before adopting the above values of safe load capacity of pile foundation
for design purposes, these should be confirmed through Pile Load Tests at site as
per IS: 2911.
1.5

The ground water table was encountered at 21.0m depth below existing

ground level in the boreholes during boring activities at site. The measured ground
25

REPORT ON GEOTECHNICAL &


MATERIAL INVESTIGATION

water level may fluctuate due to variation in climatic conditions and in the rate of
surface evaporation. However, for design purposes the ground water table may be
considered at 15.0m depth below existing ground level as the ground water level may
rise in heavy rainy season/due to unforeseen reasons.
The result of chemical analysis of subsoil sample indicate that the pH value,
sulphate content, chloride content are within permissible limit and the RCC work
prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement shall not be deteriorated when placed
over/within site subsoil.
The results of chemical analysis on ground water indicate that the pH Value &
Sulphate Contents are within permissible limits, the chloride content is on higher
sides hence as per IS: 456, at the time of placing the concrerte it should be ensured
that total amount of chloride (Cl) of all constituents of concrete shall be as per Table 7
of IS;456-2000.
1.6 The layer wise properties of subsoil strata may be adopted from table no.1 & 2.0
of clause 1.0.

26

S0IL
PROFILE

PROJECT: GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION WORK FOR FLYOVER AT MOHAN NAGAR


BOREHOLE NO
BH-1

GROUND R.L.
212.105
N
VALUES

R.L.

DEPTH

SAMPLE

DESCRIPTION OF SOIL

19

211.605

0.5

DS-1

210.605

1.5

SPT-1

209.605

2.5

UDS-1

21

209.105

3.0

SPT-2

23

207.605

4.5

SPT-3

207.105

5.0

UDS-2

25

206.105

6.0

SPT-4

32

204.605

7.5

SPT-5

204.105

8.0

UDS-3

41

203.105

9.0

SPT-6

42

201.605

10.5

SPT-7

201.105

11.0

UDS-4

40

200.105

12.0

SPT-8

44

198.605

13.5

SPT-9

198.105

14.0

UDS-5

48

197.105

15.0

SPT-10

41

195.605

16.5

SPT-11

195.105

17.0

UDS-6

42

194.105

18.0

SPT-12

58

192.605

19.5

SPT-13

192.105

20.0

UDS-7

51

191.105

21.0

SPT-14

56

189.605

22.5

SPT-15

189.105

23.0

UDS-8

54

188.105

24.0

SPT-16

69

187.105

25.0

SPT-17

BORING DATE
09/09 TO 11/09/2009

GRAIN SIZE ANALYSIS

IS CLASSIF -ICATION

LIQUID LIMIT

SHEET NO 27

TERMINAL DEPTH (m)


25.00

WATER TABLE (m)


21.00

PLASTIC LIMIT DRY/BULK DENSITY MOIST. CONT

GRAVEL

SAND

SILT

CLAY

gm/cc

SHEAR PARAMETER

TEST TYPE

SPECIFIC
GRAVITY

kg/cm2

deg.

Filled up

Silty Sand

SM

60

38

1.56/1.62

4.15

DST

0.05

30.5

2.64

Silty Sand

SM

55

39

1.61/1.68

4.26

DST

0.05

30.5

2.65

Sandy silt

ML

35

58

20

17

1.66/1.74

5.12

DST

0.10

31.0

2.66

Sandy silt with clay

ML-CL

20

67

10

28

21

Silty Sand

SM

57

43

1.68/1.77

5.64

DST

0.05

32.5

2.64

Sandy silt

ML

44

56

Silty Sand

SM

56

44

1.68/1.78

5.82

DST

0.0

33.5

2.65

Silty Sand

SM

55

45

1.64/1.76

7.16

DST

0.0

33.5

2.65

Silty Sand

SM

54

46

1.65/1.85

9.26

DST

0.0

33.0

2.65

DST

0.0

33.0

2.65

2.68

Slipped

Silty Sand

SM

54

46

S0IL
PROFILE

PROJECT: GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION WORK FOR FLYOVER AT MOHAN


NAGAR
BOREHOLE NO
BH-2

GROUND R.L.
212.108
N
VALUES

R.L.

DEPTH

SAMPLE

DESCRIPTION OF SOIL

211.608

0.5

DS-1

210.608

1.5

SPT-1

209.608

2.5

UDS-1

20

209.108

3.0

SPT-2

26

207.608

4.5

SPT-3

207.108

5.0

31

206.108

6.0

35

204.608

7.5

SPT-5

204.108

8.0

UDS-3

38

203.108

9.0

SPT-6

25

201.608

10.5

SPT-7

201.108

11.0

UDS-4

52

200.108

12.0

SPT-8

47

198.608

13.5

SPT-9

198.108

14.0

UDS-5

49

197.108

15.0

SPT-10

51

195.608

16.5

SPT-11

195.108

17.0

UDS-6

58

194.108

18.0

SPT-12

62

192.608

19.5

SPT-13

192.108

20.0

UDS-7

70

191.108

21.0

SPT-14

69

189.608

22.5

SPT-15

189.108

23.0

UDS-8

78

188.108

24.0

SPT-16

68

187.108

25.0

SPT-17

10

GRAIN SIZE ANALYSIS

IS CLASSIF -ICATION

BORING DATE
12/09 TO 13/09/2009

SHEET NO 28

TERMINAL DEPTH (m)


25.00

WATER TABLE (m)


21.00

LIQUID LIMIT

PLASTIC LIMIT

DRY/BULK
DENSITY

MOIST. CONT

GRAVEL

SAND

SILT

CLAY

gm/cc

42

58

1.52/1.59

4.46

27

21

1.63/1.72

SHEAR PARAMETER

TEST TYPE

SPECIFIC
GRAVITY

kg/cm2

deg.

DST

0.05

29.0

2.65

5.28

UUT

0.45

14.0

2.67

0.50

15.0

2.66

Filled up

Sandy silt

ML

UDS-2

Sandy silt with clay

ML-CL

19

69

10

SPT-4

Sandy silt

ML

28

72

Sandy silt with clay

ML-CL

22

67

28

22

1.65/1.74

5.62

UUT

Sandy silt

ML

28

67

22

19

1.69/1.79

6.08

DST

Sandy silt with clay

ML-CL

21

64

10

29

21

1.71/1.82

6.25

UUT

Sandy silt

ML

20

68

21

18

1.73/1.85

7.14

DST

Sandy silt with clay

ML-CL

20

64

28

21

1.75/1.90

8.38

UUT

0.85

14.0

2.68

Clayey silt

CL

17

65

15

32

22

1.78/2.10

18.16

UUT

1.45

9.0

2.70

2.65

0.60

14.0

2.67

2.64

S0IL
PROFILE
GROUND R.L.
211.995
N
VALUES

R.L.

DEPTH

SAMPLE

DESCRIPTION OF SOIL

211.495
14

0.5

DS-1

210.495

1.5

SPT-1

209.495

2.5

UDS-1

18

208.995

3.0

SPT-2

18

207.495

4.5

SPT-3

206.995

5.0

UDS-2

205.995

6.0

SPT-4

20
26

204.495

7.5

SPT-5

203.995

8.0

UDS-3

BOREHOLE NO
BH-3

IS CLASSIF -ICATION

Filled up

SHEET NO 29

PROJECT: GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION WORK FOR FLYOVER AT MOHAN


NAGAR
BORING DATE

GRAIN SIZE ANALYSIS

LIQUID LIMIT

WATER TABLE (m)


21.00

TERMINAL DEPTH (m)


25.00
PLASTIC LIMIT DRY/BULK DENSITY

GRAVEL

SAND

SILT

CLAY

58

42

SHEAR PARAMETER

MOIST. CONT

TEST TYPE
gm/cc

SPECIFIC
GRAVITY

kg/cm2

deg.

2.64

90

10

Silty sand

SM

52

48

1.54/1.60

4.16

DST

0.05

29.5

2.65

Silty sand

SM

55

45

1.58/1.65

4.35

DST

0.05

30.5

2.64

Fine sand

SP-SM

86

14

1.60/1.68

5.08

DST

0.0

31.5

2.63

35

40

25

1.68/1.78

5.76

DST

0.0

32.5

2.67

1.66/1.76

6.28

DST

0.10

32.0

2.67

21

202.995

9.0

SPT-6

28

201.495

10.5

SPT-7

200.995

11.0

UDS-4

Silty gravels

GM

35

199.995

12.0

SPT-8

Fine sand

SP-SM

28

198.495

13.5

SPT-9

197.995

14.0

UDS-5

Sandy silt

ML

14

78

20

17

196.995

15.0

SPT-10

Sandy silt with clay

ML-CL

12

76

10

30

22

40

38

22

1.70/1.82

7.34

DST

0.0

33.5

2.68

27
43

195.495

16.5

SPT-11

194.995

17.0

UDS-6

Silty gravels

GM

49

193.995

18.0

SPT-12

Fine sand

SP-SM

53

192.495

19.5

SPT-13

191.995

20.0

UDS-7

Sandy silt with clay

ML-CL

17

71

29

21

1.74/2.07

19.28

UUT

0.80

15.0

2.66

60

190.995

21.0

SPT-14

58

189.495

22.5

SPT-15
Silty sand with gravels

SM

10

46

44

1.80/2.07

15.05

DST

0.0

34.5

2.65

188.995

23.0

UDS-8

70

187.995

24.0

SPT-16

74

186.995

25.0

SPT-17

S0IL
PROFILE

PROJECT: GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION WORK FOR FLYOVER AT MOHAN NAGAR

GROUND R.L.

BOREHOLE NO

212.094
N VALUES

R.L.

DEPTH

SAMPLE

DESCRIPTION OF SOIL

211.594
17

0.5

210.594

1.5

SPT-1

2.5

UDS-1

21

209.094

3.0

SPT-2

25

207.594

4.5

SPT-3

207.094

5.0

UDS-2

24

206.094

6.0

SPT-4

26

204.594

7.5

SPT-5

204.094

8.0

UDS-3

203.094

9.0

SPT-6

26

201.594

10.5

SPT-7

201.094

11.0

UDS-4

26

200.094

12.0

SPT-8

30

198.594

13.5

SPT-9

198.094

14.0

UDS-5

35

197.094

15.0

SPT-10

35

195.594

16.5

SPT-11

195.094

17.0

UDS-6

194.094

18.0

SPT-12

47
48

WATER TABLE (m)

25.00

GRAIN SIZE ANALYSIS

21.00

LIQUID LIMIT

PLASTIC
LIMIT

DRY/BULK
DENSITY

MOIST. CONT

GRAVEL

SAND

SILT

CLAY

gm/cc

SHEAR PARAMETER

TEST TYPE

SPECIFIC
GRAVITY

kg/cm2

deg.

DS-1

209.594

29

TERMINAL DEPTH (m)

BH-4

IS CLASSIF -ICATION

BORING DATE

SHEET NO 30

192.594

19.5

SPT-13

192.094

20.0

UDS-7

54

191.094

21.0

SPT-14

61

189.594

22.5

SPT-15

189.094

23.0

UDS-8

70

188.094

24.0

SPT-16

73

187.094

25.0

SPT-17

Silty sand

SM

53

45

1.56/1.62

3.76

DST

0.05

30.0

2.65

Silty sand

SM

65

33

1.62/1.69

4.17

DST

0.0

32.0

2.64

Sandy silt

ML

38

58

1.64/1.72

5.08

DST

Sandy silt

ML

34

59

21

18

1.66/1.75

5.72

DST

Sandy silt

ML

36

61

1.65/1.75

5.86

DST

Silty gravels

GM

12

30

58

1.68/1.80

7.36

DST

0.0

33.5

2.68

Silty sand

SM

52

41

1.72/1.98

15.22

DST

0.0

33.5

2.68

Silty sand

SM

53

42

1.74/2.02

16.14

DST

0.15

34.0

2.64

Sandy silt

ML

42

58

2.66

0.10

31.0

2.65

2.65

2.65

SHEET NO. 31

NO. OF BLOWS

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

DEPTH IN M

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

26

SPT CURVE
BH-1
Continuous line - Observed SPT, Dotted Line - Corrected SPT

100

SHEET NO. 32

NO. OF BLOWS

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

DEPTH IN M

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

26

SPT CURVE
BH-2
Continuous line - Observed SPT, Dotted Line - Corrected SPT

100

SHEET NO. 33

NO. OF BLOWS
0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

DEPTH IN M

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

26

SPT CURVE
BH-3
Continuous line - Observed SPT, Dotted Line - Corrected SPT

100

SHEET NO. 34

NO. OF BLOWS
0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

DEPTH IN M

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

26

SPT CURVE
BH-4
Continuous line - Observed SPT, Dotted Line - Corrected SPT

100

SHEET NO. 35

GRAIN SIZE ANALYSIS


Project: GEOTECHNICAL Investigation for FLYOVER at Mohan Nagar

Bore Hole No. BH - 1

100.00
90.00
80.00
Percentage passing

70.00
60.00
50.00
40.00
30.00
20.00
10.00
0.00
0.001

0.01

0.1

10

Particle size (mm)

Symbol

Description of soil

Depth (m)

Gravel
(%)

Sand (%)

Silt (%)

Clay (%)

Silty sand

2.50

60

38

Sandy silt with clay

9.00

20

67

10

Silty sand

20.00

54

46

SHEET NO. 36

GRAIN SIZE ANALYSIS


Project: GEOTECHNICAL Investigation for FLYOVER at Mohan Nagar

Bore Hole No. BH - 2

100.00
90.00
80.00
Percentage passing

70.00
60.00
50.00
40.00
30.00
20.00
10.00
0.00
0.001

0.01

0.1

10

Particle size (mm)

Symbol

Description of soil

Depth (m)

Gravel
(%)

Sand (%)

Silt (%)

Clay (%)

Sandy silt

2.50

42

58

Sandy silt with clay

14.00

21

64

10

Clayey silt

23.00

17

65

15

SHEET NO.

37

GRAIN SIZE ANALYSIS


Project: GEOTECHNICAL Investigation for FLYOVER at Mohan Nagar

Bore Hole No. BH - 3

100.00
90.00
80.00
Percentage passing

70.00
60.00
50.00
40.00
30.00
20.00
10.00
0.00
0.001

0.01

0.1

10

Particle size (mm)

Symbol

Description of soil

Depth (m)

Gravel
(%)

Sand (%)

Silt (%)

Clay (%)

Silty sand

2.50

52

48

Silty gravels

11.00

35

40

25

Sandy silt with clay

20.00

17

71

SHEET NO. 38

GRAIN SIZE ANALYSIS


Project: GEOTECHNICAL Investigation for FLYOVER at Mohan Nagar

Bore Hole No. BH - 4

100.00
90.00
80.00
Percentage passing

70.00
60.00
50.00
40.00
30.00
20.00
10.00
0.00
0.001

0.01

0.1

10

Particle size (mm)

Symbol

Description of soil

Depth (m)

Gravel
(%)

Sand (%)

Silt (%)

Clay (%)

Silty sand

5.00

65

33

Sandy silt

14.00

36

61

Silty gravels

17.00

12

30

58

Sheet No.39

SAMPLE CALCULATION FOR SAFE LATERAL LOAD CAPACITY OF BORED


CAST IN SITU RCC PILE FOUNDATION (AS PER:2911,Pt-I,sec-2-1979)
Location: Geotechnical Investigation for Flyover at Mohan Nagar
The safe Lateral load carrying capacity of Normal bored Cast in situ RCC
piles have been calculated using the following expression: T = 5 E.I/K11
Where,K1is constant given in table1,appendix-c, of above code
E is Youngs modulus of the pile material in kg/cm2
I is the moment of inertia of the pile cross section in cm4
As per IS: 456, 2000

E = 5000fck

Where fck is the characteristic strength of concrete of pile


Considering fck = 35 N/mm2

E = 500035 = 29580.4N/mm2
= 295804.0Kg/cm2

For Dia of pile,D= 120cm, I = /64x(20)4


= 10182857 cm4
K1 = 0.146
( for loose submerged case in worst subsoil condition.
Putting these values into the above equation-1, we get
T = 460.16 cm
From fig.2,appendix-c of above code for fixed head pile and L1= 0.0, Lf/T = 2.15
Or Lf = 460.16x 2.15 = 989.3cm
And from equation, Y = Ql(L1 + Lf )3/ 12EI, where Q is lateral load in kg
Adopting Y= 5mm = 0.5cm,we have
0.5 = Q(0.0 + 989.3)3/(12x295804.0x 10182857)
Or Ql = 18,666 kg = 18.7 T
As per above analysis, the safe lateral load capacity of subject pile may be
adopted as 18.7 T.

Sheet No.40
SAMPLE CALCULATION FOR VERTICAL SAFE LOAD CAPACITY OF
BORED CAST IN SITU RCC PILE FOUNDATION (AS PER IRC-78, 2000)
Location: Geotechnical Investigation Flyover at Mohan Nagar
The safe vertical load carrying capacity of Normal bored Cast in situ RCC piles
have been calculated using the following expression: n
Qu= Ap ( c.Nc. + r D Nr + PD Nq ) +  (Asi Ki Pdi tan + Di ci )
i=1

where, Ap = Cross sectional area of pile toe.


D = Stem diameter.
Nc, Nq , Nr = Bearing Capacity factors.
r = Effective unit weight of soil at pile toe.
PD = Effective overburden pressure at pile toe
Asi = Surface area of pile stem for ith layer.
Ki = Coefficient of earth pressure = 1.5
Pdi = Effective overburden pressure at center of the ith layer
= Angle of wall friction =
Ground water has been assumed at 15.0m depth.
Soil Parameter adopted:
Depth (m)

From

To

T/m3

Kg/cm2

degree

degree

0.0

3.0

1.60

0.0

28

1.5

28

0.0

2.0

3.0

1.60

0.0

28

1.5

28

0.0

3.0

7.0

1.65

0.0

28

1.5

28

0.0

7.0

15.0

1.0

0.0

28

1.5

28

0.0

15.0

25.0

1.0

0.0

28

1.5

28

0.0

*During piling process the cohesion less strata get loosened hence properties of loose sand
i.e. C = 0.0kg/cm2,

 = 28.00 have been adopted.

For pile dia= 1.20m, cut off level below EGL = 2.0 m
and length of pile= 18.0m
PD = 2.664 kg/cm2, Nc = 0.0, Nq = 16, Nr= 17.792, F.O.S. = 3.0in comp. & =2.5 in uplift
Applying above parameters in above equation, we get
Qu = Qp + Qf = 374.1 + 821.0 T and Qa, comp. = (374.1+ 821.0)/3.0 = 398.4 T
Qa, uplift = 0.5 x 821/2.5 uplift pressure of ground water
= 164.2 -5.0 = 159.2
(uplift pressure of ground water = cut off level + length of
pile assumed ground water depth)

Sheet No.42

CHEMICAL TEST REPORT OF GROUND WATER SAMPLE


Location: Geotechnical Investigation for flyover at Mohan Nagar
SAMPLE NO: 1

BORE HOLE NO: BH-1

SL.NO.

Name of test

Observed values

pH value

6.8

Permissible
values
>6

Chloride content

624mg/l

500 mg/l

Sulphate content
(as SO3- -)

51.7mg/l

400 mg/l

Sheet No.43.

CHEMICAL TEST REPORT OF SUBSOIL SAMPLE


Location: Geotechnical Investigation for flyover at Mohan Nagar

SAMPLE NO: 1

BORE HOLE NO: BH-4

DEPTH: 4.5m

SL.NO.

Name of test

Observed values

pH value

6.9

Permissible
values
>6

Chloride content

0.012%

0.2%

Sulphate content
(as SO3- -)

0.062%

0.16 %

www.WilburSmith.com

#8, Second Floor, 80 Feet Road,


RT Nagar Bangalore Karnataka - 560 032. India
w +91.80. 3918.7500 f +91.80. 2363.4097

NCR Planning Board


Asian Development Bank

Capacity Development of the National


Capital Region Planning Board
(NCRPB) Component B
(TA No. 7055-IND)
FINAL REPORT
Volume V-A2: DPR for Flyover at Mohan Nagar Junction in
Ghaziabad
Detailed Designs
July 2010

Contents
Appendix D-1
Appendix D-2
Appendix D-3

: Super Structure Design: Deck Slab Design


: Super Structure Design: Cross Girder Design
: Design of Substructure & Foundation

Appendix D-1: Super Structure Design: Deck Slab

Deck slab design


General
Slab is designed as one way slab spanning between main beams. The slab is
discretised into 8 beam elements for finding ouir sectional forces at various
sections in the transeverse direcrtion.
Live load calculation
Total width

unit in meters
8.5

Cantilever length
C/C of main beams(lo) =

0.8
2.2

C/Cof Cross girders(b) =

10

&GGFDUJWFXJEUIPGEJTQFSTJPO
Efective width

k* a*(1-a/lo)+b1

k depends on b/lo ratio


a = distance of the load from the nearest support
4.55
b/lo =
k =
2.6 Refer cl. 305.16.2 IRC 1-2000
LOADING - CLASS A WHEELED - minimum distance from the ker
Impact factor
Refer clause 211.2 IRC 6-2000
1.55
Impact factor =
1+4.5/(6+L) =
=
1.5
Tyre contact dimensions
0.5 x 0.25
b1
= Dispersion upto the top of the slab
= 0.25+2*0.065 =
0.38 m
&GGFDUJWFEJTQFSTJPOBMPOHUIFTQBO
Dispersion upto the bottom of the deck slab
= wheel dim. along span + 2*(0.065+0.24)
=
1.11 m
Maximum wheel load =
57
including impact =
85.5
Efective width for L1
a =
0.1 m
beff1
=
0.63
L1/contact area =
(incl. Impact)
122.62
Efective width for L2
a =
0.3 m
beff
=
L2/contact area =
(incl. Impact)

kN
kN

m
2
(kN/m )

1.05 m

73.11 (kN/m )

Efective width for L3


a =
0.8 m
beff
=
L2/contact area =
(incl. Impact)

1.70 m

45.21 (kN/m )

Efective width for L4


a =
beff1
=
L2/contact area =
(incl. Impact)

1m
1.798 m
85.5/(1.092*0.362)
2
42.84 (kN/m )

LOADING - CLASS 70R WHEELED - minimum distance from the ker


Refer clause 211.3 IRC 6-2000
Impact factor =
1.25
.36 x .263

tyre contact dimensions


Dispersion perpendicular to span=

Dispersion along span =


=
Maximum wheel load =
Load with impact =
&GGFDUJWFXJEUIPGEJTQFSTJPO
For L1
a =
0.72
m
beff1 =
1.67 m
L1/ contact area =
(Including impact)
For L2
a =
beff2 =

0.263+2*.075
0.413 m
0.36+2*(0.075+0.24)
0.99 m

85 kN
106.25 kN

64.18 kN/m2

0.99 m
1.83 m

L2/ contact area =


(Including impact)

58.69 kN/m2

LOADING - CLASS A WHEELED (For max: support moment


For L1 And L2
a =
beff =

0.9 m
1.76 m

L/contact area =
(including impact)

L3
0.4
1.25
43.70 kN/m2
60.49 kN/m2

LOADING - CLASS 70R WHEELED (For max: support moment


For both loads
a =
beff =

0.965
1.82 m

Load/contact area =
(including impact)

58.92 kN/m2

LOADING - CLASS A WHEELED


Impact factor
Refer clause 211.2 IRC 6-2000
Impact factor =
1+4.5/(6+L) =
=
1.5

1.55

Tyre contact dimensions


0.5 x 0.25
b1
= Dispersion upto the top of the slab (0.25+2*0.075)
=
0.4 m
&GGFDUJWFEJTQFSTJPOBMPOHUIFTQBO
Dispersion upto the bottom of the deck slab
= wheel dim. along span + 2*(0.75+0.2)
=
1.13 m
Maximum loat at mid span
Maximum wheel load =
57 kN
including impact =
85.5 kN
Efective width for L1
a =
1.1 m
beff1
=
1.83 m
L1/contact area =
2
(incl. Impact)
41.35 (kN/m )
Efective width for L2
a =
0.7 m
beff
=
L2/contact area =
(incl. Impact)

1.64 m

46.11 (kN/m )

LOADING - CLASS 70R WHEELED


Maximum loat at mid span
Refer clause 211.3 IRC 6-2000
Impact factor =
1.25
tyre contact dimensions

.36 x .263

Dispersion perpendicular to span=

Dispersion along span =


=
Maximum wheel load =
Load with impact =
&GGFDUJWFXJEUIPGEJTQFSTJPO
For L1
a =
1.1
m
beff1 =
1.84 m
L1/ contact area =
(Including impact)
For L2
a =
beff2 =
L2/ contact area =
(Including impact)

0.263+2*.075
0.413 m
0.36+2*(0.075+0.24)
0.99 m

85 kN
106.25 kN

58.23 kN/m2

0.83 m
1.76 m
61.09 kN/m2

CLASS A

0.8000
0.1000

0.3000

1.0000

CLASS A + CLASS 70R

0.7200

0.9900

4@2.2

MINIMUM CLEARANCE FROM KERB END

MINIMUM CLEARANCE FROM KERB END

0.9000

0.9650

0.9000

MAXIMUM LOADS EQUIDISTANT FROM SUPPORT

0.9650

MAXIMUM LOADS EQUIDISTANT FROM SUPPORT

0.8300

1.1000
1.1000

0.7000

MAXIMUM LOAD AT MID SPAN

MAXIMUM LOAD AT MID SPAN

FIG. 2 LOAD ARRANGEMENT FOR TRANSVERSE ANALYSIS


GIRDER SPACING - 2.2m

STAAD INPUT
STAAD PLANE TRANSVERSE ANALYSIS OF DECK
UNIT METER KNS
PAGE LENGTH 100
JOINT COORDINATES
1 0 0 0; 2 0.8 0 0; 3 3.0 0 0; 4 5.2 0 0; 5 7.4 0 0
6 8.5 0 0;
MEMBER INCIDENCES
1 1 2 5
MEMBER PROPERTIES
1 TO 5 PRI YD 0.25 ZD 1
CONSTANTS
E CONCRETE ALL
POISSON CONCRETE ALL
SUPPORT
2 3 4 5 PINNED
LOAD 1 DL
MEM LOAD
1 TO 5 UNI GY -6.25
LOAD 2 SIDL
MEM LOAD
CRASH BARRIER
member load
1 UNI GY -6.25 0 0.5
5 UNI GY -6.25 0.6
WEARING COAT
member load
1 UNI GY -1.43 0.5
5 UNI GY -1.43 0 0.6
2 3 4 UNI GY -1.43
LOAD 3 LIVELOAD (CLASS A SINGLE LANE)
MEM LOAD
1 UNI GY -122.62 0.585
2 UNI GY -122.62 0.0 0.415
2 UNI GY -73.11 1.395
3 UNI GY -73.11 0 0.2025
LOAD 4 LIVELOAD (CLASS A DOUBLE LANE)
MEM LOAD
1 UNI GY -122.62 0.585
2 UNI GY -122.62 0.0 0.415
2 UNI GY -73.11 1.395
3 UNI GY -73.11 0 0.2025
3 UNI GY -45.21 0.55 2.055
4 UNI GY -45.21 0.0 0.05
4 UNI GY -42.84 0.5 1.5
LOAD 5 LIVELOAD (CLASS 70 R MAX. SPAN MOMENT)
MEM LOAD
2 UNI GY -64.18 0.805 2.155
3 UNI GY -58.69 0.575 1.845
LOAD 6 LIVELOAD (CLASS 70 R MAX. SUPPORT MOMENT)
MEM LOAD
3 UNI GY -58.92 0.61 1.86
4 UNI GY -58.92 0.34 1.59
LOAD 7 LIVELOAD (CLASS A MAX. SUPPORT MOMENT)
MEM LOAD
2 UNI GY -43.7 0.655 1.945
3 UNI GY -43.7 0.255 1.545
LOAD 8 LIVELOAD (CLASS 70 R MAX LOAD AT MID SPAN)
MEM LOAD
3 UNI GY -58.23 0.55 1.65
4 UNI GY -61.09 0.165 1.505
LOAD 9 LIVELOAD (CLASS A MAX LOAD AT MID SPAN)

MEM LOAD
3 UNI GY -41.35 0.555 1.645
4 UNI GY -46.11 0.035 1.375
LOAD COMBINATION 10
1 1 2 1 3 1
LOAD COMBINATION 11
1 1 2 1 4 1
LOAD COMBINATION 12
1 1 2 1 5 1
LOAD COMBINATION 13
1 1 2 1 6 1
LOAD COMBINATION 14
1 1 2 1 7 1
LOAD COMBINATION 15
1 1 2 1 8 1
LOAD COMBINATION 16
1 1 2 1 9 1
PERFORM ANALYSIS
PRINT MEMBER FORCES MEMB
PRINT MAX FORCE ENVELOPE
LOAD LIST 10 TO 16
SEC 0.001 0.999 MEM 1 TO 5
PRINT SECTION FORCES
SEC .25 .5 .75 MEM 2 TO 4
PRINT SECTION FORCES
Print section forces
FINISH

Member numbers

1 kNm0
6.617
1.000
kNm
0 kNm0
kNmkNm

BMD Envelope
`

2
3.269 kNm
-16.748 kNm

28.811 kNm

3
3.583 kNm
-14.325 kNm

27.882 kNm
-2.306 kNm

4
3.746 kNm
-16.833 kNm

5 kNmkNm
6.695
1.885
0
kNmkNm
0
0 kNm

Design of section
Material properties and design constants
Concrete
M50
m
10
Steel
Fe415 V c (MPa) 16.67
V st (MPa) 200

k
j
Q (MPa)

0.455
0.848
3.21

The design is carried out for maximum bending moments at the following locations
(a) Cantilever support (hogging)
(b) Intermediate support (hogging)
(c) Mid span moment (sagging)
The design moments have been taken from staad Output
Refer to the staad details attached
Design
(a) Cantilever support (hogging)
Maximum moment =
Depth required =
Provided depth
Provided depth enough
Steel requirement
Ast =
provide 10mm bars at 150mm c/c
Bar area =
Steel provided
Design
(b) Intermediate support (hogging)
Maximum moment =
Depth required =
Provided depth
Provided depth enough

At support
7
kNm
47
mm
192

215

mm2

78.5
524

mm2
mm2

29.00
95
192

kNm
mm

890

mm2

201
1340

mm2
mm2

Bar area =
Steel provided
(c) Mid span moment (sagging)

113
754

mm2
mm2

Maximum moment =
Depth required =
Provided depth
Provided depth enough

23
85
192

kNm
mm

706

mm

201
1340

mm2
2
mm

Steel requirement
Ast =
provide 16 mm bars at 150mm c/c
Bar area =
Steel provided

Steel requirement
Ast =
provide 16 mm bars at 150mm c/c
Bar area =
Steel provided

(Load combination 13)

(Load combination 13)

Distribution steel
Design moment = 0.3*Llmoment + 0.2* DL moment
Maz live load moment
26 kNm
Maz dead load moment
6 kNm
Design moment =
9
2
Ast required
296.29 mm
2
0.12% of Cross sectional area =
300 mm
Provide 10mm dia bars
2
Bar Area =
78.5 mm
Spacing
261.6667
Provide 10mm bars at 175mm c/c

Depth
Cover

250
50

STRUCTURAL DATA.(Mid Girder)


Span of Bridge
=
39520 mm
(length of girder)
Centre to centre of bearing
=
38440 mm
Carriageway Width
=
15 mm
19760
Width of footpath
=
0 mm
19220
Width of crash barrier
=
500 mm
540
O/O of Parapet
=
17000 mm
Depth of Deck Slab
=
250 mm
Overall Depth of the Girder
=
2200 mm
C/C distance between the girders
=
2200 mm
Cantilever distance beyond end girder
=
800 mm
Web thickness (Running X n )
=
350 mm
Web thickness (End Block X n )
=
700 mm
Thickness of End Diaphragm
=
800 mm
Thickness of Intermediate Diaphragm
=
300 mm
3
Density of Concrete
=
2.5 T/m
Grade of Concrete Used
=
500
M
2
Characteristic Compressive Strength
=
500 Kg/cm
2
Permissible stress in Concrete.
=
165 Kg/cm
Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete "Ec"
=
353553.3906
5000 x fck Mpa
Grade of Steel Used
=
Fe-415
2
Yield strength of Steel
=
2000 Kg/cm
2
Modulus of Elasticity of Steel "Es"
=
2.0E+06 Kg/cm
(Vide Cl:10.1.1 of I.R.C:-18-2000)
Referances :
I.R.C :18 - 2000 - Design Criteria for Prestressed Concrete Road Bridges (Post Tensioned)
I.R.C :6 - 2000 - For Loads and Stresses
I.R.C :21 - 2000 - For Plain and Reinforced Cement Concrete.
SECTION PROPERTIES
Section properties for the grillage members with proper sketches are calculated below.
a) Simple Section at Mid span

700
350

175
2

2200

175
150
150

1450

6
4

150

350
175

300
175

700

1) Moment of Inertia. (I
Sl
Description
1)
35
2)
70
3) ( 17.5
4) ( 17.5
5)
70
6) ( 0
7)
0

x
x
x
x
x
x
x

ZZ )

Nos

175.0
15.0
15.0)/2
15 )/2
30
145)/
15

x
x
x
x
x
x
x

1
1
2
2
1
2
2

=
=
=
=
=
=
=

Total
Distance of N.A from bottom "Vb"

Distance of N.A from top "Vt"


Moment of Inertia about N.A "Izz"

Section Modulus about top "Zt"

=
=
=
=
=

Section Modulus about bottom "Zb"

Area

Ax

Ax 2

Iself

6125.00
1050.00
262.50
262.50
2100.00
0.00
0.00

117.50
212.50
200.00
35.00
15.00
93.33
37.50

7.2.E+05
2.2.E+05
5.3.E+04
9.2.E+03
3.2.E+04
0.0.E+00
0.0.E+00

8.5.E+07
4.7.E+07
1.1.E+07
3.2.E+05
4.7.E+05
0.0.E+00
0.0.E+00

1.6.E+07
2.0.E+04
3.3.E+03
3.3.E+03
1.6.E+05
0.0.E+00
0.0.E+00

1.4.E+08

1.6.E+07

9800.00
= 1036000
Ax
A
9800
220
105.714
2
Ax
Iself
+
15815260.42
+
1.4E+08
4
4.96E+07 cm
Iself
= 5E+07
114.286
Vt
= 5E+07
Iself
Vb
105.714

=
=
-(
-(

1.0.E+06
105.7142857 cms

114.2857143 cms
Ax
x
Vb )
1036000
x 105.7142857 )

433708.3333 cm

468873.8739 cm

b) Simple section at end Block

2200
1

700
1) Moment of Inertia. (I
Sl
Description
1)

ZZ )

70
x
220
x
Total
Distance of N.A from bottom "Vb"
Distance of N.A from top "Vt"
Moment of Inertia about N.A "Izz"

Nos
1

Area
=
=
=
=
=
=

15400.00
110.00
15400.00
= 1694000
Ax
A
15400
220
110
2
Ax
Iself
+
62113333.33
+
1.9E+08
4
62113333.33 cm

Ax

1.7.E+06
1.7.E+06
110 cms

=
-(
-(

110 cms
Ax
x
1694000
x

Ax

Iself

1.9.E+08
1.9.E+08

Vb )
110

6.2.E+07
6.2.E+07

Section Modulus about top "Zt"

Section Modulus about bottom "Zb"

Iself
Vt
Iself
Vb

= 6.2E+07
110
= 6.2E+07
110

564666.6667 cm

564666.6667 cm

a) Composite Section at Mid span for end Girders


2200
1
6

250
150

150 x
2200

175

350
2

150

700
1) Moment of Inertia. (I
Sl
Description
1)
220
2)
35
3) ( 17.5
4) ( 17.5
5)
70
6) ( 70

x
x
x
x

300

ZZ )

25.0
175.0
15.0 ) /2
15 ) /2
30
15

Nos
x
x
x
x
x
x

Total
Distance of N.A from bottom "Vb"
Distance of N.A from top "Vt"
Moment of Inertia about N.A "Izz"

1
1
2
2
1
1

=
=
=
=
=
=
=

Section Modulus about top "Zt"

=
=
=
=
=

Section Modulus about bottom "Zb"

Area

Ax

Ax 2

Iself

5500.00
6125.00
262.50
262.50
2100.00
1050.00

232.5
117.5
200.0
35.0
15.0
212.5

1.3.E+06
7.2.E+05
5.3.E+04
9.2.E+03
3.2.E+04
2.2.E+05

3.0.E+08
8.5.E+07
1.1.E+07
3.2.E+05
4.7.E+05
4.7.E+07

2.9.E+05
1.6.E+07
3.3.E+03
3.3.E+03
1.6.E+05
2.0.E+04

4.4.E+08

1.6.E+07

15300.00
= 2314750
Ax
A
15300
245
151.291
2
Ax
Iself
+
16101718.75
+
4.4E+08
4
106482005.7 cm
Iself
= 1.1E+08
Vt
93.7092
= 1.1E+08
Iself
Vb
151.291

=
=
-(
-(

2.3.E+06
151.2908497 cms

93.70915033 cms
Ax
x
Vb )
2314750
x 151.2908497 )

1136303.182 cm

703823.172 cm

2) Torsional Stiffnesss ( I

XX )

2200
4

250
612.5

300
Refer EC Hambly's book on Bridge Deck Behaviour.
1450
Area 1
= 400133.0618
Area 2
= 1762379.284
Area 3
= 1175849.905
Area 4
= 1018103.009
4
6 I XX
= 4356465.259 cm

350
2200

=
450

641.67
b) Composite section at end Block for Inner Girders
2200
1

250
75
150

2200
2

0.0436 m

1) Moment of Inertia. (I
Sl
Description
1)
2)
3)

220
70
15

x
x
x

ZZ )

700
Nos

25
220
7.5

x
x
x

1
1
0

=
=
=

Total
Distance of N.A from bottom "Vb"

Distance of N.A from top "Vt"


Moment of Inertia about N.A "Izz"

Section Modulus about top "Zt"

=
=
=
=
=

Section Modulus about bottom "Zb"

2) Torsional Stiffnesss ( I

Area

Ax

Ax 2

Iself

5500.00
15400.00
0.00

232.5
110
217.5

1.3.E+06
1.7.E+06
0.0.E+00

3.0.E+08
1.9.E+08
0.0.E+00

2.9.E+05
6.2.E+07
0.0.E+00

4.8.E+08

6.2.E+07

20900.00
= 2972750
Ax
A
20900
245
142.237
2
Ax
Iself
+
62399791.67
+
4.8E+08
4
123214594.3 cm
Iself
= 1.2E+08
Vt
102.763
= 1.2E+08
Iself
Vb
142.237

=
=
-(
-(

2972750
142.2368421 cms

102.7631579 cms
Ax
x
Vb )
2972750
x 142.2368421 )

1199015.258 cm

866263.5677 cm

XX )

2200
1

250

2200

Refer EC Hambly's book on Bridge Deck Behaviour.


Area 2
= 20556833.02
Area 1
= 1018103.009
4
6 I XX
= 21574936.03 cm
=
700

0.2157 m

c) End Diaphragm
Effective flange width = bw +( lo /10), as per IRC: 21-2000, for L beams.
x
= 1482.81 mm
1) Moment of Inertia. (I ZZ )
4
Area 1
= 5.7E+07 cm
4
Area 2
= 9.7E+07 cm
4
6 I XX
= 1.5E+08 cm
Torsional Stiffnesss ( I XX )
Area 1
= 1490900
Area 2
=
3E+07
3
6 I XX
= 3.1E+07 cm
=

0.31336 m

d) Intermediate Diaphragm
Effective flange width = bw +( lo /5), as per IRC: 21-2000, for T beams.
x
= 1482.81 mm
Moment of Inertia. (I ZZ )
250
4
Area 1
= 2.1E+07 cm
4
Area 2
= 3.6E+07 cm
4
cm
6 I ZZ
= 5.8E+07
Torsional Stiffnesss ( I XX )
Area 1
=
539101
Area 2
= 1749469
2200
3
6 I XX
= 2288570 cm
=

0.02289 m

3200
1

250
800

2200

800

1200
1

300

300

2470.55
e) Transverse Members
Moment of Inertia. (I ZZ )
4
6 I ZZ
= 0.00322 m
Torsional Stiffnesss ( I XX )
3
6 I XX
= 0.00643 cm

250

Summary of Member Properties for Grillage Analysis


Description
Area

Simple

Moment of
Inertia
4
m

Torsional
Constant
m4

Vb
in cm

Zt
3
in cm

Zb
in cm 3

m2

C.G from
Bottom
m

468873.8739

Running

0.9800

1.0571

0.4957

0.0000

105.7143

433708.3333

End block

1.5400

1.1000

0.6211

0.0000

110.0000

564666.6667

564666.6667

Average

1.2600

1.0786

0.5584

0.0000

107.8571

499187.5000

516770.2703

Composite Running 2&3

1.5300

1.5129

1.0648

0.0436

151.2908

1136303.1822

703823.1720

End block 2&3

2.0900

1.4224

1.2321

0.2157

142.2368

1199015.2582

866263.5677

For 2 &3

1.8100

1.4676

1.1485

0.1297

146.7638

1167659.2202

785043.3699

End Diaphragm

2.5600

1.4828

0.5773

0.3134

0.0000

0.0000

Intermediate Diaphragm

0.9600

1.4828

0.5773

0.0229

0.0000

0.0000

Transverse Members

0.6176

0.1250

0.0032

0.0064

0.0000

0.0000

Averaged

156
312
155300
288143144311
154
299
142
287
276
310
131132
298
153
286
309
275
119120
130
297
141
285107108
118
264
308
274
296
152
106
129
284
273
96307
263
140
95
295
117
84306
283
252
272
83
262
94
294
105
151
28271 72
128
261
82
251
305
139
271
293
116
70
93
281
240
270
60304
260
250
104
59
292
81
150
127
48303
249
239
280
269
47
138
259
58
291
69
115
36
279
92
228
35
258
46
248
238
302
103
268
290
80
149
126
34
237
57
278
227
267
24301
257
137
247
68
23
289
114
12
45
91
216
246
277
11
236
226
266
102
256
22
33
79
148
125
225
56
10
215
255
245
136
235
265
67
113
44
90
204
234
21
224
214
254
147
101
244
32
9
78
124
135
213
55
203
243
233
146192
223
253
66
112
145
43
180
89
168
222
20
212
133134 191
202
242
100
232
123
31
8
77
179
201
54
167
231
221
111
211
122190
241
65
121
42
88
178
99
210
19
110
200
166
189
230
220
109
30
7
76
17798
165
53
219
209
97
199
229
188
64
87
41
176
198
18
164 86
218
75
208
29
6
85175 187
52
63
207
74 186
197
163
217
73174
40
162
17
206
61 62 185
196
28
51
5
173
195
161
205
39
50
184
49172
16
27
38 183
194
160
4
37171
26
159
193
25
182
15
170
3
158 14 181
131692
157
1

Model

STAAD PLANE stage - 1


START JOB INFORMATION
END JOB INFORMATION
INPUT WIDTH 79
UNIT METER KN
joint coordinates
1 0 0 0; 2 0.54 0 0; 3 1.74 0 0; 4 4.94 0 0 10 34.58 0 0
11 37.78 0 0; 12 38.98 0 0; 13 39.52 0 0
member incidences
1 1 2 12
member property indian
1 2 11 12 pri ax 1.54 ix 0.001 iz 0.62
3 10 pri ax 1.26 ix 0.001 iz 0.558
4 to 9 pri ax 0.98 ix 0.001 iz 0.496
constants
e concrete all
poi concrete all
supports
2 12 pinned
load 1
member load
1 2 11 12 uni gy -38.5
3 10 uni gy -31.5
4 to 9 uni gy -24.5
Load 2 end girder
member load
slab
0.25*1.9*25 = 11.875
1 to 12 uni gy -11.875
pre-cast slab
0.05*1.5*25/2=0.9375
1 to 12 uni gy -0.9375
diapragm
joint load
1 13 fy -4.9
7 FY -16.5
load 3 mid girder
member load
slab
0.25*2.2*25 = 13.75
1 to 12 uni gy -13.75
pre-cast slab
0.05*1.5*25=1.875
1 to 12 uni gy -1.875
diapragm
joint load
1 13 fy -9.75
7 FY -33
perform analysis
PRINT MAXFORCES ENVELOPE
print member forces
print support reactions
FINISH

STAAD SPACE
START JOB INFORMATION
ENGINEER DATE 15-Dec-07
END JOB INFORMATION
INPUT WIDTH 79
unit kn meter
joint coordinates
1 0 0 0; 2 0.54 0 0; 3 1.74 0 0; 4 4.94 0 0 10 34.58 0 0
11 37.78 0 0; 12 38.98 0 0; 13 39.52 0 0
repeat all 1 0 0 -0.8
repeat 1 0 0 -2.2
repeat 1 0 0 -1.1
repeat 1 0 0 -1.1
repeat 1 0 0 -2.2
repeat 1 0 0 -1.1
repeat 1 0 0 -1.1
repeat 1 0 0 -2.2
repeat 1 0 0 -1.1
repeat 1 0 0 -1.1
repeat 1 0 0 -2.2
repeat 1 0 0 -0.8
member incidences
1 1 2 12
13 14 15 24
25 27 28 36
37 40 41 48
49 53 54 60
61 66 67 72
73 79 80 84
85 92 93 96
97 105 106 108
109 118 119 120
121 131 132 132
133 144 145 144
145 157 158 156
157 1 14 168 1 13
169 2 15 180 1 13
181 3 16 192 1 13
193 4 17 204 1 13
205 5 18 216 1 13
217 6 19 228 1 13
229 7 20 240 1 13
241 8 21 252 1 13
253 9 22 264 1 13
265 10 23 276 1 13
277 11 24 288 1 13
289 12 25 300 1 13
301 13 26 312 1 13
memeber property indian
end memebers
1 to 12 145 to 156 pri ax 0.001 ix 0.0001 iy 0.0001 iz 0.0001
end members outer girders
13 14 23 24 133 134 143 144 pri ax 2.09 ix 0.216 iy 0.00001 iz 1.23
end memebers inner girders
25 26 35 36 49 50 59 to 62 71 72 85 86 pri ax 1.95 ix 0.213 iy 0.00001 iz
1.11
107 108 121 122 131 to 132 95 to 98 pri ax 1.95 ix 0.213 iy 0.00001 iz 1.11
taper memebers outer girders
15 22 135 142 pri ax 1.81 ix 0.13 iy 0.00001 iz 1.145
taper members inner girders
27 34 51 58 63 70 87 99 123 94 106 130 pri ax 1.672 ix 0.127 iy 0.0001 iz
1.037
middle memebers - end girders
16 to 21 136 to 141 pri ax 1.53 ix 0.0436 iy 0.00001 iz 1.06
middle memebers - inner girders
28 to 33 52 to 57 64 to 69 pri ax 1.393 ix 0.041 iy 0.00001 iz 0.964
88 to 93 100 to 105 124 to 129 pri ax 1.393 ix 0.041 iy 0.00001 iz 0.964
memebers at bearing location

37 to 48 73 to 84 109 to 120 pri ax .0000275 ix 0.00286 iy 0.00001 iz


0.0000143
end cross girders
170 to 179 290 to 299 pri ax 1.76 ix 0.3136 iy 0.00001 iz 1.5
mid cross girders
230 to 239 pri ax 0.66 ix 0.023 iy 0.00001 iz 0.58
deck members near end cross girder
182 to 191 278 to 287 pri ax 0.435 ix 0.00045 iy 0.00001 iz 0.0023
deck members near mid cross girder
218 to 227 242 to 251 pri ax 0.935 ix 0.0097 iy 0.00001 iz 0.0049
deck memebers
193 to 216 253 to 276 pri ax 1.235 ix 0.0129 iy 0.00001 iz 0.0064
deck end memebers - along width
157 to 168 301 to 312 pri ax 0.0001 ix 0.00001 iy 0.00001 iz 0.00001
deck end memebers - along span
181 192 217 228 229 pri ax 1.235 ix 0.0129 iy 0.00001 iz 0.0064
241 252 277 288 240 pri ax 1.235 ix 0.0129 iy 0.00001 iz 0.0064
deck corner memebers
169 180 289 300 pri ax 0.62 ix 0.0064 iy 0.00001 iz 0.0032
Constants
E concrete all
Poi concrete all
den 25 all
supports
41 80 119 pinned
51 90 129 fixed but fx mz
load 1
memeber load
end members outer girders
13 14 23 24 133 134 143 144 uni gy -52.25
end memebers inner girders
25 26 35 36 49 50 59 to 62 71 72 85 86 uni gy -48.75
107 108 121 122 131 to 132 95 to 98 uni gy -48.75
taper memebers outer girders
15 22 135 142 95 to 98 uni gy -45.25
taper members inner girders
27 34 51 58 63 70 87 99 123 94 106 130 uni gy -41.8
middle memebers - end girders
16 to 21 136 to 141 uni gy -38.25
middle memebers - inner girders
28 to 33 52 to 57 64 to 69 uni gy -34.825
88 to 93 100 to 105 124 to 129 uni gy -34.825
memebers at bearing location
37 to 48 73 to 84 109 to 120 uni gy -6.875
end cross girders
170 to 179 290 to 299 uni gy -44
mid cross girders
230 to 239 uni gy -16.5
load 2
memeber load
crash barrier
1 to 12 145 to 156 uni gy -9.4
Wearing course
13 to 24 uni gy -1.65 0.5
133 to 144 uni gy -1.65 0.3
25 to 132 uni gy -1.65
median .3*25 = 7.5
7.5-1.65 = 5.85)
73 to 84 uni gy -5.85
DEFINE MOVING LOAD
CLASS A four LANES
TYPE 1 LOAD 13.5 13.5 57 57 34 34 34 34 DISTANCE 1.1 3.2 1.2 4.3 3.0 3.0 3.0
TYPE 2 LOAD 13.5 13.5 57 57 34 34 34 34 DISTANCE 1.1 3.2 1.2 4.3 3.0 3.0 3.0
LOAD GENERATION 60
a ECCENTRIC (near FP)
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -0.9 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -2.7 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -4.4 XINC 1.

TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -6.2 XINC 1.


TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -9.4 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -11.2 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -12.9 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -14.7 XINC 1.
b ECCENTRIC (near median FP)
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -7.6 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -5.8 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -4.1 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -2.3 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -9.4 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -11.2 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -12.9 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -14.7 XINC 1.
C ECCENTRIC TWO LANE (near fp)
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -0.9 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -2.7 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -4.4 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -6.2 XINC 1.
D ECCENTRIC TWO LANE(near median)
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -7.6 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -5.8 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -4.1 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -2.3 XINC 1.
CLASS 70R WHEELED
DEFINE MOVING LOAD
TYPE 3 LOAD 40 60 60 85 85 85 85 DISTANCE 3.96 1.52 2.13 1.37 3.05 1.37
TYPE 4 LOAD 40 60 60 85 85 85 85 DISTANCE 3.96 1.52 2.13 1.37 3.05 1.37
LOAD GENERATION 55
E 70R WHEELED + CLASS A (70R E1) (70R near FP)
TYPE 3 -13.4 0. -2.13 XINC 1.
TYPE 4 -13.4 0. -4.06 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -9.4 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -11.2 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -12.9 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -14.7 XINC 1.
F CLASS A + 70 R (70RE2) (70R near median)
TYPE 3 -13.4 0. -6.87 XINC 1.
TYPE 4 -13.4 0. -4.94 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -9.4 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -11.2 XINC 1.
TYPE 1 -18.8 0. -12.9 XINC 1.
TYPE 2 -18.8 0. -14.7 XINC 1.
G 70R WHEELED (on both 2 lanes near FP)
TYPE 3 -13.4 0. -2.13 XINC 1.
TYPE 4 -13.4 0. -4.06 XINC 1.
TYPE 3 -13.4 0. -10.63 XINC 1.
TYPE 4 -13.4 0. -12.56 XINC 1.
H 70R WHEELED (on both 2 lanes near FP)
TYPE 3 -13.4 0. -6.87 XINC 1.
TYPE 4 -13.4 0. -4.94 XINC 1.
TYPE 3 -13.4 0. -10.63 XINC 1.
TYPE 4 -13.4 0. -12.56 XINC 1.
perform analysis
print maxforce envelope
print support reactions
FINISH

Shear Force Results From Grillage Analysis


Girder

G1

G2

G3

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24

DL
0.01
786.34
724.05
579.25
388.9
199.94
10.43
200.6
389.71
579.66
724.46
786.53
0.01

SIDL
0.19
214.73
171.93
145.97
98.36
36.16
26.78
36.9
99.08
146.64
172.59
215.91
215.98

LL A
0
239.75
236.7
223.73
200.42
171.97
34.8
157.63
196.2
223.85
237.09
236.74
331.31

LL B
0.01
143.43
140.72
124.62
116.85
108.1
0.65
102.19
117.14
126.26
140.15
142.52
0.01

LL C
0
219.68
221.7
212.94
180.59
152.39
54.36
139.63
174.51
208.16
215.02
211.91
0

Live Load
LL D
LL E
0
0.01
130.81
204.51
130.69
203.85
129.01
185.95
124.82
162.62
120.62
148.08
0.7
35.83
114.44
162.14
125.15
167.35
130.69
189.02
130.16
212.14
129.89
214.48
0
0.01

LL F
0.01
211.26
209.94
189.4
166.92
152.44
28.9
166.25
172.82
193.81
211.32
213.04
0.01

LL G
0.01
104.6
102.4
90.13
87.77
85.41
0.7
86.15
88.39
91.1
103.3
105.9
0.02

LL H
0.01
109.95
107.47
95.19
92.67
89.99
0.68
90.32
92.41
95.23
107.71
110.04
0.01

Max Load Case


0.01
239.75
236.7
223.73
200.42
171.97
54.36
166.25
196.2
223.85
237.09
236.74
331.31

25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36

0
727.4
667.87
534.11
361.57
188.59
16.55
188.67
360.68
535.83
672.57
731.07
0

115.94
116.83
65.87
59.46
52.57
50.63
42.48
50.61
52.57
59.7
66.15
152.45
151.56

0.12
337.89
310.12
264.57
194.02
134.55
107.98
115.16
173.9
242.06
289.89
306.91
0.41

0.02
227.05
199.3
176.3
135.41
88.69
77.54
39.05
118.76
159.48
185.6
201.58
0.02

0
236.48
211.09
181.68
132.47
84.28
106.89
71.73
117.23
164.83
196.53
208.03
0

0
214.7
182.33
157.77
114.83
68.94
92.73
55.76
98.1
139.87
167.32
182.41
0

0.01
326.63
284.72
236.74
166.13
102.84
201.56
85.81
183.41
257.86
312.97
367.68
0.01

0
332.03
290.72
244.54
173.44
95.87
193.87
91.68
184.81
254.9
307.64
361.6
0

0.07
134.5
131.1
113.2
96.91
92.68
24.24
92.97
100.5
124.5
144.8
146.1
0.09

0.06
141.97
138.99
120.45
100.77
94.72
16.85
99.39
104.56
124.42
141.32
143.56
0.07

49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

0.01
729.03
670.53
535.83
363.12
190.49
19.08
191.11
362.95
534.41
664.65
720.95
0

88.09
88.98
64.85
57.94
46.67
35.54
23.52
35.53
46.58
57.66
64.52
66.5
45.96

0.9
429.92
387.8
321.17
235.74
136.88
191.44
121.74
208.85
289.98
345.37
360.72
0.16

0
246.44
219.97
187.39
137.71
93.54
94.71
78.6
121.5
169.55
203.15
218.5
0

0.06
209.97
181.97
154.9
109.33
64.12
102.01
55.08
94.7
138.66
165.81
178.07
0.06

0.03
224.51
189.58
155.67
100.23
55.55
120.4
64.46
83
135.31
170.22
186.08
0.03

0.05
206.89
184.86
152.21
116.03
87.52
82.26
94.05
134.42
180.03
218.18
247.49
0.03

0.04
215.2
194.86
162.5
124.31
88.42
69.25
102.42
138.41
176.19
208.23
235.45
0.04

0
322
284.7
251.1
181
159
257.5
118.2
219.6
294.5
332
356.2
0

0
327.61
292.05
261.36
192.66
147.22
244.25
123.24
217.57
285.15
319.02
344.27
0

Node

Total
Max Load Case
0.209
0.209
1216.85
1216.845
1109.01
1109.01
926.577
926.577
667.638
667.638
390.873
390.873
86.134
86.134
387.125
387.125
665.37
665.37
927.765
927.765
1110.43
1110.431
1215.51
1215.506
514.169
514.169

Total
0.1981
1478.34
1375.53
1182.27
918.144
631.856
112.971
608.233
912.173
1185.1
1376.63
1473.22
794.072

0.12
337.89
310.12
264.57
194.02
134.55
201.56
115.16
184.81
257.86
312.97
367.68
0.41

116.048
1148.33
1012.85
831.683
588.758
360.315
240.434
342.924
579.579
827.604
1020.39
1214.43
151.929

116.048
1148.331
1012.848
831.683
588.758
360.315
240.434
342.924
579.579
827.604
1020.393
1214.432
151.929

104.583
1598.44
1420.98
1189.38
859.312
547.524
401.911
462.842
814.281
1146.38
1393.84
1601.48
137.166

0.9
429.92
387.8
321.17
235.74
158.95
257.53
123.24
219.63
294.49
345.37
360.72
0.16

88.91
1204.94
1084.4
882.823
621.956
369.085
274.377
337.556
607.197
857.111
1040
1112.1
46.104

88.91
1204.938
1084.4
882.823
621.956
369.085
274.377
337.556
607.197
857.111
1040.003
1112.098
46.104

80.919
1760.8
1583.73
1303.1
933.21
562.597
533.089
504.14
876.827
1230.93
1484.52
1580.11
41.6536

40 stage 1
Node
0
1
510.09
2
463.89
3
363.09
4
242.06
5
121.03
6
0
7
121.03
8
242.06
9
363.09
10
463.89
11
510.09
12
0

G4

G5

G6

61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72

0.01
720.88
663.85
533.13
362.68
190.9
18.86
189.66
361.6
533.41
667.21
725.71
0

12.09
91.38
89.4
75.54
51.57
24.8
3.06
24.76
51.6
75.83
89.85
91.83
20.01

149.94
220.26
218
191.25
153.57
134.97
33.56
117.24
143.07
181.56
211.75
219.31
180.84

0
238.81
224.41
194.78
148.66
106.8
98.69
97.42
138.32
183.54
213.29
222.64
0

0
102.19
102.23
90.88
75.11
63.38
24.54
58.47
72.66
88.66
101.12
102.35
0

0
184.04
173.3
150.81
109.41
64.08
118.48
69.01
90.74
127.08
148.16
156.8
0

0.01
143.93
140.81
123.23
110.39
104.35
6.42
111.11
106.9
115.84
134.48
137.04
0.04

0.03
138.26
135.85
120.47
116.71
123.98
2.08
123.94
116.88
121.13
137.62
140.62
0.03

0.03
257.3
244.9
211.3
140.6
123.2
197.9
123.7
188.6
260.1
299.6
310.7
0.03

0
269.67
261.34
226.05
161.68
114.3
176.5
133.48
183.52
247.04
283.7
288.83
0

149.94
269.67
261.34
226.05
161.68
134.97
197.88
133.48
188.6
260.11
299.61
310.66
180.84

147.046
1054.96
988.456
812.115
559.762
337.173
200.012
334.552
582.94
843.339
1026.71
1097.13
182.766

149.94
1054.963
988.456
812.115
559.762
337.173
200.012
334.552
582.94
843.339
1026.709
1097.134
182.766

284.886
1408.54
1332.02
1116.93
806.016
545.226
312.261
515.757
806.036
1124.11
1349.08
1429.37
345.329

85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96

0.01
721.32
664.25
533.03
362.29
190.43
18.4
189.49
361.25
532.09
664.16
776.65
0

10.49
91.42
89.44
75.62
51.64
24.83
3
24.8
51.56
75.51
89.32
91.3
19.67

49.12
296.56
258.99
225.81
180.85
126.01
87.67
112.09
164.09
210.05
244.44
260.42
24.09

0
238.4
224.44
194.72
148.63
106.79
98.68
97.42
138.32
183.56
213.14
222.4
0

0.08
54.46
52.17
46.98
45.11
43.67
0.28
43.15
44.79
47.28
51.31
51.74
0.08

0.07
73.51
70.95
60.34
51.19
46.98
6.69
42.05
48.73
58.63
68.52
70.08
0.07

0.03
216.48
206.57
187.58
153
103.33
90.37
97.07
130.93
154.55
169.41
175.4
0.03

0.03
190.87
187.77
169.25
136.03
104.67
94.22
120.87
152.23
185.7
205.03
206.15
0.03

0.04
259.4
247.4
211.7
164.2
121.1
122.9
108.3
131.9
176.1
207.4
211.3
0.01

0.01
230.19
226.41
191.07
138.63
115.19
114.27
132.23
153.28
207.4
243.48
244.71
0.01

49.12
296.56
258.99
225.81
180.85
126.01
122.88
132.23
164.09
210.05
244.44
260.42
24.09

54.708
1079.64
986.781
811.879
576.695
328.669
131.992
333.297
560.491
796.645
973.476
1102.33
41.351

54.708
1079.644
986.781
811.879
576.695
328.669
131.992
333.297
560.491
796.645
973.476
1102.328
41.351

98.3572
1506.64
1371.53
1151.22
848.506
528.602
305.143
509.477
806.852
1110.59
1333.71
1474.92
61.3059

97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108

0.01
780.54
667.74
533.84
361.8
189.93
18.58
190.62
362.54
534.32
665.08
721.43
0

90.79
91.68
64.73
57.85
46.69
35.64
23.65
35.67
46.73
57.72
64.42
66.4
46.46

28.44
302.65
272.98
227.77
161.45
107.8
117.16
92.37
143.39
206.19
252.19
268.68
13.56

0
246.35
219.95
187.38
137.7
93.54
94.68
78.61
121.52
169.58
203.06
218.21
0

0
29.61
28.86
27.54
28.09
28.62
0.2
28.65
28.47
28.08
28.26
27.13
0

0
39.78
39.07
37.54
38.11
40.07
0.25
40.13
38.7
37.84
38.25
37.28
0

0.01
243.73
212.66
179
122.59
72.62
110.68
64.99
105.26
151.35
182.96
198.22
0

0
313.65
279.27
235.32
158.76
128.77
233.55
113.66
174.9
249.95
298.95
342.55
0

0.01
260.3
231.6
198.9
143.8
91.08
105.2
87.13
122.8
162.1
193.1
208.7
0

0
323.41
286.2
245.02
175.47
117.63
215.82
102.87
191.11
259.66
305.78
352.74
0

28.44
323.41
286.2
245.02
175.47
128.77
233.55
113.66
191.11
259.66
305.78
352.74
13.56

116.396
1163.29
990.05
812.208
566.413
341.463
252.425
328.584
581.269
825.734
1004.7
1105.3
58.664

116.396
1163.289
990.05
812.208
566.413
341.463
252.425
328.584
581.269
825.734
1004.702
1105.296
58.664

133.196
1595.96
1383.98
1146.14
808.922
508.657
439.023
466.706
788.052
1118.93
1359.48
1481.66
66.3576

G7

G8

121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132

0.01
728.19
669.69
534.77
361.63
188.29
16.51
188.55
360.76
535.94
672.68
731.18
0

117.75
118.64
66.37
59.91
52.77
50.8
42.66
50.81
52.79
60.01
66.47
154.47
153.58

0.12
274.49
235.34
197.67
145.02
88.69
116.4
75.75
126.48
176.98
214.45
230.64
0.4

0.02
227.45
199.3
176.36
135.45
88.71
77.52
74.87
118.76
159.47
185.59
201.57
0.02

0.06
9.99
10.02
9.06
7.56
8.17
0.08
8.21
7.44
8.68
10.67
11.64
0.06

0.05
22.38
22.43
21.97
20.91
21.29
0.12
21.3
20.78
21.69
23.05
23.86
0.05

0.03
220.46
188.02
161.76
117.24
71.4
91.22
58.98
100.52
142.81
170.66
186.31
0.03

0.07
169.48
154.9
125.22
85.97
63.11
68.47
74.33
96.55
134.32
166.01
185.47
0.05

0.02
238.5
210.6
187
141.7
89.82
81.09
84.34
124.6
159.5
182.3
198.1
0.01

0.04
178.19
167.38
144.85
111.01
87.32
50.2
97.89
122.11
156.06
180
188.52
0.04

0.12
274.49
235.34
197.67
145.02
89.82
116.4
97.89
126.48
176.98
214.45
230.64
0.4

117.868
1093.87
947.866
772.583
544.918
319.928
163.93
327.461
527.382
755.232
932.155
1093.23
153.94

117.868
1093.871
947.866
772.583
544.918
319.928
163.93
327.461
527.382
755.232
932.155
1093.226
153.94

106.221
1486.42
1287.72
1069.35
770.896
465.335
341.457
445.335
719.884
1016.16
1238.98
1416.11
138.966

133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144

0.01
786.58
724.29
579.49
389.2
200.25
10.84
200.95
390
579.87
724.67
786.73
0.01

216.81
216.41
173.06
146.77
98.89
36.4
26.84
36.896
99.33
147.18
173.46
217.35
217.74

110.05
96.46
96.58
93.47
92.19
92.22
8.21
91.11
90.43
92.2
95.89
95.79
112.35

0.01
143.41
140.71
124.59
116.84
107.1
0.65
102.17
117.12
126.25
140.14
142.51
0.01

0.01
0.11
1.03
4.56
22.96
26.7
31.78
26.82
23.01
4.55
1.04
0.04
0.01

0.01
14.42
11.39
0.07
4.56
7.96
12.58
8.05
4.58
0.09
11.45
14.46
0.01

0.01
124.55
120.79
100.9
94.68
91.68
12.27
77.69
94.78
110.38
124.77
126.54
0.01

0.02
94.78
91.55
76.07
73.96
73.63
0.59
73.78
73.84
76.27
91.91
95.15
0.02

0.01
154.4
151.8
136.3
128.7
120.5
0.74
114.4
129
136
144.5
145.8
0.01

0.01
124.48
122.39
111.87
110.08
110.5
0.85
111.12
109.81
112.16
122.85
124.89
0.01

110.05
154.35
151.76
136.3
128.71
120.51
31.78
114.4
129
135.96
144.5
145.82
112.35

315.865
1141.91
1033.93
848.93
603.929
345.109
66.282
340.806
605.43
849.414
1028.18
1135.32
318.865

315.865
1141.905
1033.934
848.93
603.929
345.109
66.282
340.806
605.43
849.414
1028.18
1135.318
318.865

394.339
1267.58
1167.83
982.097
752.566
509.918
68.5138
500.005
752.437
982.923
1161.39
1260.09
399.339

esults From Grillage Analysis


Girder
Girder
alone
Node
0
13
5.61
14
578.77
15
1901.94
16
3396.67
17
4293.5
G1
18
4592.44
19
4293.5
20
3396.67
21
1901.94
22
578.77
23
5.61
24
0

G2

G3

Deck slab
0
1.87
294.31
993.93
1816.37
2326.13
2523.22
2326.13
1816.37
993.93
294.31
1.87
0

Live Load
LL B
LL C
LL D
LL E
LL F
LL G
LL H
DL
SIDL LL A
Max Load Case
0
0.01
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
31.1
72.16
28.46
4.39
19.18
89.57
40.97
54.02
0.01
0.01
89.57
937.09 111.06 280.51 289.49
199.89
172.49
278.72
309.64
251.94
282.95
309.64
3024.09 519.45 952.05 733.33
818.49
571.57
876.69
933.67
565.75
601.48
952.05
5410.99 948.03 1797.54 1317.1 1644.17 1158.19 1684.99 1753.72 1006.7
1056.61
1797.54
6866.33 1084.85 2303.9 1810.65 2168.23 1674.99
2272.5 2350.77 1442.81
1510.8
2350.77
7383.85 912.73 2461.49 2184.52 2384.48 2106.95 2718.08 2807.06 1866.87 1956.87
2807.06
6865.59 1084.76 2185.13 1775.36 2052.4
1639.59 2309.35 2361.72 1444.04 1510.48
2361.72
5407.51 947.59 1666.36 1289.74 1508.71 1125.62 1786.54 1794.28 1019.81 1057.71
1794.28
3014.57 517.73 891.93 715.85
733.7
545.84
1014.46 975.87
605.95
603.58
1014.46
926.8
109.13 263.83
277.6
163.04
156.21
370.22
324.52
313.65
285.85
370.22
20.58
74.42
32.16
7.37
159.85
88.22
80.71
57.36
8.77
0.01
159.85
0
0.01
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Total
0.01
160.253
1262.82
4272.17
7778.86
9820.17
10554.7
9829.94
7775.48
4326.61
1315.41
225.765
0.01

25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36

0
5.61
578.77
1901.94
3396.67
4293.5
4592.44
4293.5
3396.67
1901.94
578.77
5.61
0

0
2.28
366.65
1240.45
2275.2
2928.69
3200.85
2928.69
2275.2
1240.45
366.65
2.28
0

0
0
0
0
25.63
44.6
53.55
54.14
812.14 137.37 251.89
223.1
2735.3 366.05 917.52 807.41
4945.38 643.24 1717.92 1527.95
6298.92 883.35 2116.3 1903.07
6805.05 1111.23 2126.72 1861.94
6298.6 883.32 1971.83 1762.9
4947.45 643.76 1559.41 1389.07
2741.85 367.45 844.09 746.67
813.22 137.61 226.81 200.74
28.96
43.91
45.85
45.38
0
0
0
0

0
86.36
209.77
812.47
1496.84
1773.25
1664.26
1640.89
1337.25
721.17
169.6
82.14
0

0
202.35
199.35
969.73
1831.48
2253.61
9.67
2359.44
1980.7
1120.58
267.6
193.61
0

0
202.35
199.35
969.73
1831.48
2253.61
9.67
2359.44
1980.7
1120.58
267.6
193.61
0

0
193
214.26
1009.96
1912.68
2347.03
2354.4
2374.68
2358.16
1971.24
1091.26
248.82
0

0
0.03
192.8
607.6
1146.08
1536.84
1882.17
1610.17
1258.85
687.86
235.15
4.81
0

0
1.25
211.91
648.49
1221.58
1628.17
1966.52
1638.49
1249.31
666.11
219.77
0.87
0

0
202.35
251.89
1009.96
1912.68
2347.03
2354.4
2374.68
2358.16
1971.24
1091.26
248.82
0

0
234.605
1309.49
4417.4
8036.52
10217.9
11023.5
10242.7
8437.97
5283.96
2065.16
275.738
0

49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

0
5.61
578.77
1901.94
3396.67
4293.5
4592.44
4293.5
3396.67
1901.94
578.77
5.61
0

0
2.28
366.65
1240.45
2275.2
2928.69
3200.85
2928.69
2275.2
1240.45
366.65
2.28
0

0
0
0
0
29.72
26.08
35.42
50.11
810.01 119.46 249.54 252.21
2738.65 348.67 871.73 897.66
4956.35 637.05 1629.42 1650.44
6320.49 863.19 2036.05 1982.47
6836.17 1028.58 2066.29 1909.43
6316.91 862.42 1900.56 1843.96
4949.11 635.63 1486.9 1489.05
2734.14 347.86 807.25 812.48
821.27 121.75
232.5
220.98
8.77
30.39
37.36
42.87
0
0
0
0

0
75.47
184.51
702.67
1274.39
1476.35
1361.63
1355.81
1127.78
617.62
154.19
59.78
0

0
93.06
189.22
729.83
1295.41
1422.78
3.8
1321.75
1139.2
626.61
160.22
83.39
0

0
40.69
210.31
778.81
1511.93
1953.84
2143.52
2072.26
1693.06
930.3
272.75
35.96
0

0
27.31
237.47
838.21
1609.33
2068.53
2226.22
2081.53
1654.82
901.54
266.09
17.62
0.02

0
188.29
180.22
880.65
1613.37
1935.51
1949.29
2090.1
1798.37
1048.41
246.86
188.62
0

0
170.36
205.62
940.22
1722.89
2066.12
2075.73
2081.09
1766.28
1012.14
233.86
177.54
0

0
188.29
252.21
940.22
1722.89
2068.53
2226.22
2090.1
1798.37
1048.41
272.75
188.62
0.02

0
203.431
1291.87
4337.26
7859.52
9947.06
10825.5
9965.7
7926.03
4433.82
1312.65
208.038
0.018

40 stage 1
Node
0
1
5.61
2
578.77
3
1901.94
4
3396.66
5
4293.5
6
4592.44
7
4293.5
8
3396.66
9
1901.94
10
578.78
11
5.61
12
0

G4

G5

G6

61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72

0
5.61
578.77
1901.94
3396.67
4293.5
4592.44
4293.5
3396.67
1901.94
578.77
5.61
0

0
2.28
366.65
1240.45
2275.2
2928.69
3200.85
2928.69
2275.2
1240.45
366.65
2.28
0

0
7.1
826.4
2736.95
4945.82
6312.53
6830.63
6318.54
4957.13
2747.28
826.37
9.38
0

0.02
0.78
115.67
382.17
684.02
858.59
894.97
859.7
686.13
384.16
115.52
0.74
0.02

0
0
7.93
29.21
264.31 266.85
785.95
913.7
1444.7 1654.5
1870.23 1991.4
2107.81 2010.03
1800.66 1864.58
1366.31 1500.27
748.55 829.14
248.83 237.48
13.29
37.87
0
0

0
7.94
143.42
444.76
822.26
1047.79
1136.41
999.56
769.52
427.46
138.32
13.3
0

0
63.8
160.14
585.51
1032.07
1169.79
1090.65
1075.28
907.37
510.09
134.44
55.56
0

0
17.42
277.18
703.31
1269.17
1723.51
2172.71
1691.55
1228.95
690.39
279.01
17.92
0

0
27.68
305.29
710.5
1251.08
1743.61
2296.23
1746.34
1256.87
724.11
314.58
30.87
0

0
95.83
221.52
856.66
1618.11
1937.3
1955.18
2078.33
1801.11
1049.03
287.88
106.25
0

0
61.5
278.95
978.63
1743.68
2069.67
2100.55
2086.88
1784.23
1043.88
300.4
63.15
0

0
95.83
305.29
978.63
1743.68
2069.67
2296.23
2086.88
1801.11
1049.03
314.58
106.25
0

0.02
94.917
1335.85
4405.33
7925.2
9943.48
10754.9
9960.08
7979
4470.68
1344.06
104.255
0.02

85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96

0
5.61
578.77
1901.94
3396.67
4293.5
4592.44
4293.5
3396.67
1901.94
578.77
5.61
0

0
2.28
366.65
1240.45
2275.2
2928.69
3200.85
2928.69
2275.2
1240.45
366.65
2.28
0

0
7.1
827.82
2739.62
4948
6312.79
6828.59
6317.33
4957.6
2754.03
842.76
21.54
0

0.02
0.9
115.62
382.09
684.44
859.37
896.07
860.4
686.43
384.09
115.64
0.41
0.02

0
25.07
242.64
819.79
1505.89
1869.47
1926.28
1752.07
1374.3
756.21
225.33
35.67
0

0
29.04
266.65
913.74
1654.6
2009.97
1956.24
1864.51
1500.13
828.82
237.71
37.89
0

0
4.66
107.01
267.1
490.88
700.7
902.34
697.16
484.73
258.3
99.55
3.15
0

0
10.97
121.89
344.19
624.29
822.39
970.21
800.64
597.95
325.41
111.32
9.06
0

0
28.51
252.46
804.47
1461.87
1802.12
1768.06
1615.3
1236.58
676.16
202.23
40.42
0

0
25.14
230.01
756.74
1405.53
1789.13
1917.2
1921.04
1445.65
812.26
245.45
10.71
0.01

0
56.33
302.95
943.24
1616.8
1896.72
1976.14
1865.89
1537.82
876.59
273.56
38.17
0

0
37.33
298.46
950.3
1689.81
2026.69
2132.41
2044.56
1726.65
1013.7
315.75
38.92
0

0
56.33
302.95
950.3
1689.81
2026.69
2132.41
2044.56
1726.65
1013.7
315.75
40.42
0.01

0.02
59.487
1333.7
4379.75
7877.14
9905.58
10608.5
9922.69
7912.29
4438.81
1345.24
44.678
0.029

97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108

0
5.61
578.77
1901.94
3396.67
4293.5
4592.44
4293.5
3396.67
1901.94
578.77
5.61
0

0
2.28
366.65
1240.45
2275.2
2928.69
3200.85
2928.69
2275.2
1240.45
366.65
2.28
0

0
40.64
828.33
2748.86
4960.01
6320.85
6833.8
6317.03
4951.31
2736.83
822.58
8.04
0

0
26.29
119.83
349.48
638.51
865.37
1031.5
864.45
636.76
348.09
121.77
30.52
0

0
60.91
233.61
851.3
1559.82
1846.19
7.39
1731.5
1398.17
764.39
202.07
53.41
0

0
49.92
252.43
897.77
1650.42
1982.41
1909.41
1843.85
1488.78
811.94
220.76
42.82
0

0
0.03
65.64
153.82
287.91
426.24
567.48
426.57
286.23
148.65
61.64
0.03
0

0
6.32
83.9
199.88
377.41
561.78
757.84
562.7
374.41
192.32
77.75
4.7
0

0
66.14
237.2
853.96
1544.43
1777.59
1602.86
1587.11
1300.86
709.7
177.76
74.11
0

0
203.27
179.87
903.28
1656.91
1912.98
8.56
1931.6
1918.97
1684.24
975.72
211.45
0

0
75.16
283.56
943.74
1712.66
2027.43
1930.41
1829.46
1456.77
800.35
224.83
60.94
0

0
169.4
221.72
984.03
1808.33
2169.14
2175.4
2192.37
1853.44
1061.15
253.09
176.29
0

0
203.27
283.56
984.03
1808.33
2169.14
2175.4
2192.37
1918.97
1684.24
975.72
211.45
0

0
217.123
1320.45
4377.5
7937.88
10039.8
10782.7
10059.8
8035.7
5006.3
1945.34
228.715
0

G7

G8

121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132

0
5.61
578.77
1901.94
3396.67
4293.5
4592.44
4293.5
3396.67
1901.94
578.77
5.61
0

0
2.28
366.65
1240.45
2275.2
2928.69
3200.85
2928.69
2275.2
1240.45
366.65
2.28
0

0
0
0
0
24.7
44.35
55.47
54.35
814.03 137.76 214.36 223.21
2739.28 367.7
770.22
807.3
4949.61 645.97 1428.39 1527.67
6301.87 886.89 1726.83 1902.95
6806.53 1115.46 1630.94 1861.9
6300.11 886.69 1593.47 1762.78
4948.77 646.15 1284.33 1388.91
2742.73 368.65 701.93 746.55
813.75 137.86 190.58 200.64
28.56
43.79
47.57
45.45
0
0
0
0

0
0.03
56.3
87.94
133.19
170.39
210.33
170.15
133.61
90.38
56.6
0.03
0

0
0.03
64.86
134.68
242.84
345.78
450.6
345.72
243.59
136.78
64.49
0.03
0

0
46.56
222.95
768.86
1398.87
1659.63
1537.86
1513.98
1226.59
667.47
170.36
64.81
0

0.03
20.28
186.34
664.88
1256.18
1528.69
1594.19
1537.32
1291.25
714.15
205.89
0.03
0.01

0
53.07
243.46
856.32
1613.49
1989.49
1942.39
1805.25
1392.86
734.95
188.66
61.89
0

0
20.12
200.66
723.68
1427.72
1852.33
2062.34
1865.35
1471.4
780.18
215.45
21.43
0

0.03
55.47
243.46
856.32
1613.49
1989.49
2062.34
1865.35
1471.4
780.18
215.45
64.81
0.01

0.027
102.163
1302.29
4280.78
7769.98
9899.62
10764.9
9787.7
7642.28
4213.2
1277.19
110.009
0.009

133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144

0
5.61
578.77
1901.94
3396.67
4293.5
4592.44
4293.5
3396.67
1901.94
578.77
5.61
0

0
1.87
294.31
993.93
1816.37
2326.13
2523.22
2326.13
1816.37
993.93
294.31
1.87
0

0
0.01
0
0
31.25
73.31
4.39
4.39
937.53 111.14 290.33 289.45
3025.27 521.59 691.06
733.2
5413.61 952.58 1188.76 1316.86
6870.43 1090.48 1582.42 1810.34
7389.45 918.06 1859.86 2184.2
6869.18 1090.27 1546.62 1775.16
5409.38 951.91 1156.98 1289.62
3015.01 519.54 672.19
715.8
926.58 108.89 279.01 277.58
20.12
75.72
7.37
7.37
0
0.01
0
0

0
154.06
152.73
144.94
37.97
93.96
247.13
93.34
39.25
146.34
154.08
155.4
0

0
0.01
150.14
192.21
175.42
138.85
0
139.49
176.38
193.26
150.98
0.01
0

0
32.69
313.36
687.89
1141.39
1512.76
1797.28
1497.6
1115.91
625.81
234.37
7.37
0

0
0.01
298
565.99
914.08
1265.09
1622.49
1262.6
917.36
571.59
302.72
0.02
0

0
40.43
309.71
781.37
1411.16
1943.82
2367.92
1883.01
1328.66
692.6
233.1
7.37
0

0
0.01
296.23
653.84
1180.79
1713.25
2255.52
1710.1
1183.07
657.83
299.8
0.01
0

0
154.06
313.36
781.37
1411.16
1943.82
2367.92
1883.01
1328.66
715.8
302.72
155.4
0

0.01
219.444
1266.24
4120.69
7435.66
9459.55
10164.8
9404.61
7360.74
4059.63
1254.42
223.06
0.01

DESIGN OF PSC GIRDER


Design of Girder - 40m psan
Calculation of Bending Moments due to the following at Various X n
Summary of Shear & Moments at Various X ns obtained from respective STAAD analysis
Moment / Shear due to
1-1
3-3
5-5
0.000
4.940
9.880
1) DL of girder
M
-0.56
190.19
339.67
S
72.90
53.58
36.31
2) DL of deck slab & diaphragm M
-0.23
124.05
227.52
S
70.00
50.00
35.00
M
-4.46
36.75
64.38
2) S.I.D.Load
S
8.90
5.79
4.67
Vehicular Loads
a) Class _70r -- Total
M
20.94
204.02
244.07
S
49.44
36.93
27.11
b) Class _A --Total
M
-0.33
107.92
176.20
S
30.39
24.34
19.05
Ultimate
M
42.25
1054.91
1589.71
Moment / Shear
S
355.75
259.30
184.08
M
Moment
S
Shear
The effect of vehicular impact is taken as follows
Impact Factor for Class 70r
Impact Factor
=
6

=
4.5
+

7-7
14.820
429.35
19.05
292.87
18.00
88.33
3.55

9-9
19.760
459.24
1.91
320.09
1.50
111.12
2.35

245.78
18.28
209.24
13.99
1874.44
108.38

243.68
29.62
220.25
9.03
2000.44
83.86

15.00% (Vide Fig-5 on page 23 of IRC-6:2000)


10.126% (Vide Cl:211.2 on page 22 of IRC-6:2000)

38.44

Position of Cables at Running X .

2200

700

b
250

700
a

250
150

250

Prestresing Details
Type of Cable Used
Cable make

22
T
22
T
= BBRV Cona make.

15
15

with duct diametre


with duct diametre

100mm
90mm

2 numbers
1 number

Sheating type
Anchorage block size.
Distance bet n anchrages
Value of wooble co-eff
Value of friction co-eff
Conduit ID assembled
No of Cables Used
(15mm dia)
No of Cables Used
(15mm dia)
Ultimate Strength / strand
(15mm dia)
Ultimate Strength / strand
(15mm dia)
Stressing to
Stressing @ 0.74times UTS
(15mm dia)
Stressing @ 0.74times UTS
(15mm dia)
Force per cable (A ,B)
(15mm dia)
Force per cable C
(15mm dia)
C/S Area of 1 Cable
(15mm dia)
C/S Area of 1 Cable
(15mm dia)
? Total Force

? Total C/S Area

= Corrugated HDPE pipe of approved make.


=
375
mm
=
650
mm
=
0.002
per meter length of cable.as per IRC:18-2000.
=
0.17
As per IRC:18-2000.
=
100mm
=
2
=

27.9 T

27.9 T

=
=

186 Kn as per BBRV's brochure.

0.74 times UTS


20.646 T / STRAND
20.646 T / STRAND

454.212 T

454.212 T

Force per cable as per BBR's brochure is 2827Kn at 0.8UTS.

33 cm 2 As per BBRV's brochure.

33 cm 2

=
=
=
=

1362.636 T
1362636 Kg
33
x
99
cm 2

+ 33.0

Clear cover to Prestressing Cables


=

100

mm,

75

mm whichever is greater.

Girder No : 1
Summary of Stresses at Various X ns
Stress due to
1) DL of girder

2) DL od deck slab

2) S.I.D.Load

1-1

3-3

5-5

7-7

9-9

-0.099

81.128

72.443

91.570

97.946

-0.099

38.101

78.317

98.995

105.888

-0.040

24.004

48.525

62.462

68.267

-0.040

43.936

52.459

67.527

73.802

-0.515

2.610

9.147

12.550

15.788

-0.797

1.186

4.154

5.700

7.170

2.418

14.494

34.678

34.921

34.622

3.740

6.582

15.749

15.859

15.724

-0.038

7.667

25.035

29.729

31.294

-0.059

3.482

11.370

13.501

19.6794

4)Vehicular Live Load


Class 70-R

Class - A

14.212
B

Lifting point for cables


Half length of cable
=
c
=
18760 mm
b
=
17760 mm
a
=
13760 mm

Cables
Cables
C
Cables
b
Cables
a

Dist
T
Dist
T
Dist
T

Resultant C.G

19760 mm
6.108
3.549
0.833

Bottom
y
1000.000
550.000
100

1000
2000
6000

19760.000

14820.000

9880

4940

Section

Section

Section

Section

Section

1-1

3-3

5-5

7-7

9-9

1650.00
0.11
950.000
0.062
250.000
0.015

1192.69
0.08
686.585
0.045
191.087
0.009

874.06
0.05
508.275
0.027
157.951
0.004

694.11
0.02
400.000
0.000
150.000
0.000

650.00
0.00
400.000
0.000
150.000
0.000

950.00

690.12

513.43

414.70

400.00

0.002

Px

Calculation of Losses in Prestress :Ref: IRC 18: 2000, Cl. 11.6, Table 5.
1) Instantenous Losses consisting of the following ;a) Frictional Loss : (for galvanised wire cable)
Wobble Coefficient

P o x e -( k x +

43.15473

PT )

Top
x
18760.0
17760.0
13760.0

6.108292
3.548725
0.832787

k
2.8E-06
1.7E-06
5.3E-07

T
0.107
0.062
0.015

6.10829206
3.54872508
0.83278749

Cable
Nos
C

Cable
Nos

Coefficient of Friction
Cable
Lengths
AB
BC
CD
AB
BC
CD
AB
BC
CD
Section
A

B
C
D

B
C
D

B
C
D

P
length

0.17
k x length

PT

e -( kx+PT)

0.000
0.018
0.000
0.000
0.011
0.000
0.000
0.002
0.000

0.9984
0.9458
0.9980
0.9982
0.9550
0.9960
0.9982
0.9705
0.9881

radians

0.810
18.787
1.000
0.890
17.769
2.000
0.890
13.760
6.000

0.002
0.038
0.002
0.002
0.036
0.004
0.002
0.028
0.012

0.000
0.107
0.000
0.000
0.062
0.000
0.000
0.015
0.000

Tension
Factor
1
0.99838
0.94429
0.94241
1
0.99822
0.95328
0.94947
1
0.99822
0.96873
0.95717

Prestress

Ave Force

Force(T)
454.21

(T)

453.48
428.91
428.05

453.84
441.19
428.48

0.56
12.56
0.00

453.81
443.20
432.13

0.61
11.93
1.31

453.81
446.71
437.38

0.61
9.31
3.98

Elongation (cms)
FxL / AxE
0

454.21

453.40
432.99
431.26

13.115

454.21

453.40
440.01
434.76

Total Elon gation (cms)

13.853

b) Slip Loss :
Assuming 6mm Slip in the Prestressing Cables & that the Cables are stressed from both ends.
Force due to 6mm Slip. (for 13mmdia)for Cable A and B
F =
AE G
=
33.000
x
2.0E+06
x
0.6
=
4.0E+05 Kg

13.902

For Both end stressing case 1/2 force on either side of midpan is considered.
? Force
=
=
198.00 T
396000
2 x 1000
Force due to 6mm Slip. (for 13mmdia)for Cable C
F =
AE G
=
33.000
x
2.0E+06
x
0.6
=
4.0E+05 Kg
For Both end stressing case 1/2 force on either side of midpan is considered.
? Force
=
=
198.00 T
396000
2 x 1000
Computation of Force after slip for the cables:
Cable
Force
Force Diagram after 6mm Slip
Nos
in Tonne
B
453.5
453.5
B
B

445.6
C

428.9

437.655

5837.5

428.9

428.1
D

12923
1000

18760
19760

D
B

428.1
453.4

453.4
432.1

433.0
C

431.3
D

431.2

433.0

1058.7 941.3

410.75

2000

17760
19760

D
B

431.3
453.8

453.8
446.7

437.7
C

437.4
D

428.8

446.7

5767.1 232.9

421.68
13760
19760

437.4

6000

Summary of Cable Forces after slip loss at various X n .


19760

14820

9880

4940

Cable
Nos

1-1

3-3

5-5

7-7

9-9

419.4

426.1

432.8

440.2

428.1

410.7

416.43

422.10

427.78

431.26

421.68

424.23

426.78

429.33

437.38

6 Force

1251.81

1266.73

1281.66

1297.27

1296.70

Average force in the cables


(I cable)
Force / strands

429.3

429.3
22
19.5
T
27.9 T
0.699 <

Ultimate Force / strand


Ultimate stress / strand

=
=
=

Average force in the cables


(II and III cable)
Force / strands

=
Ultimate Force / strand
=
Ultimate stress / strand
=
Average Stress in the cables
=
Horizontal Component of Cable forces at various X n .
Cable
1-1
3-3
Nos
c
417.0
424.8

0.74

849.5
44
19.3
T
27.9 T
0.692 <
0.74
12917.5 Kg/cm 2

times ultimate. Hence safe

times ultimate. Hence safe

5-5

7-7

9-9

432.2

440.0

428.1

410.0

416.0

421.9

427.8

431.3

421.6

424.2

426.8

429.3

437.4

1280.94

1297.16

1296.70

5-5

7-7

9-9

6 Force

1248.60
1264.99
Vertical Component of Cable forces at various X n .
Cable
1-1
3-3
Nos
c

44.6

33.4

21.8

9.9

0.0

25.4

18.6

11.6

0.0

0.0

6.1

4.0

1.7

0.0

0.0

6 Force

76.18

55.99

35.18

9.85

0.00

Effect of Prestressing :1-1

3-3

5-5

7-7

9-9

Force, F( T )

Sections

1248.6

1265.0

1280.9

1297.2

1296.7

Area, A(cm 2 )

15400.0

9800.0

9800.0

9800.0

9800.0

F/A (Kg/cm 2 )

81.1

129.1

130.7

132.4

132.3

Vb (cms)

110.0

105.7

105.7

105.7

105.7

e = Vb-x (cms)

15.0

36.7

54.4

64.2

65.7

Zt (cm 3 )

564667

433708

433708

433708

433708

Zb (cm 3 )

564666.7

468873.9

468874

468874

468874

F x e / Zt

33.2

107.0

160.6

192.1

196.5

Fxe / Zb

33.2

99.0

148.5

177.7

181.7

F/A -(Fxe / Zt)

47.9

22.0

-29.9

-59.8

-64.2

F/A +(Fxe / Zt)

114.2

228.1

279.2

310.1

314.1

2) Time Dependent Losses consisting of the following ;a) Elastic Shortening of Wires:
(Vide Cl:11.1 of I.R.C:-18-2000)
Loss
=
0.5
x
m
x Stress at C.G of the Cables at that X n .
It is proposed to stress the cables after 28-Days when the concrete attains 100% of its full strength.
The effect of Prestress & Dead Load acts together.
Descriptions

1-1

3-3

5-5

7-7

9-9

Prestress

Vt
47.910

Vb
114.246

Vt
22.032

Vb
228.100

Vt
-29.876

Vb
279.249

Vt
-59.781

Vb
310.096

Vt
-64.156

Vb
314.053

Dead Load

-0.099

0.099

38.101

-81.128

78.317

-72.443

98.995

-91.570

105.888

-97.946

Resultant

47.810

114.345

60.132

146.972

48.441

206.806

39.214

218.526

41.732

216.107

3-3

5-5

7-7

60.132

48.441

39.2

Sections

1-1
47.81

41.8

Stress at
the C.G of
the Cables

125

151

169

85.61
95
114.35

169.85
51.34

146.97

Average stress at C.G of the X n .


? Loss
=
0.5
x
5.657
=
421.05 Kg/cm 2
% Loss
=
421.0510026 x
100
12917.5
Initial relaxation loss (Cl-11.4 IRC 18-2000)

33.5
179

119.73
69.01

x
=

148.86 Kg/cm 2
148.9
3.260 %
2.446 %

35.6
180

184.73
41.47

206.81

9-9
41.73

218.53

184.40
40.00
216.11

Es
Ec

2000000
353553

5.66

b) Creep of Concrete:-

(Vide Cl:11.1 of I.R.C:-18-2000)

Descriptions

1-1

3-3

5-5

7-7

9-9

Prestress

Vt
47.910

Vb
114.246

Vt
22.032

Vb
228.100

Vt
-29.876

Vb
279.249

Vt
-59.781

Vb
310.096

Vt
-64.156

Vb
314.053

Dead Load

-0.099

0.099

38.101

-81.128

78.317

-72.443

98.995

-91.570

105.888

-97.946

Inst: Loss %
5.706
Resultant

-2.734

-6.519

-1.257

-13.015

1.705

-15.934

3.411

-17.694

3.661

-17.920

45.077

107.826

58.875

133.957

50.146

190.872

42.625

200.832

45.392

198.187

Sections

1-1
45.08

3-3

5-5

58.875

50.146

7-7

45.8

Stress at
the C.G of
the Cables

125

151

169

80.73
95.0
107.83

c) Shrinkage of Concrete:Shrinkage Strain at 100% Maturity


at 28-days
? Loss

190.87

=
=
=
=

180
171.01

(Vide Cl:11.1 of I.R.C:-18-2000)


=
0.00019
= 0.00019
x

170.41

41.5

40.0
200.83

138.12 Kg/cm 2
0.00040 /
10 Mpa
2000000
0.00040 x
138.12
100

(Vide Cl:11.4 of I.R.C:-18-2000)


d) Relaxation of H.T.Steel
From table 4A, percentage relaxation loss corresponding to
1.3 %
0.60

198.19

2000000

2000000

0.696

1104.93 Kg/cm 2

380.0 Kg/cm 2

times Ultimate Stregth of Wires is calculated as for low relaxation steel

2.4 %

0.696

0.70
Relaxation Loss corresponding

38.5

158.03
51.3

133.96

Average stress at C.G of the cables


Creep Strain at 100% Maturity at 28-days
Es
? Loss

45.39

179

110.40
69.0

9-9

42.63

2.446

2.5 %
% of the average prestress
? Total Time Dependent Losses

ie

12918 Kg/cm2

=
=

632.04 Kg/cm 2
2116.96 Kg/cm 2

ie

4.89%

? % Loss

3)
a)
b)
c)

2116.96
x
100
=
12917.5
Time Dependent Losses consisting of the following ;20 % higher time dependent losses as per Cl 7.2.4 of I.R.C:-18-2000.
Creep of Concrete:Shrinkage of Concrete:Relaxation of H.T.Steel

% Loss

1484.927
12917.5

Recapitulation of Stresses at Various X n .


Descriptions
1-1
Vt
Vb
Prestress
47.910
114.246

20

16.388 %

1.47

Total
3.767

=
=
=

1104.93 Kg/cm 2
380.00 Kg/cm 2
1.47 %

=
%

1484.93 Kg/cm 2

5-5

3-3

9-9

7-7

Vt
22.032

Vb
228.100

Vt
-29.876

Vb
279.249

Vt
-59.781

Vb
310.096

Vt
-64.156

Vb
314.053

Dead Load

-0.099

0.099

38.101

-81.128

78.317

-72.443

98.995

-91.570

105.888

-97.946

Inst: Loss %
5.706
Resultant
(28-Days)
Deck slab

-2.734

-6.519

-1.257

-13.015

1.705

-15.934

3.411

-17.694

3.661

-17.920

45.077

107.826

58.875

133.957

50.146

190.872

42.625

200.832

45.392

198.187

-0.040

0.040

43.936

-24.004

52.459

-48.525

67.527

-62.462

73.802

-68.267

S.I.D.L

-0.797

0.515

1.186

-2.610

4.154

-9.147

5.700

-12.550

7.170

-15.788

Bal: Loss %
16.388
Vehicular
Load

-7.852

-18.723

-3.611

-37.382

4.896

-45.764

9.797

-50.820

10.514

-51.468

3.740

-2.418

6.582

-14.494

15.749

-34.678

13.501

-34.921

15.724

-34.622

20 %Extra Loss

-1.805

-4.304

-0.830

-8.592

1.125

-10.519

2.252

-11.681

2.417

-11.830

3.767
Resultant

38.324

82.937

106.138

46.874

128.529

42.239

141.402

28.398

155.019

16.211

(Vide Cl: 7.1 to 7.1.4 of IRC:-18-2000. )


Remarks about Stresses at various Stages of Prestressing:
1) Permissible Temporary Stress in Concrete
a) Maximum Compressive Stress immediately after Prestressing shall not exceed minimum of the following
300 Kg/cm 2 or
0.5
Fcj
= Expected Concrete Strength at the time of Prestressing.
Fcj
=
0.5
x
500
=
250 Kg/cm 2
Max Compressive Stress developed
=
200.83 Kg/cm 2
Hence O.K
b) Temporary Tensile Stress in the extreme fibre immediately after Prestressing shall not exceed,
=
1
of Maximum Compressive Stress immediately after Prestressing
10

-1
x
250.00
=
-25.00 Kg/cm 2
10
=
42.63 Kg/cm 2
Minimum Stress developed
Tension developed is within limits at this stage.Hence O.K
2) Permissible Stress in Concrete at Service Condition
a) Maximum Compressive Stress allowed during Service Condition
=
0.33
Fck
=
0.33
x
500
=
165 Kg/cm 2
Maximum Compressive Stress attained at Service
=
155.0 Kg/cm 2
Hence O.K
b) Minimum Stress attained at Service
=
16.211 Kg/cm 2
No Tension is developed .The Stresses are Compressive only.Hence O.K
=

Check for Deflection at Midspan.


Downward deflection is given by G
=
5
x
M x L2
48
ExI
M = Moment
L = Span
E = Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete
I = Moment of Inertia
?G 1
=
5
48
= 8.402075
= 84.02075
Upward deflection due to prestress
= P x e x L2
8xExI
P = Prestressing Force at Mid Span
e = eccentricity
?G 2
= 1.3E+06
8
= 7.5753576
=
75.75
? Net G
=
84.02
=
8.27
Permissible Deflection
=
L
800
=
49.4

x 113413240
x
353553.39
cms
mm

x
x
cms
mm
=
mm

=
=
=
=
x
x

=
=
65.714286 x
353553.39 x

75.75358
Downward
39520
800
HenceO.K

1134.132
39.52
353553.39
6.2.E+07
3952
62113333

Tm
m
Kg/cm 2
cm 4
2

1296.699 T
65.7 cms
2
3952
62113333

Check for Ultimate Strength at Various X n .


(i ) Failure by yield of steel ( Under Reinforced section )
M ult ( Steel ) = 0.9 d b A s f p

(Vide Cl:13 of I.R.C:-18-2000)

A s = Area of High Tensile Steel


f p = The Ultimate Tensile Strength of Steel .
d b = The Depth opf the beam from the maximum compression edge to C.G of Tendons.
( ii ) Failure by crushing of concrete ( over reinforced section )
2
M ult ( Con :) = 0.176 b d b f ck + (2/3) x 0.8( B f - b )(d b - t / 2)x t x fck
b = Total width of the Webs.
B f = Overall width of the top flange
t = Average thickness of flange.
UTS
=
0.74
Sections
1-1
3-3
0.00990
0.010
A s (m 2 )
(T/m 2 )

5-5
0.010

7-7
0.010

9-9
0.010
186000

186000

186000

186000

186000

1.500

1.760

1.937

2.035

2.050

M ult( Steel ) (Tm)


b (m)
B f (m)
t (m)

2485.89
0.700
2.200
0.550

2916.58
0.350
2.200
0.550

3209.40
0.350
2.200
0.550

3373.02
0.350
2.200
0.550

3397.38
0.350
2.200
0.550

M ult( Conc ) (Tm)

4081.00

4982.91

5663.49

6052.14

6110.54

Min M Ult

2485.89

2916.58

3209.40

3373.02

3397.38

M Ultimate

42.25
Safe

1054.91
Safe

1589.71
Safe

1874.44
Safe

2000.44
Safe

d b (m)

Remarks

Check for Ultimate Shear Strength at Various X n .


Sections Uncracked in flexure
V co = 0.67bd (f t +0.8 f cp* f t )
n
V co = Ultimate Shear Resistance of the X .

(Vide Cl:14.1.2 of I.R.C:-18-2000)

b = Width of Webs - (2/3 x Duct Diametre) if the Cables are grouted.


d = Overall depth
f t = Max principal stress
0.24 fck
f cp = Stress at c.g at the section due to prestress after inst: loss is accounted.
Sections Cracked in flexure
V cr = 0.037bd b f ck + (M t xV/M)
d b = Distance of extreme comp.fibre from centroid of tendons.
M t = (0.37  f ck + 0.8 f pt ) I/y
V and M = Ultimate Shear & corresponding moment at the section
V cr (min) = 0.1bd  f ck
Acc.to IRC :18 - 2000 Cl. No. 14.1.5 &Table 6.
V Capacity =(
P Sin( T) if the X n is Uncracked.
530
x b web xdb )+
db = 0.8 x Overall Depth or Dist: from comp: face to C.G of Tendons,which ever is more.

Sections
b (m)
d (m)
f cp (T/m 2 )
f

(T/m 2 )

1-1
0.5000
2.2000
807.299

3-3
0.1500
2.2000
1104.04

5-5
0.1500
2.2000
1580.296

7-7
0.1500
2.2000
1710.094

9-9
0.1500
2.2000
1704.063

169.706

169.706

169.706

169.706

169.706

V co (T)

222.7238

169.3343

199.2360

203.8136

199.5911

d b (m)

1.500

1.76

1.937

2.035

2.050

I (m 4 )
y = Vb (m)

0.621
1.100

0.496
1.06

0.496
1.057

0.496
1.057

0.496
1.057

V t (T/m 2 )
V b (T/m 2 )

479.096
1142.460
1142.460

220.32
2281.00
2281.002

-298.758
2792.488
2792.488

-597.812
3100.960
3100.960

-641.560
3140.531
3140.531

M t (Tm)

663.821

978.273

1170.131

1285.839

1300.682

M ult (Tm)

42.255

1054.91

1589.706

1874.441

2000.441

V ult (T)
Vcr (T)
Vcr(min)(T)
? Vcr (T)
Remarks
P Sin( T ) T
b web
db (m)

355.753
5608.5
77.782
5609

259.299
247.4
23.335
247.37

184.077
143.1
23.335
143.093

108.380
82.3
23.335
82.334

83.856
62.6
23.335
63

Cracked

Cracked

Uncracked

Uncracked

Uncracked

0.000
0.700
1.960

0.000
0.350
1.960

35.177
0.350
1.960

9.854
0.350
2.035

0.000
0.350
2.050

V Capacity (T)
Remarks

727.160
Safe

363.580
Safe

398.757
Safe

387.402
Safe

380.275
Safe

pt

(T/m 2 )

Check for Shear Reinforcement Requirement ;Sections


V ult (T)
Vc (T)
Spacing (mm)
Asv (cm 2 )

(Vide Cl:14.1.4 of IRC :18 - 2000.)

I of Bar(mm)
No of Legs

1-1
355.7525
222.724
150
4.78
4.78
12
2

3-3
259.2989
169.334
150
3.23
3.23
10
2

5-5
184.0773
143.093
150
1.47
1.47
10
2

7-7
108.3796
82.334
200
1.25
1.25
10
2

9-9
83.8559
62.568
200
1.02
1.02
10
2

Asv Prov (cm 2 )


Remarks

15.080
Safe

10.472
Safe

10.472
Safe

7.854
Safe

7.854
Safe

Asv(cm 2 )/Web

EFFECTS OF DIFFERENTIAL SHRINKAGE


It is generally assumed that the time lag between transfer of prestress and casting of deck slab will be about 30 days.
Differential shrinkage strain,

H sh

Force induced by differential shrinkage, F =


Refer BS 5400, Chapter 8, page 110.

K .A.E. H sh

Eccentricity of the above force from top of the composite section


Yt (Distance of the NA of composite section from top)
Eccentricity of the above force CG of the composite section
Moment doe to above force
Zt
Zb
Zj
A
Stresses induced due to differential shrinkage
V t = 83615.4 + 6790333.7
15400.0
564666.7
V b = 83615.4 6790333.7
15400.0
564666.7
V j = 83615.4 + 6790333.7
15400.0
1549750.0
=
-83615.4
Tensile stress in deck slab
F
A
5500.0
Stresses due to differential shrinkage
-15.2
-

17.45
+
9.81

2.25
-5.39

9.81
+

=
-

-6.60

-6.60

0.0001

2
where A =
0.55 m
5000
50
E =
=
35355 Mpa
= 3535533.91 Kg/cm 2
K =
0.43 (As per BS:5400)
=
83.6 T
=
0.125 m
=
0.937 m
=
0.812 m
=
67.90 Tm
=
564666.67 cm 3
=
564666.67 cm 3
= 1549750.00 cm 3
=
15400.00 cm 2

17.45 Kg/m 2

-6.60 Kg/m 2

9.81 Kg/m 2

-15.2 Kg/m 2

Analysis for temperature stresses


The analysis for temprature stresses is carried out as out lined in IRC 6-2000
Concrete bridge practice by V K Raina (Analysis design and economics) is referred

Stress calculation due to variation in temperature


Calculation of eigen stresses (Positive temperarure difference)
Geometric section
2.2
17.8 deg

-4.48

0.15

a
0.1
0.25

10.9 deg
4.00 deg
2.40 deg

a1
3.20 deg

b
0.15
0.9

0.25
1.20 deg
0.9

2.45

1.21

0.0 deg
0.0 deg
0.86

0.0 deg

b1

0.9

0.0 deg
c
d

0.1
0.15

0.25
0.36
0.7

0.0
0.0
1.05
2.10

deg
deg
deg
deg

-0.43
-1.62

0.7
Concrete mix

M45

45

3.35E+04

1.17E-05 /deg C

1.525
fck

E concrete

5000 fck

Coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete


Calculation of thermal strain and gradient due to variation in temperature along the cross section

Mpa

Zone

Area
(m^2)

Y
(m)

AY
(m^3)

AY^2
(m^4)

t
(Deg)

At

AtY
0.269775

0.33

0.075

0.02475

0.00185625

10.9 deg

3.597

a1

0.22

0.2

0.044

0.0088

3.2 deg

0.704

0.1408

0.105

0.325

0.034125

0.011090625

1.20 deg

0.126

0.04095

b1

0.324

0.85

0.2754

0.23409

0.0 deg

0.324

1.75

0.567

0.99225

0.0 deg

0.07

2.1

0.147

0.3087

0.0 deg

0.105

2.375

0.249375

0.592265625

1.05 deg

0.11025

0.26184375

1.3417E+00

2.1490525

4.53725

0.71336875

d1
Sum

1.48E+00

For equilibrium
HR6A - T6AY = DA t
HR6AY - T6AY^2 = DA Yt
HR
HR

1.48E+00
1.34E+00

T
T

HR
HR

x 1.00 x 1.00 -

=
=

1.17E-05
1.17E-05

T
T

0.90774696 =
1.60179816 =

3.59E-05
6.22E-06

T

0.6940512 =
T
=
HR
=

2.97E-05
4.28E-05
7.48E-05

Calculation of thermal stresses


Sl
Y
YT
No.
(m)
1
0.00E+00 0.00E+00
2
0.25 1.07E-05
3
1.15 4.92E-05
4
2.05 8.77E-05
5
2.3 9.84E-05

1.34E+00
2.15E+00

(1)
(2)

D t

t
17.80
2.40
0.00
0.00
2.1

deg
deg
deg
deg
deg

2.08E-04
2.808E-05
0.00E+00
0.00E+00
2.46E-05

x 4.54
x 0.71
(3)
(4)

fci = Ec (HR -Y T D t )


-4.48E+00
1.21E+00
8.57E-01
-4.35E-01
-1.62E+00

Calculation of eigen stresses (Reverse temperarure difference)


Equivalent I - section for runnimg section
2.2
10.6 deg

-2.58

a
0.25
0.25

5.65 deg
b

0.15

0
0.2

b1

0.9

0.05
0.7

b2
2.45

0.70 deg
0.700
0.44 deg
0.175
deg
0.0 deg
0.0875
0.0 deg
0.0 deg

0.40 deg

0.89

0.7

c1
c2

0.9

1.25

0.2
0

c3

0.8

0.0 deg
0.8 deg
3.70 deg
0.35

d
0.25

0.25
0.3600
0.7

6.60 deg

-2.39

0.7
Concrete mix

M50

fck

50

3.54E+04

1.17E-05 /deg C

E concrete

5000 fck

Coefficient of thermal expansion of concrete


Calculation of thermal strain and gradient due to variation in temperature along the cross section

Zone
a
b
b1
b2
c1
c2
c3
d
Sum

Area
(m^2)
0.55
0.105
0.018
0.252
0.252
0.072
0
0.175
1.42E+00

Y
(m)
0.125
0.325
0.425
0.8
1.5
1.95
2.05
2.325

AY
(m^3)
0.06875
0.034125
0.00765
0.2016
0.378
0.1404
0
0.406875
1.2374E+00

AY^2
t
(m^4)
(Deg)
0.00859375 5.65 deg
0.011090625 0.438 deg
0.00325125 0.0875 deg
0.16128
0.0 deg
0.567
0.0 deg
0.27378 0.40 deg
0
0.80 deg
0.945984375
3.7 deg
1.97098

At

AtY

3.1075
0.0459375
0.001575
0
0
0.0288
0
0.6475
3.8313125

0.3884375
0.014929688
0.000669375
0
0
0.05616
0
1.5054375
1.965634063

Mpa

For equilibrium
HR6A - T6AY = DA t
HR6AY - T6AY^2 = DA Yt
HR
HR

1.42E+00
1.24E+00

T
T

HR
HR

x 1.00 x 1.00 -

1.24E+00
1.97E+00

(1)
(2)

=
=

1.17E-05
1.17E-05

T
T

0.86896067 =
1.59283983 =

3.15E-05
1.86E-05

T

0.72387915 =
T
=
HR
=

1.29E-05
1.78E-05
4.70E-05

x 3.83
x 1.97
(3)
(4)

Calculation of thermal stresses


Sl
No.
1
2
3
4
5

Y
YT
(m)
0.00E+00 0.00E+00
0.25 4.45E-06
1.15 2.05E-05
2.05 3.65E-05
2.3 4.10E-05

D t

t
10.60
0.44
0.00
0.00
6.6

deg
deg
deg
deg
deg

1.24E-04
5.119E-06
0.00E+00
0.00E+00
7.72E-05

fci = Ec (HR -Y T D t )


-2.58E+00
1.25E+00
8.88E-01
3.50E-01
-2.39E+00

Design for Bursting Tensile Force :


(Vide Cl:17.2 on page no -35 of I.R.C:18-2000)
2 Yo
= Width of End Block
=
800 mm
? Yo
=
400 mm
2 YPo
= Width of Bearing Plate
=
375 mm assumed
? YPo
=
187.5 mm
Pk
= Force at anchorage
=
454.212 T
YPo
=
187.5
=
0.469
Yo
400
Fbst
=
0.179375 (From Table- 8) for corresponding
YPo
Pk
Yo
? Fbst
=
0.1794
x
454.212
=
81.474 T
Calculation of area of steel required.
Permissible tensile stress in H.Y.S.D steel
2
=
0.87
x
4150
=
3610.5 Kg/cm
2
Ast reqd
= 81.4742775 x
1000
=
22.566 cm
3610.5
nos in
Provide
16 mm dia bars,
4
3 layers at the front face of
anchoring cone.
2
Ast prov =
24.127 cm
Safe

Appendix D-2: Super Structure Design - Cross Girder

STAAD PLANE cross-girder


START JOB INFORMATION
END JOB INFORMATION
INPUT WIDTH 79
UNIT METER KN
joint coordinates
1 0 0 0; 2 2.2 0 0; 3 3.3 0 0; 4 4.4 0 0, 5 6.6 0 0
6 7.7 0 0; 7 8.8 0 0; 8 11 0 0; 9 12.1 0 0; 10 13.2 0 0;
11 15.4 0 0;
member incidences
1 1 2 10
member property indian
1 to 10 pri ax 2.56 ix 0.001 iz 0.57
constants
e concrete all
poi concrete all
supports
3 6 9 pinned
load 1
member load
******cross girder self weight
1 to 10 uni gy -55
*******girder load
joint load
1 2 4 5 7 8 10 11 fy -531
*****slab load
1 11 fy -262
2 4 5 7 8 10 fy -326
***SIDL
1 fy -216
2 fy -118
4 fy -88
5 fy -92
7 fy -92
8 fy -90
10 fy -118
11 fy -217
****live load
1 fy -145
2 fy -267
4 fy -576
5 fy -395
7 fy -320
8 fy -689
10 fy -294
11 fy -165
perform analysis
PRINT MAXFORCES ENVELOPE
print member forces
print support reactions
print displacements
FINISH

10

Cross girder Analysis model

Max: 5572.88 kNm

Max: 5473.88 kNm

Max: 2671.9 kNm

Max: 2163.27 kNm

Max:
-874.169 kNm
Max: -912.089
kNm

BMD-Cross girder

Max: 2718.1 kNm


Max: 2163.27 kNm

DESIGN OF END CROSS GIRDER


800

25 nos 32 tor
2450

6 nos 32 tor
12 mm dia

6 L
125 mm C/C
200
50
800

Design forces are taken from STAAD


SECTION
SUM
SUM
Torsional moment
Grade of Concrete =
eff. depth reqd. (mm) =
eff. depth provided (mm) =
Total depth provided(mm) =
Dia of bar provided (mm)
No of bars reqd.
Shear Stress Kg/cm 2
=
Allow Shear Stress Kg/cm 2 =

1
2 BM
554.00
-134.00 +ve
269.00
-ve
Shear
0
500
1479
2384
2450
32
25
14.10
4.04

Shear Reinft Provided


Dia of Bar provided
No of legs
Spacing

Hogging
Sagging

727
2384
2450
32
6
Safe

12
6
125

Check for effective depth at section 1-1


Moments due to
Total Moment
=
554.00 Tm
Check for eff: Depth
deff
=
554.000
x
100000
31.67
x
80
=
147.86 cms
Depth provided at 1-1
=
2450 mm
deff prov:
=
238.4 cms
Ast Reqd
=
554.000
x
100000
2000
x
1.00
No. of bars reqd.

NOTE :+ ve =
- ve =

554 Tm
134 Tm
269 T

25

25.68969491
Shear due to
Total Shear

Bar Size
Cover

139.5

269.00 T

=
=

32 mm
50 mm

Safe
2
198.57 cm

27.1515
13.78
5

21.597
13.787
5

Check for effective depth at section 2 - 2


Moments due to
Total Moment
Check for eff: Depth

Shear due to
Total Shear

134.00 Tm

Depth provided at 2-2


deff prov:
Ast Reqd
No. of bars reqd.

=
=
=

134.000
x
31.67
x
=
72.72 cms
2450 mm
238.4 cms
134.000
x
100000
2000
x
1.00

100000
80

269.00 T

Bar Size
Cover

32 mm
50 mm

Safe
2
48.03 cm

=
x

=
=

139.5

2) Maximum Permissible Shear Stress :Shear stress ,


W
=
V
( Vide cl - 304.7.1.1 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )
Bxd
V
= The design shear across the section
d
= Effective depth of the section
B
= Breadth of slab

?W

269.000
80
Maximum Permissible Shear Stress :W max

x
x

Wmax perm
Calculation of permissible Shear Stress :100 As
bd
? Permissible shear stress in concrete corresponding to

1000
238.4

2.50

Mpa

25.0

Kg/cm

1.307239896 value from table is


4.04 Kg/cm

269.0
191.9 T
V
x
V st
x
269.00
T
125
mm

V
s , spacing

=
=

? Asw

191.95
2000
6

6.8

12

( Vide cl - 304.7.1.2 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )


for M40 and above concret grade

1.307

Asw

Using

( Vide cl - 304.7.1.3.3 of I.R.C:-21-2000, Table -12B )


=

?Wc
=
3) Shear Reinforcement Reqd : ( Vide cl - 304.7.1.4 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )
Shear reinforcement is provided to carry a shear equivalent to
Vs = (V - Wc bd)
Design shear
=(

Asw

14.1044 Kg/cm

mm dia stirrups

Required

77.05088

)T

s
d
(assumed)

x
1000
x
238.4
Legged at spacing
cm

4.04

>
Hence O.K

12.5

125

mm.

5.0

cm

5.0

cm

Kg/cm 2

DESIGN OF INTERMEDIATE DIAPHARGM:The output of BM and SF is taken from STAAD Analysis for the worst effects on the intermediate diaphragm.
300

19 nos 25 tor
2450

16 nos 25 tor
2 L
125 mm C/C

12 mm dia

300
SECTION
SUM
SUM
Torsional moment

1
153.00
47.00
0

Grade of Concrete =
eff. depth reqd. (mm) =
eff. depth provided (mm) =
Total depth provided(mm) =
Dia of bar provided (mm)
No of bars reqd.
Shear Stress Kg/cm 2
=
Allow Shear Stress Kg/cm 2 =

0
1269
2090
2150
25
19
7.50
4.20

Shear Reinft Provided


Dia of Bar provided

2
125.00

Hogging
Sagging
Shear

1147
2090
2150
25
16
Safe

12

No of legs

2
125

Spacing

Check for effective depth at section 1-1


Total Moment
=
153.00 Tm
Check for eff: Depth
deff
=
153.000
x
100000
31.67
x
30
=
126.89 cms
Depth provided at 1-1
=
2150 mm
deff prov:
=
209 cms
Ast Reqd
=
153.000
x
100000
2000
x
1.00
No. of bars reqd.

153 Tm
125 Tm
47 T

19

Total Shear

Bar Size
Cover

130.5

47.00 T

=
=

20 mm
50 mm

Safe
2
58.62 cm

Check for effective depth at section 2 - 2


Total Moment
Check for eff: Depth

125.00 Tm

Total Shear

Depth provided at 2-2


deff prov:
Ast Reqd

No. of bars reqd.

=
=

125.000
x
31.67
x
=
114.69 cms
2150 mm
209 cms
125.000
x
100000
2000
x
1.00

100000
30

47.00 T

Bar Size
Cover

20 mm
50 mm

Safe
2
47.89 cm

=
x

=
=

130.5

16

2) Maximum Permissible Shear Stress :Shear stress ,


W
=
V
( Vide cl - 304.7.1.1 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )
Bxd
V
= The design shear across the section
d
= Effective depth of the section
B
= Breadth of slab

?W

47.000
30
Maximum Permissible Shear Stress :W max

x
x

Wmax perm
Calculation of permissible Shear Stress :100 As
bd
? Permissible shear stress in concrete corresponding to

1000
209

2.50

Mpa

25.0

Kg/cm

2.740125171 value from table is


4.2 Kg/cm

47.0
20.7 T
V
x
V st
x
47.00
T
125
mm

V
s , spacing

=
=

? Asw

20.67
2000
2

2.3

12

( Vide cl - 304.7.1.2 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )


for M40 and above concret grade

2.740

Asw

Using

( Vide cl - 304.7.1.3.3 of I.R.C:-21-2000, Table -12B )


=

?Wc
=
3) Shear Reinforcement Reqd : ( Vide cl - 304.7.1.4 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )
Shear reinforcement is provided to carry a shear equivalent to
Vs = (V - Wc bd)
Design shear
=(

Asw

7.4960 Kg/cm

mm dia stirrups

Required

26.334

)T

s
d
(assumed)

x
1000
x
209.0
Legged at spacing
cm

4.2

>
Hence O.K

12.5

125

mm.

0.6

cm

0.6

cm

Kg/cm 2

Appendix D-3: Design of Substructure & Foundation

Design of Trestle Abutment and Pile Foundation


Design Data for Substructure:Type
Simply supported Precast Prestressed Girders and RCC slab
C/C Distance bet n piers
=
40000
mm
Carriageway Width
=
7500
mm
Overall Width of Deck.
=
17000
mm
=
500
mm
Both sides
Width of Crash Barrier
Height of Crash Barrier
=
1050
mm
No of Bearings
=
3
Overall Depth of I.Girders
=
2200
mm
Depth of Deck Slab
=
250
mm
Design Data for Pier :Formation level at abutment loca
=
212.600 m
R.L at abutment cap top
=
209.448 m
Existing Road level
=
207.656 m
Pile cap top below existing road
=
500
mm
R.L at Pile cap top
=
207.16 m
R.L at Pile cap bottom
=
205.36 m
=
25000 mm
Depth of Pile below pilecap
Founding level for Piles.
=
180.36 m
Overall Heigth of Substructure
=
2292
mm
Diameter of pier
=
1300
mm
Transverse width of pier
=
1300
mm
No of piers
=
3
C/C distance between piers
=
3500
mm
Pier Cap Width in Long Dirn.
=
1600
mm
Pier Cap Length in Trans Dirn.
Straight Depth of Pier Cap
Type of Bearing
Size of Pedestals
Distance betn Pedestals

=
=
=
=
=

Longitudinal width of pile cap


Transverse width of pile cap
Straight Depth of pile cap
Varying Depth of pile cap
P.C.C Projections
Diameter of Pile
Distance betn Piles in
Distance betn Piles in transverse
dirn
No of Piles
Edge projection in longitudinal
dirn
Edge projection in transverse
dirn
Grade of Concrete

=
=
=
=
=
=
=

5100
8700
1800
0
150
1200
3600

mm
mm
mm
mm
mm
mm
mm

=
=

3600
6

mm

150

mm

Permissible flexural stress


Grade of Steel

=
=

Permissible tensile stress


Total Height of Pier

=
=

Density of Concrete

=
=

12290 mm
1000
mm
POT PTFE BEARING
600
x
4400
mm

150
mm
M 50
N/mm2
16.67
Fe - 415
N/mm2
200
1292
mm
kN/m3
24

=
25
Density of Concrete for PSC Girde
References.
I.R.C :- 6 - 2000 - Loads & Stresses.
I.R.C :- 21 - 2000 - Permissible Stresses
I.R.C :- 78 - 2000 - Sub Structure and Foundation

kN/m3

600

350

209.45
350

600
4400

1300

1000

1300

2200

2200

1300

2292
12290
GL-

207.656

RL-

207.156

RL-

205.356

8700
1800
25000
150

1200

1200
3600

150
RL-

Transverse View
1600
350
1000
0

1000

1300

2292

1900

1800

1800

25000
150

1200

1200
3600

5100
Longitudinal View

150

180.356

Load Calculations:1) DEAD LOADS


Total Load
2aSIDL
Wearing coat load
Median
Crash barrier load
SIDL
Impact Factor

3) LIVE LOAD

7184.00 kN

=
=
=
=

429.00
144.00
249.60
822.60

kN
kN
kN
kN
considering 50 % reduction as per clause 211.7 IRC 6-2000

70 R
170

170
0 1.37
B

170
3.05

170
1.37

2.13

120

1.52

80

3.96

25

D
866.6

RC

38.4

133.4323

=
( 170 x 38.4 + 170 x 37.03 + 170 x 33.98 + 170 x 32.61 + 120 x 30.48 + 120 x 28.96 + 80 x 25 ) / 38.4

=
=
=
=

RC
RD
RD
70 R one lane
Class A One lane
0
35.65

0
3.2
2.2

1.1
37.75

RC

120

B
0.00

866.5677 kN
170 + 170 + 170 + 170 + 120 + 120 + 80 - 866.568
133.432 kN
866.57

kN

114

114

1.2
1C
425.60

4.3

68

68
3
38.4

68
3

68
3

23.9
D
74

( 114 x 38.4 + 114 x 37.2 + 68 x 32.9 + 68 x 29.9 + 68 x 26.9 + 68 x 23.9 ) / 38.4

RC

425.60 kN

RD

74.40 kN

Reaction at pier Support


=
425.60 kN
Class A One lane
=
425.60 kN
10% reduction of live load is considered for three lane as per Clause 208
Class 70R
=
866.57 kN
Class A two lane
=
851.21 kN
Critical live load
=
866.57 kN
The design for critical live load case is done here and checked for all other cases.
Calculation of Dead Load from Sub - Structure :1) From Pedestals
Volume of 1 Pedestal
=
0.6
x
0.6
x
m3
Rows
=
0.126
No: of Pedestals
=
3
x
1
=
?Total Volume
=
0.126
x
3
=
?Total Load
2) From Bed - Block :
Total C/S Area in longitudinal Dir
Width in the Transverse Dirn
? Total Volume
?Total Load
3) From Pier :Diameter of pier
Area of pier
Ht: of Pier
?Total Volume
No of pier
?Total Load

24

0.35
3 Nos
3
0.38 m

0.378

9.07 kN

=(

1.6

12.29

=
=

1.60
19.66

x
x

12.29
24

=
=

3
19.66 m
471.94 kN

1.3

3
1.714 m

123.43 kN

2
1.6 m

1.3

=
=

1.327
1.292

=
=
=

1.327
3
1.714

m
m2
m

3 x 24

4) From Pile Cap :Volume of footing


? Dead Load
5) From Pile :Diameter of Pile
Depth of Pier with Circular X n
C/S Area of Circular Pier
No of Piles
?Total Volume of Concrete
?Total Load
5) From Dirt Wall :Volume of dirt wall
?Total Load

=(

5.1

79.866

79.866

x
x

1.2

25

=
=

1.131
6

=
=

3.152
11.349
11.349

1.8

24

1916.78 kN

24

4071.50 kN

m2

3
169.646 m
x
169.646

=
=

8.7

m3

12.0

0.30

m3
x

24

272.376 kN

Options
A) Both Spans on.
Case ( i )
Calculation of Longitudinal Moments at start of Pier Flaring & Pier Base & Pilecap Base
1) Due to Braking
b) Braking.
( Vide :- cl 214.2 (a) & (b) of I.R.C : 6 - 2000 . )
Braking . Since the movement of bearing under the girders on one side is restricted to move
in the longitudinal direction half the effect of braking is considered in the design.
st
1) 20 % of I Train Load. + 10% of succeding Train Loads for Single or a Two Lane Bridge.
st
2) 20 % of I Train Load. + 10% of succeding Train Loads for Single or a Two Lane Bridge.
+ 5 % of Loads on the lanes exceeding Two.
3 Lanes of Class A Wheeled Vehicles.
Total Load of 1 Vehicle
=
554
kN
one span
?Braking Force
110.8
kN
=
1 Lanes of Class 70 R Wheeled Vehicles.+ Class A one lane
Total Load of 70R Vehicle
=
1000
kN
one span
Total Load of Cl A Vehicle
=
554
kN
? Braking Force
=
200
kN
Max Braking Force
=
200
kN

Vertical reaction due to braking


=
200(1.2+0.075+2.45)/(40-0.6)
=
17.5888 kN
Longitudinal moment due to vertical load of braking
Longitudinal Eccentricity
=
0.45
Moment due to long.Eccentricity
=
7.91497 kNm
2) Due to Temp & Shrinkage of Bearings :
(ii)

Fh +m (Rg +Rq)
=
2
Total Force
=
?Moment at Pile Cap top =
Moment at Pile Cap bottom =

543.66

kN

543.66
544
544

kN
x
x

3.69
5.49

=
=

3) Moment due to Longitudinal Eccentricity


Longitudinal Eccentricity

Due to DL
Due to SIDL
Due to LL
Moment

0.80

=
=
=
=

Normal
Case
0
0
693
693

kNm
kNm
kNm
kNm

Seismic
Case
0
0
347
347

kNm
kNm
kNm
kNm

Due to Live Load


Transverse moment about the centre of the pier is calculated by finding
the eccentricity

2006.91 kNm
2985.50 kNm

Class 70R 1 lane


Moment in Transverse Dir n.

Class A 2 lane.
Moment in Transverse Dir n.

5778.09

70 R One lane- both carriage ways


Moment in Transverse Direction

2001.77 kNm

4683.80

Class A two lane-both carriage ways


Moment in Transverse Direction
=

kNm

kNm

1634.21

kNm

Critical Moment in Transverse Direction


5778.09
kNm
Axial Load
Pile Cap Top
=
7184 + 822.6 + 866.57 + 9.08 + 471.94 + 123.43+17.59
Pile Cap Bottom
=
7184 + 822.6 + 866.57 + 9.08 + 471.94 + 123.43 + 1916.79
Longitudinal moment
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

2006.92 + 693.26
2985.51 + 693.26

Transverse moment
Pile Cap Top
=
5778.1
Pile Cap Bottom
=
5778.1
Summary of Axial Loads & Moments
Descriptions
Pile Cap Bottom
Pile Cap Top
9750.0
Axial Load
11666.8
3678.8
2700.2
ML (Tm)
5778.1
5778.1
MT (Tm)
C) Both Spans on Under Seismic in Longitudinal Direction.
As per Modified Clause 222
Feq
Ah (Dead load +Appropriate Live Load)
=
Feq
Ah

=
=

Seismic force to be resisted


Horizontal Seismic coefficient

Z Sa


2 g

Zone No
Zone Factor,Z
Sa/g

=
=
=

IV
0.24
Average accelaration coefficient

Response Modification factor,R

3.3

Importance Factor,I
T

=
=

1.2

Case ( ii )

D
1000 F

Dead load of the super


structure, and appropriate live
load in kN,D
F

=
=

8006.60 kN
Horizontal force in kN required to be applied at the centre mass
of the super structure for one mm horizontal deflection at the top of
the pier /abutment along the considered direction of horizontal force.

3 EI G

l3

Modulus of Elasticity of
concrete,E
IXX
Deflection,G

=
=

Distance from bottom to the


centre of mass of super
structure,y

2
3.54E+07 kN/m
m4
0.42

0.001

0.97

Height of substructure,h
Total height measured from the
centre of mass of super
structure,l

2.29

3.56

0.97
0.3

2.29

F
T
Soil type
Sa/g
Ah
Feqx
Design of seismic force in longitud

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

990.85 kN
0.18
II
2.50
0.36
2882.38 kN
Feqz / R
873.45 kN

Seismic force in transverse direction


The seismic force due to live load shall be considered when acting in the direction perpendicular to traffic
The horizontal seismic force in the direction perpendicular to traffic shall be computed by taking 20%
of live load (excluding impact factor)
=
8179.91 kN
Dead load and appropriate live
Ah (Dead load +Appropriate Live Load)
Feq
=
Iyy
F
T
Soil type
Sa/g
Ah
Feqx
Design Seismic force in trans dirn,D
Seismic vertical component,V f

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

0.42
990.85
0.18
II
2.50
0.36
2944.77
892.35
594.90
1319.62
3.492861
4609.26

m4
kN

kN
kN
kN
kN
m
kNm

=
2/3 * 892.36
DFeqz+0.3 DFeqx+ 0.3Vf
Resultant force in longi dirn
=
CG of loads
=
Moment,M eqz at Pile Cap top
=
Moment,M eqx at Pile Cap
=
6984.59 kNm
bottom
Seismic vertical load ( Acting downwards-considering critical condition)
0.3DFeqz+0.3 DFeqx+ Vf
At pile cap top
=
1124.64
(0.3DFeqz+0.3 DFeqx+ Vf ) *1.25
At pile cap bottom
=
1405.80
Axial load
Pile Cap Top

7184+822.6+866.57 x 0.5+9.08+471.936+123.43

Pile Cap Bottom

7184+822.6+866.57 x 0.5+9.08+471.936+123.43 + 1916.79

Pile Cap Top

( 100 x 0.5 + 46.8 ) x 2 x 3.692 +4609.26+ 346.627

Pile Cap Bottom

( 100 x 0.5 + 46.8 ) x 2 x 5.49 +6984.58+ 346.627

Longitudinal moment

As per Table 1 Load Combination, 50 % of LL is considered in seismic case


Summary of Axial Loads & Moments
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom
Descriptions
Axial Load
10441.34
12639.28
ML (Tm)
6698.26
9923.17
2889.05
2889.05
MT (Tm)

D) Both Spans on Under Seismic in Transverse Direction.


Design Seismic force in trans
=
892.35 kN
dirn,DFeqx
=
1332.859 kN
Resultant force in trans dirn
CG of loads
=
3.492861
m
=
4655.492 kN
Moment,M eqx at Pile Cap top
=
7054.638 kN
Moment,M eqx at Pile Cap
Axial load is same as that of Case iii
Longitudinal moment
Pile Cap Top
=
( 100 x 0.5 + 46.8 ) x 2 x 3.7 +4655.49
Pile Cap Bottom
=
( 100 x 0.5 + 46.8 ) x 2 x 5.49 +7054.63

Case ( iii )

Transverse moment
Pile Cap Top
=
5778.09 x 0.5 + 4655.5
Pile Cap Bottom
=
5778.09 x 0.5 + 7054.64
As per Table 1 Load Combination, 50 % of LL is considered in seismic case
Summary of Axial Loads & Moments
Pile Cap Top
Descriptions
10441.34
Axial Load
6744.49
ML (Tm)
7544.54
MT (Tm)

Pile Cap Bottom


12639.28
9993.22
9943.68

G)Service condition with Wind in Transverse direction


(Vide cl: 212.1 of I.R.C:6-2000)
Height of the exposed surface above ground level
Exposed depth of C/Barrier & Superstructure

Case ( iv )
=
=
=

Due to crash Barrier


Avg Height of Crash barrier from GL

Intensity of Wind pressure corres : to height


Average Exposed Length

=
=

Effective area of crash barrier


Force
G
Cd
Force
Due to Deck Slab and girder
Average ht of deck slab and girder from GL

=
=
=
=
=

Intensity of Wind pressure corres : to height

Effective area of deck slab + girder


Force
G
Cd
Force

=
=
=
=
=

Live Load
Effective length
Depth
Height of the exposed surface above ground level

=
=
=

Area

Pressure

4.94
2.45
3.50

m
+
m

5.47 m
2
463.70 Kg/m
40.00 m
2
42.00 m
Pz A1GCd
2
1.30
506.36 kN
2.67 m
2
463.70 Kg/m
2
98.00 m
Pz A1GCd kN
2
1.95
177.23 kN

40.00
1.30
6.44

m
m
m
2
52.00 m
2
463.70 N/m

Force
G
Cd
Force

=
=
=
=

Pz A1GCd
2
1.20
57.87 kN

Due to Pier
Average ht of pier and pier cap from GL

Intensity of Wind pressure corres : to height

Effective area of pier and pier cap


Force
G

=
=
=

1.15 m
2
463.70 kg/m
2
1.60 m
Pz A1GCd kN
2

1.05

Cd
Force
Total transverse force
Transverse Moment due to wind
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom
Longitudinal Force
Crash barrier

=
=

0.50
0.74 kN

742.20 kN

=
=

3615.62 kNm
4017.76 kNm

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

Superstructure
On Live load
Substructure
Total longitudinal force
Longitudinal Moment due to wind
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

25 % of trans force
126.59
25 % of trans force
44.31 kN
25 % of trans force
14.47 kN
25 % of trans force
0.19
185.55 kN
=
=

Vertical load

=
Pz
A3
G
CL

=
=
=
=
=

829.48 kNm
1237.89 kNm

Pz A3GCL
2
463.70 N/m
680.00
2.00
0.75
472.97 kN

Acting upwards or downwards

Axial loads and Longitudinal Moments are same as Case 1


Summary of Axial Loads & Moments
Descriptions
Axial Load
ML (Tm)
MT (Tm)

Pilecap Top
10222.95
3529.65
9393.71

Pile cap Bottom


12139.73
4916.65
9795.85
Case ( iv b )

Descriptions
Axial Load
ML (Tm)
MT (Tm)
I)

Pilecap Top
9277.00
3529.65
9393.71

Effect of collision in longitudinal direction


Axial load
Pile Cap Top
=
Pile Cap Bottom
=
Longitudinal moment
Collision load in longitudinal direction
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

Pile cap Bottom


11193.79
4916.65
9795.85
Case v
7184+822.6+9.072+471.936+123.425
7184+822.6+9.072+471.936+123.425 + 1916.78

=
=

500.00 kN

acting at 1.5m above


carriageway level of service road
= 1000.00 kNm
= 1900.00 kNm

500x(1.5+0.5)
500x(1.5+2.3000000

Transverse moment
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom
Summary of Axial Loads & Moments
Descriptions
Footing top
8611.03
Axial Load
1000.00
ML (Tm)
MT (Tm)
0.00

=
=

0.00
0.00

Footing bottom
10527.82
1900.00
0.00

kNm
kNm

J)

Effect of collision in transverse direction

Case vi

Axial load
Pile Cap Top
=
7184+822.6+9.072+471.936+123.425
Pile Cap Bottom
=
7184+822.6+9.072+471.936+123.425 + 1916.78
Longitudinal moment
Pile Cap Top
=
0.00 kNm
Pile Cap Bottom
=
0.00 kNm
Transverse moment
Collision load in longitudinal direction
=
250.00 kN
Pile Cap Top
=
250x(1.5+0.5)
=
Pile Cap Bottom
=
250(1.5+2.30000000000001) =
Summary of Axial Loads & Moments
Descriptions
Footing top
Footing bottom
Axial Load
8611.03
10527.82
ML (Tm)
0.00
0.00
MT (Tm)
500.00
500.00

The Axial loads and moments will be equally shared by the 3 piers.
Description
(i)
( ii )
( iii )
( iv )
( iv b)
At Pile Cap top
Axial Load ( T )
Moment (Long - Tm)
Moment (Trans - Tm)
% steel assumed
Stress in concrete
(N/mm2)
Stress in steel

3249.99
900.06
1926.03
1.70

3480.45
2232.75
963.02
1.70

3480.45
2248.16
2514.85
1.70

10.58

14.17

19.81

3407.65 3092.33
1176.55 1176.55
3131.24 3131.24
1.70
1.70
18.20

18.24

500
950.00

(V)

acting at 1.5m above


carriageway level of service ro
kNm
kNm

(Vi)

2870.34 2870.344
333.33
0
0.00
166.6667
1.70
1.70
3.04

2.41

(N/mm2)
87.38
159.33
272.91
227.00 241.35
2.85
14.11
At Pile Cap bottom
Axial Load ( T )
3888.92 4213.09 4213.09 4046.58 3731.26 3509.27 3509.272
Moment (Long - Tm)
1226.25 3307.72 3331.07 1638.88 1638.88 633.33
0
Moment (Trans - Tm)
1926.03
963.02 3314.56 3265.28 3265.28
0.00
166.6667
The stresses in concrete and steel is calculated by a programme developed for columns subjected to
axial load and biaxial bending. In non of the load cases, the stresses in concrete and steel is exceeded
beyond the permissible limits. Hence the section adopted is safe.
As per Table - 1 and Cl-202.3 in IRC-6:2000, permissible stresses in concrete and steel are increased by 50%
and 33% for seismic and wind conditions respectively.

a)
b)
a)
b)
a)
b)
c)

a)
b)

Calculation of Pier Reinforcements.


Longitudinal Reinforcements:
( Vide cl:-306.2 & 306.3 of I.R.C :-21 : 2000 )
Not less than 0.3 % & not more than 8 % the gross C/S Area of the Column.
0.8 % of the minimum area of concrete required to resist the direct stresses.
Transverse Reinforcements:Diameter of Transverse Reinforcement shall not be less than 1/4ththe Dia
of Main Reinforcement & minimum being 8mm.
Minimum of 8mm Diameter.
Pitch of Transverse Reinforcement shall be the least of the following.
The least Lateral Dimension of the Column.
12 Times the Diameter of the smallest Longitudinal Reinforcement.
Maximum allowable spacing of 300 mm
Longitudinal Reinforcements:
2
m2
C/S Area of Pier Section.
=
1.327
= 13273.23 cm
2
0.3 % C/S Area.
=
13273.23
x
0.3
= 39.81969 cm
100
Direct Stress
=
P
P max
= 3480.45 kN
A
= 348044.5 Kg
2
Vcbc
=
16.66667 Kg/cm
? Area

348044.5
166.6667

0.8 % of Min C/S Area.

2088.267

x
100

2
2088 cm

0.8

2
16.706 cm

Assumed % of Longitudinal Reinforcement


?Longitudinal Reinforcement Provided.
=
Using
32 mm f bars,
No of bars reqd:

13273.23

1.700

x
100

1.70
2
8.042 cm
28.06
Nos

As1
=
225.645 =
8.042477
mm I bars, at
=

32
Provided steel
Transverse Reinforcements:a) Diameter of Transverse Reinforcement
=

1
4

2
= 225.6449 cm

30

b) Minimum Diameter
Pitch of Transverse Reinforcement
a) The least Lateral Dimension of the Column.
b)
12
x
32
c) Maximum Allowable Spacing
10
m f bars, at
So provide
Design of Pilecap & Pile
750
3600

32

300

no of bars

8 mm

10 mm

=
=
=
mm C/C.

1300 mm
384 mm
300 mm

750

750
1

3600

8700
3600

3
750

5100

1800

150

1200

1200

150

2400
3600
25 m
Length of pile
=
S.B.C of Pile
=
4520 kN
Moment due to tilt of pile
As per Cl 709.1.6 of IRC:78-2000, for vertical piles,
Permissible shift of pile
=
75
mm
Permissible tilt of pile ( 1:150 )
= 166.7 mm
Moment due to tilt of pile
= Axial load/pile x (
166.7 ) mm
Depth of fixity
= 7000 mm
Reduction factor
=
0.82
a) Piles :For piles subjected to direct load aswell as moments, the distribution of loads on individual pile
is determined as per the equation stated below.
Load /pi
=
W
+
Mxy
+
Myx
6y2
6x2
n

W
n
y
x

=
=
=
=
=
=

Total Load
No of piles
1.800
1.800
12.960
19.440

m
m
m2
m2

2996.99

3128.01

3778.89

90.61

512.66

32.27

90.61

90.61

0.00

0.00

0.00

123.70

123.70

260.05

1471.34

92.61

260.05

260.05

6
Considering 75mm permissible shift

6x2
6y2
Reduction Factor
0.8
Considering the total load from the 4 piers
Effective spacing between the piles
3.6
m
Considering 75mm permissible shift
Sumary of Axial loads,Moments,Stresses,Steel provided & resultant stresses.
(i)
(ii )
( iii )
( iv )
( ivb )
Description
Axial Load kN
Horizontal load/pileLong
Horizontal load/pileTrans
Moment due to
horizontal load-Long
Moment due to
horizontal load-Trans
Mr = M L2 + MT2
Moment /pile due
to tilt of piles
Total moment
e ;eccentricity (M/N)
R ;radius of column
r ;radius of reinf: ring
Bar size in mm
Perimeter in mm
Spacing in mm
No of bars
p;% of reinforcement
n ;modular ratio
e/R
r/R
np
constant "c"(from
Manohar chart)
constant "k"(from
Manohar chart)
"fc"c(M/R3)Kg/cm2
"fs" n k fc Kg/cm2
Per:stress in conc:
Per: stress in steel
Remarks
% increase in stress
Vertical Capacity of
Pile kN
Horizontal Capacity
of Pile kN
Remarks

3654.79 3497.13

0.00

0.00

0.00

355.02

355.02

260.05

1471.34

92.61

440.07

440.07
582.86

499.50

521.34

629.81

609.13

759.55
0.25
0.60
0.53
20
3298.67
180.0
18.33
0.0051
10.00
0.422
0.875
0.05

3464.02
1.11
0.60
0.53
20
3298.67
180
18.33
0.0051
10.00
1.846
0.875
0.05

815.03
0.22
0.60
0.53
20
3298.67
180
18.33
0.0051
10.00
0.36
0.875
0.05

1309.25 1282.98
0.36
0.37
0.60
0.60
0.53
0.53
20
20
3298.67 3298.67
180
180
18.33
18.33
0.0051 0.0051
10.00
10.00
0.60
0.61
0.875
0.875
0.05
0.05

2.060

2.450

2.110

2.040

2.000

0.200
7.24
14.49
16.67
200
Safe
1.00

1.390
39.29
546.14
25.00
300
Safe
1.50

0.700
7.96
55.73
25.00
300
Safe
1.50

0.540
12.37
66.77
22.22
267
Safe
1.33

0.350
1187.94
4157.80
22.22
267
Safe
1.50

4520

5650

5650

5650

5650

200
Safe

200
Safe

200
Safe

200
Safe

200
Safe

Calculation of Pile Reinforcements.


Longitudinal Reinforcements:
( Vide cl:-306.2 & 306.3 of I.R.C :-21 : 2000 )
a) Not less than 0.3 % & not more than 8 % the gross C/S Area of the Column.
b) 0.8 % of the minimum area of concrete required to resist the direct stresses.
Transverse Reinforcements:a) Diameter of Transverse Reinforcement shall not be less than 1/4th the Dia
of Main Reinforcement & minimum being 8mm.
b) Minimum of 8mm Diameter.
Pitch of Transverse Reinforcement shall be the least of the following.
a) The least Lateral Dimension of the Column.
b) 12 Times the Diameter of the smallest Longitudinal Reinforcement.
c) Maximum allowable spacing of 300 mm
Longitudinal Reinforcements:
2
m2
C/S Area of Pile Section.
=
1.131
= 11309.73 cm
2
a) 0.4 % C/S Area.
=
11309.73
x
0.4
=
45.24 cm
100

Assumed % of Longitudinal Reinforcement


?Longitudinal Reinforcement Provided.
11309.73 x
=

0.509
0.509

2
57.57 cm

100
Using
20 mm f bars,
No of bars reqd:

a)

b)
a)
b)
c)

As1
=
57.573 =
3.141593
m I bars, at
Provided steel
20
Transverse Reinforcements:Diameter of Transverse Reinforcement
=
1
4
Minimum Diameter
Pitch of Transverse Reinforcement
The least Lateral Dimension of the Column.
x
20
12
Maximum Allowable Spacing
So provide
m f bars, at
10

2
3.142 cm
18.33
Nos

19

no of bars

20

240

5 mm

10 mm

=
=
=
mm C/C.

1200 mm
240 mm
300 mm

Pilecap :1300
Fcos T

FsinT
T

150

1200
R

1800

150

1200
2400
3600

Design of steel in the Longitudinal direction.

Check for Pile Cap depth


Maximum Moment
Moment of resistance factor
Effective depth required,dreq
Effective depth provided,dpro
Hence Safe

2267.33
1.90
1092.40
1649.00

kNm
N/mm2
mm
mm

Design of reinforcement in longitudinal direction


FsinT
R
=
Providing
32 mm dia bar at bottom of pile cap.
tanT
0.95
T
43.40
Horizontal force ,H
3996.47 kN
2
Ast Provided
19982.4 mm
Provide 80 % steel in each band (above pile)(Refer Cl 307.2.5 IRC 21:2000)
2
Steel area
15985.9 mm
No of bars Reqd:

15985.9
804.25
19.88 Nos
No of bars in each band
20.00 Nos
Provide 20 bars of 32mm dia in each band in longitudinal direction at bottom
2
( providing
16084.95 mm )
1.5 times the diameter is taken as band width as per Cl 307.2.5.2 -IRC 21-2000
2
3996.5 mm
Ast Required in the remaining portion
Assume
Provide

20 mm
dia bars
20 mm dia bar @
120
mm c/c in longitudinal direction at pile cap bottom
in the remaining portion.
Provide min reinforcement of 0.06% in the pile cap top
2
Ast required in the pile cap top
1080 mm
Provide
16
mm dia bar @
150
mm c/c in at pile cap top in both directions

Design of reinforcement in transverse dirn


This has be designed as cantilever bending due to pile load.
Moment,M
Ast required
Min Ast required = 0.85bd/fy
Assume
25 mm
dia bars
spacing
140
Provide25mm bars @140mm c/c

4345.72 kNm
2
14190.6 mm
2
16820 mm

Min Stirrup Reinforcement Reqd : Assume

8 legged
Sv
8 legged

Provide

10

10
mm
diameter stirrups
162.039 mm
mm diameter stirrups@

150

mm C/c

Design of Bed Block


Moment at face of Pier

750.00 kNm

Torsion due to Live load from one side


Equivalent longitudinal moment due to torsion

=
=

56.41 kNm
49.77 kNm

6Moments
Effective Depth Reqd "deff"

deff reqd:

deff provided
Ast reqd

=
=
=

?Ast reqd

As1
No of bars Reqd:

=
=

Spacing of Bars

So provid

25 mm dia bars ,

M
QxB
750.00
x
1.47
x
564.69 cms
1000
M
Vst x j x d
750.00
200

x
x

Maximum Permissible Shear Stress :W max


=

1071.1
1600

x
x

2.3

Mpa
Kg/cm2

Wmax perm
=
23.0
Calculation of permissible Shear Stress :d
=
993.75

Since W

>

?Wc

Wc

56.41* (1+1/1.4)/1.7

Clear Cov
Bar Dia

=
=
=

<
5

993.75
1.25

Hence O.K
993.75 mm

1000000
0.89

2
4239.98 mm

cms

993.75

Refer staad

( Vide cl - 304.7.1.1 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )

1000
993.75

0.7

Kg/cm2

( Vide cl - 304.7.3.1 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )


Effective Depth
2
100 x As
As
= 4239.98 mm
Bxd
4240.0
x
100
= 0.267
1600
x
993.8
kg/cm2
0.2

Shear Reinforcement Reqd:

750.00 kNm
50 mm
25 mm

1000000
1600

2
490.8739 cm
4239.983
=
8.64 Nos
490.8739
1600
=
185.2 mm
9
185
mm c/c spacing

2) Check for Shear at pier face.


Calculation of S.Force at face of Pier due to
Due to DL,SIDL and LL
=
1014
kN
Equivalent shear due to torsi
=
56.41
kN
S Shear
=
1071.07 kN
Shear stress ,
W
=
V
Bxd
V
= The design shear across the section
d
= Effective depth of the section
B
= Breadth of slab
?W

Refer staad

Shear Reinforcement Reqd : Asw

V
s , spacing

=
=

? Asw

685.75
200
6

x
1000 x
x
993.8
Legged at spacing

678.6

cm2

Using
Asw

12

mm dia stirrups

V
s st
685.75
100

x
x
kN
mm

s
d
(assumed)

>
Hence O.K

100

100

mm.

345.0

mm2

345.0

B) Design of Cantilever Portion in the Longitudinal Direction.


The cantilevered portion of Bed block in this direction is very less.Even for one span offcondition
during construction time the girders are not rested initially over this cantilever portion.So the nominal
reinforcement need to be provided.

mm2

Design of Elliptical Pier with Pile Foundation - P7


Design Data for Substructure:Type
C/C Distance betn piers
Carriageway Width
Overall Width of Deck.
Width of Crash Barrier
Width of Median
Height of Crash Barrier
No of Bearings

PSC Girder
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

Overall Depth of I.Girders


=
Depth of Deck Slab
=
Depth of cross girder
=
Width of cross girder
=
Design Data for Pier :Formation level at pier locatio
=
R.L at pier cap top
=
=
Height of varying portion of pi
=
Height of straight portion of pi
Existing Ground level
=
=
Pile cap top below existing gr
R.L at Pile cap top
=
R.L at Pile cap bottom
=
Depth of Pile below GL
=
Founding level for Piles.
=
=
Overall Height of Substructure
=
Longitudinal width of pier at b
=
Transverse width of pier at bot
Transverse width of pier above pile cap
Longitudinal width of pier at top
=
Transverse width of pier at top
No of piers
=
Pier Cap Width in Long Dir n.
=
Pier Cap Length in Trans Dirn.
Straight Depth of Pier Cap
Varying Depth of Pier Cap
Type of Bearing
Size of Pedestals
Distance betn Pedestals
Longitudinal width of pile cap
Transverse width of pile cap
Straight Depth of pile cap
Varying Depth of pile cap
P.C.C Projections
Diameter of Pile
Distance betn Piles in
longitudinal dirn
Distance betn Piles in
transverse dirn
No of Piles
Edge projection in
Edge projection in transverse
Grade of Concrete for pier

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

40000
40000
7500
17000
500
1000
1050
3
3
2200
250
2200
800

mm
on left side
mm
on right side
mm
on both sides
mm
mm
One side
mm
One side
mm
on left side
on right side
mm
mm
mm
mm

220.100
216.95
3000.00
2547.50
210.700
500
210.20
208.40
25000
185.70
6748
1700
3000
4000
2500
5000
1

m
m
mm
mm
m
mm
m
m
mm
m
mm
mm
mm
mm
mm
mm

2500

mm

9700
mm
600
mm
600
mm
Pot PTFE bearing
x
600
4400
mm
4400
mm
8700
mm
8700
mm
1800
mm
0
mm
150
mm
1200
mm

3600

mm

=
=
=
=
=

mm

Permissible flexural stress


Grade of Steel

=
=

3600
8
150
150
M 50
16.67
Fe - 415

Permissible tensile stress


Total Height of Pier

=
=

200
5548

Density of Concrete

24

N/mm2
mm
kN/m3

Density of Concrete for Earth

18

kN/m3

mm
mm
N/mm2

600
x
on left side
on right side

350

References.
I.R.C :- 6 - 2000 - Loads & Stresses.
I.R.C :- 21 - 2000 - Permissible Stresses
I.R.C :- 78 - 2000 - Sub Structure and Foundation
600

216.95
350

4400

600
600
5000
3000.00
9700

3350
6748

3000
2547.50

4000

1000

1800

25000
3000
GL-

210.700

RL-

208.400

210.200

8700

1200

150
3600

150

RLTransverse View
2500
350
600
600

1200
2500
3000

2547.5
6747.5

1700
3500
1800

1800

25000
150

1200

1200
3600

8700
Longitudinal View

150

185.700

Load Calculations:1) DEAD LOADS


Load from slab, girder & diaphragm =
Load from slab, girder & diaphragm =
Total dead load
=
2) S.I.D.L
Wearing coat load

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

Crash barrier load


Median load
SIDL for 40m span
SIDL for 40m span
S.I.D.L
Impact Factor

3) LIVE LOAD

7184
kN
7184
kN
14368.00 kN

for 40m span


for 40m span

20 x 0.065 x 15 x 22
429.00
20 x 0.065 x 15 x 22
429.00 kN
249.60 kN
249.60
144.00 kN
144.00 kN
822.60 kN
822.60 kN
1645.20 kN

for 40m span


for 40m span
for 40m span
for 40m span
for 40m span
for 40m span

considering 50 % reduction as per clause 211.7 IRC 6-2000

70 R
170
0 1.37
B

170

170

170

3.05

1.37

2.13

120
1.52

120
3.96

80
25

D
867

RC
RC
RD
RD
70 R one lane

38.4

133.4323

=
( 170 x 38.4 + 170 x 37.03 + 170 x 33.98 + 170 x 32.61 + 120 x 30.48 + 120 x 28.96 + 80 x 25 ) / 38.4

=
=
=
=

866.568 kN
170 + 170 + 170 + 170 + 120 + 120 + 80 - 866.568
133.432 kN
866.57

kN

Class A One lane


114 114

68

68

68

68

27

27

114

114

68

68

68

68

27

27

3.2
3 1.2
A
#

4.3

3
38.4

20

1.1

1.6
B

RA
RB

=
=

400.67 kN
153.33 kN

RC

430.32 kN

RD

123.68 kN

Reaction at pier Support


Class A One lane
Class 70R

=
=
=

583.65
583.65
866.57

kN
kN
kN

Class A two lane


Class A One lane ( One span
dislodged)
Critical live load

=
=

1167.29
430.32

kN
kN

866.57

kN

1.6
153.33

1.2
C
430.32

4.3

3
38.4

20

1.1

2.8
D
124

Calculation of Dead Load from Sub - Structure :1) From Pedestals


Volume of 1 Pedestal
=
0.6
No: of Pedestals
?Total Volume
?Total Load
2) From Bed - Block :
Total C/S Area in transverse

0.6

0.35

m3

=
=

0.126
6

0.126

0.756

11.25

m2
m
m3

24

6 Nos
3
0.76 m

18.14 kN

675.00 kN

839.20 kN

1.8

Dir
Width in the longitudinal Dir n

2.5

? Total Volume
?Total Load
3) From Pier :-

=
=

28.13
28.13

Area at top

10.62

m2

Area at bottom

4.35

m2

Averaged area
Height of varying portion

=
=

7.485
3

Volume of varying portion


Height of straight portion

=
=

22.455
1.5475

m2
m
m3
m
m3

Volume of straight portion

Area of pier above pilecap

5.78

Volume of tapered portion


?Total Volume
?Total Load
4) From Pile Cap :Volume of pile cap

5.78

=
=

6.73

24

m2
m3

34.967 m
34.967

=(

8.7

136.242

? Dead Load
5) From Pile :Diameter of Pile
Depth of Pier with Circular Xn

136.242

1.2

25

C/S Area of Circular Pier


No of Piles
?Total Volume of Concrete
?Total Load

=
=

1.131
8.00

m2

=
=

226.195
226.195

m3

1 x 24

8.7
24

3269.81 kN

24

5428.67 kN

Options
A) Both Spans on.
Calculation of Longitudinal Moments at start of Pier Flaring & Pier Base & Pilecap Base
1) Due to Braking
b) Braking.
( Vide :- cl 214.2 (a) & (b) of I.R.C : 6 - 2000 . )
Braking . Since the movement of bearing under the girders on one side is restricted to move
in the longitudinal direction half the effect of braking is considered in the design.
st
1) 20 % of I Train Load. + 10% of succeding Train Loads for Single or a Two Lane Bridge.
st
2) 20 % of I Train Load. + 10% of succeding Train Loads for Single or a Two Lane Bridge.
+ 5 % of Loads on the lanes exceeding Two.
2 Lanes of Class A Wheeled Vehicles.
Total Load of 1 Vehicle
=
554
kN
one span
?Braking Force
=
110.8
kN
1 Lanes of Class 70 R Wheeled Vehicles
Total Load of 70R Vehicle
=
1000
kN
one span
? Braking Force
=
200
kN
Max Braking Force
=
200
kN

Vertical reaction due to braking


=
=

m3

200(1.2+0.065+2.45)/(40 -1.6)
19.35 kN

Case ( i )

Longitudinal moment due to vertical load of braking


Longitudinal Eccentricity
Moment due to long.Eccentri

=
=

0.800
15

m
kNm

2) Due to Temp & Shrinkage of Bearings :


Fixed Bearing
Coefficient of Friction,m
(i) Fh -m (Rg +Rq)
(ii) Fh +m (Rg +Rq)
2

=
=
=

0.05
-200.33
543.66

Free Bearing
Coefficient of Friction,m
=
(i) m (Rg +Rq)
=
Total Force
=
?Moment at Pile Cap top =
Moment at Pile Cap bottom =

0.05
400.33
943.99
944
944

kN
kN

kN
kN
x
x

7.20
9.00

=
=

Seismic
Case
0
0
347
347

kNm
kNm
kNm
kNm

6794.36 kNm
8493.54 kNm

3) Moment due to Longitudinal Eccentricity


Longitudinal Eccentricity

Due to DL
Due to SIDL
Due to LL
Moment

4 Centrifugal force
Live load
Design Speed
Radius of curvature

0.80

=
=
=
=

Normal
Case
0
0
693
693

kNm
kNm
kNm
kNm

=
=
=

867
kN
100
km/hr
2350.00
m
WV2
Centrifugal force
=
127R
T
=
29
Centrifugal force acts at 1.2m above the level of carriage way.
Increase in impact effect is not considered.(Refer Cl 215-IRC 6:2000)
=
29
x
10.91
\ Moment at Pile Cap top
=
29
x
12.72
\ Moment at Pile Cap bot

=
=

316.85
369.41

kNm
kNm

Due to Live Load


Transverse moment about the centre of the pier is calculated by finding
the eccentricity
Class 70R 1 lane
c/l of pier
433.28 433.3
2.13
1.93
4.44
1
1

7.5

7.5

8.5
Moment in Transverse Dirn

17
=

4683.80

0.5
8.50

kNm

c/l of pier
433.28 433.3

433.28

433.28

2.13
1.93

4.44

1.93
2.13

7.5

7.5

8.5

0.5

17

Moment in Transverse Dirn

2001.77

8.50
kNm

Class A 2 lane.
c/l of pier
291.82
291.82 291.8
1.8
1.8
1.7

1
1

291.8
2.30

7.5
17

8.5

7.5

0.5
8.50

Moment in Transverse Dirn.

5778.09

kNm

291.82
291.82 291.8
1
1.8 1.7

291.8
2.30

1.8

291.82
0.90

Moment in Transverse Dirn.

291.82

291.82

1.7

1.8

291.82

1.00

1634.21

1.8

kNm

Due to Class A One lane


C/L
215.16 215.2
1
1.8
5.8
1

7.5
17

Transverse Eccentricity
Moment in Transverse Dirn.

Axial Load
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

7.5

=
=

3.80
2883.11

m
kNm

=
=

14368 + 1645.2 + 866.57 + 18.15 + 675 + 839.2 + 19.35


14368 + 1645.2 + 866.57 + 18.15 + 675 + 839.2 + 3269.81 + 19.35

=
=

6794.36 + 693.26 + 15.48


8493.54 + 693.26 + 15.48

Longitudinal moment
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

Transverse moment
Pile Cap Top
=
6094.94
Pile Cap Bottom
=
6147.50
Summary of Axial Loads & Moments
Pile Cap Bottom
Descriptions Pile Cap Top
Axial Load
18431.5
21701.3
9202.3
ML (Tm)
7503.1
MT (Tm)
6094.9
6147.5

B) One Span Dislodged with one lane of class A


Calculation of Longitudinal Moments at Pier Base & Pile cap Base
1) Due to Temp & Shrinkage of Bearings :
(i) Fh +m (Rg +Rq)
=
499.06 kN
2

Case ( ii )

Vertical reaction due to braking


=
110.8(1.2+0.065+2.45)/(40 -1.6)
=
10.72 kN
Longitudinal moment due to vertical load of braking
Longitudinal Eccentricity
Moment due to long.Eccentri

=
=

0.800
9

m
kNm

2) Due to Eccentricity of Dead Load and SIDL :Eccentricity of Loading

=
0.8

Dead Load +SIDL


Longitudinal Moment
Transverse moment for sidl
Axial Load
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

8006.60
6405.28
0.00

0.8

C/L of
Bearings

C/Lof Pier

kN
kNm
kNm

=
=

822.6 + 7184 + 430.32 + 18.15 + 675 + 839.2 + 10.72


822.6 + 7184 + 430.32 + 18.15 + 675 + 839.2 + 3269.81 + 10.72

Pile Cap Top


Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

6405.28 + 430.32 x 1.125 + 499.06 x 7.2 + 8.58


6405.28 + 430.32 x 1.125 + 499.06 x 9 + 8.58

Transverse moment
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

2883.12+871.2+157.34
2883.12+871.2+183.43

Longitudinal moment

4 Centrifugal force
Live load
Design Speed
Radius of curvature

=
=
=

430
kN
100
km/hr
2350.00
m
WV2
Centrifugal force
=
127R
=
14
kN
Centrifugal force acts at 1.2m above the level of carriage way.
Increase in impact effect is not considered.(Refer Cl 215-IRC 6:2000)
x
10.91
Moment at Pile Cap top
=
14
=
14
x
12.72
Moment at Pile Cap botto
Summary of Axial Loads & Moments
Descriptions Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom
13249.79
Axial Load
9979.98
11248.39
ML (Tm)
10350.08
MT (Tm)
3754.31
3754.31

=
=

C) Both Spans on Under Seismic in Longitudinal Direction.


As per Modified Clause 222
Feq
Ah (Dead load +Appropriate Live Load)
=
Feq

Seismic force to be resisted

157.34
183.44

kNm
kNm

Case ( iii )

Ah

Horizontal Seismic coefficient

Z Sa

2 g

Zone No
Zone Factor,Z
Sa/g
Response Modification
factor,R

=
=
=

IV
0.24
Average accelaration coefficient

3.3

Importance Factor,I
T

=
=

1.2

Dead load of the super


structure, and appropriate
live load in kN,D
F
=

D
2
1000 F

=
16013.20 kN
Horizontal force in kN required to be applied at the centre mass
of the super structure for one mm horizontal deflection at the top of
the pier /abutment along the considered direction of horizontal force.
=

3 EI G
l3

Modulus of Elasticity of
concrete,E
IXX
Deflection,G

3.0E+07

=
=

0.41
0.001

Distance from bottom to the


centre of mass of super
structure,y

1.23

Height of substructure,h

6.75

Total height measured from


the centre of mass of super
structure,l

8.27

kN/m2
m4

1.23
0.3

6.75

F
T
Soil type
Sa/g
Ah
Feqx

=
64.27
kN
=
1.00
=
II
=
1.362
=
0.20
=
3141.24 kN
Feqz / R
Design Seismic force in long d
=
DFeqz
=
951.89 kN
Seismic force in transverse direction
The seismic force due to live load shall be considered when acting in the direction perpendicular to traffic
The horizontal seismic force in the direction perpendicular to traffic shall be computed by taking 20%
of live load (excluding impact factor)
(0 + 0.2 x 0 )
=
16186.51 kN
Dead load and appropriate
Ah (Dead load +Appropriate Live Load)
Feq
=

Iyy
F
T
Soil type
Sa/g
Ah
Feqx
Design Seismic force in trans
Seismic vertical component,V
Resultant force in longi dirn
CG of loads

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

0.41
64.27
1.00
II
1.35
0.2
3158.19
957.03
638.02
1430.40
7.52

m4
kN

kN
kN
kN

2/3 * 957.03
DFeqz+0.3 DFeqx+ 0.3Vf

=
10756.85 kNm
Moment,Meqz at Pile Cap top
Moment,Meqz at Pile Cap
=
13331.58 kNm
bottom
Seismic vertical load ( Acting downwards-considering critical condition)
0.3DFeqz+0.3 DFeqx+ Vf
=
1210.69 kN
At pile cap top
(0.3DFeqz+0.3 DFeqx+ Vf ) *1.25
At pile cap bottom
=
1513.37 kN
Axial load
Pile Cap Top

14368+1645.2+866.57 x 0.5+18.15+675+839.2 + 19.35

Pile Cap Bottom

14368+1645.2+866.57 x 0.5+18.15+675+839.2 + 3269.81 + 19.35

Pile Cap Top

( 100 x 0.5 + 46.8 ) x 2 x 7.197 +10756.84+ 346.627 + 15.48

Pile Cap Bottom

( 100 x 0.5 + 46.8 ) x 2 x 8.99 +13331.57+ 346.627 + 15.48

5778.09 x 0.5 +0+316.85x 0.5

Longitudinal moment

Transverse moment
Pile Cap Top

Pile Cap Bottom


=
5778.09 x 0.5 +0+369.4x 0.5
As per Table 1 Load Combination, 50 % of LL is considered in seismic case
Summary of Axial Loads & Moments
Pile Cap Bottom
Descriptions Pile Cap Top
Axial Load
19754.62
16787.48
21542.42
ML (Tm)
17397.51
MT (Tm)
3073.75
3047.47
D) Both Spans on Under Seismic in Transverse Direction.
The Seismic effect on Live Load is taken in this Case
Design Seismic force in trans
957.03 kN
dirn,DF eqx
Resultant force in trans dirn
CG of loads

=
=

1434.00 kN
7.52
m

Moment,Meqx at Pile Cap top


Moment,Meqx at Pile Cap
bottom

10783.89 kNm

13365.09 kNm

Axial load is same as that of Case iii


Longitudinal moment
Pile Cap Top
=
Pile Cap Bottom
=

Case ( iv )

0.3DFeqz+ DFeqx+ 0.3Vf

( 100 x 0.5 + 46.8 ) x 7.19 +10756.84


( 100 x 0.5 + 46.8 ) x 8.99 +13331.57

Transverse moment
Pile Cap Top
=
3047.47 + 10783.9
Pile Cap Bottom
=
3047.47 + 13365.1
As per Table 1 Load Combination, 50 % of LL is considered in seismic case

Summary of Axial Loads & Moments


Descriptions Pile Cap Top
Axial Load
16787.48
ML (Tm)
6625.18
MT (Tm)
13989.79

Pile Cap Bottom


19754.62
8195.36
16570.99

E) One Spans Dislodged Under Seismic in Longitudinal Direction.


D
T
Soil type
Sa/g
Ah
Feqz

=
8006.60 kN
=
0.71
=
II
=
1.93
=
0.28
=
2221.19 kN
Feqz / R
Design Seismic force in long d
=
DFeqz
673.09 kN
=
Seismic force in transverse direction-One span dislodged
Dead load and appropriate
=
8092.66 kN
live load in kN,D
Ah (Dead load +Appropriate Live Load)
Feq
=
Iyy
F
T
Soil type
Sa/g
Ah
Feqx

=
=
=
=
=
=
=

Design Seismic force in trans


dirn,DF eqx
Seismic vertical component,V
Resultant force in longi dirn
CG of loads

=
=
=
=

Moment,Meqx at Pile Cap top


Moment,Meqx at Pile Cap
bottom

0.41
64.27
0.71
II
1.92
0.28
2233.10
676.70
451.13
1011.44
7.27

m4
kN

kN
kN
kN
kN
m

7348.98

kNm

9169.56

kNm

Seismic vertical load ( Acting downwards-considering critical condition)


0.3DFeqz+0.3 DFeqx+ Vf
At pile cap top
=
856.07 kN
(0.3DFeqz+0.3 DFeqx+ Vf ) *1.25
At pile cap bottom
=
1070.08 kN
Axial load
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

8006.6+430.32*0.5+18.15+675+839.2 + 10.72
8006.6+430.32*0.5+18.15+675+839.2+3269.81 + 10.72

Longitudinal moment
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

6405.28 + ( 50 + 46.8 ) x 7.2 + 172.13 + 7348.98 + 8.58


6405.28 + ( 50 + 46.8 ) x 8.99 + 172.13 + 9169.56 + 8.58

Transverse moment
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

2883.12 x 0.5+0
2883.12 x 0.5+0

Summary of Axial Loads & Moments


Descriptions Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom
Axial Load
11964.55
8908.75
19938.67
ML (Tm)
17281.23
MT (Tm)
1533.27
1520.23
The seismic force caused due to dead load of the girders placed over the
Sand Jacks are considered.

Case ( v )

F) One Spans Dislodged Under Seismic in Transverse Direction.


Design Seismic force in trans
dirn,DF eqx
Resultant force in trans dirn
CG of loads
Moment,Meqx at Pile Cap top
Moment,Meqx at Pile Cap
bottom

=
=
=

676.70
1013.96
7.27

kN
kN
m

7367.33

kNm

9192.46

kNm

Case ( vi )

Axial load is same as for Case v


Longitudinal moment
Pile Cap Top

6405.28 + ( 50 + 46.8 ) x 7.197 + 172.13

Pile Cap Bottom

6405.28 + ( 50 + 46.8 ) x 8.99 + 172.13

Pile Cap Top

2883.12 x 0.5 + 0+7367.33

Pile Cap Bottom

2883.12 x 0.5 + 0 +9192.46

Transverse moment

Summary of Axial Loads & Moments


Descriptions Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom
Axial Load
11964.55
8908.75
10760.53
ML (Tm)
9923.68
MT (Tm)
10817.45
8966.22
G)Service condition with Wind in Transverse direction
Transverse direction
(Vide cl: 212.1 of I.R.C:6-2000)
Height of the exposed surface above ground level
Exposed depth of C/Barrier & Superstructure
Due to crash Barrier
Avg Height of Crash barrier from GL

Case ( viia )

=
=
=
=

Intensity of Wind pressure corres : to height


Average Exposed Length

=
=

Effective area of crash barrier


Force
G
Cd
Force

=
=
=
=
=

Due to Deck Slab and girder


Average ht of deck slab and girder from GL

Intensity of Wind pressure corres : to height

Effective area of deck slab + girder


Force
G
Cd
Force

=
=
=
=
=

Live Load
Effective length
Depth
Height of the exposed surface above ground level
Area
Pressure
Force
G
Cd
Force

6.25
2.45
3.50

m
+
m

6.77
m
2
463.70 Kg/m
40.00
m
m2
42.00
Pz A1GCd
2
1.30
506.36
kN

7.12
m
2
463.70 Kg/m
2
m
98.00
Pz A1GCd
2
1.95
177.23
kN

40.00
3.00
7.75
120.00

m
m
m
m2

2
463.70 N/m
= Pz A1GCd
=
2
=
1.20
= 133.55
kN

1.05

Due to Pier
Average ht of pier and pier cap from GL

Intensity of Wind pressure corres : to height

Effective area of pier and pier cap


Force
G
Cd
Force

=
=
=
=
=

Total transverse force

Transverse Moment due to wind


Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

3.37
m
2
463.70 kg/m
m2
10.73
Pz A1GCd
kN
2
0.80
7.96
kN
825.09

= 5753.12
= 6495.71

Longitudinal Force
Crash barrier

kN

kNm
kNm

25 % of trans force
126.59
kN
25 % of trans force
44.31
kN
25 % of trans force
33.39
kN
25 % of trans force
1.99
kN
206.27
kN

Superstructure
On Live load
Substructure
Total longitudinal force
Longitudinal Moment due to wind
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

= 1438.28
= 1809.57

Vertical load

= Pz A3GCL
Pz
A3
G
CL

=
=
=
=
=
Axial loads and Longitudinal Moments are same as Case 1
Summary of Axial Loads & Moments
Descriptions Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom
Axial Load
18904.43
22174.24
8941.37
11011.84
ML (Tm)
MT (Tm)
11848.07
12643.21

463.70
680.00
2.00
0.75
472.97

kNm
kNm

N/m2

kN

Acting upwards or downwards

Case ( vii-b )
Descriptions
Axial Load
ML (Tm)
MT (Tm)

Pile Cap Top


17958.49
8941.37
11848.07

Pile Cap Bottom


21228.29
11011.84
12643.21

I) Effect of collision in longitudinal direction


Axial load
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

14368+1645.2+18.144+675+839.199
14368+1645.2+18.144+675+839.199 + 3269.8

Longitudinal moment
Collision load in longitudinal direction
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

Case viii

500x(1.5+0.5)
500x(1.5+2.30)

500.00
= 1000.00
= 1900.0

kN
kNm
kNm

acting at 1.5m above


carriageway level of service road

Transverse moment
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

Summary of Axial Loads & Moments


Descriptions
Footing top
Axial Load
17545.54
1000.00
ML (Tm)
MT (Tm)
0.00

0.00
0.00

kNm
kNm

Footing bottom
20815.35
1900.00
0.00

J) Effect of collision in transverse direction


Axial load
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

Case ix

14368+1645.2+18.144+675+839.199
14368+1645.2+18.144+675+839.199 + 3269.8

Longitudinal moment
Pile Cap Top
Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

0.00
0.00

kNm
kNm

Transverse moment
Collision load in longitudinal direction

250.00

kN

Pile Cap Top


Pile Cap Bottom

=
=

250x(1.5+0.5)
250(1.5+2.30)

Summary of Axial Loads & Moments


Descriptions
Footing top
Axial Load
17545.54
ML (Tm)
0.00
MT (Tm)
500.00

=
=

acting at 1.5m above


carriageway level of service road
500.00 kNm
950.00 kNm

Footing bottom
20815.35
0.00
950.00

Summary of loads and moment for all 7 cases


Description

(i)

At Pile Cap top


Axial Load ( T )
18431.46
Moment (Long - T 7503.09
Moment (Trans - T
% steel assumed
Stress in
concrete
Stress in steel

( ii )

( iii )

( iv )

(v)

( vi )

( viia )

( viib )

(viii)

(ix)

9979.98
10350.08

16787.48 16787.48 8908.75 8908.75 18904.43 17958.49 17545.54 17545.54


17397.51 6625.18 17281.2 9923.68 8941.37 8941.37 1000.00
0.00

6094.94
1.89

3754.31
1.89

3047.47
1.89

9.20

10.18

15.40

13989.79 1520.23 8966.22 11848.07 11848.07


1.89
1.89
1.89
1.89
1.89
12.0

14.1

12.6

12.8

12.8

0.00
1.89

500.00
1.89

9.1

8.2

(N/mm2)
28.80
97.04
145.60
67.4
203.6
130.3
68.3
72.9
59.5
68.9
At Pile Cap bottom
Axial Load ( T )
21701.27
13249.79
19754.62 19754.62 11964.5 11964.5 22174.24 21228.29 20815.35 20815.35
Moment (Long - T 9202.27
11248.39
21542.42 8195.36 19938.7 10760.5 11011.84 11011.84 1900.00
0.00
Moment (Trans - T 6147.50
3754.31
3073.75 16570.99 1533.27 10817.4 12643.21 12643.21
0.00
950.00
The stresses in concrete and steel is calculated by a programme developed for columns subjected to
axial load and biaxial bending. In none of the load cases, the stresses in concrete and steel is exceeded
beyond the permissible limits. Hence the section adopted is safe.
As per Table - 1 and Cl-202.3 in IRC-6:2000, permissible stresses in concrete and steel are increased by 50%
and 33% for seismic and wind conditions respectively.
Calculation of Pier Reinforcements.
Longitudinal Reinforcements:
( Vid( Vide cl:-306.2 & 306.3 of I.R.C :-21 : 2000 )
a) a) Not less than 0.3 % & not more than 8 % the gross C/S Area of the Column.
b) b) 0.8 % of the minimum area of concrete required to resist the direct stresses.
Transverse Reinforcements:a) Diameter of Transverse Reinforcement shall not be less than 1/4ththe Dia
of Main Reinforcement & minimum being 8mm.

b) Minimum of 8mm Diameter.


Pitch of Transverse Reinforcement shall be the least of the following.
a) a) The least Lateral Dimension of the Column.
b) b) 12 Times the Diameter of the smallest Longitudinal Reinforcement.
c) c) Maximum allowable spacing of 300 mm
Longitudinal Reinforcements:
m2
C/S Area of Pier Section.
=
2.270

a) a) 0.3 % C/S Area.

0.3

2
22698.01 cm
2
68.09402 cm

P max

=
=

22174.24 kN
2217424 Kg

13305

cm2

22698.007

x
100

b) b) Direct Stress

P
A

Vcbc

2
16.666667 Kg/cm

? Area

2217424.2
166.66667

0.8 % of Min C/S Area.

13304.545

=
x

0.8

2
106.436 cm

2
428.9923 cm

100
Assumed % of Longitudinal Reinforcement
?Longitudinal Reinforcement Provided.
=

22698.007

1.890

1.89
100

Using
32 mm f bars,
No of bars reqd:

As1
=
428.992 =
8.0424772

mm I bars, at
Provided steel
32
Transverse Reinforcements:a) Diameter of Transverse Reinforcement
=

1
4

b) Minimum Diameter
Pitch of Transverse Reinforcement
a) a) The least Lateral Dimension of the Column.
x
32
b) b)
12
c) c) Maximum Allowable Spacing
So provide
mm f bars, at
10
Design of Pilecap & Pile
750

cm2
Nos

8.042
53.34
54

no of bars

32

8 mm

10 mm

=
=
=
mm C/C.

300

3600

3600

1700 mm
384 mm
300 mm

750

750
2

3600

8700

3600
7

750

8700

1800

1200

1950

1200
2400
3600

Length of pile
=
25
m
S.B.C of Pile
=
4520
kN
Moment due to tilt of pile
As per Cl 709.1.6 of IRC:78-2000, for vertical piles,
Permissible shift of pile
=
75
mm
Permissible tilt of pile ( 1:150 )
= 166.7
mm
Moment due to tilt of pile
= Axial load/pile x (
167 ) mm
= 7000
mm
Depth of fixity
Reduction factor
=
0.82
a) Piles :For piles subjected to direct load aswell as moments, the distribution of loads on individual pile
is determined as per the equation stated below.
=
W
+
Mxy
+
Myx
Load /p
6x2
6y2
n
W
= Total Load
n
= No of piles
=
8
y
=
3.60
m
Considering 75mm permissible shift
x
=
3.60
m
678.584
m2
6x2
=
77.76
4020.78
2
2
6y
m
=
77.76
Reduction Factor
0.82
Considering the total load from the pier
3.6
m
Considering 75mm permissible shift
Effective spacing between the piles
Sumary of Axial loads,Moments,Stresses,Steel provided & resultant stresses.
(i)
(iii )
( iv )
(v)
( vi )
( viia )
(viib)
( ii )
Description
Axial Load kN
Horizontal
load/pile-Long
Horizontal
load/pile-Trans
Moment due to
horizontal loadLong
Moment due to
horizontal loadTrans

3342.20

2309.20

3415.85

118.00

62.38

416.85

24.20

289.75

12.10

143.78

143.78

0.00

0.00

0.00

120.59

0.00

84.59

103.14

103.14

338.66

179.04

1196.37

69.45

831.58

34.73

412.66

412.66

0.00

338.66
Mr = ML2 + MT2
Moment /pile
557.03
due to tilt of
895.69
Total moment
e ;eccentricity (M
0.27
0.60
R ;radius of colum
0.53
r ;radius of reinf: r
20
Bar size in mm
3298.67
Perimeter in mm
150.0
Spacing in mm
21.99
No of bars
p;% of reinforcem 0.0061
10.00
n ;modular ratio
0.447
e/R
0.875
r/R
0.06
np

3423.72 2366.01 2370.10 3734.25

3616.01

0.00

0.00

346.08

0.00

242.76

296.00

296.00

179.04

1196.37

352.98

831.58

245.24

507.84

507.84

394.33

395.02

384.87

569.31

570.62

622.38

602.67

563.90
0.24
0.60
0.53
20
3298.67
150
21.99
0.0061
10.00
0.41
0.875
0.06

1765.68
0.52
0.60
0.53
20
3298.67
150
21.99
0.0061
10.00
0.862
0.875
0.06

923.60 1225.91 640.25 1542.87


0.27
0.52
0.27
0.41
0.60
0.60
0.60
0.60
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
20
20
20
20
3298.67 3298.67 3298.67 3298.67
150
150
150
150
21.99
21.99
21.99
21.99
0.0061
0.0061 0.0061
0.0061
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
0.45
0.86
0.45
0.69
0.875
0.875
0.875
0.875
0.06
0.06
0.06
0.06

1523.17
0.42
0.60
0.53
20
3298.67
150
21.99
0.0061
10.00
0.70
0.875
0.06

constant
"c"(from
constant
"k"(from
"fc"c(M/R3)Kg/cm
"fs" n k fc Kg/cm2
Per:stress in conc
Remarks
Per: stress in steel
Remarks
% increase in stre
Capacity of Pile
kN
Remarks

2.000

1.980

2.260

2.000

2.260

2.000

2.120

2.200

0.200
8.29
16.59
16.67
Safe
200
Safe
1.00

0.200
5.17
10.34
16.67
Safe
200
Safe
1.00

1.150
18.47
212.45
25.00
Safe
300
Safe
1.50

0.200
8.55
17.10
25.00
Safe
300
Safe
1.50

1.150
12.83
147.51
25.00
Safe
300
Safe
1.50

0.200
5.93
11.86
25.00
Safe
300
Safe
1.50

0.930
15.14
140.83
22.22
Safe
267
Safe
1.33

0.930
15.51
144.28
22.22
Safe
267
Safe
1.33

4520
Safe

4520
Safe

5650
Safe

5650
Safe

5650
Safe

5650
Safe

5650
Safe

5650
Safe

Calculation of Pile Reinforcements.


Longitudinal Reinforcements:
( Vide cl:-306.2 & 306.3 of I.R.C :-21 : 2000 )
a) Not less than 0.4 % & not more than 8 % the gross C/S Area of the Column.
b) 0.8 % of the minimum area of concrete required to resist the direct stresses.
Transverse Reinforcements:a) Diameter of Transverse Reinforcement shall not be less than 1/4th the Dia
of Main Reinforcement & minimum being 8mm.
b) Minimum of 8mm Diameter.
Pitch of Transverse Reinforcement shall be the least of the following.
a) The least Lateral Dimension of the Column.
b) 12 Times the Diameter of the smallest Longitudinal Reinforcement.
c) Maximum allowable spacing of 300 mm
Longitudinal Reinforcements:
m2
C/S Area of Pile Section.
=
1.131
=
11309.73
a) 0.4 % C/S Area.
=
11309.734
x
0.4
=
45.24
100
b) Direct Stress
=
P
A
P max
=
3734.25 kN
=
373425
2
s cbc
=
16.667 Kg/cm
2
\ Area
=
373425.42
= 2240.55 cm
166.66667
x
0.8
=
17.92
0.8 % of Min C/S Area.
=
2240.5525
100
Assumed % of Longitudinal Reinforcement
=
0.611
?Longitudinal Reinforcement Provided.
0.611
=
69.09
11309.734 x
=
100
2
Using
20 mm f bars,
As1
=
3.142 cm
No of bars reqd:
=
69.087 =
21.99
Nos
3.1415927
mm I bars, at
22
Provided steel
20
no of bars
Transverse Reinforcements:a) Diameter of Transverse Reinforcement
=
1
x
20
=
5
4
b) Minimum Diameter
=
10
Pitch of Transverse Reinforcement
a) The least Lateral Dimension of the Column.
=
1200
b)
12
x
20
=
240
c) Maximum Allowable Spacing
=
300
10
240
mm f bars, at
mm C/C.
So provide

cm2
cm2

Kg

cm2

cm2

mm
mm
mm
mm
mm

Design of Pilecap :Provide min reinforcement of 0.06% in the pile cap top
2
Ast required in the pile cap top
1080 mm
Provide 16 mm dia bar @
150
mm c/c in at pile cap top in both directions

Design of reinforcement in transverse dirn


This has be designed as cantilever bending due to pile load.
Load coming on three piles ( normal case)
Moment,M
Ast required

8981
14369.6
46922.7

kN
kNm
mm 2

Design of reinforcement in longitudinal dirn


Moment,M
Ast required

24697.8
123095

kNm
mm 2

28693

mm 2

Min Ast required = 0.85bd/fy


Assume 32 mm
dia bars
spacing
Provide32mm bars @120mm c/c

120
in transverse direction

Assume 32 mm
dia bars
spacing
Provide32mm bars @50mm c/c

50
in longitudinal direction

Min Stirrup Reinforcement Reqd : Assume


Provide

8 legged
Sv
8 legged

16

16
mm
diameter stirrups
166.881 mm
mm diameter stirrups@

150 mm C/c
3.225

Design of Bed Block

Girder + Deck slab


Live Load
SIDL

2394.67
289
274
600
600
1900
450

2350

1) Design of Cantilever Portion in the Transverse Direction.


Calculation of B.Moments at face of Pier due to'
a) Due to self weight
Width of Bedblock in long: dir n
=
Cantilevered Length
=
=
Average depth of cantilever part
Volume
U.D.L /m Length
C.G of Load
D.Load Moment at face of Pier
b) Due to Dead load of Girder & Deck Slab
Moment at face of Pier
c) Due to S.I.D.Load
Moment at face of Pier
d) Due to Vehicular Liveload
Moment at face of Pier

=
=
=
=

2.5
2.35
0.9
5.288
5.288
1.044
126.9

m
m
m
m3
x
m
x

24

126.90 KN

1.044

132.54 KNm

548.83 kNm

4549.87 Tm

520.98 Tm

Torsion due to Live load from one side


Equivalent longitudinal moment due to torsion
6Moments
Effective Depth Reqd "def

deff reqd:

deff provided
Ast reqd

=
=
=

?Ast reqd

As1
No of bars Reqd:

=
=

Spacing of Bars

=
=

M
QxB
x
5814.43
x
1.90
1106.39 cms
1200 M
Vst x j x d
5814.43
200
804
27683
804
2500
34

So provide two layers 32 dia bars,17 nos


2) Check for Shear at pier face.
Calculation of S.Force at face of Pier due to
a) Due to self weight
deff
=
1.1934
Shear due to self wt:
=
48.18
=
2394.67
b) D load of Girder ,DeckSlab
c) Due to S.I.D.Load
=
274
d) Due to LL
=
289
=
45.74
Equivalent shear due to to
=
3051.65
S Shear
Shear stress ,
W
=
V
Bxd
V
= The design shear across the section
d
= Effective depth of the section
B
= Breadth of slab
?W
=
3051.6
2500
Maximum Permissible Shear Stress :W max
=
2.3

71.47 kNm
62.22 kNm

Clear Cov
Bar Dia

=
=
=

5814.43 kNm
50 mm
32 mm

1000000
2500

x
x

<
-

1000000
0.88

1193.40 mm
1.6 =

Hence O.K
1193.40 mm

2
27683 mm

=
1193.40

cm2
=
=

34

Nos

73

mm

m
KN
KN
KN
kN
kN
kN
( Vide cl - 304.7.1.1 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )

x
x

1000
1193.40

1.0

Mpa

Mpa
which ever is less

fck
=
Calculation of permissible Shear Stress :-

35

100 x As
Bxd
27682.7
2500

?Wc

0.4

N/mm2
( Vide cl - 304.7.3.1 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )
2
As
=
27682.72 mm
x
x
N/mm2

Since W >
Wc
Shear Reinforcement Reqd:
Shear Reinforcement Reqd : ( Vide cl - 304.7.4.2 of I.R.C:-21-2000 )
Asw
=
V
x
s st
x
V
=
1846.41
kN
s , spacing
=
150
mm
? Asw
Using
Asw

12

100
1193.4

s
d
(assumed)

1846.41
200
12

x
1000
x
1193.4
Legged at spacing

1357.2

cm2

>

mm dia stirrups

0.928

150
150

2
1160.4 mm

mm.

2
1160.4 mm

Hence O.K
B) Design of Cantilever Portion in the Longitudinal Direction.
The cantilevered portion of Bed block in this direction is very less.Even for one span offcondition
during construction time the girders are not rested initially over this cantilever portion.So the nominal
reinforcement need to be provided.

www.WilburSmith.com

#8, Second Floor, 80 Feet Road,


RT Nagar Bangalore Karnataka - 560 032. India
w +91.80. 3918.7500 f +91.80. 2363.4097

NCR Planning Board


Asian Development Bank

Capacity Development of the National


Capital Region Planning Board
(NCRPB) Component B
(TA No. 7055-IND)
FINAL REPORT
Volume V-A3: DPR for Flyover at Mohan Nagar Junction in
Ghaziabad
Detailed Drawings
July 2010

List of Drawings

Drawing No.

Drawing Title

MN-2D-00-001-01

General Notes

MN-1D-10-001-01/1 to 2

Plan & Profile (2 sheets)

General Arrangement Drawing of Flyover (6 sheets)

MN-2D-60-001-02/1

Dimension Details of PSC I Girder

MN-2D-60-001-02/2

Reinforcement Details of Deck Slab (PSC I Girder


Location)

MN-2D-60-001-02/3

Reinforcement Details of Cross Girder

MN-2D-60-001-02/4

Cable Profile and Anchorage Details of PSC I Girder

MN-2D-60-001-02/5

Reinforcement Details of PSC I Girder

MN-2D-60-001-03/1

Dimension Details of Abutment & Foundation

MN-2D-60-001-03/2

Dimension Details of Pier and Foundation

MN-2D-60-001-03/3

Reinforcement Details of Abutment & Foundation

MN-2D-60-001-03/4

Reinforcement Details of Pier and Foundation (P3 to P13)

MN-2D-60-001-03/5

Reinforcement Details of Pier and Foundation (P1, P2, P14


and P15)

MN-2D-80-001-01

Miscellaneous Details

MN-2D-80-001-02

Details of Reinforced Earth Wall

MN-2D-80-001-03

Details of Reinforced Earth Wall

MN-2D-80-001-04

Details of Bearings

General Drawings

General Arrangement Drawings


MN-2D-60-001-01/1 to 6
Superstructure

Substructure

Miscellaneous Drawings

www.WilburSmith.com

#8, Second Floor, 80 Feet Road,


RT Nagar Bangalore Karnataka - 560 032. India
w +91.80. 3918.7500 f +91.80. 2363.4097

NCR Planning Board


Asian Development Bank

Capacity Development of the National


Capital Region Planning Board
(NCRPB) Component B
(TA No. 7055-IND)
FINAL REPORT
Volume V-A4: DPR for Flyover at Mohan Nagar Junction in
Ghaziabad
Detailed Estimates
July 2010

Contents
Appendix E-1
Appendix E-2
Appendix E-3
Appendix E-4

:
:
:
:

Summary Cost Estimate


Detailed Item-wise Cost Estimates
Detailed Quantity Estimates
Rate Analysis

Appendix E-1 : Summary Cost Estimate

SUMMARY OF COST
BILL NO.

BILL NAME

AMOUNT (Rs.)

SITE CLEARANCE AND DISMANTLING

EARTH WORK

SUB-BASE AND BASE COURSES

30,497,551.00

BITUMINOUS WORKS

27,862,232.00

FLYOVER

TRAFFIC SIGNAGES, ROAD MARKING AND OTHER APPURTENANCES

DRAINAGE AND PROTECTIVE WORKS, DUCTS & OTHER SERVICES

ELECTRICAL WORKS

168,394.00
4,768,367.00

422,521,116.00

950,674.00

22,552,630.00

4,165,144.00

TOTAL CONSTRUCTION COST

513,486,108.00

CONTIGENCIES & PETTY SUPERVISION CHARGES

3%

15,404,583.00

UTILITY SHIFTING

2%

10,269,722.00

GRAND TOTAL

539,160,413.00

Appendix E-2 : Detailed Item-wise Cost Estimates

Item No.

1.01

Description

1. SITE CLEARANCE AND DISMANTLING


Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Clearing and grubbing road land in an area of light jungle by mechanical means including
uprooting rank vegetation, grass, bushes, shrubs, saplings and trees girth up to 300 mm,
removal of stumps of trees cut earlier and disposal of unserviceable materials and
stacking of serviceable material to be used or auctioned, up to a lead of 1000 metres
including removal and disposal of top organic soil not exceeding 150 mm in thickness as
per Technical specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

Total

201

Unit

ha

Quantity

3.51

Rate MoRTH

48,044.00

Amount MoRTH

168,394.22

168,394.22

2. EARTH WORK
Item No.

Description

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Unit

Quantity

2.01

Excavation for roadwork in soil with hydraulic excavator of 0.9 cum bucket capacity
including cutting and loading in tippers, trimming bottom and side slopes, in accordance
with requirements of lines, grades and cross sections, and transporting to the
embankment location within all lifts and lead upto 1000m

301

cum

15,417.75

46.00

709,216.50

2.02

Supplying and filling in with good earth for construction of subgrade and earthern
shoulder in regular layers of 150mm thick etc including watering, consolidation by
power road roller etc complete.

305

cum

17,845.00

221.00

3,943,745.00

2.03

Supplying and filling in with good earth for formation of traffic island, median strips,
footpaths etc., including watering and consolidation by hand roller etc., complete.

407

cum

735.00

83.00

61,005.00

2.04

Grassing with 'Doobs' grass including watering and maintenance of the lawn for 30 days
or more till the grass forms a thick lawn free from weeds and fit for moving including
supplying good earth if needed

307

Sqm

10,880.00

5.00

54,400.00

Total

Rate MoRTH

Amount MoRTH

4,768,366.50

Item No.
3.01

3.02

3. GRANULAR BASE COURSE AND SUB-BASE


Ref. to
Unit
MoRTH
401
cum
Construction of granular sub-base by providing close graded material (Grading l),
mixing by mix in place method with rotavator at OMC, and compacting with vibratory
roller to achieve the desired density, all complete as per Technical specifications and as
directed by the Engineer-in-charge.
Description

Providing, laying, spreading and compacting graded stone aggregate to wet mix
macadam specification including premixing the Material with water at OMC in
mechanical mix plant carriage of mixed Material by tipper to site, laying in uniform
layers with paver in sub- base / base course on well prepared surface and compacting
with vibratory roller to achieve the desired density.

Total

406

cum

Quantity

Rate MoRTH

Amount MoRTH

6,404.00

2,219.00

14,210,476.00

7,087.50

2,298.00

16,287,075.00

30,497,551.00

Item No.

Description

4. BITUMINOUS COURSE
Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Unit

Quantity

Rate MoRTH

Amount MoRTH

4.01

Providing and applying primer coat with bitumen emulsion on prepared surface of
granular Base including clearing of road surface and spraying primer at the rate of 0.60
kg/sqm using mechanical means.

502

sqm

28,350.00

28.00

793,800.00

4.02

Providing and applying tack coat with bitumen emulsion using emulsion pressure
distributor at the rate of 0.6 kg per sqm on concrete surface treated with primer cleaned
with mechanical broom all complete as per Technical specifications and as directed by
the Engineer-in-charge.

503

sqm

28,350.00

12.00

340,200.00

4.03

Providing and applying tack coat with bitumen emulsion using emulsion pressure
distributor at the rate of 0.25 kg per sqm on the prepared nominal bituminous surface
cleaned with mechanical broom all complete as per Technical specifications and as
directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

503

sqm

28,350.00

10.00

283,500.00

4.04

Providing and laying dense graded bituminous macadam with 100-120 TPH batch type
HMP producing an average output of 75 tonnes per hour using crushed aggregates of
specified grading, premixed with bituminous binder @ 4.0 to 4.5 per cent by weight of
total mix and filler, transporting the hot mix to work site, laying with a hydrostatic paver
finisher with sensor control to the required grade, level and alignment, rolling with
smooth wheeled, vibratory and tandem rollers to achieve the desired compaction as per
MoRTH specification clause No. 507 complete in all respects.

507

cum

2,190.75

7,650.00

16,759,237.50

4.05

Providing and laying bituminous concrete Grading II with 100-120 TPH batch type hot
mix plant producing an average output of 75 tonnes per hour using crushed aggregates
of specified grading, premixed with bituminous binder @ 5.4 to 5.6 per cent of mix and
filler, transporting the hot mix to work site, laying with a hydrostatic paver finisher with
sensor control to the required grade, level and alignment, rolling with smooth wheeled,
vibratory and tandem rollers to achieve the desired compaction as per MORTH
specification clause No. 509 complete in all respects.

509

cum

1,134.00

8,541.00

9,685,494.00

Total

27,862,231.50

DPR

5. FLYOVER
Item No.

Description

Ref. to
MoRTH Spec.

Unit

5.1.01

Earth work in excavation ( ordinary soil ) for foundation of Bridges as per drawing and
technical specification, including setting out, construction of shoring and bracing,
removal of stumps and other deleterious matter, dressing of sides and bottom and
backfilling with approved material all complete as per Technical specifications and as
directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

304

cum

3,276.43

49.00

160,545.07

5.1.02

Providing Plain Cement Concrete in Open Foundation complete as per Drawing and
Technical Specifications.

5.1.02a

PCC Grade M15 for Pile cap

1500, 1700 &


2100
PCC Grade M15 for levelling course
1500, 1700 &
2100
Providing Plain Cement Concrete M20 in Open Foundation complete as per Drawing 1500, 1700 &
and Technical Specifications.
2100

cum

128.25

4,773.00

612,132.48

cum

971.20

4,966.00

4,822,979.20

cum

59.54

5,749.00

342,266.72

5.1.03

Bored cast-in-situ M40 grade R.C.C. Pile excluding Reinforcement complete as per 1100,1600 &
1700
Drawing and Technical Specifications and removal of excavated earth with all lifts and
lead upto 1000 m.

2,996.40

10,811.00

32,394,080.40

5.1.04

MT

210.94

58,457.00

12,331,190.02

5.1.05

Providing Steel Liner for Pile including Fabricating and Setting out as per Detailed
Drawing.
Pile Load Test on single Vertical Pile in accordance with IS:2911(Part-IV)

5.1.05a

a) Initial

No

2.00

31,941.20

63,882.40

5.1.05b

b) Routine load test

No

3.00

20,907.00

62,721.00

5.1.05c

c) Lateral load test

No

3.00

20,907.00

62,721.00

5.1.06

Cement Concrete for Reinforced Concrete in Pile Cap complete as per Drawing and
Technical Specification
RCC Grade M40 for Pile Cap

cum

2,203.36

5,913.00

13,028,479.51

cum

931.84

7,095.00

6,611,420.46

5.1.02b
5.1.02c

5.1.06a
5.1.07
5.1.07a

1100

Quantity

Rate MoRTH

Amount MoRTH

1100

1100, 1500
&1700

Providing Reinforced cement concrete in sub-structure complete as per drawing and 1500, 1700 &
Technical Specifications
2200
RCC Grade M50

5. FLYOVER
Item No.

Description

Ref. to
MoRTH Spec.

Unit

5.1.07b

RCC Grade M25

1500, 1700 &


2200

cum

5.1.08

Furnishing and Placing Reinforced/ Prestressed cement concrete in super-structure as 1500 &1600
per drawing and Technical Specification
1700
PSC Beam and Slab M50

cum

5.1.08a
5.1.09

Quantity

Rate MoRTH

Amount MoRTH

106.64

6,406.00

683,142.57

cum

9,370.02

8,711.00

81,622,265.13

MT

666.93

53,679.00

35,800,303.80

1600

5.1.09a

Supplying, fitting and placing HYSD bar reinforcement complete including providing
couplings wherever required as per drawings and Technical specifications and as
directed by the Engineer-in-charge.
For Foundation

5.1.09b

For Substructure

MT

260.86

53,754.00

14,022,378.64

5.1.09c

For Superstructure

MT

1,158.81

54,403.00

63,042,512.37

5.1.10

High Tensile Strands

MT

405.86

88,473.00

35,907,547.03

5.1.11

Providing and laying Plain cement concrete M-15 for levelling course of approach slab, 1500 , 1700 &
2100
mechanically mixed and compacted complete as per drawings and Technical
specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

cum

17.85

4,775.00

85,233.75

5.1.12

Providing and laying Reinforced cement concrete of M30 grade for approach slab 1500,1600,
including reinforcement and formwork all complete as per drawings and Technical 1700 & 2704
specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

cum

35.70

8,683.00

309,983.10

5. FLYOVER
Item No.

Description

Ref. to
MoRTH Spec.

Unit

5.1.13

Provision of an Reinforced cement concrete crash barrier at the edges of the road,
approaches to bridge structures and medians, constructed with M-40 grade concrete
with HYSD reinforcement conforming to IRC:21 and dowel bars 25 mm dia, 450 mm
long at expansion joints filled with pre-moulded asphalt filler board, keyed to the
structure on which it is built and installed as per design given in the enclosure to MOST
circular No. RW/NH - 33022/1/94-DO III dated 24 June 1994 as per dimensions in the
approved drawing and at locations directed by the Engineer, complete as per drawing
and Technical specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

5.1.13a

Crash Barrier (having cross section area 0.26 sqm)

809

5.1.14

RCC M40 Concrete for Median

809

5.1.15a

Expansion joint including crack inducer slot in surfacing filled with rubber/bitumen seal

5.1.15b

Providing and laying of a strip seal expansion joint catering to maximum horizontal
movement upto 70 mm, complete as per approved drawings and standard specifications
to be installed by the manufacturer/supplier or their authorised representative ensuring
compliance to the manufacturer's instructions for installation.

5.1.16

Supplying, fitting and fixing in position true to line and level POT-PTFE bearing 2000 & 2200
consisting of a metal piston supported by a disc or unreinforced elastomer confined
within a metal cylinder, sealing rings, dust seals, PTFE surface sliding against stainless
steel mating surface, complete assembly to be of cast steel/fabricated structural steel,
metal and elastomer elements to be as per IRC: 83 part-I & II respectively and other
parts conforming to BS: 5400, section 9.1 & 9.2 and clause 2006 of MoRTH
Specifications complete as per drawing and approved Technical Specifications.

5.1.17

Providing and applying tack coat with bitumen emulsion using emulsion pressure
distributor at the rate of 0.6 kg per sqm on cement concrete surface cleaned with
mechanical broom complete as per Technical specifications and as directed by the
Engineer-in-charge.

Quantity

Rate MoRTH

Amount MoRTH

2,414.00

3,746.00

9,042,844.00

cum

192.00

7,104.00

1,363,968.00

2605

102.00

16,000.00

1,632,000.00

2607

102.00

29,000.00

2,958,000.00

tonne
capacity

33,600.00

207.00

6,955,200.00

sqm

9,705.00

15.00

145,575.00

503

5. FLYOVER
Item No.

Description

Ref. to
MoRTH Spec.

Unit

Quantity

Rate MoRTH

Amount MoRTH

5.1.18

Providing and applying tack coat with bitumen emulsion using emulsion pressure
distributor at the rate of 0.25 kg per sqm on the prepared bituminous surface cleaned
with mechanical broom complete as per Technical specifications and as directed by the
Engineer-in-charge.

503

sqm

9,705.00

10.00

97,050.00

5.1.19

Providing and laying bituminous concrete with 100-120 TPH batch type hot mix plant
producing an average output of 75 tonnes per hour using crushed aggregates of
specified grading, premixed with bituminous binder @ 5.4 to 5.6 per cent of mix and
filler, transporting the hot mix to work site, laying with a hydrostatic paver finisher with
sensor control to the required grade, level and alignment, rolling with smooth wheeled,
vibratory and tandem rollers to achieve the desired compaction as per MORTH
specification clause No. 509 complete in all respects

509

sqm

9,705.00

8,541.00

82,890,405.00

5.1.20

Providing and laying 25 mm thick mastic asphalt wearing course with paving grade
bitumen meeting the requirements given in table 500-29, prepared by using mastic
cooker and laid to required level and slope after cleaning the surface, including
providing antiskid surface with bitumen precoated finegrained hard stone chipping of
13.2 mm nominal size at the rate of 0.005cum per 10 sqm and at an approximate
spacing of 10 cm center to center in both directions, pressed into surface when the
temperature of surfaces is not less than 1000C, protruding 1 mm to 4 mm over mastic
surface, all complete as per clause 515.

515

sqm

9,705.00

459.00

4,454,595.00

5.1.21

Construction of Reinforced Earth Structures including assembly and erection of


reinforcing elements, placement of facing panels, plain cement concrete M15 as
levelling course for the facia material and all associated components, etc., all complete
as per drawings and Technical specificatoins and as directed by the Engineer-incharge.

3100

sqm

3,419.66

2,000.00

6,839,328.00

5.1.22

Filling with approved material suitable for Earth Retaining Strucure graded and
compacted to meet requirement as per Technical specifications and as directed by the
Engineer-in-charge.

305

cum

1,628.57

221.00

359,914.41

5.1.23

Providing and fitting Drainage Spouts complete as per drawing and Technical
specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

2705

Each

256.00

1,060.00

271,360.00

5. FLYOVER
Item No.

Description

Ref. to
MoRTH Spec.

5.1.24

Unit

Rm

Quantity

Rate MoRTH

Amount MoRTH

1,505.25

300.00

451,575.90

100.00

0.30

30.00

56,245.21

55.00

3,093,486.47

Providing and fixing 150mm dia PVC pipes for draining storm water to drain all complete
as per drawings and technical specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.
5.1.25

Printing of Bridge No. and span arrangement of any shade with synthetic enamel paint
black or any other approved colour to give an even shade complete as per Technical
specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

801

per cm
height per
letter

5.1.26

Painting two coats after filling the surface with synthetic enamel paint in all shades on
new plastered concrete surfaces

803

sqm

Total

422,521,116.00

Item No.
6.01

6. TRAFFIC SIGNAGES, ROAD MARKING AND OTHER APPURTENANCES


Description
Ref. to
Unit
MoRTH Spec.
801
Providing and fixing of retro- reflectorised cautionary, mandatory and informatory sign as per IRC
:67 made of high intensity grade sheeting vide clause 801.3, fixed over aluminium sheeting, 1.5
mm thick supported on a mild steel angle iron post 75 mm x 75 mm x 6 mm firmly fixed to the
ground by means of properly designed foundation with M15 grade cement concrete 45 cm x 45
cm x 60 cm, 60 cm below ground level as per approved drawing all complete as per Technical
specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

Quantity

Market Rate

Amount MoRTH

6.01a

90 cm equilateral triangle

No

7.00

3,267.00

22,869.00

6.01b

90 cm high octagon

No

4.00

4,838.00

19,352.00

6.01c

75 cm x 60 cm rectangular ( Chevron Signs )

No

2.00

3,091.00

6,182.00

6.01d

80 cm x 60 cm rectangular ( Bus stop signs )

No

7.00

3,902.00

27,314.00

6.02

Providing and laying of hot applied thermoplastic compound 2.5 mm thick including reflectorising
glass beads @ 250 gms per sqm area, thickness of 2.5 mm is exclusive of surface applied glass
beads as per IRC:35 .The finished surface to be level, uniform and free from streaks and holes
all complete as per Technical specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

6.02a

Lane, Centreline, Edge and other marking along strips

sq.m.

761.70

271.00

206,420.70

6.02b

Directional arrows and letters

sq.m.

271.00

6.03

Providing Gantry sign board over a designed support system of aluminium alloy or galvanised
steel
Providing and erecting direction and place identification retro-reflectorised sign as per IRC:67
made of high intensity grade sheeting vide clause 801.3, fixed over aluminium sheeting of 2 mm
thick supported on a mild steel single angle iron post 75 x 75 x 6 mm firmly fixed to the ground
by means of properly designed foundation with M15 grade cement concrete 45 x 45 x 60 cm, 60
cm below ground level as per approved drawing and all complete as per Technical specifications
and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

6.04

803

No

2.00

150,000.00

300,000.00

801

6.04a

Direction and Place Identification Signs with size more than 0.9 sqm size Board.

sq.m.

6.30

6,930.00

43,659.00

6.04b

Direction and Place Identification Signs upto 0.9 sqm Size Board.

sq.m.

0.96

6,608.00

6,343.68

Item No.
6.05

6.06

6. TRAFFIC SIGNAGES, ROAD MARKING AND OTHER APPURTENANCES


Description
Ref. to
Unit
MoRTH Spec.
No
Providing and fixing of road stud 100x 100 mm, die-cast in aluminium, resistant to corrosive
effect of salt and grit, fitted with lense reflectors, installed in concrete or asphaltic surface by
drilling hole 30 mm upto a depth of 60 mm and bedded in a suitable bituminous grout or epoxy
mortar, all as per BS 873 part 4:1973

6.06a

Reinforced cement concrete M15 grade kilometre stone of standard design as per IRC:8-1980,
fixing in position including painting and printing etc all complete as per Technical specifications
and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.
Ordinary kilometer stone (precast)

6.06b

Hectometer stone (precast)

6.07

Reinforced cement concrete M15 grade boundary pillars of standard design as per IRC:25-1967,
fixed in position including finishing and lettering but excluding painting all complete as per
Technical specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.
Total

Quantity

Market Rate

Amount MoRTH

967.00

230.00

222,410.00

No

3.00

1,846.00

5,538.00

No

16.00

496.00

7,936.00

No

145.00

570.00

82,650.00

804

806

950,674.00

Item No.
7.01

7. DRAINAGE WORKS
Ref. to
MoRTH
304
Earth work in excavation for foundation of Drains in ordinary rock (not requiring
blasting) as per drawing and technical specification, including setting out,
construction of shoring and bracing, removal of stumps and other deleterious matter,
dressing of sides and bottom and backfilling with approved material all complete as
per Technical specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.
Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate MoRTH

Amount MoRTH

cum

8,100.00

49.00

396,900.00

cum
cum

648.00
1,684.80

4,966.00
5,695.00

3,217,968.00
9,594,936.00

7.02

Providing Plain Cement Concrete in Open Foundation complete as per Drawing and 1500, 1700
Technical Specifications.
& 2100

7.02a
7.03

PCC Grade M15


Providing Reinforced Cement Concrete M25 in Open Foundation complete as per 1500, 1700
Drawing and Technical Specifications.
& 2100

7.04

Supplying, fitting and placing HYSD bar reinforcement complete as per drawing and
all complete as per Technical specifications and as directed by the Engineer-incharge.
Construction of cement concrete kerb with channel with top and bottom width 115
and 165 mm respectively, 250 mm high in M 20 grade PCC on M10 grade foundation
150 mm thick, kerb channel 300 mm wide, 50 mm thick in PCCM20 grade, sloped
towards the kerb, kerb stone with channel laid with kerb laying machine, foundation
concrete laid manually, all complete as per clause 408

1600

MT

132.52

53,679.00

7,113,326.36

408

Rm

3,920.00

544.00

2,132,480.00

Painting two coats on kerbs in black and white or yellow after filling the surface with
synthetic enamel paint complete as per drawing and Technical specifications and as
directed by the Engineer-in-charge.

800

sqm

1,764.00

55.00

97,020.00

7.05

7.06

Total

22,552,630.00

8. ELECTRICAL WORKS
Sl No.

Description

8.01

Supplying,High pressure sodium vapour street lighting fitting die cast aluminium canopy with aluminium housing for
control gear, finished stove enamel gray glassy white canopy interior with pair of anodised aluminium reflectors
clear acrylic bowl, gasket lining for drip inset resistance,duly wired with porcelain holder, heavy duty copper wound
ballast, igniter and HPF condenser including a mercury vapour lamp

8.01a

250W high pressure Sodium Vapour Lamp of philips /Bajaj or Equivalent make of material as per IS standards.

8.02

Supply and erection of Steel tubular poles with one side arm/ both side arm bracket of specified length including
accessories and incidentals as given below
a) Sole Plate at bottom.
b) Earthing arrangement as per IS Rule with 20mm dia x2m long G.I. earthing rod and 8SWG G.I Wire of 2 in a
set.
c) Junction box with terminal block and fuse Protection for Luminaries circuit with gasket. Railway Type locking ,
440 V Statutoty Notice Board.
d) 2x 1C x2.5 sq.mm. PVC insulated copper wire +1No. 1sq.mm. PVC insulated Cu wire from junction box to
luminaries.
e) Muffing of 300 mm above ground including 3mm thick heat cement finish (6:3:1).
f) Providing Suitable class 'B' G.I.pipe with long bend for passage of cable up to cable looping box.
g) identification working in Block letters or Digits (40 mm size) one alphabet and 3 nos . in Black Japan Paint
withing circle.
h) The cost to include for 10mm M.S.Base plate and 4 no.holding down J bolts:transportation cost of carriage of
pole anywhere in the project area ,rate to include for multiple handling.
j) All steel parts to be painted with an approved coat of anti-corrosive primer and 2 coats of aluminium

8.02a
8.03

9 mtr. Pole (Double arm pole)


Design, Installation, Testing and commissioning of outdoor hooded type Feeder cum Service Pillar Box made of
5mm thick M.S.Plate with 15mm thick cast iron base for Programmable Time Switch complete with suitable
Contactor, Fuse protection isolating switch
1 x 4P x 63A x MCB
Time Switch: TSQ - 100 of L & T
Contractor: ML-2 of L & T
4 x4P x 25A MCB

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Unit

Qty

Rate

Amount

Nos

176

5,000.00

880,000.00

Nos

88

30,000.00

2,640,000.00

Nos

11,500.00

23,000.00

8. ELECTRICAL WORKS
Sl No.
8.04

Description
Supply and Laying of service line for street lighting PVC armoured Aluminium Cables - 3.5C x 25 sq.mm. on wall
including supply and fixing of M.S. saddles with earthing attachment.
(The rate shall be inclusive of excavation, back filling and ramming of soil consolidating & making good.)

8.05

Supply and laying PVC armoured Aluminium Conductor cable underground in trenches, including earthwork
excavation, brick protection on the top of the cable (6 nos.Bricks/mtr.) including filling the space between brick and
the cable and also trench with shifted soil,levelling and restoring the surface duly rammed / Cable trench with
necessary saddle on cable rack.

8.05a
8.06

4C x 16 sq.mm
Supplying and fitting Vitrified Enamel Danger Board at a height of 3mtr. above G.L. with clamps made of 25mm x
3mm G.I. Strip.

8.07

Provide materials and construct foundations in M15 concrete 1000mm x1000mmx 1.5m, 300mm height located
above ground level for street light pole including fixing in position of Anchor Bolts etc.,all asper Drawings and
specifications.(For Double armed poles)
Total

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Unit

Qty

Rate

Amount

Rm
140

185.00

25,900.00

Rm

2860

145.00

414,700.00

Nos

88

463.00

40,744.00

Nos

88

1,600.00

140,800.00
4,165,144.00

Appendix E-3 : Detailed Quantity Estimates

ESTIMATE
Item No

Description
Nos

1
1.01

2.01

Unit
Depth

Area

Clearing and Grubbing

Ha
1
1
2
1
1

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

26.50
36.00
9.50
36.00
26.50

3.51
0.42
0.14
2.26
0.25
0.42

Total
Bill No:- 2 EARTH WORK

3.51

Earth work Excavation

15,417.75
LHS Service Road

6,892.95

RHS Service Road

8,524.80

Total
2.02

Total
Quantity

Bill No:- 1 SITE CLEARANCE AND DISMANTLING

Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880

Dimensions
Length
Breadth

15,417.75

Sub-grade and Earthern Shoulders

cum

17,845.00

Subgrade
Main Road
Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880

1
1
1
1

160.00
40.00
70.00
160.00

17.00
17.00
17.00
17.00

0.50
0.50
0.50
0.50

1,360.00
340.00
595.00
1,360.00

Ch:0+260 - 0+420 ( Tapering )


Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880 ( Tapering )

2
2
2
2
2

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

5.75
9.50
9.50
9.50
5.75

0.50
0.50
0.50
0.50
0.50

920.00
380.00
11,305.00
665.00
920.00

Service Road

Shoulder

2.03

2.04

Total
Soil filling- Median and Island
Median

cum
Ch:0+260 - 0+811
Ch:1+451 - 1+880

1
1

551.00
429.00

1.00
1.00

Ch:0+811 - 1+451

640.00

17.00

Total
Grassing with ' Doobs' Grass

Total

0.75
0.75

17,845.00
735.00
413.25
321.75
735.00
10,880.00
10,880.00
10,880.00

ESTIMATE
Item No
3
3.01

Description
Nos
Bill No:- 3 GRANULAR BASE COURSE AND SUB-BASE
Granular Sub Base
GSB-Drainage Layer - I
Main Road
1
Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
1
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
1
Ch:1+720 - 1+880
1
Service Road
Ch:0+260 - 0+420 ( Tapering )
2
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
2
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
2
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
2
Ch:1+720 - 1+880 ( Tapering )
2

Dimensions
Length
Breadth

Unit
Depth

Area
cum

Total
Quantity
6,404.00

160.00
40.00
70.00
160.00

17.00
17.00
17.00
17.00

0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10

272.00
68.00
119.00
272.00

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

5.75
9.50
9.50
9.50
5.75

0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10

184.00
76.00
2,261.00
133.00
184.00

GSB-Drainage Layer - II
Main Road
Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880

1
1
1
1

160.00
40.00
70.00
160.00

15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00

0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10

240.00
60.00
105.00
240.00

Ch:0+260 - 0+420 ( Tapering )


Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880 ( Tapering )

2
2
2
2
2

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

3.75
7.50
7.50
7.50
3.75

0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.10

120.00
60.00
1,785.00
105.00
120.00

Service Road

Total
3.02

6,404.00
cum

Wet Mix Macadam


WMM Layer- I
Main Road

7,087.50

Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880

1
1
1
1

160.00
40.00
70.00
160.00

15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00

0.125
0.125
0.125
0.125

300.00
75.00
131.25
300.00

Ch:0+260 - 0+420 ( Tapering )


Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880 ( Tapering )

2
2
2
2
2

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

3.75
7.50
7.50
7.50
3.75

0.125
0.125
0.125
0.125
0.125

150.00
75.00
2,231.25
131.25
150.00

Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880

1
1
1
1

160.00
40.00
70.00
160.00

15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00

0.125
0.125
0.125
0.125

300.00
75.00
131.25
300.00

Ch:0+260 - 0+420 ( Tapering )


Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880 ( Tapering )

2
2
2
2
2

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

3.75
7.50
7.50
7.50
3.75

0.125
0.125
0.125
0.125
0.125

150.00
75.00
2,231.25
131.25
150.00

Service Road

WMM Layer - II
Main Road

Service Road

Total

7,087.50

ESTIMATE
Item No

Description
Nos

4
4.01

4.02

4.03

Bill No:- 4 BITUMINOUS COURSE


Prime coat Over WMM
Main Road
Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880
Service Road
Ch:0+260 - 0+420 ( Tapering )
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880 ( Tapering )
Total
Tack coat Over Primed Surface
Main Road
Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880
Service Road
Ch:0+260 - 0+420 ( Tapering )
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880 ( Tapering )
Total
Tack coat - Bituminous Surface
Main Road
Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880
Service Road
Ch:0+260 - 0+420 ( Tapering )
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880 ( Tapering )

Dimensions
Length
Breadth

Depth

Unit

Total
Quantity

sqm

28,350.00

Area

1
1
1
1

160.00
40.00
70.00
160.00

15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00

2,400.00
600.00
1,050.00
2,400.00

2
2
2
2
2

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

3.75
7.50
7.50
7.50
3.75

1,200.00
600.00
17,850.00
1,050.00
1,200.00

1
1
1
1

160.00
40.00
70.00
160.00

15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00

28,350.00
28,350.00
2,400.00
600.00
1,050.00
2,400.00

2
2
2
2
2

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

3.75
7.50
7.50
7.50
3.75

1,200.00
600.00
17,850.00
1,050.00
1,200.00

sqm

sqm
1
1
1
1

160.00
40.00
70.00
160.00

15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00

2,400.00
600.00
1,050.00
2,400.00

2
2
2
2
2

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

3.75
7.50
7.50
7.50
3.75

1,200.00
600.00
17,850.00
1,050.00
1,200.00

Total
4.04

28,350.00
28,350.00

28,350.00
cum

Dense Bituminous Macadam


Main Road

2,190.75

Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880

1
1
1
1

160.00
40.00
70.00
160.00

15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00

0.085
0.085
0.085
0.085

204.00
51.00
89.25
204.00

Ch:0+260 - 0+420 ( Tapering )


Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880 ( Tapering )

2
2
2
2
2

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

3.75
7.50
7.50
7.50
3.75

0.075
0.075
0.075
0.075
0.075

90.00
45.00
1,338.75
78.75
90.00

Service Road

Total

2,190.75

ESTIMATE
Item No

Description
Nos

4.05

Dimensions
Length
Breadth

Unit
Depth

Area
cum

Bituminous concrete
Grading-lI

Total
Quantity
1,134.00

Ch:0+260 - 0+420
Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880

1
1
1
1

160.00
40.00
70.00
160.00

15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00

0.04
0.04
0.04
0.04

96.00
24.00
42.00
96.00

Ch:0+260 - 0+420 ( Tapering )


Ch:0+420 - 0+460
Ch:0+460 - 1+650
Ch:1+650 - 1+720
Ch:1+720 - 1+880 ( Tapering )

2
2
2
2
2

160.00
40.00
1,190.00
70.00
160.00

3.75
7.50
7.50
7.50
3.75

0.04
0.04
0.04
0.04
0.04

48.00
24.00
714.00
42.00
48.00

Main Road

Service Road

6
6.01
6.01a

6.01b
6.01c
6.01d
6.02
6.02a

Total
Bill No:-6 Traffic Signages, Road Marking and other Appurtenances
Cautionary,Mandatory and Informatory sign
90 cm equilateral triangle
Triangular Regulatory Signs
Cautionary Sign Boards
900 Octagon sign
Stop sign

No.
4
2

80 cm x 60 cm rectangular
Bus Stops

6.02b

Directional arrows ,Pedestrian Crossings and


letters

6.03

Gantry mounted variable message sign board

6.04

Direction and Place identification

6.04a

Signs with size more than 0.9 sqm size Board.

6.04b
6.05

No.

5
2

75 cm x 60 cm rectangular
Chevron Signs

Hot applied thermoplastic compound


Lane, Centreline, Edge and other marking
along strips
Edge line MCW
Service Road
Cariage way Center line
Service Road

1,134.00

No.

2.00
2.00

No.

7.00
7.00

sq.m.
2
2
57
432

430.00
1,620.00
3.00
3.00

7.00
5.00
2.00
4.00
4.00

0.15
0.15
0.10
0.10

761.70
129.00
486.00
17.10
129.60

sq.m.

No.

2.00

1.50

1.05

sq.m.

6.30

Signs with size upto 0.9 sqm size Board.


Road stud 100x 100 mm

2
967

0.60

0.80

sq.m.
No

0.96
967.00

6.06
6.06a
6.06b
6.07

RCC M15 grade kilometre stone


Ordinary kilometer stone (precast)
Hectometer stone (precast)
RCC M15 grade boundary pillars

3
16
145

Each
Each
Each

3.00
16.00
145.00

7
7.01

Bill No:- 7 DRAINAGE & PROTECTION WORK


Earthwork Excavation

cum

8,100.00
6,804.00
1,296.00

cum

648.00
486.00

7.02
7.02a

For service duct


Plain cement concrete,
Levelling Course PCC M15
For Covered Lined Drain

2
2

1,620.00
1,620.00

1.50
0.50

1.40
0.80

1,620.00

1.50

0.10

ESTIMATE
Item No

Description
For service duct

7.03

Total
RCC M25 grade
For Drain

For Service duct

7.04
7.05

Nos
2

Dimensions
Length
Breadth
1,620.00
0.50

Unit
Depth
0.10

Area

cum
Cover Slab
Bottom
Wall
Cover Slab
Bottom
Wall

1
1
2
1
1
1

1,620.00
1,620.00
1,620.00
1,620.00
1,620.00
1,620.00

Total
HYSD
Kerb Stone
Kerb Stone
Median Kerb Start approach

4.00

551.00

Median Kerb End approach

4.00

429.00

1.10
1.30
0.20
0.40
0.40
0.10

0.10
0.20
1.30
0.10
0.10
0.70
MT
Lm

Total
Quantity
162.00
648.00
1,684.80
178.20
421.20
842.40
64.80
64.80
113.40
1,684.80
132.52
3,920.00
2,204.00
1,716.00
3,920.00

7.06

sq.m.

Painting on kerbs

1,764.00

For Kerb Painting


4.00
Total

980.00

0.45

1,764.00
1,764.00

Proposed Fly over at Mohan Nagar Chowk


Item
No

Description

Dimensions
Nos

Length

Width

Depth

5.1.01 Earth work Excavation

Area

Unit

Total

Cum

3,276.43

For Abutment

A1

8.90

5.30

2.40

113.21

For Abutment

A2

8.90

5.30

2.40

113.21

15

8.90

8.90

2.40

2,851.56

567.00

0.35

0.50

198.45

For Pier
P1-P15

Reinforced earth wall


Total
5.1.02a PCC M15 (blinding for pile cap)

Cum

3,276.43
128.25

For Abutment

A1

8.90

5.30

0.10

4.72

For Abutment

A2

8.90

5.30

0.10

4.72

15

8.90

8.90

0.10

118.82

For Pier
P1-P15
Total

128.25

5.1.02b PCC M15

Cum

Over carriage way

0.5

607.00

16.00

0.200

971.20
971.20

Total
5.1.02c PCC M20

59.54

Reinforced earth wall

567.00

0.35

0.15

59.54

Total
5.1.03

971.20

59.54

Cast in Situ Piles

Rm

For Abutment

A1

22.70

For Abutment

A2

22.70

2,996.40
136.20
136.20

(3*2+2)*15
For Pier P1 - P15

120

22.70

2,724.00

Total
5.1.04

2,996.40

Pile Liner Plate

M.T

For Abutment

A1

3.77

0.006

9.00

9.59

For Abutment

A2

3.77

0.006

9.00

9.59

120

3.77

0.006

9.00

191.77

For Pier P1 - P15


Total
5.1.05

210.94

Pile Load Test

210.94

Vertical Load Test

5.00

5.1.05a Initial Load test

2.00

No

2.00

5.1.05b Routine Load Test

3.00

No

3.00

5.1.05c Lateral Load Test


Routine Load Test
5.1.06a Foundation M40 for pile cap

3.00
3.00

No
Cum

3.00
2,203.36

For Abutment

A1

8.70

5.10

1.80

79.87

For Abutment

A2

8.70

5.10

1.80

79.87

15

8.70

8.70

1.80

2,043.63

For Pier
P1-P15

5.1.07a Sub Structure M50

Cum

2,203.36
931.84

For Abutment
A1
For Abutment cap

12.29

1.60

1.00

19.66

Dirt wall

12.29

0.30

3.05

11.25

2.36

0.30

2.03

2.86

Bracket

12.29

0.30

0.45

1.66

Trestle columns

For Abutment
A2
For Abutment cap

12.29

1.60

1.00

19.66

Dirt wall

12.29

0.30

3.05

11.25

2.36

0.30

2.03

Bracket

12.29

0.30

0.45

Trestle columns

1.06

1.79

1.33

4.23

1.66
1.33

7.13

For Pier
P1
(0.725/2*(4.78+2*(5.79+7.61)+10.62
) = 15.287)
P1 Bottom section
P2
(0.907/2*(4.79+2*(5.21+7.07)+10.62
) = 18.130)
P2 Bottom section

2.176

2.176
-

2.721

15.298
4.78

2.721
-

15.30
-

18.126
4.79

18.13
-

P3 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
1
P3 Bottom section

3.000

3.471
0.471

19.240
4.34

19.24
2.04

P4 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
1
P4 Bottom section

3.000

4.150
1.150

19.240
4.34

19.24
4.99

P5 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
1
P5 Bottom section

3.000

4.750
1.750

19.240
4.34

19.24
7.60

P6 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
1
P6 Bottom section

3.000

5.405
2.405

19.240
4.34

19.24
10.44

P7 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
1
P7 Bottom section

3.000

5.757
2.757

19.240
4.34

19.24
11.97

P8 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
1
P8 Bottom section

3.000

6.948
3.948

19.240
4.34

19.24
17.13

P9 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
1
P9 Bottom section

3.000

6.848
3.848

19.240
4.34

19.24
16.70

P10 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
1
P10 Bottom section

3.000

6.726

19.240

3.726

4.34

6.328
3.328

4.34

19.24
16.17

P11 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
P11 Bottom section
P12 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
P12 Bottom section

1
1

3.000

3.000

5.643
2.643

19.240

19.24
14.44

19.240

19.24

4.34

11.47

P13 (1/2*(4.34+2*(4.96+6.8)+10.62)
= 19.240)
1
P13 Bottom section
P14
(0.955/2*(4.75+2*(5.08+6.96)+10.62
) = 18.84)
P14 Bottom section
P15
(0.955/2*(4.88+2*(5.94+7.72)+10.62
) = 20.447)
P15 Bottom section
Bottom haunch

3.000

2.865

1
1
15

4.900
1.900

2.060
1.70

0.500

19.240
4.34

2.865

8.25

18.837

4.75

2.060
-

4.88

18.84
-

20.447

1.00

19.24

20.45
12.75

Pier cap
P1-P15

15

2.50

11.26

422.06

Pedestal
Pier P1-P15

90

0.60

0.60

0.35

11.34

A1

0.60

0.60

0.35

0.38

A2

0.60

0.60

0.35

0.38

Total

931.84

5.1.07b Sub Structure M25

(+PI()*2.7+((4.5-2.7)*2)+PI()*3.2+((5-3.2)*2))/2

Around Pier P1 - P15

15

12.868

0.33

1.70

Total

106.64
106.64

106.64

5.1.08a Super Structure M50

Cum

Slab

17.00

0.25

9,370.02

640.00

2,720.00

A1- P1 ---- P15 - A2 Mid Section

128

29.64

0.975

3,699.07

0.7*0.3+(0.7+0.35)/2*0.15+0.35*1.4
5+(0.35+0.7)/2*0.15+0.1*0.7+0.6*0.
05 = 0.975
A1- P1 ---- P15 - A2 Taper Section

128

6.40

1.255

1,028.10

128.00

3.48

1.535

683.75

PSC M50

A1- P1 ---- P15 - A2 End Section


0.7*(2.2-0.05)+0.6*0.05 = 1.535

16*7*2

Cross Girder
End Cross Girder

224.00

1.50

0.80

2.20

394.24

16*7*1
Mid Cross Girder

112

Anchor beam

0.30

550.00

3.87

129.86

0.65

715.00

9,370.02
5.1.09 HYSD steel reinforcement

M.T

In Foundation

666.93

5.1.09a

In Substructure
5.1.09b

Pile Cap

90.00

kg/cum

198.30

Road Median

58.00

kg/cum

11.14

Pile

135.00

kg/cum

457.49
260.86

For Abutment A1 and A2

180.00

kg/cum

2.05

For Abutment cap and Dirt wall

175.00

kg/cum

11.90

For Pier P1 to P26

120.00

kg/cum

50.20

For Pier cap

180.00

kg/cum

75.97

For around Piers P1 - P15

100.00

kg/cum

10.66

Pedestal

120.00

kg/cum

1.45

Crash Barrier

45.00

Kg/m

108.63

5.1.09c In Super Structure

1,158.81

PSC Girder
Long Girder

120.00

kg/cum

649.31

Cross Girder

150.00

kg/cum

78.62

Slab

150.00

kg/cum

408.00

Anchor beam

32.00

kg/cum

22.88

5.1.10 PC Strands

M.T

strands

8*16

Cable C

128

40.00

Cable B

128

40.00

Cable A

128

40.00

17.00

134.95
135.29
135.62
405.86

5.1.11 Approach slab M15

17.85
3.50

0.15

17.85

Total

17.85

5.1.12 Approach slab M30

Cum
2

17.00

3.50

0.30

Flyover

5.1.14

35.70

Crash Barrier M40

5.1.13a Crash Barrier 0.26 sqm Area


Approaches

Rm

567.00

2,414.00
1,134.00

640.00

1,280.00

RCC M40 for median


Median

35.70
35.70

Total
5.1.13

405.86

Cum
1

640.00

1.00

0.30

192.00
192.00

Total
Rm

5.1.15a Crack inducer


6

17.00

102.00
102.00

Total

102.00
Rm

5.1.15b Strip seal


6

17.00

102.00
102.00

Total

102.00

5.1.16 Pot PTFE bearing(350T)

MT

33,600.00

5.1.16a Fixed

16

16.00

5.1.16b Guide

32

32.00

48

48.00

5.1.16c
Free

33,600.00
5.1.17 Tack Coat over Concrete Surface

Sqm
2

647.00

7.50

9,705.00
9,705.00

9,705.00
5.1.18 Tack Coat over Bituminous
Surface

Sqm
2

647.00

7.50

9,705.00
9,705.00

9,705.00
5.1.19 Laying 40mm thick modified bitumen

Sqm
2

647.00

7.50

0.04

9,705.00

Total

9,705.00

5.1.20 Wearing Coat

Sqm
2

647.00

7.50

9,705.00

Reinforced earthwall

Sqm

3,419.66

Sides

351.00

2.87

2,014.39

Ends
Sides

1
2

17.00
199.00

4.62
3.12

78.47
1,242.76

Ends

17.00

4.94

84.05

Total
5.1.22

9,705.00
9,705.00

Total
5.1.21

9,705.00

3,419.66

Reinforced Earthfill

Cum
1

351.00

17.00

2.87

1,628.57
1,007.19

199.00

17.00

3.12

621.38
1,628.57

5.1.23

Drainage Spouts

Nos
256

256.00
256.00

Total

256.00

5.1.25 Printing of Bridge No.

100.00
10

10.00

Per cm
ht per Lt
Rm

5.1.24 PVC Pipe for taking drain water


2

640.00

112.63

100.00
1,505.25
1,280.00
225.25
1,505.25

Painting Exposed Concrete


5.1.26 Surfaces

Sqm

56,245.21

Slab

640.00

17.00

10,880.00

Girder

640.00

4.40

22,528.00

End cross

32

15.40

4.40

2,168.32

Mid cross

16

15.40

4.40

1,084.16

Crash Barrier

2,414.00

1.50

3,621.00

RE wall

Pier P1 - P15

15

10.67

4.72

754.48

Pier Cap

15

25.00

1.20

450.00

Abutment

4.08

1.06

13.03

4.08

1.79

21.95

27.78

1.00

55.56

Abutment cap

Add 25% extra for inner coverages

3,419.66

3,419.66

11,249.04
56,245.21

Appendix E-4 : Rate Analysis

SUMMARY OF RATES
Item No.

Description

Unit

Rate
Analysis
Reference

ha

1.2

48,044.00

Rate

SITE CLEARANCE AND DISMANTLING


1.01

Clearing and grubbing road land in an area of light jungle


EARTH WORK

2.01

Earth work Excavation

cum

2.1

46.00

2.02

Construction of sub-grade and earthen shoulders with approved


material obtained from borrow pits

cum

2.6

221.00

2.03

Construction of Median and Island with approved material

cum

2.8

83.00

2.04

Grassing with ' Doobs' Grass

sqm

10.4

5.00

GRANULAR BASE COURSE AND SUB-BASE


3.01

Construction of granular sub-base

cum

3.1

2,219.00

3.02

WMM

cum

3.2

2,298.00

BITUMINOUS COURSE
4.01
4.02

Primer coat
Tack coat with 0.25kg/ sqm over primed surface

sqm
sqm

4.1
4.2.2

28.00
12.00

4.03

Tack coat with 0.20kg/ sqm over bituminous surface

sqm

4.2.3

10.00

4.04

DBM

cum

4.3

7,650.00

4.05

BC (Grading-ll)

cum

4.4.2

8,541.00

7.1.1

49.00

7.13
7.2.1
8.3.1
7.10b
7.20

4,773.00
4,966.00
5,749.00
10,811.00
58,457.00

Per Test
Per Test
Per Test
cum
cum

7.11.1
7.11.2
7.11.3

31,941.20
20,907.00
20,907.00

7.12.3

5,913.00

Cum
Cum

8.3.5
8.3.3

7,095.00
6,406.00

cum

9.1.4

8,711.00

MT
MT
MT
MT
cum
cum

7.3
8.4
9.2
9.3
9.7
9.8

53,679.00
53,754.00
54,403.00
88,473.00
4,775.00
8,683.00

6.9.2
9.1.4

3,746.00

FLYOVER
5.1.01

Earth work in excavation for foundation ( ordinary soil )

5.1.02
5.1.02a
5.1.02b
5.1.02c
5.1.03
5.1.04
5.1.05
5.1.05a
5.1.05b
5.1.05c
5.1.06
5.1.06a
5.1.07
5.1.07a
5.1.07b
5.1.08
5.1.08a
5.1.09
5.1.09a
5.1.09b
5.1.09c
5.1.10
5.1.11
5.1.12
5.1.13

Plain cement concrete


PCC Grade M15 ( For Pile cap )
PCC Grade M15
PCC Grade M20
Pile Driving Height 1200m dia
Pile Liner Plate
Pile Load Test
a) Initial
b) routine load test
a) Lateral load test
Reinforced Cement Concrete in Foundation
RCC Grade M40 fo pile cap
Reinforced Cement Concrete in sub structure
Sub Structure RCC M50
Sub Structure RCC M25
Reinforced/ Prestressed cement concrete in super-structure
PSC Beam and Slab M50
HYSD bar reinforcement
For Foundation
For Substructure
For Superstructure
High tensile steel wires / strands
PCC M-15 for levelling course of approach slab
RCC of M30 grade for approach slab
Crash Barrier

5.1.13a

Crash Barrier (having cross section area 0.26 sqm)

5.1.14
5.1.15a

RCC of M40 grade for median


Expansion joint including crack inducer slot in surfacing filled with
rubber/bitumen seal
Strip seal Expansion Joint

5.1.15b

cum
cum
cum
cum
m
MT

cum
m
m

9.10

7,104.00
16,000.00
29,000.00

SUMMARY OF RATES
Item No.
5.1.16

Description
POT PTFE bearing

Unit

Rate
Analysis
Reference

Tonne
capacity
sqm

9.11

Rate
207.00

5.1.17

Tack coat with 0.30kg/ sqm over cement concrete surface

4.2.1

15.00

5.1.18

Tack coat with 0.20kg/ sqm over bituminous surface

sqm

4.2.3

10.00

5.1.19

BC of 40mm thick

cum

4.4

5.1.20

25 mm thick mastic asphalt wearing course

sqm

4.5

5.1.21

Reinforced earthwall

Sqm

5.1.22

Reinforced earthfill

5.1.23
5.1.24
5.1.25

Drainage Spouts
PVC 150mm dia pipes for drainage purpose
Printing of Bridge No. and span arrangement

5.1.26

Painting two coats on new plastered concrete surfaces

cum
Each
m
per cm
height per
letter
Sqm

8,541.00
459.00
2,000.00

2.6
9.6

221.00
1,060.00
300.00
0.30

6.1
6.4

55.00

Traffic Signages, Road Marking and other Appurtenances


6.01

Cautionary,Mandatory and Informatory sign

6.01a

90 cm equilateral triangle

No

6.01b

900 Octagon sign

No

6.2.6

4,838.00

6.01c

Chevron Signs 75 cm x 60 cm rectangular

No

6.2.5

3,091.00

6.01d

Bus Stop Signs 80 cm x 60 cm rectangular

No

6.2.4

3,902.00

6.02
6.02a

Hot applied thermoplastic compound 2.5 mm thick including


reflectorising glass beads
Lane, Centreline, Edge and other marking along strips

sq.m.

6.5

271.00

6.02b

Directional arrows and letters

sq.m.

6.5

271.00

6.03

Gantry mounted variable message sign board

6.04

Direction and Place identification

6.04a

Signs with size more than 0.9 sqm size Board.

Sqm

6.3.2

6,930.00

6.04b

Signs with size upto 0.9 sqm size Board.

sqm

6.3.1

6,608.00

6.05

Road stud 100x 100 mm

No

6.12

230.00

6.06

RCC M15 grade kilometre stone

6.06a

Ordinary kilometer stone (precast)

No

6.6.2

1,846.00

6.06b

Hectometer stone (precast)

No

6.6.3

496.00

6.07

RCC M15 grade boundary pillars

No

6.8

570.00

7.01

Earthwork Excavation

cum

7.1.1

49.00
4,966.00

6.2.1

No

3,267.00

150,000.00

DRAINAGE & PROTECTION WORK

7.02

Plain cement concrete,

7.02a

Levelling Course PCC M15

cum

7.2.1

7.03

RCC M25 grade

cum

7.2.3

5,695.00

7.04

HYSD

MT

7.3

53,679.00

7.05

Kerbstone

10.1

544.00

7.06

Painting kerbstone

sqm

6.4

55.00

1.2

Ref. to
MoRTH
Description
Spec.
201
Clearing and Grubbing Road Land .
Clearing and grubbing road land including uprooting rank
vegetation, grass, bushes, shrubs, saplings and trees girth
up to 300 mm, removal of stumps of trees cut earlier and
disposal of unserviceable materials and stacking of
serviceable material to be used or auctioned, up to a lead
of 1000 metres including removal and disposal of top
organic soil not exceeding 150 mm in thickness.
Unit = Hectare
By Mechanical Means
In area of light jungle
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
Machinery
b)
Dozer 80 HP with attachment for removal of trees &
stumps
Tractor-trolley
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b)
c)
d)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)
Rate per Hectare = a+b+c+d

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

day
day

0.160
4.000

140.00
125.00

22.40
500.00

hour

10.000

3546.00

35,460.00

hour

1.000

346.00

346.00
5,449.26
6,266.65
48,044.31
48,044.00

say
2.1

301

Excavation in Soil using Hydraulic Excavator CK 90


and Tippers with Disposal upto 1000 metres.
Excavation for roadwork in soil with hydraulic excavator of
0.9 cum bucket capacity including cutting and loading in
tippers, trimming bottom and side slopes, in accordance
with requirements of lines, grades and cross sections, and
transporting to the embankment location within all lifts and
lead upto 1000m
Unit = cum
Taking output = 360 cum
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
Machinery
b)
Hydraulic excavator 0.9 cum bucket capacity @ 60
cum per hour
Tipper 5.5 cum capacity, 4 trips per hour.
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b)
c)
d)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)
Cost for 360 cum = a+b+c+d
Rate per cum = (a+b+c+d)/360

day
day

0.080
2.000

140.00
125.00

11.20
250.00

hour

6.000

1241.00

7,446.00

hour

16.000

295.00

4,720.00
1,864.08
2,143.69
16,434.97
45.65
46.00

say
2.6

305

Cost Rs

Construction of Subgrade and Earthen Shoulders


Construction of sub-grade and earthen shoulders with
approved material obtained from borrow pits with all lifts &
leads, transporting to site, spreading, grading to required
slope and compacted to meet requirement of table No. 3002
Unit = cum
Taking output = 100 cum
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
Machinery
b)
Hydraulic excavator1 cum bucket capacity @ 60 cum
per hour

day
day

0.040
1.000

140.00
125.00

5.60
125.00

hour

1.670

1241.00

2,072.47

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description
Tipper 10 tonne capacity
Add 10 per cent of cost of carriage to cover cost of
loading and unloading
Dozer 80 HP for spreading @ 200 cum per hour
Motor grader for grading @ 50 cum per hour
Water tanker with 6 km lead
Vibratory roller 8-10 tonnes @ 80 cum per hour
Material
c)
Cost of water
Compensation for earth taken from private land
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 100 cum = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per cum = (a+b+c+d+e)/100

Unit
tonne.km

Quantity
175xL

Rate Rs
2.00

407

hour
hour
hour
hour

0.500
2.000
4.000
1.250

3546.00
2283.00
100.00
1469.00

1,773.00
4,566.00
400.00
1,836.25

KL
cum

24.000
100.000

40.00
50.00

960.00
5,000.00
2,510.75
2,887.36
22,136.43
221.36
221.00

say
2.8

Cost Rs

Construction of Median and Island with Soil Taken


from Roadway Cutting
Construction of Median and Island with approved material
deposited at site from roadway cutting and excavation for
drain and foundation of other structures, spread, graded
and compacted as per clause 407
Unit = cum
Taking output =21 cum
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
Machinery
b)
Water tanker 6 KL with 5 km lead and 1 trip per hour
Plate compactor @ 3.5 cum per hour
Material
Cost of water
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 21 cum = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per cum = (a+b+c+d+e)/21

day
day

0.240
6.000

140.00
125.00

33.60
750.00

hour

1.000

100.00

100.00

hour

6.000

32.00

192.00

KL

6.000

40.00

240.00
197.34
226.94
1,739.88
82.85
83.00

c)

say
3.1

401

Granular Sub-Base with Close Graded Material (Table:400-1)


Plant Mix Method
Construction of granular sub-base by providing close
graded Material, mixing in a mechanical mix plant at OMC,
carriage of mixed Material to work site, spreading in
uniform layers with motor grader on prepared surface and
compacting with vibratory power roller to achieve the
desired density, complete as per clause 401
Unit = cum
Taking output = 225 cum (450 tonne)
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor skilled
Mazdoor
Machinery
b)
Wet mix plant @ 75 tonne capacity per hour
Electric generator 125 KVA
Water tanker 6 KL capacity 5 km lead with one trip per
hour
Front end loader 1 cum bucket capacity

day
day
day

0.400
2.000
8.000

140.00
140.00
125.00

56.00
280.00
1,000.00

hour
hour
hour

6.000
6.000
4.500

1148.00
665.00
100.00

6,888.00
3,990.00
450.00

hour

6.000

768.00

4,608.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description
Tipper 10 tonne
Add 10 per cent of cost of carriage to cover loading
and unloading
Motor Grader 110 HP
Vibratory roller 8-10 t
c) Material
Close graded Granular sub-base Material as per table
400-1
For Grading-I Material
53 mm to 9.5 mm @ 50 per cent
9.5 mm to 2.36 mm @ 20 per cent
2.36 mm below @ 30 per cent
Cost of water
Rate per cum for grading-I Material
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 225 cum = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per cum = (a+b+c+d+e)/225

Unit
tonne.km

Quantity
450 x L

Rate Rs
2.00

406

hour
hour

6.000
6.000

2283.00
1469.00

13,698.00
8,814.00

cum
cum
cum
KL

144.000
57.000
86.400
27.000

1151.10
1151.10
1217.90
40.00

165,758.40
65,612.70
105,226.56
1,080.00

Add 10 per cent of cost of carriage to cover cost of


loading and unloading
Material ( Table 400-11)
c)
45 mm to 22.4 mm@ 30 per cent
22.4 mm to 2.36 mm @ 40 per cent
2.36 mm to 75 micron@ 30 per cent
Cost of water
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 225 cum = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per cum = (a+b+c+d+e)/225

day
day
day

0.480
2.000
10.000

140.00
140.00
125.00

67.20
280.00
1,250.00

hour
hour
hour
hour
hour

6.600
6.000
6.000
6.000
6x0.65

1148.00
665.00
768.00
929.00
1469.00

7,576.80
3,990.00
4,608.00
5,574.00
5,729.10

hour
hour
tonne.km

12.000
3.000
495 x L

100.00
2.00

300.00
-

cum
cum
cum
KL

89.100
118.800
89.100
18.000

1184.90
1235.00
1217.90
40.00

say
502

56,619.25
65,112.14
499,193.05
2,218.64
2,219.00

Wet Mix Macadam


Providing, laying, spreading and compacting graded stone
aggregate to wet mix macadam specification including
premixing the Material with water at OMC in mechanical
mix plant carriage of mixed Material by tipper to site, laying
in uniform layers with paver in sub- base / base course on
well prepared surface and compacting with vibratory roller
to achieve the desired density.
Unit = cum
Taking output = 225 cum (495 tonnes)
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor skilled
Mazdoor
Machinery
b)
Wet mix plant of 75 tonne hourly capacity
Electric generator 125 KVA
Front end loader 1 cum capacity
Paver finisher
Vibratory roller 8 - 10 tonne
or
Smooth 3 wheeled steel roller @ 8-10 tonnes.
Water tanker 6 KL capacity
Tipper

4.1

say
3.2

Cost Rs

Prime Coat

105,574.59
146,718.00
108,514.89
720.00
58,635.39
67,430.70
516,968.66
2,297.64
2,298.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

Cost Rs

day
day

0.080
2.000

140.00
125.00

11.20
250.00

hour
hour
hour

2.800
2.800
2.000

340.00
304.00
1022.00

952.00
851.20
2,044.00

hour

1.000

100.00

100.00

tonne
KL

2.100
6.000

33045.40
40.00

69,395.34
240.00
11,076.56
12,738.05
97,658.35
27.90
28.00

Providing and applying primer coat with bitumen


emulsion on prepared surface of granular Base
including clearing of road surface and spraying primer
at the rate of 0.60 kg/sqm using mechanical means.
Unit = sqm
Taking output = 3500 sqm
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
b) Machinery
Mechanical broom @ 1250 sqm per hour
Air compressor 250 cfm
Bitumen pressure distributor @ 1750 sqm per hour
Water tanker 6 KL capacity @ 1 trip per hour
Material
Bitumen emulsion @ 0.6 kg per sqm
Cost of water
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 3500 sqm = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per sqm = (a+b+c+d+e)/3500
c)

say
4.2.1

503

Tack Coat
Providing and applying tack coat with bitumen emulsion
using emulsion pressure distributor at the rate of 0.3 kg per
sqm on concrete surface treated with primer cleaned with
mechanical broom all complete as per Technical
specifications and as directed by the Engineer-in-charge.
Unit = sqm
Taking output = 3500 sqm
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
b) Machinery
Mechanical broom @ 1250 sqm per hour
Air compressor 250 cfm
Emulsion pressure distributor @ 1750 sqm per hour
Material
Bitumen emulsion @ 0.2 kg per sqm
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 3500 sqm = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per sqm = (a+b+c+d+e)/3500

day
day

0.080
2.000

140.00
125.00

11.20
250.00

hour
hour
hour

2.800
2.800
2.000

340.00
304.00
1022.00

952.00
851.20
2,044.00

tonne

1.050

33045.40

34,697.67
5,820.91
6,694.05
51,321.03
14.66
15.00

c)

say
4.2.2

503

Tack Coat
Providing and applying tack coat with bitumen emulsion
using emulsion pressure distributor at the rate of 0.25 kg
per sqm on the prepared granular surface treated with
primer cleaned with mechanical broom all complete as per
Technical specifications and as directed by the Engineer-incharge.
Unit = sqm
Taking output = 3500 sqm
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
b) Machinery

day
day

0.080
2.000

140.00
125.00

11.20
250.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Mechanical broom @ 1250 sqm per hour


Air compressor 250 cfm
Emulsion pressure distributor @ 1750 sqm per hour

hour
hour
hour

2.800
2.800
2.000

340.00
304.00
1022.00

952.00
851.20
2,044.00

tonne

0.875

33045.40

28,914.73
4,953.47
5,696.49
43,673.08
12.48
12.00

Material
Bitumen emulsion @ 0.2 kg per sqm
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 3500 sqm = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per sqm = (a+b+c+d+e)/3500

Rate Rs

Cost Rs

c)

say
4.2.3

503

Tack Coat
Providing and applying tack coat with bitumen emulsion
using emulsion pressure distributor at the rate of 0.20 kg
per sqm on the prepared nominal bituminous surface
cleaned with mechanical broom all complete as per
Technical specifications and as directed by the Engineer-incharge.
Unit = sqm
Taking output = 3500 sqm
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
b) Machinery
Mechanical broom @ 1250 sqm per hour
Air compressor 250 cfm
Emulsion pressure distributor @ 1750 sqm per hour
Material
Bitumen emulsion @ 0.2 kg per sqm
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 3500 sqm = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per sqm = (a+b+c+d+e)/3500

day
day

0.080
2.000

140.00
125.00

11.20
250.00

hour
hour
hour

2.800
2.800
2.000

340.00
304.00
1022.00

952.00
851.20
2,044.00

tonne

0.700

33045.40

23,131.78
4,086.03
4,698.93
36,025.14
10.29
10.00

c)

say
4.3

507

Dense Graded Bituminous Macadam


Providing and laying dense graded bituminous macadam
with 100-120 TPH batch type HMP producing an average
output of 75 tonnes per hour using crushed aggregates of
specified grading, premixed with bituminous binder @ 4.0
to 4.5 per cent by weight of total mix and filler,
transporting the hot mix to work site, laying with a
hydrostatic paver finisher with sensor control to the
required grade, level and alignment, rolling with smooth
wheeled, vibratory and tandem rollers to achieve the
desired compaction as per MoRTH specification clause
No. 507 complete in all respects.
Unit = cum
Taking output = 195 cum (450 tonnes)
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor working with HMP, mechanical broom, paver,
roller, asphalt cutter and assistance for setting out
lines, levels and layout of construction
b)

Skilled mazdoor for checking line & levels


Machinery
Batch mix HMP @ 75 tonne per hour
Paver finisher hydrostatic with sensor control @ 75
cum per hour

day
day

0.840
16.000

140.00
125.00

117.60
2,000.00

day

5.000

140.00

700.00

hour
hour

6.000
6.000

16499.00
2549.00

98,994.00
15,294.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description
Generator 250 KVA
Front end loader 1 cum bucket capacity
Tipper 10 tonne capacity
Add 10 per cent of cost of carriage to cover cost of
loading and unloading
smooth wheeled roller 8-10 tonnes for initial break
down rolling.
Vibratory roller 8 tonnes for intermediate rolling.
Finish rolling with 6-8 tonnes smooth wheeled tandem
roller.
c) Materials
Bitumen @ 4.25 per cent of weight of mix
Aggregate
Total weight of mix = 450 tonnes
Weight of bitumen = 19.13 tonnes
Weight of aggregate = 450 -19.13 = 430.87 tonnes
Taking density of aggregate = 1.5 ton/cum
Volume of aggregate = 287.25 cum
Grading - II19 mm (Nominal Size)
25 - 10 mm 30 per cent
10 - 5 mm 28 per cent
5 mm and below 40 per cent
Filler @ 2 per cent of weight of aggregates.
For GradingII(19 mm nominal size)
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 195 cum = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per cum = (a+b+c+d+e)/195 (For Grading-II)

Unit
hour
hour
tonne.km

Quantity
6.000
6.000
450 x L

Rate Rs
1350.00
768.00
2.00

509

8,100.00
4,608.00
-

hour

6.00x0.65*

439.00

1,712.10

hour
hour

6.00x0.65*
6.00x0.65*

1469.00
1090.00

5,729.10
4,251.00

tonne

19.130

32146.18

614,956.42

cum
cum
cum
tonne

86.160
80.430
114.900
8.620

1235.00
1235.00
1217.90
3000.00

106,407.60
99,331.05
139,936.71
25,860.00

say
4.4

Cost Rs

169,199.64
194,579.58
1,491,776.80
7,650.14
7,650.00

Bituminous Concrete
Providing and laying bituminous concrete with 100-120
TPH batch type hot mix plant producing an average output
of 75 tonnes per hour using crushed aggregates of
specified grading, premixed with bituminous binder @ 5.4
to 5.6 per cent of mix and filler, transporting the hot mix to
work site, laying with a hydrostatic paver finisher with
sensor control to the required grade, level and alignment,
rolling with smooth wheeled, vibratory and tandem rollers
to achieve the desired compaction as per MORTH
specification clause No. 509 complete in all respects

Unit = cum
Taking output = 191 cum (450 tonnes)
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor working with HMP, mechanical broom, paver,
roller, asphalt cutter and assistance for setting out
lines, levels and layout of construction

b)

Skilled mazdoor for checking line & levels


Machinery
Batch mix HMP @ 75 tonne per hour
Paver finisher hydrostatic with sensor control @ 75
cum per hour
Generator 250 KVA
Front end loader 1 cum bucket capacity
Tipper 10 tonne capacity

day
day

0.840
16.000

140.00
125.00

117.60
2,000.00

day

5.000

140.00

700.00

hour
hour

6.000
6.000

16499.00
2549.00

98,994.00
15,294.00

hour
hour
tonne.km

6.000
6.000
450 x L

1350.00
768.00
2.00

8,100.00
4,608.00
-

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description
Add 10 per cent of cost of carriage to cover cost of
loading and unloading
Smooth wheeled roller 8-10 tonnes for initial break
down rolling.
Vibratory roller 8 tonnes for intermediate rolling.
Finish rolling with 6-8 tonnes smooth wheeled tandem
roller.
c) Material
i) Bitumen@ 5 per cent of weight of mix
ii) Aggregate
Total weight of mix = 450 tonnes
Weight of bitumen = 22.5 tonnes
Weight of aggregate = 450 -22.50 = 427.50 tonnes
Taking density of aggregate = 1.5 ton/cum
Volume of aggregate = 285 cum
* Grading - I-19 mm (Nominal Size)
20 - 10 mm 35 per cent
10 - 5 mm 23 per cent
5 mm and below 40 per cent
Filler @ 2 per cent of weight of aggregates.
or
Grading - II-13 mm (Nominal Size)
13.2 - 10 mm30 per cent
10 - 5 mm 25 per cent
5 mm and below43 per cent
Filler @ 2 per cent of weight of aggregates.
*Any one of the alternative may be adopted as per
approved design
for Grading-II (10 mm nominal size)
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 191 cum = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per cum = (a+b+c+d+e)/191 (For Grading-II)

4.4.2

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

hour

6.00x0.65*

439.00

1,712.10

hour
hour

6.00x0.65*
6.00x0.65*

1469.00
1090.00

5,729.10
4,251.00

tonne

22.500

32146.18

723,289.05

cum
cum
cum
tonne

99.750
65.550
114.000
8.620

1235.00
1235.00
1217.90
3000.00

123,191.25
80,954.25
138,840.60
25,860.00

cum
cum
cum
tonne

85.500
71.250
122.550
8.620

1235.00
1235.00
1217.90
3000.00

105,592.50
87,993.75
149,253.65
25,860.00

say
4.5

515

Cost Rs

185,024.21
212,777.84
1,631,296.80
8,540.82
8,541.00

Mastic Asphalt
Providing and laying 25 mm thick mastic asphalt wearing
course with paving grade bitumen meeting the
requirements given in table 500-29, prepared by using
mastic cooker and laid to required level and slope after
cleaning the surface, including providing antiskid surface
with bitumen precoated finegrained hard stone chipping of
13.2 mm nominal size at the rate of 0.005cum per 10 sqm
and at an approximate spacing of 10 cm center to center in
both directions, pressed into surface when the temperature
of surfaces is not less than 1000C, protruding 1 mm to 4
mm over mastic surface, all complete as per clause 515.

Unit = sqm
Taking output = 35.00 sqm (0.87 cum ) assuming a
density of 2.3 tonnes/cum.-2 tonnes
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
Mazdoor skilled
b) Machinery
Mechanical broom @ 1250 sqm per hour
Air compressor 250 cfm
Mastic cooker 1 tonne capacity
Bitumen boiler 1500 litres capacity

day
day
day

0.440
10.000
1.000

140.00
125.00
140.00

61.60
1,250.00
140.00

hour
hour
hour
hour

0.060
0.060
6.000
6.000

340.00
304.00
59.00
189.00

20.40
18.24
354.00
1,134.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

Cost Rs

Tractor for towing and positioning of mastic cooker


and bitumen boiler
c) Material
Base mastic (without coarse aggregates) = 60 per cent

hour

1.000

346.00

346.00

tonne

0.204

32146.18

6,557.82

cum

0.390

1166.70

455.01

tonne

0.360

3000.00

1,080.00

cum

0.550

1235.00

679.25

cum

0.018

1296.75

23.34

kg

0.500

32.00

16.00

Coarse aggregate (6.3mm to 13.2 mm) = 40 per cent .


Proportion of material required for mastic asphalt with
coarse aggregates (based on mix design done by
CRRI for a specific case)
I) Bitumen 85/25 or 30/40 @ 10.2 per cent by weight
of mix. 2 x 10.2/100 = 0.204
ii) Fine aggregate passing 2.36mm and retained on
0.075mm sieve @ 31.9 per cent by weight of mix = 2
x 31.9/100 = 0.638 tonnes = 0.638/1.625 = 0.39
iii) Lime stone dust filler with calcium content not less
than 80 per cent by weight @ 17.92 per cent by
weight of mix = 2 x 17.92/100 = 0.36
iv) Coarse aggregates 6.3 mm to 13.2 mm @ 40 per
cent by weight of mix = 2 x 40/100 = 0.8 MT =
0.8/1.456 = 0.55
v) Pre-coated stone chips of 13.2 mm nominal size for
skid resistance = 35 x 0.005/10 = 0.018
vi) Bitumen for coating of chips @ 2 per cent by
weight = 0.018 x 1.456 x 2/100 = 0.0005 MT = 0.5kg
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 35.00 sqm = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per sqm = (a+b+c+d+e)/35
say
6.1

801

Printing New Letter and Figures of any Shade


Printing new letter and figures of any shade with synthetic
enamel paint black or any other approved colour to give an
even shade
English and Roman
Hyphens and the like not to be measured and paid for
Detail for 100 letters of 16 cm height. i.e.1600 cm
Unit = per cm height per letter
a) Labour
Mate
Painter Ist class
Mazdoor
b)
Material
Paint
c)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b)
d)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)
Cost for 1600 cm = a+b+c+d
Rate per cm height per letter = (a+b+c +d)/1600

day
day
day

0.070
1.250
0.500

140.00
200.00
125.00

9.80
250.00
62.50

Litre

0.500

172.00

86.00
61.25
70.43
539.98
0.34
0.30

say
6.2

801

1,820.35
2,093.40
16,049.42
458.55
459.00

Retro-Reflectorised Traffic Signs

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

Cost Rs

cum
cum
sqm

0.216
0.120
0.430

138.00
4966.00
45.00

29.81
595.92
19.35

day
day

0.010
0.250

140.00
125.00

1.40
31.25

kg

19.000

34.50

655.50

sqm

0.350

3689.00

1,291.15

sqm

0.156

3689.00

575.48

sqm

0.283

3689.00

1,043.99

sqm

0.480

3689.00

1,770.72

sqm

0.270

3689.00

996.03

sqm

0.360

3689.00

1,328.04

sqm

0.672

3689.00

2,479.01

sqm

0.450

3689.00

1,660.05

hour

0.010

346.00

3.46

Providing and fixing of retro- reflectorised cautionary,


mandatory and informatory sign as per IRC :67 made of
high intensity grade sheeting vide clause 801.3, fixed over
aluminium sheeting, 1.5 mm thick supported on a mild
steel angle iron post 75 mm x 75 mm x 6 mm firmly fixed
to the ground by means of properly designed foundation
with M15 grade cement concrete 45 cm x 45 cm x 60 cm,
60 cm below ground level as per approved drawing

6.2.1

6.2.2

6.2.3

6.2.4

Unit = Each
Taking output = one traffic sign
i)
Excavation for foundation
ii)
Cement concrete M15 grade
iii)
Painting angle iron post two coats
a) Labour (For fixing at site)
Mate
Mazdoor
b)
Material
Mild steel angle iron 75 x 75 x 6 mm
Aluminium sheeting fixed with encapsulated lens type
reflective sheeting of size including lettering and signs
as applicable
Add 2 per cent of cost of angle iron towards cost of
drilling holes, nuts, bolts etc.
90 cm equilateral triangle
or
60 cm equilateral triangle
or
60 cm circular
or
80 mm x 60 mm rectangular
or
60 cm x 45 cm rectangular
or
60 cm x 60 cm square
or
90 cm high octagon
or
60 cm x 75 cm rectangular
c)
Machinery
Tractor-trolley
90 cm equilateral triangle
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Rate per traffic sign = ( i+ii+iii+a+b+c+d+e)

say

297.41
342.03
3,267.28
3,267.00

say

190.06
218.57
2,320.81
2,321.00

say

260.34
299.39
2,940.41
2,940.00

say

369.35
424.75
3,901.51
3,902.00

60 cm equilateral triangle
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Rate per traffic sign = ( i+ii+iii+a+b+c+d+e)
60 cm circular
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Rate per traffic sign = ( i+ii+iii+a+b+c+d+e)
80 mm x 60 mm rectangular
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Rate per traffic sign = ( i+ii+iii+a+b+c+d+e)

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

60 cm x 75 cm rectangular
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Rate per traffic sign = ( i+ii+iii+a+b+c+d+e)

6.2.5

say

say

302.95
348.39
3,316.07
3,316.00

say

475.59
546.93
4,838.22
4,838.00

90 cm high octagon
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Rate per traffic sign = ( i+ii+iii+a+b+c+d+e)

6.2.6

801

Direction and Place Identification Signs upto 0.9 sqm


Size Board.
Providing and erecting direction and place identification
retro-reflectorised sign as per IRC:67 made of high
intensity grade sheeting vide clause 801.3, fixed over
aluminium sheeting, 2 mm thick with area not exceeding
0.9 sqm supported on a mild steel single angle iron post 75
x 75 x 6 mm firmly fixed to the ground by means of
properly designed foundation with M15 grade cement
concrete 45 x 45 x 60 cm, 60 cm below ground level as per
approved drawing
Unit = sqm
Taking output = 0.9 sqm
i) Excavation for foundation
ii) Cement concrete M15 grade
iii) Painting angle iron post two coats
a) Labour (For fixing at site)
Mate
Mazdoor
b)
Material
Mild steel angle iron 75 mm x 75 mm x 6 mm,2.85
metres long
Aluminium sheeting fixed with encapsulated lens type
reflective sheeting of size 0.9 sqm
Add 2 per cent of cost of materials for drilling holes, nuts,
bolts, fabrication etc.
c)
Machinery
Tractor-trolley
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 0.9 sqm =I+ii+ii+ a+b+c+d+e
Rate per sqm (for sign having area upto 0.9 sqm) =
(I+ii+iii+a+b+c+d+e)/0.90

cum
cum
sqm

0.216
0.120
0.430

138.00
4966.00
45.00

29.81
595.92
19.35

day
day

0.010
0.200

140.00
125.00

1.40
25.00

kg

19.000

34.50

655.50

sqm

0.900

3689.00

3,320.10

hour

0.020

346.00

6.92
601.34
691.54
5,946.87
6,607.64

say

6.3.2

801

Cost Rs

352.75
405.66
3,091.13
3,091.00

60 cm x 60 cm square
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Rate per traffic sign = ( i+ii+iii+a+b+c+d+e)

6.2.6

6.3.1

Description

Direction and Place Identification Signs with size more


than 0.9 sqm size Board.

6,608.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

Cost Rs

cum
cum
sqm

0.430
0.240
0.860

138.00
4966.00
45.00

59.34
1,191.84
38.70

day
day

0.010
0.300

140.00
125.00

1.40
37.50

kg

38.000

34.50

1,311.00

sqm

1.500

3689.00

5,533.50

hour

0.020

346.00

6.92
1,027.71
1,187.70
10,395.62

Providing and erecting direction and place identification


retro- reflectorised sign as per IRC :67 made of high
intensity grade sheeting vide clause 801.3, fixed over
aluminium sheeting, 2 mm thick with area exceeding 0.9
sqm supported on a mild steel angle iron post 75 mm x 75
mm x 6 mm, 2 Nos. firmly fixed to the ground by means of
properly designed foundation with M 15 grade cement
concrete45 cm x 45 cm x 60 cm, 60 cm below ground level
as per approved drawing

Unit = sqm
Taking output = 1.50 sqm
i)
Excavation for foundation
ii)
Cement concrete M15 grade
iii)
Painting angle iron post 2 coats
a) Labour (For fixing at site)
Mate
Mazdoor
b)
Material
Mild steel angle iron 75 mm x 75 mm x 6 mm, 2.85
metres long, 2 nos
Aluminium sheeting fixed with encapsulated lens type
reflective sheeting
Add 2 per cent of cost of materials for drilling holes, nuts,
bolts, fabrication etc.
c)
Machinery
Tractor-trolley
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 1.5 sqm =I+ii+ii+ a+b+c+d+e
Rate per sqm ( for sign having area more than 0.9
sqm) = ( i+ii+iii+a+b+c+d+e)/1.50

6,930.41
say

6.4

803

6,930.00

Painting Two Coats on New Concrete Surfaces


Painting two coats after filling the surface with synthetic
enamel paint in all shades on new plastered concrete
surfaces
Unit = sqm
Taking output = 40 sqm
a) Labour
Mate
Painter
Mazdoor
b)
Material
Paint conforming to requirement of clause 803.3.

day
day
day

0.120
2.000
1.000

Litre

6.000

140.00
200.00
125.00

16.80
400.00
125.00

172.00

1,032.00

Add for scaffolding @ 1 per cent of labour cost where


required

10.32
78.69

Add @ 5 per cent cost of labour and materials to


prepare the surface by filling minuts roughness on the
surface and priming the surface before laying 2 coats
of painting.
c)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b)
d)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)
Cost for 40 sqm = a+b+c+d
Rate per sqm = (a+b+c+d)/40
say

249.42
286.83
2,199.07
54.98
55.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.
6.5
803

Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

day
day

0.500
2.000

140.00
125.00

70.00
250.00

hour
hour

8.000
8.000

89.00
346.00

712.00
2,768.00

Litre
kg

2000.000
200.000

55.00
45.00

110,000.00
9,000.00
18,420.00
21,183.00
162,403.00
270.67
271.00

Road Marking with Hot Applied Thermoplastic


Compound with Reflectorising Glass Beads on
Bituminous Surface
Providing and laying of hot applied thermoplastic
compound 2.5 mm thick including reflectorising glass
beads @ 250 gms per sqm area, thickness of 2.5 mm is
exclusive of surface applied glass beads as per IRC:35
.The finished surface to be level, uniform and free from
streaks and holes.
Unit = sqm
Taking output = 640 sqm
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
b)
Machinery
Road marking machine @ 80 sqm per hour
Tractor-trolley
c)
Material
Hot applied thermoplastic compound
Reflectorising glass beads
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 640 sqm = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per sqm = a+b+c+d+e)/640

say

804
6.6

6.6.1

Kilometre Stone
Reinforced cement concrete M15grade kilometre stone of
standard design as per IRC:8-1980, fixing in position
including painting and printing etc
5th kilometre stone (precast)
Unit = Nos.
Taking output = 6 Nos.
cum
a)
M-15 grade of concrete
kg
b) Steel reinforcement @ 5 kg per sqm
cum
c) Excavation in soil for foundation
sqm
d) Painting two coats on concrete surface
e) Lettering on km post (average 30 letters of 10 per cm
per letter
cm height each)
Transportation and fixing
f)
Labour
Mate
day
Mason
day
Mazdoor including loading/unloading
day
g)
Machinery
Tractor-trolley
hour
h)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (f+g)
i)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (f+g+h)
Cost for 6 Nos. 5th km stone = a+b+c+ d+e +f+g+h +i
Rate for each 5th km stone = (a+b+c+ d+e +f+g+h +i )
/6

2.350
22.080
1.680
9.850

4966.00
53.76
138.00
52.00
0.30

11,670.10
1,186.98
231.84
512.20
540.00

0.260
0.600
6.000

140.00
200.00
125.00

36.40
120.00
750.00

6.000

346.00

2,076.00
447.36
514.46
18,085.34

1800.000

3,014.22
say

6.6.2

Cost Rs

Ordinary kilometer stone (precast)


Unit = Nos.
Taking output = 14 Nos.
a)
M-15 grade of concrete
b) Steel reinforcement @ 5 kg per sqm
c) Excavation in soil for foundation

cum
kg
cum

3.770
26.320
2.770

4966.00
53.76
138.00

3,014.00

18,721.82
1,414.91
382.26

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

sqm
d) Painting two coats on concrete surface
e) Lettering on km post ( average 12 letters of 10 per cm
per letter
cm height each)
Transportation and fixing
f)
Labour
Mate
day
Mason
day
Mazdoor
day
g)
Machinery
Tractor-trolley
hour
h)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (f+g)
i)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (f+g+h)
Cost for 14 Nos. ordinary km stone = (a+b+ c
+d+e+f+g+h+i)
Rate for each ordinary km stone = (a+b+ c
+d+e+f+g+h+j) /14

Quantity
11.410

Rate Rs
52.00
0.30

593.32
504.00

0.320
1.000
7.000

140.00
200.00
125.00

44.80
200.00
875.00

6.000

346.00

2,076.00
479.37
551.28

1680.000

25,842.76
1,845.91
say

Hectometer stone (precast)


Unit = Nos.
Taking output = 33 Nos.
cum
a)
M-15 grade of concrete
kg
b) Steel reinforcement @ 5 kg per sqm
cum
c) Excavation in soil for foundation
sqm
d) Painting two coats on concrete surface
e) Lettering on km post (average 1 letter of 10
per cm
per letter
cm height each)
Transportation and fixing
f)
Labour
Mate
day
Mason
day
Mazdoor
day
g)
Machinery
Tractor-trolley
hour
h)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (f+g)
i)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (f+g+h)
Cost for 33 Nos. Hectometer stone = (a+b +c +d+e+f+
g+h+i)
Rate for each Hectometer stone = (a+b +c +d+e+f+
g+h+i) 33

6.6.3

1.580
66.000
1.390
6.270

806

1,846.00

4966.00
53.76
138.00
52.00
0.30

7,846.28
3,548.03
191.82
326.04
99.00

0.340
1.500
7.000

140.00
200.00
125.00

47.60
300.00
875.00

6.000

346.00

2,076.00
494.79
569.01

330.000

16,373.57
496.17
say

6.8

Cost Rs

496.00

Boundary pillar
Reinforced cement concrete M15 grade boundary pillars of
standard design as per IRC:25-1967, fixed in position
including finishing and lettering but excluding painting
Unit = Each
Taking output = 57 Nos.
a)
M-15 grade of the boundary stone
b)
Steel reinforcement
c)
Excavation in soil
d)

Lettering, each 10 cm high

Transportation and fixing


e)
Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
f)
Machinery
Tractor-trolley

cum
kg
cum
per letter
per cm
high

1.250
79.800
10.720

4966.00
53.76
138.00
0.30

6,207.50
4,289.89
1,479.36
684.00

2280.000

day
day

0.570
14.250

140.00
125.00

79.80
1,781.25

hour

6.000

346.00

2,076.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description
Material
Stone spall
h)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (e+f+g)
i)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (e+f+g+h)

Unit

Quantity

cum

11.970

Rate Rs

Cost Rs

g)

924.70

Cost for 57 Nos. boundary pillar = (a+b +c+d +e+ f+g+h+i )


Rate for each
f+g+h+i)/57

boundary

pillar

32,505.80

(a+b+c+d+e+

570.28
say

6.9

6.9.2

809

570.00

Reinforced Cement Concrete Crash Barrier


Provision of an Reinforced cement concrete crash barrier
at the edges of the road, approaches to bridge structures
and medians, constructed with M-40 grade concrete with
HYSD reinforcement conforming to IRC:21 and dowel bars
25 mm dia, 450 mm long at expansion joints filled with premoulded asphalt filler board, keyed to the structure on
which it is built and installed as per design given in the
enclosure to MOST circular No. RW/NH - 33022/1/94-DO
III dated 24 June 1994 as per dimensions in the approved
drawing and at locations directed by the Engineer, all as
specified
Unit = Linear metre
Taking output = 10 m
a)
M 40 grade concrete (0.26 sqm)
M 40 grade concrete
b)
Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
c)
Material
HYSD steel reinforcement including dowel bars
Pre-moulded asphalt filler board
d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (b+c+d)
Cost for 10 metre = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per metre = (a+b+c+d+e)/10

cum

2.600

7544.00

19,614.40

day
day

0.040
1.000

140.00
125.00

5.60
125.00

tonne
sqm

0.374
0.320

35700.00
25.00

13,351.80
8.00
2,023.56
2,327.09
37,455.45
3,745.55
3,746.00

say

6.12

11,068.66
2,250.86
2,588.48

Suggesti
Road Markers/Road Stud with Lense Reflector
ve
Providing and fixing of road stud 100 x 100 mm, die-cast in
aluminium, resistant to corrosive effect of salt and grit,
fitted with lense reflectors, installed in concrete or asphaltic
surface by drilling hole 30 mm upto a depth of 60 mm and
bedded in a suitable bituminous grout or epoxy mortar, all
as per BS 873 part 4:1973
Unit = Nos
Taking output = 50Nos
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
b)
Material
Aluminium studs 100 x 100 mm fitted with lense
reflectors
Add 10 per cent of cost of material for fixing and
installation
c)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b)
d)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)
Cost for 50 studs = a+b+c+d

day
day

0.040
1.000

each

50.000

140.00
125.00

5.60
125.00

155.63

7,781.50
778.15
1,303.54
1,499.07
11,492.86

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

Rate per studs = (a+b+c+d)/50


say

7.1

7.1.1

304

7.2.1

Ordinary soil
Unit = cum
Taking output = 10 cum
Mechanical Means
Depth upto 3 m
Unit = cum
Taking output = 240 cum
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
Machinery
b)
Hydraulic excavator 1.0 cum bucket capacity
c)
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b)
d)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)
Cost for 240 cum = a+b+c+d
Rate per cum = (a+b+c+d)/240

day
day

0.32
8.00

140.00
125.00

44.80
1,000.00

hour

6.00

1241.00

7,446.00
1,698.16
1,528.34
11,717.30
48.82
49.00

1500, Plain/Reinforced Cement Concrete in Open Foundation


1700 & complete as per Drawing and Technical Specifications.
2100
PCC Grade M15
Unit = cum
Taking output = 15 cum
a) Material
Cement
Coarse sand
40 mm Aggregate
20 mm Aggregate
10 mm Aggregate
Labour
b)
Mate
Mason
Mazdoor
Machinery
c)
Concrete mixer (cap. 0.40/0.28 cum)
Generator 63 KVA
Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Machinery
(a+b+c)
d)
Formwork @ 4 per cent on cost of concrete i.e.
cost of material, labour and machinery

tonne
cum
cum
cum
cum

4.13
6.75
8.10
4.05
1.35

4620.00
1506.65
1184.90
1235.00
1235.00

19,080.60
10,169.89
9,597.69
5,001.75
1,667.25

day
day
day

0.86
1.50
20.00

140.00
200.00
125.00

120.40
300.00
2,500.00

hour
hour

6.00
6.00
3460.00

222.00
355.00

1,332.00
2,130.00

2,075.98

e)
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b+c+d)
f)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d+e)
Cost for 15 cum = a+b+c+d+e+f
Rate per cum = (a+b+c+d+e+f)/15
say
7.2.3

229.86
230.00

Excavation for Structures


Earth work in excavation of foundation of structures as per
drawing and technical specification, including setting out,
construction of shoring and bracing, removal of stumps
and other deleterious matter, dressing of sides and bottom
and backfilling with approved material.

say
7.2

Cost Rs

RCC Grade M25


With Batching Plant, Transit Mixer and Concrete Pump

10,795.11
9,715.60
74,486.27
4,965.75
4,966.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Unit: cum
Taking Output = 120 cum
a) Material
Cement
tonne
Coarse sand
cum
20 mm Aggregate
cum
10 mm Aggregate
cum
Labour
b)
Mate
day
Mason
day
Mazdoor
day
Machinery
c)
Batching Plant @ 20 cum/hour
hour
Generator 100 KVA
hour
Loader 1 cum capacity 1 cum
hour
Transit Mixer 4 cum capacity for lead upto 1 km.
hour
Transit Mixer 4 cum capacity lead beyond 1 Km, L tonne.km
lead in Kilometer
Concrete Pump
hour
Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Machinery
(a+b+c)
d)
Formwork @ 3.75 per cent on cost of concrete i.e.
cost of material, labour and machinery
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b+c+d)
e)
f)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d+e)
cost of 120 cum = a+b+c+d+e+f
Rate per cum (a+b+c+d+e+f )/120

Quantity

Rate Rs

48.38
54.00
64.80
43.20

4620.00
1506.65
1235.00
1235.00

223,515.60
81,359.10
80,028.00
53,352.00

0.84
3.00
18.00

140.00
200.00
125.00

117.60
600.00
2,250.00

6.00
6.00
6.00
15.00
300L

2128.00
665.00
768.00
886.00
2.35

12,768.00
3,990.00
4,608.00
13,290.00
-

6.00
3978.00

244.00

1,464.00

17,900.34

say
7.10b

Bored cast-in-situ M40 grade R.C.C. Pile excluding


1100,160 Reinforcement complete as per Drawing and Technical
0 & 1700 Specifications and removal of excavated earth with all
lifts and lead upto 1000 m.
Pile diameter-1200 mm
Unit = meter
Taking output = 10 m
a) Materials
PCC Grade M40
Rate for concrete may be adopted same as for bottom
plug vide item no. 12.11( C ) (IV)
Concrete to be cast with a tremie pipe 200mm dia.
b)
Machinery( for boring and construction )
Hire and running charges of hydraulic piling rig with
power unit and complete accessories including shifting
from one bore location to another.
Hire and running charges of light crane for lowering
reinforcement cage
Hire and running charges of Bentonite pump

Loader I cum bucket capacity.


Tipper 5.5 cum capacity for disposal of muck from pile
bore hole
Bentonite
c)
Labour
Mate/Supervisor
Mazdoor
Overhead charges @ 20% on (b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (b+c+d)
Cost for 10 m = a+b+c+d+d+e
Rate per metre (a+b+c+d+e)/10

Cost Rs

99,048.53
89,143.67
683,434.84
5,695.29
5,695.00

cum

10.17

4322.00

43,954.74

hour

6.00

5208.00

31,248.00

hour

0.50

340.00

170.00

hour

6.00

hour
hour

0.50
0.50

Rate
included in
piling rig
768.00
295.00

384.00
147.50

kg

385.00

4.80

1,848.00

day
day

0.18
4.50

140.00
125.00

25.20
562.50
15,667.99
14,101.19
108,109.12
10,810.91

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs
say

7.11

1100

7.11.1

Pile Load Test on single Vertical Pile in accordance


with IS:2911(Part-IV)
Unit = 1 MT
Taking output = 1 MT
a) Initial test
Per test

1.00

31941.20

Cost Rs
10,811.00

From CPWD
SOR Delhi
From CPWD
SOR Delhi
From CPWD
SOR Delhi

7.11.2

b) Routine test

Per test

1.00

20907.00

7.11.3

a) Lateral load test

Per test

1.00

20907.00

tonne

1.05

34500.00

36,225.00

Mate

day

1.24

140.00

173.60

Fitter

day

6.00

150.00

900.00

Blacksmith

day

5.00

200.00

1,000.00

Although, this item is incidental to work and is not required


to be included in BOQ of contract, the same is required to
be added in the estimate to assess cost of work.
7.20

1200 & Providing Steel Liner 10 mm thick for Curbs and 6 mm


1900 thick for Steining of Wells including Fabricating and
Setting out as per Detailed Drawing.
Unit = 1 MT
Taking output = 1 MT
a)

Material
i) Structural steel including 5 per cent wastage

b)

Labour

Welder

day

5.00

200.00

1,000.00

Mazdoor

day

10.00

125.00

1,250.00

Electrodes, cutting gas and other consumables @ 5


per cent on cost a (a) above.
c)
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b)
d)

1,811.25
8,471.97
7,624.77

Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)

58,456.59

Rate for per MT (a+b+c)


say
7.12

7.12.3

1100,
1500
&1700

58,457.00

Cement Concrete for Reinforced Concrete in Pile Cap


complete as per Drawing and Technical Specification
RCC Grade M40
Unit = cum
Taking output = 15 cum
Using Batching Plant, Transit Mixer and Concrete
Pump
a) Material
Cement
Coarse sand
20 mm Aggregate
10 mm Aggregate
Labour
b)
Mate
Mason
Mazdoor for concreting
Mazdoor for breaking pile head, bending bars,
cleaning etc.
Machinery
c)
Batching Plant @ 20 cum/hour

tonne
cum
cum
cum

6.45
6.75
8.10
5.40

4620.00
1506.65
1235.00
1235.00

29,799.00
10,169.89
10,003.50
6,669.00

day
day
day
day

0.16
0.38
2.50
1.00

140.00
190.00
125.00
125.00

22.40
72.20
312.50
125.00

2128.00

1,596.00

hour

0.75

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description
Generator 100 KVA
Loader (capacity 1 cum)
Transit Mixer ( capacity 4.0 cu.m )
Lead upto 1 Km
Lead beyond 1 Km, L - lead in Kilometer
Concrete Pump
Formwork @ 4 per cent on cost of concrete i.e. cost
of a) Material, b)
Labour and c)
Machinery

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

hour
hour

0.75
0.75

665.00
768.00

498.75
576.00

hour
tonne.km

2.00
37.5L

886.00
2.35

1,772.00
-

hour

0.75

244.00

183.00
2,471.97

Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b+c)


d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 15 cum = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per metre (a+b+c+d+e)/15
say
7.13

1100&17 Levelling Course for Pile cap


00
Providing and laying of PCC M15 levelling course
100mm thick below the pile cap.
Unit = cum
Taking output = 15 cum
a) Material
Cement
Coarse sand
40 mm aggregate
20 mm Aggregate
10 mm Aggregate
Labour
b)
Mate
Mason
Mazdoor
Machinery
c)
Concrete mixer (cap. 0.40/0.28 cum)
Generator 33 KVA
d)
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 15 cum = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per metre (a+b+c+d+e)/15
1600

Supplying, Fitting and Placing un-coated HYSD bar


Reinforcement in Foundation complete as per Drawing
and Technical Specifications.
Unit = 1 MT
Taking output = 1 MT
a) Material
HYSD bars including5 per cent overlaps and wastage
Binding wire
b)
Labour for cutting, bending, shifting to site, tying
and placing in position
Mate
Blacksmith
Mazdoor
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b)
c)
d)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)

4.13
6.75
8.10
4.05
1.35

4620.00
1506.65
1184.90
1235.00
1235.00

19,080.60
10,169.89
9,597.69
5,001.75
1,667.25

day
day
day

0.86
1.50
20.00

140.00
190.00
125.00

120.40
285.00
2,500.00

hour
hour

6.00
6.00

222.00
355.00

1,332.00
2,130.00
10,376.92
9,339.22
71,600.72
4,773.38
4,773.00

tonne

1.05

35700.00

37,485.00

Kg

6.00

34.50

207.00

day
day
day

0.40
2.00
6.00

140.00
200.00
125.00

56.00
400.00
750.00
7,779.60
7,001.64
53,679.24
53,679.00

say
8.3

1500, Plain/Reinforced cement concrete in sub-structure


1700 & complete as per drawing and Technical Specifications
2200

12,854.24
11,568.82
88,694.27
5,912.95
5,913.00

tonne
cum
cum
cum
cum

say
7.3

Cost Rs

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

8.3.1

Description

Unit

Unit = cum
Taking output = 1 cum
PCC Grade M20
Height upto 5m
Same as Item 12.8 (B) upto 5 m height, except for
formwork which shall be 10 per cent instead of 4 per cent
of cost of material, labour and machinery.
Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Machinery
(a+b+c) of Item 12.8 (B)
d) formwork
Add 10 per cent of cost of material, labour and
machinery (a+b+c) for Formwork
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b+c+d)
e)
f)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d+e)
Rate per m (a+b+c+d+e+f)

Quantity

Rate Rs

3,787.00

10.00

378.70

say
8.3.3

Cost Rs

833.14
749.83
5,748.67
5,749.00

RCC Grade M25


Height upto 5m
Same as Item 12.8 (E) upto 5m height, excluding
formwork. For cost of formwork, add 10 per cent of cost of
material, labour and machinery instead of 3.75 per cent .
With Batching Plant, Transit Mixer and Concrete Pump
4,220.00

Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Machinery


(a+b+c) of Item 12.8 (E) Case II
d) formwork
Add 10 per cent of cost of material, labour and
machinery (a+b+c) for Formwork
e)
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b+c+d)
f)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d+e)
Rate perm (a+b+c+d+e+f)

10.00

422.00

say
8.3.5

928.40
835.56
6,405.96
6,406.00

RCC Grade M50


Height upto 5m
Same as Item 12.8 (G) upto 5m height, excluding
formwork. For cost of formwork, add 10 per cent of cost of
material, labour and machinery instead of 3.5 per cent .
With Batching Plant, Transit Mixer and Concrete Pump
4,674.00

Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Machinery


(a+b+c) of Item 12.8 (G) Case II
d) formwork
Add 10 per cent of cost of material, labour and
machinery (a+b+c) for Formwork
e)
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b+c+d)
f)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d+e)
Rate perm (a+b+c+d+e+f)

10.00

467.40

say
8.4

1,028.28
925.45
7,095.13
7,095.00

Section Supplying, fitting and placing HYSD bar reinforcement


1600 & in sub-structure complete as per drawing and
2200 Technical Specifications
Output: MT
Taking output = 1 MT
a) Material
HYSD bars including 5 per cent overlaps and wastage
Binding wire

tonne

1.05

35700.00

37,485.00

kg

6.00

34.50

207.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description
b)
Labour for cutting, bending, shifting to site, tying
and placing in position
Mate
Blacksmith
Mazdoor
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b)
c)
d)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)
Rate for per MT (a+b+c+d)

Unit

Quantity

day
day
day

0.34
2.00
6.50

Rate Rs

140.00
200.00
125.00

say
9.1

1500
&1600
1700

9.1.4

Cost Rs

47.60
400.00
812.50
7,790.42
7,011.38
53,753.90
53,754.00

Furnishing and Placing Reinforced/ Prestressed


cement concrete in super-structure as per drawing and
Technical Specification
PSC Grade M-50
Unit = 1 cum
Taking output = 120 cum
a)

Material
Cement

4620.00

271,656.00

Coarse sand

cum

54.00

1506.65

81,359.10

cum

64.80

1235.00

80,028.00

10 mm Aggregate

cum

43.20

1235.00

53,352.00

kg

235.20

150.00

35,280.00

day

0.94

140.00

131.60

Labour
Mate

c)

58.80

20 mm Aggregate
Admixture @ 0.4 per cent of cement
b)

tonne

Mason

day

3.50

200.00

700.00

Mazdoor

day

20.00

125.00

2,500.00
12,768.00

Machinery
Batching Plant @ 20 cum/hour

hour

6.00

2128.00

Generator 100 KVA

hour

6.00

665.00

3,990.00

Loader

hour

6.00

768.00

4,608.00

hour

15.00

886.00

13,290.00

tonne.km

300L

2.35

6.00

244.00

Transit Mixer ( capacity 4.0 cu.m )


Transit Mixer 4 cum capacity lead upto1 Km
Lead beyond 1 Km, L - lead in Kilometer
Concrete Pump
Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Machinery (a+b+c)
for 120 cum
For formwork and staging add the following:
For T-beam & slab including launching of precast
girders by launching truss upto 40 m span, 35-35 per
cent of cost of concrete.
Height upto 5m
Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Machinery (a+b+c)
for
120 cum
d)

Formwork and staging 35 per cent of (a+b+c)

hour

561,127.00
35.00

196,394.45

say
1600

Supplying, fitting and placing HYSD bar reinforcement in


super-structure complete as per drawing and technical
specifications

1,464.00

561127.00

e)
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b+c+d)
f)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d+e)
Cost for 120 cum = a+b+c+d+e+f
Rate per cum = (a+b+c+d+e+f)/120
9.2

151,504.29
136,353.86
1,045,379.60
8,711.50
8,711.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

Cost Rs

tonne

1.05

35700.00

37,485.00

Kg

8.00

34.50

276.00

140.00
200.00
125.00

61.60
600.00
1,000.00

Unit = 1 MT
Taking output = 1 MT
a) Material
HYSD bars including 5 per cent for laps and wastage
Binding wire
b)
Labour for cutting, bending, tying and placing in
position
Mate
Blacksmith
Mazdoor
Basic Cost of Labour & Material (a+b)
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b)
c)
d)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)
Rate per MT = a+b+c+d

day
day
day

0.44
3.00
8.00
39423.00

say
9.3

1800

High tensile steel wires/strands including all accessories


for stressing, stressing operations and grouting complete
as per drawing and Technical Specifications
Unit = 1 MT
Taking output = 0.377 MT
Details of cost for 12T13 strand 40 m long cable (weight =
0.377 MT)
a) Material
H.T. Strand @ 9.42 kg/m including 2 per cent for
wastage and extra length for jacking
Sheathing duct ID 66 mm along with 5 per cent extra
length 40 x 1.05 = 42 m.
Tube anchorage set complete with bearing plate,
permanent wedges etc
Cement for grouting including 3 per cent wastage @
3.00 kg/m = 3 x 1.03 x 40 = 123.60 kg (say, = 125 kg)
Add 0.50 per cent cost of material for Spacers,
Insulation tape and miscellaneous items
b)
Labour
i) For making and fixing cables, anchorages
Blacksmith
Mazdoor
ii) For prestressing
Mate/Supervisor
Prestressing operator / Fitter
Mazdoor
iii) For grouting
Mate/Supervisor
Mason
Mazdoor
Machinery
c)
Stressing jack with pump
Grouting pump with agitator
Generator 33 KVA.
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 0.377 MT (a+b+c+d+e)
Rate per MT = (a+b+c+d+e)/0.377

tonne

0.39

50000.00

19,250.00

metre

42.00

80.00

3,360.00

each

2.00

2450.00

4,900.00

tonne

0.125

4620.00

577.50

1,404.38

day
day

1.00
3.00

200.00
125.00

200.00
375.00

day
day
day

0.05
0.25
1.00

140.00
150.00
125.00

7.00
37.50
125.00

day
day
day

0.05
0.25
1.00

140.00
200.00
125.00

7.00
50.00
125.00

hour
hour
hour

2.50
1.00
3.50

123.00
300.00
355.00

307.50
300.00
1,242.50
559.78
503.80
33,354.36
88,473.10
88,473.00

say
9.6

2705

7,884.52
7,096.07
54,403.19
54,403.00

Drainage Spouts complete as per drawing and Technical


specification

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description
Unit = 1 No.
Taking output = 1 No.
a) Material
Corrosion resistant Structural steel including 5 per
cent wastage
GI pipe 100mm dia
GI bolt 10 mm Dia
Galvanised MS flat clamp
Labour
b)
For fabrication
Mate
Skilled (Blacksmith, welder etc.)
Mazdoor
For fixing in position
Mate
Mason
Mazdoor
Add @ 5 per cent of cost of material and labour for
electrodes, cutting gas, sealant, anti-corrosive
bituminous paint, mild steel grating etc.
c)
d)

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

Kg

4.00

56.00

224.00

metre
each
each

6.00
6.00
2.00

50.00
15.00
40.00

300.00
90.00
80.00

day
day
day

0.02
0.02
0.02

140.00
200.00
125.00

2.80
4.00
2.50

day
day
day

0.01
0.01
0.20

140.00
200.00
125.00

1.40
2.00
25.00
36.59

153.66
138.29

Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b)


Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)

1,060.23

Rate per metre (a+b+c+d)


say
9.7

9.8

2700

Unit = 1 cum
Taking output = 1 cum
Material
Concrete, Rate as per item No. 12.8 (A) excluding
formworks
Rate per cum
1500,160 Reinforced cement concrete approach slab including
0,1700 & reinforcement and formwork complete as per drawing and
Technical specification
2704
Unit = 1 cum
Taking output = 1 cum
a) Material
Cement concreteM30 Grade Refer relevant item of
concrete in item 12.8(G)by using batching plant,
excluding formwork i.e. per cum basic cost (a+b+c)
(Excluding OH & CP)
( Refer relevant item of concrete in item No. 13.8 (G)
except that form work may be added at the rate of 2
per cent of cost against 3.5 per cent provided in the
foundation concrete.
HYSD bar reinforcement Rate as per item No
14.2(Excluding OH & CP)
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a)
b)
c)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on(a+b)
Rate per cum (a+b+c)

2607

1,060.00

PCC M15 Grade leveling course below approach slab


complete as per drawing and Technical specification

cum

1.00

4775.00
say

cum

1.00

4236.00

Strip Seal Expansion Joint

4,775.00
4,775.00

4,236.00

84.72

tonne

0.05

39427.00

say
9.10

Cost Rs

1,971.35
1,258.41
1,132.57
8,683.06
8,683.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

Cost Rs

day
day
day

0.05
1.00
0.25

140.00
125.00
140.00

7.00
125.00
35.00

metre

12.00

20000.00

240,000.00

Providing and laying of a strip seal expansion joint catering


to maximum horizontal movement upto 70 mm, complete
as per approved drawings and standard specifications to
be installed by the manufacturer/supplier or their
authorised representative ensuring compliance to the
manufacturer's instructions for installation.
Unit = Running meter
Taking output = 12 m
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
Mazdoor (Skilled)
b) Material
Supply of complete assembly of strip seal expansion
joint comprising of edge beams, anchorage, strip seal
element and complete accessories as per approved
specifications and drawings.

12,008.35

Add 5 per cent of cost of material for anchorage


reinforcement, welding and other incidentals.
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b)
c)
Cost for 12 m = (a+b+c+d)
Rate per m = (a+b+c+d)/12
9.11

50,435.07
348,001.98
29,000.00

2000 & Supplying, fitting and fixing in position true to line and
2200 level POT-PTFE bearing consisting of a metal piston
supported by a disc or unreinforced elastomer
confined within a metal cylinder, sealing rings, dust
seals, PTFE surface sliding against stainless steel
mating surface, complete assembly to be of cast
steel/fabricated structural steel, metal and elastomer
elements to be as per IRC: 83 part-I & II respectively
and other parts conforming to BS: 5400, section 9.1 &
9.2 and clause 2006 of MoRTH Specifications complete
as per drawing and approved Technical Specifications.

Unit: one tonne capacity


Considering a Pot bearing assembly of 626.707 tonne
capacity for this analysis.
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor
Mazdoor (Skilled)
Material
b)
Pot type bearing assembly consisting of a metal piston
supported by a disc, PTFE pads providing sliding
surfaces against stainless steel mating together with
cast steel assemblies/fabricated structural steel
assemblies duly painted with all components as per
clause 2006 and complete as per drawings and
Technical Specifications.
Add 1 per cent of cost of bearing assembly for
foundation anchorage bolts and consumables.
Overhead charges @ 20% on (a+b)
c)
d)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c)
cost for 250 tonnes capacity bearing = a+b+c+d
Rate per tonne capacity = (a+b+c+d)/626.707

387.20

day
day
day

0.08
1.50
0.50

140.00
125.00
140.00

11.20
187.50
70.00

each.

1.00

92792.00

92792.00

927.92

say
10.4

307

Grassing with ' Doobs' Grass

18,797.72
16,917.95
129704.30
206.96
207.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Grassing with 'Doobs' grass including watering and


maintenance of the lawn for 30 days or more till the grass
forms a thick lawn free from weeds and fit for moving
including supplying good earth if needed
Unit = sqm
Taking output = 100 sqm
In rows 15 cm apart in either direction
a) Labour
Mate
Mazdoor for grassing
Mazdoor for maintenance for 30 days
Machinery
b)
Water tanker6 KL capacity
c)
Material
Doob grass
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
d)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 100 sqm = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per sqm= (a+b+c+d+e)/100

day
day
day

0.170
0.750
1.000

140.00
125.00
125.00

23.80
93.75
125.00

hour

0.500

100.00

50.00

100.000

1.00

100.00
58.88
67.71
519.15
5.19
5.00

kg

Rate Rs

say
10.12

408

Cost Rs

Cast in Situ Cement Concrete M 20 Kerb with Channel


Construction of cement concrete kerb with channel with
top and bottom width 115 and 165 mm respectively, 250
mm high in M 20 grade PCC on M10 grade foundation 150
mm thick, kerb channel 300 mm wide, 50 mm thick in
PCCM20 grade, sloped towards the kerb, kerb stone with
channel laid with kerb laying machine, foundation concrete
laid manually, all complete as per clause 408
Using Concrete Mixer
Unit = Running metre
Taking output = 300 metre length
Cement Concrete
Cement concrete of grade M20= 17.48 cum
Cement concrete of grade M10 for base = 23.18 cum
Total Concrete = 40.66 cum
Using Concrete Batching and Mixing Plant
Unit = Running metre
Taking output = 300 metre length
Cement Concrete
Cement concrete of grade M20= 17.48 cum
Cement concrete of grade M10 for base = 23.18 cum
Total Concrete = 40.66 cum
a) Labour
Mate
Mason
Mazdoor
b)
Machinery
Kerb casting machine @ 50 metres/hour for laying
kerb and channel

day
day
day

0.120
1.000
2.000

hour

6.000

Concrete batching and mixing plant @ 15 cum/hr.

hour

2.700

Water tanker6 KL capacity


Tipper of 5.5 cum capacity
c)
Material
Crushed stone aggregate 20 mm nominal size 60 per
cent
Coarse sand 30 per cent
Cement 10 per cent
Cost of water

hour
hour

6.000
6.000

cum

36.590

cum
tonne
KL

18.300
9.010
36.000

140.00
200.00
125.00

16.80
200.00
250.00

295.00

1770.00

1773.00

4787.10

100.00
3.00

600.00
18.00

1235.00

45188.65

1506.65
4620.00
40.00

27571.70
41626.20
1440.00

Ref. to
MoRTH
Spec.

Description

Unit

Quantity

Rate Rs

d)
Overhead charges @ 15% on (a+b+c)
e)
Contractor's profit @ 15% on (a+b+c+d)
Cost for 300 meter = a+b+c+d+e
Rate per metre = (a+b+c+d+e)/300
say

Cost Rs
18520.27
21298.31
163287.02
544.29
544.00

(A) Usage Rates of Plant and Machinery

Sl. No.

Description of Machine

Activity

Output of
Machine

Output

Unit

Rate

Air Compressor

General Purpose

capacity in cfm

170/250

hour

304.00

Batching and Mixing Plant (a) 30 cum


capacity

Concrete Mixing

cum/hour

20

hour

2,128.00

Batching and Mixing Plant (b) 15 - 20 cum


capacity

Concrete Mixing

cum/hour

13

hour

1,773.00

Bitumen Pressure Distributor

Applying bitumen tack coat

sqm/hour

1750

hour

1,022.00

Bitumen Boiler oil fired

Bitumen Spraying

capacity in litre

1500

hour

189.00

Concrete Paver Finisher with 40 HP Motor

Paving of concrete surface

cum / hour

20

hour

2,733.00

Concrete Pump of 45 & 30 cum capacity

Pumping of concrete

cum / hour

33 / 22

hour

244.00

Concrete Bucket

For Pouring concrete

capacity in cum

hour

15.00

Concrete Mixer (a) 0.4/0.28 cum

Concrete Mixing

cum/hour

2.5

hour

222.00

10

Concrete Mixer (b) 1 cum

Concrete Mixing

cum/hour

7.5

hour

222.00

11

Crane (a) 80 tonnes

Lifting Purpose

hour

1,219.00

12

Cranes b) 35 tonnes

Lifting Purpose

hour

813.00

13

Cranes c) 3 tonnes

Lifting Purpose

hour

340.00

14

Dozer D - 80 - A 12

Spreading /Cutting / Clearing

cum/hour

300/ 150/250

hour

3,546.00

15

Dozer D - 50 - A 15

Spreading /Cutting / Clearing

cum/hour

200/ 120/150

hour

2,102.00

16

Emulsion Pressure Distributor

Applying emulsion tack coat

sqm/hour

1750

hour

762.00

17

Front End loader 1 cum bucket capacity

Soil loading / Aggregate loading

cum/hour

60 /25

hour

768.00

18

Generator (a) 125 KVA

Genration of electric Energy

KVA

100

hour

665.00

19

Generator( b) 63 KVA

Genration of electric Energy

KVA

50

hour

355.00

20

GSB Plant 50 cum

Producing GSB

cum/hour

40

hour

990.00

21

Hotmix Plant - 120 TPH capacity

DBM/BM/SDC/ Premix

cum/hour

40

hour

22,310.00

22

Hotmix Plant - 100 TPH capacity

DBM/BM/SDC/ Premix

cum/hour

30

hour

16,499.00

23

Hotmix Plant - 60 to 90 TPH capacity

DBM/BM/SDC/ Premix

cum/hour

25

hour

13,194.00

24

Hotmix Plant - 40 to 60 TPH capacity

DBM/BM/SDC/ Premix

cum/hour

17

hour

10,564.00

25

Hydraulic Chip Spreader

Surface Dressing

sqm/hour

1500

hour

2,512.00

26

Hydraulic Excavator of 1 cum bucket

Soil Ordinary/Soil Marshy / Soil


Unsuitable

cum/hour

60 /60 /60

hour

1,241.00

27

Integrated Stone Crusher 100THP

Crushing of Spalls

TPH

100

hour

8,259.00

28

Integrated Stone Crusher 200 HP

Crushing of Spalls

TPH

200

hour

17,375.00

29

Kerb Casting Machine

Kerb Making

Rm/hour

80

hour

295.00

30

Mastic Cooker

Mastic Wearing coat

capacity in tonne

hour

59.00

31

Mechanical Broom Hydraulic

Surface Cleaning

sqm/hour

1250

hour

340.00

32

Motor Grader 3.35 mtr blade

Clearing /Spreading /GSB /WBM

cum/hour

200/200/50/50

hour

2,283.00

33

Mobile slurry seal equipment

Mixing and laying slurry seal

sqm/hour

2700

hour

960.00

34

Paver Finisher Hydrostatic with sensor control


Paving of DBM/ BM/SDC/ Premix
100 TPH

cum/hour

40

hour

2,549.00

35

Paver Finisher Mechanical 100 TPH

cum/hour

40/30

hour

929.00

Paving of WMM /Paving of DLC

(A) Usage Rates of Plant and Machinery

Sl. No.

Description of Machine

Activity

Output of
Machine

Output

Unit

Rate

36

Piling Rig with Bantonite Pump

0.75 m dia to 1.2 m dia Boring


attachment

Rm/hour

2 to 3

hour

5,208.00

37

Pneumatic Road Roller

Rolling of Asphalt Surface

cum/hour

25

hour

1,185.00

38

Pneumatic Sinking Plant

Pneumatic Sinking of wells

cum/hour

1.5 to 2.00

hour

3,974.00

39

Pot Hole Repair Machine

Repair of potholes

cum/hour

hour

864.00

40

Prestressing Jack with Pump & access

Stressing of steel wires/stands

hour

123.00

41

Ripper

Scarifying

cum/hour

60

hour

27.00

42

Rotavator

Scarifying

cum/hour

25

hour

16.00

43

Road marking machine

Road marking

Sqm/hour

100

hour

89.00

44

Smooth Wheeled Roller 8 tonne

Soil Compaction /BM Compaction

cum/hour

70/25

hour

439.00

45

Tandem Road Roller

Rolling of Aspalt Surface

cum/hour

30

hour

1,090.00

46

Tipper - 5 cum

Transportation of soil, GSB,


WMM, Hotmix etc.

Capacity in cum

5.5

km

23.00

47

Tipper - 5 cum

Transportation of soil, GSB,


WMM, Hotmix etc.

Capacity in cum

5.5

tonne.km

3.00

48

Tipper - 5 cum

Transportation of soil, GSB,


WMM, Hotmix etc.

Capacity in cum

5.5

hour

295.00

49

Transit Mixer 4.0/4.5 cum

Transportation of Concrete Mix to


site

cum/hour

4.5

hour

886.00

50

Transit Mixer 4/4.5 cum

cum/hour

4.5

tonne.km

51

Transit Mixer 3.0 cum

cum/hour

hour

813.00

52

Tractor

Pulling

capacity in HP

50

hour

346.00

53

Tractor with Rotevator

Rate of Tractor + Rotevator

hour

344.48

54

Tractor with Ripper

Rate of Tractor 6+ Ripper

hour

354.33

55

Truck 5.5 cum per 10 tonnes

Material Transport

capacity/cum

4.5

km

21.00

56

Truck 5.5 cum per 10 tonnes

Material Transport

capacity/cum

4.5

tonne.km

2.00

57

Vibratory Roller 8 tonne

Earth or soil / GSB / WBM

cum/hour

100/60/60

hour

1,469.00

58

Water Tanker

Water Transport

capacity in KL

hour

100.00

59

Water Tanker

Water Transport

capacity in KL

km

23.00

Transportation of Concrete Mix to


site
Transportation of Concrete Mix to
site

Description of Machine

Sl. No.

Unit

2.35

Rate

60

Air compressor with pneumatic chisel attachment for cutting hard clay.

hour

61

Cement concrete batch mix plant @ 175 cum per hour (effective output)

hour

7,200.00

62

Cement concrete batch mix plant @ 75 cum per hour

hour

2,880.00

63

Generator 33 KVA

hour

355.00

64

Generator 100 KVA

hour

665.00

65

Generator 250 KVA

hour

1,350.00

66

Joint Cutting Machine with 2-3 blades (for rigid pavement)

hour

1,423.00

67

Plate compactor

hour

32.00

68

Texturing machine (for rigid pavement)

hour

1,770.00

69

Wet Mix Plant 75 TPH

hour

1,148.00

70

Crane with grab 0.75 cum capacity

hour

240.00

304

(B) Labour
Description of Labour

Sl. No.

Unit

Rate

Blacksmith (IInd class)

day

190.00

Blacksmith (Ist class)/ Welder/ Plumber/ Electrician

day

200.00

Blaster (Stone cutter)

day

140.00

Carpenter I Class

day

200.00

Chiseller (Head Mazdoor)

day

140.00

Driller (Jumper)

day

125.00

Diver

day

140.00

Fitter

day

150.00

Mali

day

125.00

10

Mason (IInd class)

day

190.00

11

Mason (Ist class)

day

200.00

12

Mate / Supervisor (Bituminous Work Labour)

day

140.00

13

Mazdoor (Bituminous Work Labour)

day

125.00

14

Mazdoor/Dresser (Semi Skilled) (Bituminous Work Labour)

day

135.00

15

Mazdoor/Dresser/Sinker (Skilled) (Bituminous Work Labour)

day

140.00

16

Mate / Supervisor

day

140.00

17

Mazdoor

day

125.00

18

Mazdoor/Dresser (Semi Skilled)

day

135.00

19

Mazdoor/Dresser/Sinker (Skilled)

day

140.00

20

Painter I class

day

200.00

21

Plumber I class

day

200.00

22

Electrician Grade I

day

200.00

(C) Materials
Description

Sl. No.

Unit

Rate

Boulder with minimum size of 300 mm for Pitching at Site

cum

1,159.70

Coarse sand at Mixing Plant

cum

1,506.65

Coarse sand at Site

cum

1,506.65

Fine sand at Site

cum

483.25

Gravel/Quarry spall at Site

Cum

924.70

Filter media/Filter Material as per Table 300-3 (MoRT&H Specification)

Cum

1,149.03

Description

Unit

Rate at
Plant
(HMP/Batc
hing)

Rate at Site

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 53 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

1,151.10

1,151.10

10

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 37.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

1,151.10

1,151.10

11

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 26.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

1,151.10

1,151.10

12

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 9.5 mm to 4.75 mm

cum

1,151.10

1,151.10

13

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 9.5 mm to 2.36 mm

cum

1,151.10

1,151.10

14

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75mm to 2.36 mm

cum

1,217.90

1,217.90

15

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75mm to 75 micron

1,217.90

1,217.90

16

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 2.36 mm

cum

1,217.90

1,217.90

17

Stone crusher dust finer than 3mm with not more than 10% passing 0.075 sieve.

cum

1,166.70

1,166.70

18

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 2.36 mm & below

cum

1,217.90

1,217.90

19

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75mm to 75 micron

1,217.90

1,217.90

20

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75 mm to 2.36 mm

cum

1,217.90

1,217.90

21

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 9.5 mm to 4.75 mm

cum

1,151.10

1,151.10

22

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 26.5 mm to 4.75 mm

cum

1,151.10

1,151.10

23

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 26.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

1,151.10

1,151.10

24

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 37.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

1,151.10

1,151.10

25

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 53 mm to 26 .5mm

cum

1,151.10

1,151.10

26

Aggregates below 5.6 mm

cum

1,217.90

1,217.90

27

Aggregates 22.4 mm to 2.36 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

28

Aggregates 22.4 mm to 5.6 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

29

Aggregates 45 mm to 2.8 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

30

Aggregates 45 mm to 22.4 mm

cum

1,184.90

1,184.90

31

Aggregates 53 mm to 2.8 mm

cum

1,184.90

1,184.90

32

Aggregates 53 mm to 22.4 mm

cum

1,184.90

1,184.90

33

Aggregates 63 mm to 2.8 mm

cum

1,157.40

1,157.40

34

Aggregates 63 mm to 45 mm

cum

1,157.40

1,157.40

35

Aggregates 90 mm to 45 mm

cum

1,135.30

1,135.30

36

Aggregates 10 mm to 5 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

(C) Materials

Description

Unit

Rate at
Plant
(HMP/Batc
hing)

Rate at Site

37

Aggregates 11.2 mm to 0.09 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

38

Aggregates 13.2 mm to 0.09 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

39

Aggregates 13.2 mm to 5.6 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

40

Aggregates 13.2 mm to 10 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

41

Aggregates 20 mm to 10 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

42

Aggregates 25 mm to 10 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

43

Aggregates 19 mm to 6 mm

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

44

Aggregates 37.5 mm to 19 mm

cum

1,184.90

1,184.90

45

Aggregates 37.5 mm to 25 mm

cum

1,184.90

1,184.90

46

Aggregates 6 mm nominal size

cum

1,217.90

1,217.90

47

Aggregates 10 mm nominal size

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

48

Aggregates 13.2/12.5 mm nominal size

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

49

Aggregates 20 mm nominal size

cum

1,235.00

1,235.00

50

Aggregates 25 mm nominal size

cum

1,184.90

1,184.90

51

Aggregates 40 mm nominal size

cum

1,184.90

1,184.90

Description

Sl. No.

Unit

Rate

52

AC pipe 100 mm dia

53

Aluminium sheeting fixed with encapsulated lens type reflective sheeting including 2% towards lettering, cost of angle
iron, cost of drilling holes, nuts, bolts etc.and signs as applicable

sqm

3,689.00

54

Aluminium studs 100 x 100 mm fitted with lense reflectors

nos

155.63

55

Bearing (Elastomeric bearing assembly consisting of 7 internal layers of elastomer bonded to 6 nos. internal reinforcing
steel laminates by the process of vulcanisation,)

nos

10,500.00

52

Bearing (POT-PTFE consisting of metal piston supported by disc or unreinforced elastomer confined within a metal
cylinder) for 614.8 T

nos

92,792.00

56

Bentonite

kg

4.80

57

Binding wire

kg

34.50

58

Bitumen ( Cationic Emulsion )

tonne

22,157.57

59

Bitumen (60-70 grade)

tonne

32,146.18

62

Bitumen (emulsion)

tonne

33,045.40

64

Brick

each

3.02

65

Cement

tonne

4,620.00

66

Cold twisted bars (HYSD Bars)

tonne

35,700.00

67

Coller for joints 300 mm dia

nos

68

Compressible Fibre Board(20mm thick)

sqm

30.00

69

Copper Plate(12m long x 250mmwide)

kg

277.00

70

Corrosion resistant Structural steel

71

Curing compound

liter

200.00

72

Delineators from ISI certified firm as per the standard drawing given in IRC - 79

each

425.00

73

Earth Cost or compensation for earth taken from private land

cum

50.00

74

Epoxy compound with accessories for preparing epoxy mortar

kg

450.00

metre

tonne

50.00

400.00

56,000.00

(C) Materials
Description

Sl. No.

Unit

Rate

75

Epoxy primer

kg

200.00

76

Galvanised MS flat clamp

nos

40.00

77

GI bolt 10 mm Dia

nos

15.00

78

Grouting pump with agitator

hour

300.00

79

Grass (Doob)

kg

1.00

80

Grass (Fine)

kg

1.50

81

Hot applied thermoplastic compound

82

HTS strand

83

Joint Sealant Compound

kg

350.00

84

M.S. Clamps

nos

40.00

85

M.S. Clamps

kg

34.50

86

M.S.shoes @ 35 Kg per pile of 15 m

kg

34.50

87

Mild Steel bars

tonne

88

Nuts and bolts

kg

34.50

89

Paint

litre

172.00

90

Pavement Marking Paint

litre

172.00

91

Pesticide

92

Pipes 200 mm dia, 2.5 m long for drainage

93
94

litre
tonne

55.00
50,000.00

34,500.00

kg

315.00

metre

378.00

Plastic sheath, 1.25 mm thick for dowel bars

sqm

206.00

Pre moulded Joint filler,25 mm thick for expansion joint.

sqm

578.00

95

Pre-coated stone chips of 13.2 mm nominal size

cum

1,296.75

96

Pre-moulded asphalt filler board

sqm

25.00

97

RCC Pipe NP 4 heavy duty non presure pipe 900 mm dia

metre

3,500.00

98

RCC Pipe NP 4 heavy duty non presure pipe 1000 mm dia

metre

3,900.00

99

RCC Pipe NP 4 heavy duty non presure pipe 1200 mm dia

metre

4,500.00

100

RCC Pipe NP 4 heavy duty non presure pipe 300 mm dia

metre

1,200.00

101

Reflectorising glass beads

103

Separation Membrane of impermeable plastic sheeting 125 micron thick

104

Sheathing duct

105

Sludge / Farm yard manure @ 0.18 cum per 100 sqm at site of work for turfing

106

Strip seal expansion joint

metre

20,000.00

107

Structural Steel

tonne

34,500.00

108

Super plastisizer admixture IS marked as per 9103-1999

kg

150.00

109

Synthetic Geogrids as per clause 3102.8 and approved design and specifications.

sqm

50.00

111

Tiles size 300 x 300 mm and 25 mm thick

each

5.00

112

Tube anchorage set complete with bearing plate, permanent wedges etc

nos

2,450.00

113

Unstaked lime

tonne

3,000.00

114

Water

kg

45.00

sqm

10.00

metre

80.00

cum

350.00

KL

40.00

Overheads for Road Works

15%

Contractors profit for Road Works

15%

Overheads for Bridge Works

20%

Overheads for Bridge Works (Rehabilitation)

30%

Contractors profit for Bridge Works

15%

Lead from Mixing Plant to working site

0.00 km

Lead for E/W borow area to site

0.00 km

Items
No.

Summary of Rates calculated and used for analysis of rates of other items

Unit

Rate

per cm
height per
letter

0.30

Painting Two Coats on New Concrete Surfaces

sqm

52.00

Painting angle iron post two coats

sqm

45.00

Cement mortor 1:2 (Excluding OH & CP)

cum

4,629.00

Cement mortor 1:3 (Excluding OH & CP)

cum

4,056.00

Cement mortor 1:6 (Excluding OH & CP)

cum

3,257.00

PCC Grade M15 including OH & CP for Open Foundation by Mixer

cum

4,966.00

PCC Grade M15 for Open Foundation Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Mechinery by Mixer

cum

3,460.00

PCC Grade M20 for Open Foundation Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Mechinery by Mixer

cum

3,787.00

10

RCC Grade M20 including OH & CP for Open Foundation by Batching Plant

cum

5,338.00

11

RCC Grade M20 for Open Foundation Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Mechinery by Batching Plant

cum

3,720.00

12

PCC Grade M25 including OH & CP for Open Foundation by Batching Plant

cum

5,646.00

13

PCC Grade M25 for Open Foundation Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Mechinery by Batching Plant

cum

3,944.00

14

RCC Grade M25 for Open Foundation Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Mechinery by Batching Plant

cum

4,220.00

15

PCC Grade M30 for Open Foundation Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Mechinery by Batching Plant

cum

3,969.00

16

RCC Grade M30 for Open Foundation Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Mechinery by Batching Plant

cum

4,236.00

16

RCC Grade M50 for Open Foundation Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Mechinery by Batching Plant

cum

4,674.00

17

RCC Grade M35 including OH & CP for Open Foundation by Batching Plant

cum

4,448.00

18

RCC Grade M35 excluding OH & CP for Open Foundation by Batching Plant

cum

6,138.00

19

RCC Grade M35 for Open Foundation Per Cum Basic Cost of Labour, Material & Mechinery by Batching Plant

cum

4,319.00

20

PCC Grade M30 excluding OH & CP

cum

3,969.00

21

Excavation for Structures (Manual Means)

cum

138.00

22

Excavation for Structures (Mechenical Meanse)

cum

37.00

23

RCC Grade M20 for super-structure including OH & CP by Batching Plant

cum

6,112.00

24

RCC Grade M30 for super-structure including formwork and excluding OH & CP by Batching Plant

cum

4,429.00

25

RCC Grade M30 for super-structure excluding formwork and excluding OH & CP by Batching Plant

cum

3,691.00

26

RCC Grade M20 for super-structure including OH & CP by Batching Plant

cum

6,564.00

27

RCC Grade M20 for super-structure excluding formwork and excluding OH & CP by Batching Plant

cum

3,964.00

28

RCC Grade M40 for super-structure including OH & CP by Batching Plant

cum

7,544.00

29

RCC Grade M30 for super-structure including formwork and excluding OH & CP by Batching Plant

cum

4,803.00

30

RCC Grade M30 for super-structure excluding formwork and excluding OH & CP by Batching Plant

cum

4,002.00

31

Supplying ,fitting and placing HYSD bar reinforcement in super-structure exncluding OH & CP

tonne

39,427.00

32

Supplying, fitting and placing HYSD including OH & CP for sub-structure

tonne

53,758.00

33

PCC Grade M40 excluding OH & CP

cum

Printing new letter and figures of any shade (ii) English Roman

4,322.00

Material Rates

SI.No

Description

Unit

Cost at
Quarry

Lead
Lead in
charges
Km
in Rs

Cost at
CMP

COST AND CONVEYANCE OF MATERIALS AT CMP


1

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 53 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 37.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

827.70

1,151.10

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 26.5 mm to 9.5 mm

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 9.5 mm to 4.75 mm

cum

198.00

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 9.5 mm to 2.36 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75mm to 2.36 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75mm to 75 micron mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 2.36 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

cum

198.00

827.70

1,166.70

10

Stone crusher dust finer than 3mm with not more than 10% passing 0.075
sieve.
Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 2.36 mm & below

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

11

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75mm to 75 micron mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

12

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75 mm to 2.36 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

13

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 9.5 mm to 4.75 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

14

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 26.5 mm to 4.75 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

15

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 26.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

16

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 37.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

17

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 53 mm to 26 .5mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

18

Aggregates below 5.6 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

19

Aggregates 22.4 mm to 2.36 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

20

Aggregates 22.4 mm to 5.6 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

21

Aggregates 45 mm to 2.8 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

22

Aggregates 45 mm to 22.4 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,184.90

23

Aggregates 53 mm to 2.8 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,184.90

24

Aggregates 53 mm to 22.4 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,184.90

25

Aggregates 63 mm to 2.8 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,157.40

26

Aggregates 63 mm to 45 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,157.40

27

Aggregates 90 mm to 45 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,135.30

28

Aggregates 10 mm to 5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

29

Aggregates 11.2 mm to 0.09 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

30

Aggregates 13.2 mm to 0.09 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

31

Aggregates 13.2 mm to 5.6 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

32

Aggregates 13.2 mm to 10 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

33

Aggregates 20 mm to 10 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

34

Aggregates 25 mm to 10 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

35

Aggregates 19 mm to 6 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

36

Aggregates 37.5 mm to 19 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,184.90

37

Aggregates 37.5 mm to 25 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,184.90

38

Aggregates 6 mm nominal size

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

39

Aggregates 10 mm nominal size

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

40

Aggregates 13.2/12.5 mm nominal size

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

41

Aggregates 20 mm nominal size

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

42

Aggregates 25 mm nominal size

cum

198.00

827.70

1,184.90

43

Aggregates 40 mm nominal size

cum

198.00

827.70

1,184.90

44

Sand for Mortar

170.00

506.65

1,506.65

cum

1,000.00

Material Rates

SI.No

Description

Unit

Cost at
Quarry

Lead
Lead in
charges
Km
in Rs

Cost at
SITE

COST AND CONVEYANCE OF MATERIALS AT SITE


1

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 53 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 37.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 26.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 9.5 mm to 4.75 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 9.5 mm to 2.36 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75mm to 2.36 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75mm to 75 micron mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

Close graded Granular sub-base Material 2.36 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

cum

198.00

827.70

1,166.70

10

Stone crusher dust finer than 3mm with not more than 10% passing 0.075
sieve.
Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 2.36 mm & below

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

11

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75mm to 75 micron mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

12

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 4.75 mm to 2.36 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,217.90

13

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 9.5 mm to 4.75 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

14

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 26.5 mm to 4.75 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

15

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 26.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

16

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 37.5 mm to 9.5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,151.10

17
18

Coarse graded Granular sub-base Material 53 mm to 26 .5mm


Aggregates below 5.6 mm

cum
cum

198.00
198.00

827.70
827.70

1,151.10
1,217.90

19

Aggregates 22.4 mm to 2.36 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

20

Aggregates 22.4 mm to 5.6 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

21

Aggregates 45 mm to 2.8 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

22

Aggregates 45 mm to 22.4 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,184.90

23

Aggregates 53 mm to 2.8 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,184.90

24

Aggregates 53 mm to 22.4 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,184.90

25
26

Aggregates 63 mm to 2.8 mm
Aggregates 63 mm to 45 mm

cum
cum

198.00
198.00

827.70
827.70

1,157.40
1,157.40

27

Aggregates 90 mm to 45 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,135.30

28

Aggregates 10 mm to 5 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

29
30

Aggregates 11.2 mm to 0.09 mm


Aggregates 13.2 mm to 0.09 mm

cum
cum

198.00
198.00

827.70
827.70

1,235.00
1,235.00

31

Aggregates 13.2 mm to 5.6 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

32

Aggregates 13.2 mm to 10 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

33

Aggregates 20 mm to 10 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

34

Aggregates 25 mm to 10 mm

cum

198.00

827.70

1,235.00

35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42

Aggregates
Aggregates
Aggregates
Aggregates
Aggregates
Aggregates
Aggregates
Aggregates

cum
cum
cum
cum
cum
cum
cum
cum

198.00
198.00
198.00
198.00
198.00
198.00
198.00
198.00

827.70
827.70
827.70
827.70
827.70
827.70
827.70
827.70

1,235.00
1,184.90
1,184.90
1,217.90
1,235.00
1,235.00
1,235.00
1,184.90

43
44

Aggregates 40 mm nominal size


Sand for Mortar

cum
cum

1,000.00

198.00
170.00

827.70
506.65

1,184.90
1,506.65

45

Sand for filling

cum

320.00

30.00

163.25

483.25

46

Stone Spalls

cum

97.00

198.00

827.70

924.70

47

Random Rubble Stone

cum

332.00

198.00

827.70

1,159.70

48

Filter Material

cum

198.00

827.70

1,149.03

19 mm to 6 mm
37.5 mm to 19 mm
37.5 mm to 25 mm
6 mm nominal size
10 mm nominal size
13.2/12.5 mm nominal size
20 mm nominal size
25 mm nominal size

321.33

www.WilburSmith.com

#8, Second Floor, 80 Feet Road,


RT Nagar Bangalore Karnataka - 560 032. India
w +91.80. 3918.7500 f +91.80. 2363.4097

NCR Planning Board


Asian Development Bank

Capacity Development of the National


Capital Region Planning Board
(NCRPB) Component B
(TA No. 7055-IND)

FINAL REPORT
Volume V-A5: DPR for Flyover at Mohan Nagar Junction in
Ghaziabad
Economic & Financial Analysis
July 2010

Abbreviations
ADB
BOQ
CAA
CAGR
CDP
CF
CNCR
CPHEEO
DSC
EA,
EIRR
ENPV
EOCC
FR
FY
FYP
GoI
GoUP
HHs
HN
HPDA
HUDCO
IA
IEC
JNNURM
LA
LPCD
MDG
NCR
NCRPB,
NCT
NH
O&M
OR
PDA
PIU
Rs.
SCF
SFC
SWM
TPI
UGD
ULB
UP

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Asian Development Bank


Bill of Quantity
Constitutional Amendment Act
Compound Annual Growth Rate
city development plan
Conversion Factor
Central National Capital Region
Central Public Health and Environmental Engineering Organization
Design Supervision Consultant
Executing Agency
Economic Internal Rate of Return
Economic Net Present Value
Economic Opportunity Cost of Capital
Final Report
Financial Year
Five Year Plan
Government of India
Government of Uttar Pradesh
Households
Hapur Nagar Plalika
Hapur Pilkhua Development Authority
Housing and Urban Development Corporation
Implementing Agency
Information, Education & Communication activities
Jawaharlal Nehru Urban Renewal Mission
Land Acquisition
Litres Per Capita per Day
Millennium Development Goals
National Capital Region
National Capital Region Planning Board
National Capital Teritory
National Highway
Operation and Maintenance
Operating Ratio
Patiala Urban Planning & Development Authority
Project Implementation Unit
Indian Rupee
Standard Conversion Factor
State Finance Commission
Solid Waste Management
Third Party Inspection
Under Ground Drainage
Urban Local Bodies
Uttar Pradesh

Contents
1.

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS......................................................................................................... 1
A. Review of Macroeconomic Context ........................................................................................... 1
1. City / Town Profile ................................................................................................................................ 1
2. Economic Policy ................................................................................................................................... 2
B. Review of Sector Context ........................................................................................................... 4
1. Present Status ........................................................................................................................................ 4
C. Justification for Government Intervention to Sector ................................................................... 5
D. Demand Analysis ........................................................................................................................ 6
1. Existing Transport System in Ghaziabad City....................................................................................... 7
2. Effective Demand for Urban Transport ................................................................................................ 9
E. Identification of Project Rationale ............................................................................................ 10
F. Identification of Project Alternatives ........................................................................................ 10
G. Identification and Comparison of Project Costs and Benefits .................................................. 11
1. Economic Cost .................................................................................................................................... 11
2. Project Benefits ................................................................................................................................... 11
H. Economic Feasibility Analysis.................................................................................................. 12
1. Analysis Period ................................................................................................................................... 12
2. Economic Feasibility Criteria ............................................................................................................. 12
3. Economic Opportunity Cost of Capital (EOCC) ................................................................................. 13
I. Sensitivity Analysis .................................................................................................................. 13
J. Conclusion ................................................................................................................................ 14

2.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND ANALYSIS OF PROJECTS .................................. 15


A. Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 15
B. Financial Management Assessment .......................................................................................... 16
1. Policy Context ..................................................................................................................................... 16
2. National Capital Region Planning Board (NCRPB) ........................................................................... 19
3. Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam .................................................................................................................... 20
4. UP Public Works Department (UP PWD) .......................................................................................... 22
5. Private Sector Participation................................................................................................................ 22
6. User Charges ...................................................................................................................................... 22
7. Financing Plan .................................................................................................................................... 23
8. Operation and Maintenance................................................................................................................ 23
9. Cost Recovery ..................................................................................................................................... 23
10.
Disbursement Procedures and Fund-Flow Mechanisms ................................................................ 23
11.
Accounting Policy ........................................................................................................................... 24
12.
Financial Regulations ..................................................................................................................... 24
C. Financial Analysis ..................................................................................................................... 25
1. Present Financial Condition ............................................................................................................... 25
2. Cost Recovery and Profitability .......................................................................................................... 27
3. Cost Benefit Analysis........................................................................................................................... 27
D. Financial Analysis of Subprojects............................................................................................. 28

ii

Tables
Table 1-1: Summary of Journey Speed Data (in KMPH) ...................................................................... 8
Table 1-2: Economic Cost-Benefit Analysis for Transport Component, Ghaziabad Flyover .............. 13
Table 2-1: SFC Recommendations on Tax Sharing Uttar Pradesh ................................................... 17
Table 2-2: Tenth Plan Allocation for Urban Development in Uttar Pradesh ....................................... 19
Table 2-3: Major head summary for the Budget Year 2009-2010 for Urban Development, Uttar
Pradesh (Rs. Thousands) ............................................................................................................... 19
Table 2-4: Institutions and Their Functions ......................................................................................... 21
Table 2-5: Road Network in Uttar Pradesh .......................................................................................... 22
Table 2-6: Budget Flow - Uttar Pradesh State (2006-07 to 2008-09) .................................................. 25
Table 2-7: Comparision of State Fiscal Indicators ............................................................................... 27

Appendices
Appendix 1-1
Appendix 1-2
Appendix 1-3
Appendix 2-1
Appendix 2-2
Appendix 2-5

Economic Cost
Valuing Economic Benefits
Economic Cost-Benefit Analysis
The Constitution (Seventy-Fourth Amendment) Act, 1992
NCRPB Income & Expenditure Account
Impact of 73rd & 74th Amendments on ULBs in Uttar Pradesh

iii

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1.

A.
1.

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

Review of Macroeconomic Context


City / Town Profile

1.

Ghaziabad is one of the most important cities of UP sub-region of NCR and can easily be
termed as Gateway of UP. It is located at about 22 km from NCT Delhi and is an
important industrial and trading center in Delhi Metropolitan Area (DMA). The City is
spread and developed on both the sides of River Hindan, an important tributary of River
Yamuna. The city is bounded by the NCT Delhi in the west and NOIDA in south. This is
an important town of U.P due to rapid growth of industrial, commercial activities.

2.

The staus of Ghaziabad was upgraded from Municipal Board to Municipal Corporation,
known as Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam (GNN) on 31 August 1994 following 74th constitution
Amendment Act 1992 and conformity legislation by state government. The Municipal
administration has been decentralized in five zones and 80 administrative wards.

3.

Area of Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam (GNN) was confined to the core area of the city i.e. only
63.94 sq km till 1991 with population of 5, 11,759 but by 2001, area increased to 171.43
sq km with census population as 9, 68,521.

4.

The city is growing at a very high pace and the population base has increased from 0.5 to
1.0 million during 1991-2001. During the last twenty years the population concentration
has been on the periphery of the municipal board boundary. The city is growing spatially.
Private developers promoted by Public Private Partnership policy (PPP) are now
supporting the urban development. The quality and quantity of housing is improving and
reflecting the contribution of the private sector. Estimated population of GNN and GDA
in 2041 is 4.4 million and 6.1 million respectively.

5.

Major Economic Activity. The economy of the town has been bi-functional industries
cum services since 1971. Industries form an important component of the economic base
of the city. Ghaziabad is one of the largest industrial cities, next to Kanpur, in Uttar
Pradesh. It is also an important centre for trade and commerce in western UP sub-region.
Various products and equipments are supplied to the regional, national and international
markets. The workforce participation rate and percentage workers in secondary sector are
marginally declining but the size of work force in the city has maintained its increasing
trend.

6.

A number of famous major industries like Bharat Electronics Limited (a public sector unit
of Central Government), UPTRON (a public sector unit of Uttar Pradesh Government),
Dabur, Mohan Meakins, Gagan Vanaspati, Sri Ram Piston, Bhushan Steel and Weston
Television are located in Ghaziabad. Sahaibabad industrial area and commercial activities
are concentrated in the western part of the town. According to the statistics of the District

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

Industrial Centre, 106 units of medium and large industries employed 24,595 workers in
2001.
7.

Number of small and medium industrial units was 13,720 in 2000 with 71,245 workers
increased to 15,848 in 2002 with 87,832 workers. The main reason behind increase in
small and medium industrial units in Ghaziabad is due to recent Honble Supreme Court
Order for shifting of polluting industries from NCT Delhi.

8.

Its Importance in the NCR. It is an important city in NCR area, which is being developed
to decongest National Capital Delhi by improving infrastructure in NCR towns with the
aim of shifting some of the offices and establishments of Government of India. With all
the required facilities and proximity to Delhi, Ghaziabad has become one of the fast
developing city in NCR.

9.

Ghaziabad Development Authority (GDA) in coordination with the National Capital


Region Planning Board (NCRPB) is responsible for the planned development of
Ghaziabad city. As per the Master Plan of Ghaziabad, 2021 the total development area of
Ghaziabad is 8455 hectares, of which 4670 hectares is under residential use constituting
55.03per cent of the developed land. This is followed by industrial use (20.16per cent) and
6.13 per cent use under the roads, bus stands. The master plan proposes land use plan for
the city with the intention of achieving balanced distribution of various land uses.

10.

The NCR Regional Plan was approved on 9th July 2005. It is proposed that solid waste
disposal and management should be planned for a minimum 20 years and at least
controlled tipping should be adopted in the disposal of the solid waste. Areas should be
identified in all the towns for sanitary landfill and all the towns above one lakh population
should have arrangements to properly manage the waste disposal.

2.

Economic Policy

11.

Implication on Towns growth. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) (Goal No.7)
enjoin upon the signatory nations requiring them to halving the proportion of people
without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation by 2015 and 100
percent access by 2025. This implies extending coverage to households which are
presently without improved sanitation, and providing proper sanitation facilities in public
places to make cities open-defecation free

12.

National Urban Sanitation Policy. Based on the recommendations of National Urban


Sanitation Task Force in 2005, a National Urban Sanitation Policy has been approved by
the Government of India in October 2008. The vision of the policy is that all Indian cities
and towns become totally sanitized, healthy and livable and ensure and sustain good public
health and environmental outcomes for all their citizens with a special focus on hygienic
and affordable sanitation facilities for the urban poor and women with the following goals:

Awareness Generation and Behavioral Change

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

Open Defecation Free Cities


Integrated City Wide Sanitation
Sanitary and Safe Disposal: the environment
Proper Operation and Maintenance of all Sanitary Installations

13.

Eleventh Five Year Plan of GoI with the support of states including UP have identified
action program to achieve 100 per cent population coverage for sewerage, sewage
treatment and low cost sanitation facilities in urban areas.

14.

National Urban Transport Policy. Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India, has
announced the much needed National Urban Transport Policy in 2008. The vision of the policy
is that to make our cities the most livable in the world and enable them to become the engines
of economic growth that power Indias development in the 21st century and to allow our
cities to evolve into an urban form that is best suited for the unique geography of their
locations and is best placed to support the main social and economic activities that take place
in the city. Major strategies of the policy include:

Integrating land use and transport planning


Equitable allocation of road space
Priority to the use of public transport
Quality and pricing of Public Transport
Technologies for Public Transport
Integrated public transport systems
Priority to non-motorized transport
Parking
Freight traffic
Capacity building
Use of cleaner technologies
Innovative financing mechanisms using land as a resource
Association of the private sector

15.

The NCR Regional Plan 2021 defined Central NCR (CNCR) and area of NCR except
CNCR i.e. outside CNCR and proposed 7 metro centres and 11 regional centres.
Ghaziabad city (including Loni) has been proposed as a major metro centre within CNCR
and population estimated is as follows: 1.9 million in 2011 and 30.19 million in (2021)

16.

Ghaziabad Development Authority (GDA) is developing residential sectors with private


sector participation along the highway corridors which will attract more related activities
and will fasten the town growth.

17.

Density norms suggested for residential purpose had increased to 200 persons per hectare
in Regional Plan-2021 from 150 persons per hectare from earlier Plan. This will increase
the residential density in the city in coming years.

18.

Construction of expressways and four laning of the NH24 and NH 58 connecting

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

Ghaziabad had attracted major educational, institutional, tourism and industrial activities.
These together will have more pressure on Ghaziabad and subsequently for urban civic
infrastructure including solid waste management.

B.
1.

Review of Sector Context


Present Status

19.

The important national Highways passing through the Ghaziabad city are NH-58 which
goes to Merrut, NH-24 which goes to Hapur and NH-91 which goes to Sikandrabad.
Along with these highways, there is Hapur bypass passing through Ghaziabad connecting
Madan Mohan Malviya marg and NH 91. The Y junction on NH 24 connecting NH 58
(near Mahamaya sports stadium) has become the most critical intersection in the city. The
modal distribution of traffic at this junction is a mix of all types of vehicles with
HTV/commercial vehicles more during night and early morning hours. The GT road
carries large volume of traffic to an extent that it has exceeded its capacity by 50-60%.

20.

Ghaziabad is connected with the city bus service, shared auto service which constitutes a
major portion of the transport along with cycle carts and private vehicles. The city being
an industrial area, a large number of truck traffic can be observed all over the city.

21.

Rapid urbanization has lead to a sharp increase in travel demand. While the road layout in
the city is well-planned, efforts to improve the condition of non-arterial roads should
continue. Presently the mass transport within and around or from Delhi to Ghaziabad is
mainly handled by bus and private owned transport. However, owing to the limited
accessibility and congestion, there is a large increase in personalized modes of transport
and IPT modes like auto rickshaw in Ghaziabad.

22.

Existing Inadequacy Level. Despite the increasing importance of the town in the economic
growth of the national capital region, the urban infrastructure is not adequate. Existing
transport system in the city is observed with many deficiencies which include the
following major ones:
Inadequate and poor condition of internal roads
Virtually non-existent intra-city public transport.
Mofussil Bus Stand with inadequate facilities
Inadequate pedestrian facilities
Absence of Truck Terminal parking areas.
Inadequate facilities for non-motorized modes of transport

23.

Urban transport infrastructure in Ghaziabad, like other cities, is handled by multiple


agencies including GNN. State PWD, Ministry of Road Transport & Highways,
Government of India, UP State Road Transport Corporation, Ghaziabad Development
Authority, traffic Police are the other major agencies involved in planning and
implementation of transport infrastructure in the city along with the private operators.

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

Lack of coordination among these agencies to address the city transport problems is the
major issue in the sector.
24.

GNN is responsible for development and maintenance of urban roads and other related
issues like parking, goods traffic facilities, pedestrian facilities, traffic signals etc. Majority
of the existing urban transport problems identified earlier were attributed to the urban
roads under GNN and this may be due to inadequate provisions for this sector.
Unfortunately the available data from GNN could not explain the present expenditure level
for the development and maintenance of these urban roads.

25.

Therefore, the inadequacy in provision of transport is likely to be the major constraint to


the potential economic growth in the National Capital Region. Reduction of disparities
through targeting less developed areas was a core element of the Government of Indias
10th Five Year Plan (2002-2007). The objective of the 11th Five Year Plan is faster and
more inclusive growth, citing the issues on inequitable share of growth, which was seen
as increasing disparities among states, and regions within states, between urban and rural
areas, and between various sections of the community. In order to realize the Five Year
Plans, investment into transport sector in Ghaziabad city is necessary.

C.

Justification for Government Intervention to Sector

26.

The basic urban services include water supply, sewerage, drainage, transport and solid
waste management (SWM). All of them are the mandatory functions of urban local bodies
(ULB) under the 74th Constitutional Amendment Act (CAA). Unfortunately, immediate
transfer of functions from the states to ULB is highly impractical due to the inadequate
technical and financial strength of the ULB. Consequently, many of the state governments
take initiative on capital investment and operation of water supply and sewerage while
delegating SWM to ULB, which require less technical and financial strength than water
supply and sewerage. In some states, the state governments take initiative on capital
investment on water supply and sewerage projects and on completion of the construction
they will be handed over to the ULBs for operation and maintenance, similar to UP. In UP,
generally UP Jal Nigam will develop the sewage/SWM project and will hand over to ULB
for O&M and this will be applicable to Ghaziabad SWM scheme also. In transport, ULBs
will look after the internal road network and related issues through outsourcing and the
major arterial roads will be the responsibility of technically equipped state PWD or central
government agencies.

27.

In addition to being a constitutional obligation, provision of these services has economic


rationales for government intervention for the following reasons: (i) many of the services
(especially wastewater treatment, drainage, urban roads and solid waste management) are
natural monopolies unsuited to unregulated private investment, and hence justify
government intervention at least in regulation; (ii) environmental sanitation improvement
(a) protects a public good such as a hygienic environment, and (b) prevents a negative
situation arising from pollution; and (iii) poverty alleviation programs minimize the
inefficiency in economic growth in the urban areas. The economic rationale for
government intervention is therefore sound.

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

D.

Demand Analysis

28.

Service delivery in not commensurate with existing traffic scenario in Ghaziabad and the
strategy adopted for selection of urban transport and roads improvement sub-projects was
to improve accessibility in Program towns so that residents would have better access to
economic and social activities. Sub-projects identified would increase the supply of
effective road space by removing impedances to traffic flow including road side drains,
road strengthening, road widening, grade separators (flyovers), bus terminals, parking
facilities and Road over Bridges (ROB) to provide better and uninterrupted connectivity.

29.

Present sub-project component in Ghaziabad City considered for the present report
comprises construction of a grade separator at Mohan Nagar Crossing. This intersection on
NH 24 is one of the critical locations that carry a high volume of traffic. The speed survey
conducted on this stretch of the highway also indicated a peak hour average speed of 19
kmph. The study has mandated a flyover to be built at this junction (NH24/Madan Mohan
Malviya/Loni Road) by 2015. Since, the local officials also feel that a grade separation is
required at this location on a priority basis; this project is selected from the Transport
Master Plan prepared for preparing Detailed Project Report (DPR).

30.

Based on the intersection volume count survey conducted in December 2008, about 28,000
vehicles were found using this intersection on an average daily subjecting to more delay
due to frequent congestion and this is likely to aggravate further in future. Construction of
a flyover with related improvements like pedestrian facilities and other traffic safety
measures will benefit 28,000 vehicles daily which is further to increase at about 5 6 %
every year. Benefits to these vehicles include i) reduced vehicle operation cost, ii) reduced
delay time, iii) reduced in traffic accidents and iv) improvement to environment. Data
sources considered were primary road inventory and traffic surveys carried out as part of
the Program preparation, and available secondary data on the road network and previous
traffic surveys.

31.

Proposed DPR is selected from the recommendations were made at Master plan in the
following stages.
(i)

(ii)

Based on a comprehensive investigation of existing scenario and estimation of


future requirements a transport master plan was prepared that had outlined the
required transport infrastructure requirements to meet short, medium and long term
traffic demand in Ghaziabad City.
As per the requirement of this study the present requirement is to identify four
sample projects emerging out of the master plan proposals to be taken up for DPR.
The four improvement proposals considered are:
o A grade separator
o Road widening on a corridor stretch
o A multi-level parking facility

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

o A bus terminal
(iii)

32.

The proposed grade separator at Mohan Nagar (Patel Chowk) was thus identified and
selected for DPR preparation. Design parameters considered to the project design are
listed below.

1.

The medium / long term proposals emerged out of the study were presented to the
officials of NCR in Delhi, NCR cell in Ghaziabad, Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam,
Ghaziabad Development Authority and others. The proposals to be taken up for
DPR were extensively discussed between the Consultants and these officials. The
schemes that are essential for the current scenario of Ghaziabad were finally
identified by GDA and NCR.

The guidelines of Indian Road Congress (IRC) appropriate to intersection


improvements, urban roads capacity evaluation, construction of grade separators etc.
As part of planning, design and project formulation process, the basic design
parameters have been followed to suit the projected road capacity and the intersection
flow particularly to accommodate the peak hour flow.

Existing Transport System in Ghaziabad City

33.

Master Plan Report (MPR) of Ghaziabad Transport was prepared in April 2009 with the
objective to design a suitable integrated urban transport infrastructure system, by assessing
the resource requirement for next 20 years and suggesting suitable measures for
improvement of system.

34.

Based on discussions with the stakeholders including different government agencies,


detailed reconnaissance survey, review of available secondary data and finally
scientifically planned primary traffic surveys, the existing traffic problems in the city and
its environment was assessed.

35.

Primary traffic surveys carried out for assessment include:


Road network inventory
Screen line traffic counts
Intersection Classified Volume Counts
Roadside Interview Surveys
Speed and delayed surveys
Parking surveys
Pedestrian Crossing Count Surveys

36.

Transport system deficiencies observed in general in Ghaziabad city include:


Inadequacy of roadways
Absence of intra-city public transport:

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

Inadequate pedestrian facilities


Deficient Junctions:
Lack of Traffic Control Devices
Improper location of Bus Stops
Loading and unloading of goods at unauthorized places, obstructing the traffic and
pedestrians alike
Absence of Truck Terminal
Inadequate facilities for non-motorized modes of transport
Intermixing of Regional and local traffic:

37.

Projected traffic at major corridors and intersections indicate that the existing traffic
system in the city will experience severe congestion and that will result in speed reduction
drastically and will affect the service delivery considerably. This underlines the need for
improvement intervention in the system considerably.

38.

Of the 15 intersections where turning volume count survey was done, eight intersections
have peak hour traffic of more than 5,000 PCUs (Passenger Car Unit) and this indicates
most of the intersections in the city require improvement intervention to meet the present
and the fast growing future turning traffic.

39.

Results of the Road Side Interview Survey conducted at three locations on NH24, NH58
and NH91indicated that:
daily trips are more with 41% followed by alternate days and weekly trips with about
25% and 14% respectively.
trips are for business purpose averaging about 43% comparing with 23% of work,
18% social and recreation, 8% tourism, 7% of education and 19% other trips
respectively.

40.

Average journey speed observed from the major roads is indicated below:

Table 1-1: Summary of Journey Speed Data (in KMPH)


Description
NH 24
NH 58
NH 91
Average JS - peak Hour
Average JS - Off Peak
Hour

41.

41

38

41

Hapur
Bypass
20

58

41

59

25

Loni
Ambedkar
Bhopura
Marg
27
23
45

36

Results of parking survey conducted at four critical locations in the city had indicated that
the available parking space is less than the actual demand. It can be seen that near GDA
complex, the demand is in excess of the available supply considerably. With regard to
parking duration, about 80% of the vehicles were parked for less than 30 minutes and this
indicates high parking turn out. Another 21% of vehicles were parked more than 30
minutes but less than three hours.

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42.

Results of the Base Line Survey conducted in Ghaziabad city in 2008 revealed the
following opinions about the existing transport infrastructure services:

2.

20% of the non-slum households and 47% percent of slum households were not
satisfied about the road conditions;
30% of the non-slum households and about 20% percent of slum households were not
satisfied about the services of street lights;
77% of the non-slum households and 65% percent of slum households feel that there
is no proper drainage facilities along the roads;
75% of the non-slum households and 94% percent of slum households were not
satisfied about the available vehicular parking facilities;
78% of the non-slum households and 84% percent of slum households felt that there
is no adequate parking space for commercial vehicles

Effective Demand for Urban Transport

43.

The socio-economic baseline survey1 was aimed at understanding the perception of the
public towards the existing urban civic infrastructure and their service levels including
their opinion towards the improvement of these services and their willingness to pay for
assessing the effective demand. Though this survey had covered the willingness to pay
aspect, it was not given specific focus so as to amend the results to statistical framework.

44.

The Base line Survey results had indicated

Nearly 43 percent non-slum household spends between Rs 1000 and above and Rs
2000 per month as fuel and vehicle maintenance. More than 47.2 percent slum
household spends less than Rs.200.Another 33 percent non-slum household spends
between Rs.200 to 1000 per month as fuel and vehicle maintenance.
More than 90 percent of non-slum household spend between Rs.500-1,000 per month
to go to their respective work place. In case of slum, more than 65 percent household
spend more than an hour to reach to their work place with a monthly expenditure
ranges between Rs.100-500.
Nearly 51 percent non-slum and 30.5 percent slum households are willing to pay upto
Rs. 5 per hours for 2-wheeler parking.
Better frequencies, better comfort and better coverage are the type of improvements
commuters expect from the public transport system;
Around 98 percent non-slum and cent percent slum households are willing to pay
more than 5-10 percent if the frequencies of service level of public transport improve.
For better comfort and coverage of services the same trend is prevalent.

conducted as part of the present project (2008) in Ghaziabad City (with 0.5% sample size with stratified
sampling approach giving representation to all administrative wards and all notified slums)

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45.

These facts discussed above justify the need for the improved transport subprojects in the
city and the proposed subprojects like parking facility, terminals for public transport, grade
separator and improving road corridor backed up by effective demand.

E.

Identification of Project Rationale

46.

The present transport system has inadequate and less quality infrastructure including
mostly bad road conditions, inadequate parking facilities and pedestrian facilities, not
properly designed intersections, over utilized and congested road sections, inadequate
terminal facilities for public transport, intermediate public transport vehicles and trucks,
inadequate public transport service delivery etc.

47.

Also the Transport Master Plan (TMP) prepared for the town has identified deficiencies
and formulated recommendations to be implemented in phased manner that include (i)
short term improvements, (ii) medium and long term improvements that include integrate
terminals for public transport and trucks, improvement to identified critical intersections
through grade separators etc, capacity augmentation to arterials roads through widening,
dedicated multi storied parking facilities, development of new road links etc., to meet the
requirements of horizon year demand.. Thus the main project rationale lies for the
rehabilitation of the Transport system for Ghaziabad city in filling the demand supply
gap resulted from and the present subproject of construction of a Grade Separator at
Mohan Nagar Crossing is selected from the Transport Master Plan in consultation with the
stake holders of concerned Government Departments and agencies Ghaziabad City.

Lack of coverage, and


Inefficient functioning of the existing system

F.

Identification of Project Alternatives

48.

For the selected subproject of Grade Separator at Mohan Nagar Crossing (Patel Chowk)
for which detailed project report is prepared, alternative designs were assessed on three
aspects, namely, cost-effectiveness, operation and maintenance capacity of the states
governments and ULB, and safety to beneficiaries. The proposed design of the project
incorporates that (i) service coverage to the full GNN area, (ii) selected optimum network
with least cost options including equipments and material (iii) decision on rehabilitation of
the existing system (iv) selection of new terminal sites with reference to Ghaziabad
Development / Master Plan proposals (v) selected technologies meet geographical
restrictions and can be operated and maintained by the asset owners with minor training,
and (vii) materials and equipments are locally available and incur least cost during
construction and maintenance, but are internationally accepted as health hazard free. These
Assessments are discussed in the design section of this DPR.

10

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G.
1.
49.

Identification and Comparison of Project Costs and Benefits


Economic Cost
From the cost estimate discussed in Section of this report, the base project financial cost
is estimated to Rs. 513 million. Considering the contingency and allowances of additional
12% (Physical contingency (3%), DSC+Third Party Inspection (TPI) - 3%, IEC activities
1%, o Incremental Administration (PIU) 2%, Environmental mitigation 1%, Social
intervention 1%, and Institutional development and capacity building activities1%), the
total project financial cost was worked out to Rs 642 million and this is phased during the
two year construction period as follows:

50.

2.

2011-12 40%
2012-13 60%

Considering the standard procedures recommended for economic feasibility analysis, the
above financial cost was converted into economic cost for the analysis. Details of
economic cost analysis are presented in Appendix 1-1.

Project Benefits

51.

Project beneficiaries will be those travelers for whom accessibility to economic and social
activities will be improved through better road conditions and traffic flows brought about
by the sub-projects. This improvement is achieved by reducing the effort or
inconvenience of travel between the origin of the traveler and the destination offering
these activities.

52.

The subproject in Ghaziabad the Old NH 24, is the spinal cord of Ghaziabad city transport
network and at present experiencing tremendous traffic congestion. Most of the roads are
connected to this road and provide main access to Delhi, NOIDA, Loni, Meerut and Hapur
and thereby has resulted in many junctions. As a result significant traffic merges, diverges
and crosses the road at frequent intervals. Patel Chowk is a four road junction where the
roads from Loni and Mohan Nagar join the Old NH 24 Road. At present the movement of
traffic at the junction is controlled by signals supported by manual operation resulting
inordinate delay for the vehicular traffic. The sub proposal is to construct a grade separator
so as to allow the heavy through traffic with free flow and the remaining turning traffic at
grade with less waiting time.

53.

Subproject proposals will benefit the vehicular traffic on this road with less traffic
congestion, less traffic conflict at junctions, increase the travel speed resulting in savings
in vehicle operating cost (VOC) and travel time, accommodate the fast growing vehicular
traffic, uninterrupted movement for the major through traffic through flyover, pedestrian
safety including reduced road crossing time etc.

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54.

The economic benefits considered in the present analysis for the grade separator (flyover)
subproject in transport component in Ghaziabad city include:
(i)
(ii)

55.

Exclusions. The following benefits of transport have not been quantified for want of
adequate data and quantification techniques. These qualitative benefits along with the
quantifiable benefits discusses above, the proposed transport system (construction of a
grade separator) will tend to provide better living condition in the project city. Detailed
discussion on the project benefits considered for the analysis is given in Appendix 1-2.
(i)
(ii)
(iv)

H.
1.
56.

2.
58.

Savings in vehicular traffic accident resource cost;


Improvement in environment of the surrounding; and
Effects on tourism and tourist-related businesses.

Economic Feasibility Analysis


Analysis Period
The analysis period of the project is taken as 24 years from the base year 2010 for
different sections of the project road as follows:

57.

VOC savings for the traffic using improved Project roads


Value of Passenger Travel Time Savings

Base Year 2010


Construction period 2011 to 2012
Project opened start year 2013
End of the analysis period 2032

Number of operating years after project improvement, considered for economic analysis
20 years. Thus, 20 years of operation, in effect, from the operation start of the proposed
project i.e. 2013, has been considered for economic evaluation for the project road.

Economic Feasibility Criteria


The cost benefit analysis is carried out by using the discounted cash flow (DCF)
technique to obtain the economic internal rate of return (EIRR) and economic net present
value (ENPV) for the proposed investments and the likely quantified project benefits
linked with the project during the defined project analysis period

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3.
59.

Economic Opportunity Cost of Capital (EOCC)


Given the complexity of estimating country-specific economic opportunity cost of capital
(EOCC), a discount rate of 12% in constant economic prices is generally used as a proxy
for EOCC in the economic analysis of ADB-financed projects. The EIRR must be
compared with the economic opportunity cost of capital, for interpretation purpose of
project feasibility. Results of the analysis are presented in Table 1-2.

Table 1-2: Economic Cost-Benefit Analysis for Transport Component, Ghaziabad Flyover
Details
Present Value
(Rs. million) a/
Costs
Capital costs
Transport (Grade Separator)
403
O&M costs
Transport (Grade Separator)
30
Total costs
433
Benefits
Transport (Grade Separator)
- Travel Time Savings
1358
-VOC savings
Total benefits
1358
Economic Return Measures
Net present value (Rs. Million)
925
EIRR (%)
32.58%
a/ In 2009-10 prices; discounted to 2009-10 at 12% real discount rate.

I.

Sensitivity Analysis

60.

Sensitivity analysis was carried out to their economic feasibility results for the following
scenarios:
Capital cost increase by 20%
O&M costs increased by 20%
Target beneficiaries reduced by 20%
Delay in accrual of benefit by 1 year
Combined adverse condition

61.

Results of the sensitivity analysis for the proposed project are summarized in the Table
below. Detailed calculations are given in Appendix 1-3.

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Table 1-3: Sensitivity Analysis for Transport Component - Grade Separator Subproject (EIRR)
Details
EIRR
Switching
Value c/
Main Evaluation (Base Case) a/
32.6%
Capital Cost Overrun b/
28.3%
230.0%
O&M Cost Overrun d/
32.4%
3100.0%
Decrease in Project Benefits e/
27.3%
68.0%
One Year Delay in Implementation
32.5%
All Four Tests Combined
23.38%
a/ From Table 1-2.
b/ 20% increase in capital cost estimates.
c/ Calculated as the percentage change in a variable required for EIRR to reduce to 12%. For example
the capital cost can increase by 230% or project benefits can reduce by 68% to get the minimum
required level of EIRR of 12%
d/ 20% increase in O&M cost.
e/ 20% decrease in project benefits
62.

Of the four sensitivity scenarios (cost overrun, O&M cost increase, reduced beneficiaries,
delay in implementation) reduced beneficiaries is the most vulnerable to EIRR, followed
cost overrun. Considering the more sensitiveness of these variables, following
implementation arrangements need to be focused more so as minimize the project risk:

Ensuring adequate project coverage of beneficiaries through advance commitment


from HHs for individual access or making mandatory for all individual access through
project design;
Timely implementation of the project through appropriate procurement method in
which incentive for early completion may be included;
Adequate focus for LA related project components

J.

Conclusion

63.

The main evaluation has indicated that the proposed transport sub project (construction of
a Grade Separator) for Ghaziabad city was found to be economically viable, with the
calculated EIRR values exceeding the economic opportunity cost of capital. The
sensitivity analysis has demonstrated the robustness of this result, with the subproject
component economically viable even when the combination of changed assumptions was
tested.

64.

Furthermore, for the proposed drainage subproject, the calculated EIRR value is
considered minimum estimates of economic return, as there are a number of economic
benefits of reduced pollution, a cleaner city and improved transport environment that have
not been quantified.

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2.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND ANALYSIS OF PROJECTS

A.

Introduction

65.

Financial analysis for subprojects generally consists of both (i) Financial Management
Assessment and (ii) Financial Analysis and this is the specific requirements for the
financial analysis to the projects funded by ADB. The minimum requirement for Financial
Management Assessment and Analysis, are described in ADBs Financial Management
and Analysis of Projects (the Guidelines).

66.

Financial Management Assessment, the first part of analysis, concentrates on the


assessment review of Executing Agency (EA) and Implementing Agency (IA) with respect
to the subproject subjected to financial analysis. Assessment review will cover the areas
like financing policies; accounting policies; project implementation plan; financing plan;
disbursement procedures and fund-flow mechanisms and regulatory provisions.

67.

Second part of the analysis is the Financial Analysis for subprojects. This will mainly
focus on the review of EA, IA and the proposed subproject with respect to the following
components:

Past and present financial condition


Cost Recovery and Profitability
Financial Improvement Action Plan
Affordability Analysis
Projected Financial Forecasts
Cost benefit analysis
Sensitivity Analysis

68.

The proposed subproject of Grade Separator in Ghaziabad Naga Nigam is likely to be


funded from ADB fund through NCRPB. However, for the present analysis, it is
considered that the proposed subproject will funded by NCRPB to the end-borrower (UP
State PWD). Accordingly PWD with the guarantee of the Uttar Pradesh State will become
both the Executing Agency (EA) as it will have the direct control of NCRPB Loan and the
Implementing Agency (IA) as State PWD is the asset owner and responsible for the
implementation and operation of the proposed subproject, utilizing the loan proceed.
Accordingly, PWD as EA and IA is considered for financial management assessment
purpose.

69.

Considering the focus of the present assignment to support the project preparation efforts
of the implementing agencies by preparing demonstration feasibility studies and DPRs that
include all due diligence documentations required for processing of the project in
accordance with the best practices, including the proposed NCRPBs policies and

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guidelines , the following requirement in carrying out the financial analysis emerge:

the subprojects funded through ADB loan; and


the subprojects funded through NCRPB own fund,

70.

In both cases, NCRPB only will be the lender to the end borrowers (ULBs or line
departments / agencies) for the subprojects and hence only the end-borrower will be
assessed.

71.

With this background, the present financial feasibility analysis concentrates more on the
project financial analysis as this is the area where the capacity of the IAs needs to be
enhanced for both format of loans. Also the financial management assessment part of the
analysis is covered to the level of data availability. On finalization of the projects for ADB
funding (in which the present subprojects under review may or may not be a part),
subsequent consultancies will improve this financial management assessment part of the
financial analysis.

B.

Financial Management Assessment

1.

Policy Context

72.

Subsequent to the 74th Constitution Amendment Act (CAA), 1992 (Refer Appendix 2-1)
the Government of Uttar Pradesh (GoUP) embarked on a policy of decentralization of
powers to local governments. Uttar Pradesh Local Self Government Laws (Amendment)
Act, 1994 was drafted based on decentralization principles laid down in the 74th CAA,
which came into force w.e.f. 31.05.1994. Impact of 73rd & 74th Amendments on ULBs in
Uttar Pradesh State is summarized in Appendix 2-3.

73.

Key features of the decentralization initiative comprised (i) transferring health related
institutions (except medical colleges and regional specialty hospitals) to local
governments; (ii) transferring all schools to Urban Local Bodies (ULBs); (iii) planning and
implementing centrally sponsored poverty alleviation schemes through ULBs; (iv)
planning social welfare schemes, implementing Integrated Child Development Scheme
(ICDS), payment of various social security pensions, and creating centre for disabled care
are ULB responsibilities; (v) planning and providing urban basic services, including water
supply, sanitation, storm water drainage and urban roads (excluding those provided /
maintained by the State Public Works Department); (vi) Ward Committees in all
municipal corporations and municipalities which have a population of three lakhs or more;
and (vii) increase of financial power for ULB Heads.

74.

Constitution of State Finance Commission (SFC). Consequent upto 73rd and 74th
Amendments to the Constitution of India, and in exercise of the powers conferred by
Article 243(1) & (X), the Governor vide Finance Departments Notification no. RG1933/x-53-94 dated October 22, 1994 constituted the State Finance Commission
(Panchayat Raj & Local Bodies). Two SFCs were constituted in UP and the UP

16

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Government had mostly accepted their recommendations (more than 80 percent). Status of
the recommendations of the SFCs on tax sharing to local bodies is summarized in Table
2-1. In Indian Federal structure, SFC created by 73rd and 74th CAA is the only channel to
address issues of state-local fiscal relations. SFCs thus acquire unique place in fiscal
decentralization and local finance issues.
Table 2-1: SFC Recommendations on Tax Sharing Uttar Pradesh
Sl.
State
Recommended and accepted share of Local Bodies ( Urban & Rural)
No.
First SFC
Second SFC
1
Uttar Pradesh 10 % of net own tax revenue 12.5 % of net proceeds of taxes, duties,
receipts of state govt. (7 %
tolls & fees, exclu. entertainment tax &
for ULBs)
land revenue (7.5 % for ULBs)
Source: Decentralization and Local Finance Issues - The Workings of State Finance Commissions in
India, Dr. Ravikant Joshi

75.

Some of the major recommendations from SFCs that affect the financial management of
ULBs in UP include:
(i)

Conversion of certain category of loans sanctioned to the urban local bodies which
was over due on 31st March as state grants
(ii) Rates of Non-Tax Revenue have been revised and as mentioned earlier the power to
further revise these rates in future by framing or amending the bye laws has been
delegated to urban local bodies.
(iii) To increase the own sources of tax revenue of urban local bodies the target has been
fixed to fix the demand as per the estimated population of 1997, minimum per capita
of Rs. 120 for municipal Corporation and Rs. 40 to 90 per capita in Nagar Palika
Parishad (depending upon the population) and Rs. 20 per capita in Nagar Panchayats
vide g.o. No. 3488/IX-9-97-55/97 dated October 22, 1997.
(iv) Imposition of all types of taxes enumerated in the Act, has been made compulsory
vide g.o. No. 2371(1)/IX-91998 dated September 23, 1998.
(v) The recommendations in respect of profession tax have been accepted by most states
as per the available information.
(vi) Participation of the community and the private sector, especially in the delivery of
urban services is being emphasized. In Uttar Pradesh, decisions have been taken on
providing civic services on contract basis and to promote citizen participation
(vii) The Finance Commissions of Uttar Pradesh have given importance to devolution of
functions, functionaries and powers along with a transfer of funds.
76.

The share of transfers from state governments in the revenues of municipalities was 31.7
per cent (2001/02). This is, however, the average; municipalities in several states are
almost entirely transfer-dependent for running of local services. The dependence of urban
local bodies was as high as 83.71 per cent in case of Jammu & Kashmir, 83.33 in case of
Rajasthan and 74.48 in case of Uttar Pradesh2. This scenario is a result of the following

Decentralization and Local Finance Issues - The Workings of State Finance Commissions in India, Dr.
Ravikant Joshi

17

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three factors
The inferior local taxes which have low elasticity and buoyancy;
Poor administration of tax and other powers by local governments; and
Absence of autonomy for local governments in respect of tax rate setting, rate
revision and other spheres of their functioning.
77.

Five Year Plans. Government of India (GoI) in its Tenth Five Year Plan (2002 -2007)
emphasized the role of the ULBs:

To be responsive and accountable to the community;


to develop cities with standards of service comparable to the best in that particular
category;
to constantly improve their capabilities so as to equip themselves to undertake their
tasks in resource-raising, service provision, and poverty alleviation

78.

Tenth Plan had focused the reforms in land and housing policy, and of pricing of utilities,
should be to augment the resources of the ULBs, provide for adequate maintenance of
civic services, and undertake expansion of infrastructure to meet growing needs.

79.

Apart from the State Finance Commissions, GoI has found providing support to ULBs
through various schemes including AUWSP, IDSMT, JNNURM, Mega City Scheme,
NCR PLAN, HUDCO loan assistance, Tax-Free Bonds scheme and external assistance
from multilateral lending agencies like the Asian Development Bank (ADB), World Bank
and bilateral agencies.

80.

Govt. of Uttar Pradesh (GoUP). Based on the lessons learnt through the 9th FYP, the 10th
FYP (2002-07) for Uttar Pradesh is based upon local governments development plan and
focuses on (i) reforms and improving organization efficiencies; (ii) increasing allocation in
information technology, tourism infrastructure, poverty reduction and health; (iii) planning
programs to facilitate employment generation; (iv) promoting private sector investment in
economic development; (v) preparing sub-plans for poverty reduction with participation of
women groups and focus on vulnerable sections of the society; (vi) evolving a plan for the
disabled and women beneficiaries; (vii) strengthening decentralization and improving the
planning process; (viii) continuing support to increased use of information technology in
all facets of development; (ix) continuing support to tourism infrastructure development;
(x) promoting the development of village and small industries; (xi) promoting the
participation of private sector in providing education; and (xii) improving service delivery
in key areas like health, revenue, education, etc.

81.

Govt. of Uttar Pradesh had allotted Rs 102,066 Lakhs for the urban development during
the Tenth Plan (2002-2007) which was about 2% of the total plan outlay. However, the
actual plan outlay during the plan period was increased to Rs 143,142 Lakhs (Table 2-2).
Also the annual budget for 2009-10 during the Eleventh Plan for urban development was
increased to Rs 180,420 Lakhs (Table 2-3) in which water supply, sanitation and urban
development were the focus areas. These together underline the importance given to the
urban development by the GoUP, which includes the project city of Ghaziabad.
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Table 2-2: Tenth Plan Allocation for Urban Development in Uttar Pradesh
Year
Annual Plan Allocation for Urban
Development during the Tenth Five Year Plan
Rs. Lakhs
2002-03
22,347
2003-04
14,378
2004-05
14,174
2005-06
23,489
2006-07
68,754
Total
143,142
Source: Govt. of UP
Table 2-3: Major head summary for the Budget Year 2009-2010 for Urban Development, Uttar
Pradesh (Rs. Thousands)
Major Head and Description
Current year Budget (2009-10)
Composition
(%)
Plan
Non Plan
Total
2015Elections
83,836
83,836
0.46%
2052--Secretariat - General Services
542
62,350
62,892
0.35%
2053--District Administration
2
98,278
98,280
0.54%
2070--Other Administrative Services
5,171
5,171
0.03%
2215--Water Supply and Sanitation
1,220,000
1,220,000
6.76%
2217--Urban Development
2,755,324 1,036,092
3,791,416
21.01%
2230--Labour and Employment
125,404
125,404
0.70%
3054--Roads and Bridges
0.00%
3604--Compensation and Assignments to
550
550
0.00%
Local Bodies and Panchayati Raj
4070--Capital Outlay on Other
1
1
0.00%
Administrative Services
4215--Capital Outlay on Water Supply
1,480,003
1,480,003
8.20%
And Sanitation
4217--Capital Outlay on Urban
9,024,502
150,000
9,174,502
50.85%
Development
6215--Loans for Water Supply and
2,000,000
2,000,000
11.09%
Sanitation
Total
16,605,778 1,436,277 18,042,055
100.00%
Source: http://budget.up.nic.in/Estimates/maj_sumry.asp

2.

National Capital Region Planning Board (NCRPB)

82.

The National Capital Region Planning Board (NCRPB), constituted in 1985 under the
provisions of NCRPB Act, 19853, is a statutory body functioning under the Ministry of
Urban Development, Government of India. NCRPB has a mandate to systematically

THE NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION PLANNING BOARD ACT, 1985, No.2 OF 1985, 9th February, 1985,
published by The Gazette of India on FEBRUARY 11, 1985. This Act provide for the constitution of a
Planning Board for the preparation of a plan for the development of the National Capital Region and for
co-ordinating and monitoring the implementation of such plan and for evolving harmonized policies for
the control of land-uses and development of infrastructure in the National Capital Region so as to avoid
any haphazard development of that region and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto

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develop the National Capital Region (NCR) of India which comprises of (i) National
Capital Territory Delhi (constitutes 4.4 percent of NCR area); (ii) Haryana Sub-region
(40.0 percent of NCR area); (iii) Rajasthan Sub-region (23.3 percent of NCR area); (iv)
Uttar Pradesh Sub-region (32.3 percent of NCR area) and (v) Five Counter Magnet Areas
(CMA) The project town Ghaziabad City also part of the NCR.
83.

According to the NCRPB Act, 1985 major functions of the Board include: (i)Preparation
of the Regional Plan and Functional Plans; (ii) Coordinate enforcement and
implementation of the Regional Plan, Functional Plans, Sub-regional Plans, and Project
Plans through the participating states and NCT; (iii) Ensure proper and systematic
programming by the participating states and the NCT in project formulation, determination
of priorities in NCR or Sub-regions and phasing of the development of NCR in accordance
with the stages indicated in regional plan; and, (v) Arrange and oversee the financing of
selected development project in the NCR through Central and State Plan funds and other
sources of revenue.

84.

NCRPB has prepared regional plan for NCR area with the perspective year 2021. Further,
the Board also initiated preparation of functional plans to elaborate one or more elements
of the Regional Plan. Accordingly the functional plan for water supply and transport is
under preparation but plans for other infrastructure is yet to take off (Appendix 2-2).

3.

Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam

73

The status of Ghaziabad was upgraded from Municipal Board to Municipal Corporation,
known as Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam (GNN) on 31 August 1994 following 74th constitution
Amendment Act 1992 and conformity legislation by state government. The Municipal
administration has been decentralized in five zones and 80 administrative wards. City zone
has 24 wards; Kabir Nagar has 17 wards; Vasundra zone has 11 wards; Mohan Nagar zone
has 14 and Vijay Nagar Zone has 14 wards.

85.

Urban development and service delivery in Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam (GNN) is the
combined responsibility of a set of state level and city level institutions.These institutions
and their key functions are listed in Table 2-4 below segregated in terms of institutions
functioning at the state level and city level.

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Table 2-4: Institutions and Their Functions


Institution
Key Function
I. State Level
UP Pollution Control Board
Pollution control and monitoring especially river water quality
(UPPCB)
and regulating industries
Construction of roads main roads and transport infrastructure
Public Works Department
(PWD)
including construction and maintenance of Government houses
and Institutions
State Urban Development
Apex policy-making and monitoring agency for the urban areas
Authority (SUDA)
of the state. Responsible for providing overall guidance to the
District Urban Development Authority (DUDA) for
implementation of community development programs
Preparation of Master Plans including infrastructure for
Town and Country Planning
Department (TCPD)
the state (rural and urban)
UP Jal Nigam (JN

UP Avas Vikas Parishad (AVP)

II. City Level


Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam (GNN)

Ghaziabad Development
Authority (GDA)
District Urban Development
Authority (DUDA)

86.

Water supply and sewerage including design of water supply


and sewerage networks. In the last two decades pollution
control of rivers has become one of their primary focus areas
Nodal agency for housing in the state. Additionally involved in
planning, designing, construction and development of almost all
types of urban development projects in the state. Autonomous
body generating its own resources through loans from financial
institutions
Nodal agency for municipal service delivery and O&M.
Its key functions include:
Primary Collection of Solid Waste
Maintenance of Storm Water Drains
Maintenance of internal roads
Allotment of Trade Licenses under the Prevention of
Food Adulteration Act
O&M of internal sewers and community toilets
Management of ghats
Construction of Community Toilets
Responsible for preparing spatial Master Plans for land use and
development of new areas as well as provision of housing and
necessary infrastructure
Implementing agency for plans prepared by SUDA. Responsible
for the field work relating to community development
focusing on the development of slum communities, construction
of community toilets, assistance in construction of individual
household latrines, awareness generation etc.

In real sense, 74th Amendment is partially implemented in UP. GNN, Jal Nigam and
various other government agencies are functioning in Ghaziabad and are playing different
roles of a ULB under different capacities (and other cities of UP). This makes the
municipal corporation inadequate resulting in limited power and weak municipal
administration. These cities are dependent on the state legislature for decisions concerning
their regulations and it is critical for the decision making process required at a local level.
However, with regard to the issue of reforms, current status and future proposals the state
government /ULB are in the process of initiating steps in this direction and the willingness
of the governments to undertake the required reforms.

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4.

UP Public Works Department (UP PWD)

87.

UP State Public Works Department (UP PWD) is state owned department that has the
mandate of developing and maintaining the road net work of the UP State comprising of
different category of roads. As on 2008, 147,255 km length of road network is maintained
by UP PWD. About Rs. 13,000 million is being spent annually for the upkeep of the road
network and this exclude the plan expenditure spent on creation and replacement of road
network asset. UP PWD is specialised technical agency with adequate expertise and
suitable organizational network in executing road projects including projects funded by
multi-lateral funding agencies. As the Executing Agency, UP PWD will implement the
proposed subproject of flyover construction.

Table 2-5: Road Network in Uttar Pradesh


Length of Road (Km.)
Sl.
Classification of
Upto 31.3.2006
Upto 31.3.2007
No
Roads
1
National Road
5,570.27
5,699.89
2
State Road
8,551.49
8,448.68
3
Main District Road
7,345.02
7,343.66
4
Other District Road
29,179.00
30,133.00
5
Village Road
82,459.00
87,768.00
Total
133,104.78
139,393.22

Upto 31.3.2008
5,699.89
8,448.68
7,343.66
30,133.00
95,630.00
147,255.22

Source: UP PWD

5.

Private Sector Participation

88.

The current legal and political climate for the involvement of FIs or private parties for
building urban infrastructure and or operating urban services in UP cities including
Ghaziabad does not look very promising in its present form, as revealed from available
CDP Reports. Many reforms, legislative changes and a greater commitment from the local
body as well as the GoUP are required for attracting private investment and safeguarding
investors interest. However, three broad areas can be identified and explored for private
investment for urban infrastructure, namely transportation services, parking (multilevel
parking with commercial space) and solid waste management. Present subproject of
flyover construction in Ghaziabad city under the traffic component may not be viable for
implementation with private sector participation, as there is no scope for user fee charges.

6.

User Charges

89.

Though UP PWD (the Executing Agency) may have powers to implement projects with
levy of toll rates (user charges) in appropriate cases, the present subproject has not been
considered for levy of user charges. This is mainly because of practical problems as
levying toll on the heavily trafficked urban corridor will lead to many implementation
issues.

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7.

Financing Plan

90.

Total investment program will be shared between NCRPB and UP PWD through
participating states in such a way that NCRPB share will be 75% and UP PWD will be the
balance 25%. The terms of the loan will of

10 years tenure with two years moratorium and eight years repayment period

9 percent interest rate

91.

As per the existing arrangements, for UP state, the entire 75% loan component will be
transferred to UP PWD with the guarantee support of states but without grant component
from NCRPB and hence the total contribution by UP PWD will be 100% (25% own
contribution + 75 % NCRPB loan). For 75% Loan component and 25% own equity
component, UP PWD will be the responsibility. For implementation, UP PWD will be the
Executing Agency for the Investment Program and responsible for overall strategic
guidance, technical supervision and work quality and ensuring compliance with loan and
PFR provisions and due diligence.

8.

Operation and Maintenance

92.

The present subproject of flyover construction will be the asset of UP PWD. Accordingly
UP PWD will operate and maintain the improved flyover facilities in Ghaziabad with
adequate fund provision and the required technical capability.

9.

Cost Recovery

93.

For the present subproject of flyover construction, levy of user charges is not visualized
and hence cost recovery from this will not arise.

10.

Disbursement Procedures and Fund-Flow Mechanisms

94.

Loan disbursement is a key element in the project cycle. NCRPB expects that proposed
disbursement procedures and fund-flow mechanisms will be suitable for the particular
project. NCRPB procedures for withdrawal of loan proceeds are standardized to facilitate
disbursements under most loans.

95.

In the present case, it is assumed that the NCRPB Loan will be passed on, to the UP PWD
with the UP State government guarantee. Thus, UP PWD will be the borrower from
NCRPB with the UP State support. UP PWD will enter into supply and civil work
contracts and issues and signs the payment checks through a suitable arrangement agreed
with NCRPB. Created assets will be owned by UP PWD as it is constructed on UP PWD
road. With regards to repayment of the interest and principle, UP PWD will pay to
NCRPB and this will be governed by the NCRPBs terms and conditions agreeable in the
disbursement procedures.

23

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

11.

Accounting Policy

96.

Long-, medium- and short-term planning should be the primary elements in financial
management. Long- and medium-term plans are often referred to as corporate plans.
Short-term financial plans are usually called budgets. NCRPB will seek assurance that
satisfactory plans and budgets will be prepared in a regular, orderly and timely manner.
Also, NCRPB will consider the acceptability of accounting policies, including standards of
financial reporting and general accounting practices. In line with the existing market best
practices followed for infrastructure financing, NCRPB expects these policies to be
materially consistent with accepted national or international standards and practices.

97.

Accordingly the potential agency UP State Public Works Department (UP PWD) that will
be involved in the project loan was considered for review. As a state department of UP
State, PWD accounting procedures are in accordance with the norms prescribed by the
State Accounting Policy, monitored by Accountant General.

98.

Based on the on-going lending practice, existing accounting policies and procedures
followed by agencies in Uttar Pradesh including UP PWD is not the major hindrance for
NCRPB for completing the project.

12.

Financial Regulations

99.

A sound accounting system is underpinned by financial regulations. These are usually


designed to define the objectives ofand responsibilities withinthe financial
management system. In the interest of the funding agency, an acceptable financial
regulations need to be in place.

100.

For the present Flyover Subproject, the proposed project will be funded by National
Capital Region Planning Board (NCRPB) through loan to UP PWD, UP PWD will be both
Executing Agency (EA) and implementing agency (IA).

Financial regulations for NCRPB, as part of the Ministry of Urban Development,


Govt. of India, will be governed by the well defined regulatory system designed by
Govt. of India.
UP PWD will be governed by the financial regulation provisions laid by Uttar
Pradesh State Accountant General.
Both regulation procedures will cover all the required aspects to be considered under
financial regulations review which are normally required under the best practice
followed in the market, though there may be variations in quality and quantity aspects
in between them.

24

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

C.

Financial Analysis

1.

Present Financial Condition

101.

UP State Public Works Department (UP PWD): Financial sustainability addresses the
required as well as appropriate taxation and tariff reforms. As state government is the
borrower for UP PWD, state government finances were reviewed. The past financials of
UP State is given in Table 2-6. A snap shot of the past financial position of the state
government from 2006-07 to 2008-09 reflects growth in both receipts as well as
disbursements for Revenue Account. The compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of
revenue income from 2006-07 to 2008-09 is 18.99% and revenue expenditure is 15.91%.
Thus, the rate of growth of revenue income is more that the growth of revenue
expenditure, facilitating increase in revenue surplus from Rs. 4,900 crores in the year
2006-07 to Rs. 10,977 crores in the year 2008-09. The CAGR of capital receipts from
2007-08 to 2008-09 is -3.54%. The capital receipt growth is compared only for two years
as there is an exceptional negative trend in the year 2007-08. The CAGR for capital
expenditure for same two year period is 2.48%. It may be observed that the CAGR for
capital expenditure is less than the capital receipt, which shows that the state is taking
steps to reduce the capital account deficits.

Table 2-6: Budget Flow - Uttar Pradesh State (2006-07 to 2008-09)


Item
UTTAR PRADESH
2006-07
2007-08
2007-08
2008-09
(Accounts)
(Budget
(Revised
(Budget
Estimates) Estimates) Estimates)
1
2
3
4
5
REVENUE ACCOUNT
TOTAL REVENUE RECEIPTS (I+II)
6,059,954 7,401,769 7,656,546 8,580,634
I. TAX REVENUE (A+B)
4,621,629 5,528,140 5,788,246 6,701,910
II. NON-TAX REVENUE (C+D)
1,438,324 1,873,630 1,868,302 1,878,725
TOTAL REVENUE EXPENDITURE (I+II+III)
5,569,890 6,787,138 6,755,073 7,482,867
I. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPENDITURE (A +
2,865,733 3,775,369 3,789,759 4,179,671
B)
II. NON-DEVELOPMENTAL EXPENDITURE
2,429,932 2,649,128 2,602,674 2,940,451
III.Grants-in-Aid and Contributions
274,225
362,641
362,641
362,746
REVENUE DEFICIT
490,064
614,631
901,473 1,097,767
CAPITAL ACCOUNT
TOTAL CAPITAL RECEIPTS (I to XIII)
61,797,413 31,990,709 21,475,245 22,234,419
I. External Debt #

II. Internal Debt (1 to 8)


1,133,202 2,457,095
908,983 2,392,998
III. Loans and Advances from the Centre (1 to 6)
37,948
51,265
50,265
50,265
IV. Recovery of Loans and Advances (1 to 12)
35,564
60,799
52,436
58,888
V. Inter-State Settlement

VI. Contingency Fund


64,479
1,000
994
1,000
VII. Small Savings, Provident Funds, etc. (1+2)
485,791
438,663
438,844
466,694
VIII. Reserve Funds (1 to 4)
307,380
360,917
360,932
472,360
1,524,944
552,548
554,368
587,845
IX. Deposits and Advances (1 to 4)

25

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)


Item
2006-07
(Accounts)
1
X. Suspense and Miscellaneous (1 to 4)
XI. Appropriation to Contingency Fund
XII. Miscellaneous Capital Receipts
XIII. Remittances
TOTAL CAPITAL DISBURSEMENTS (I to
XII)
CAPITAL DEFICIT
Source: Reserve Bank of India

2
56,961,749

1,246,357

UTTAR PRADESH
2007-08
2007-08
2008-09
(Budget
(Revised
(Budget
Estimates) Estimates) Estimates)
3
4
5
27,816,922 18,856,922 17,952,869

251,500
251,500
251,500

62,301,209 32,543,245 22,588,437 23,149,114


-503,796

-552,536

-1,113,192

-914,695

102.

The financial performance of the state government has also been analysed based on 12th
Finance Commission, recommendations and compared with NCR states and the national
average. The 12th Finance Commission, as part of restructuring of public finances, has
recommended certain measures to improve the long term financial sustainability of Centre
and state governments. The suggested indicators suggested by the 12th finance
commission include the following:
The Tax to GDP ratio should be improved to 17.6 % by 2009-10
Debt to GDP ratio to be brought down to 75% by 2009-10
Fiscal deficit to GDP should be less than 3%
There should not be any revenue deficit by 2008-09
Interest payment to revenue receipts to be brought down to 15% in case of state
government

103.

The above ratios were computed for all four NCR states namely Haryana, Delhi, Uttar
Pradesh and Rajasthan and the comparison is shown in Table 2-7.

104.

The analysis shows that Uttar Pradesh has yet to achieve most of the targets in 2008-09
except the fiscal deficit. Other parameters are mostly close to the targets. This is mainly
due to the slowdown in the economy the deficit has increased in the year 2008-09. Even
the Centre in its budget has relaxed the norms of gross fiscal deficit by 0.5% for 2008-09
and further 0.5% for 2009-10 to extend the fiscal stimulus to accelerate the growth in
economy. Further to all other recommendations given by 12th finance commissions have
been achieved by the state. The growth rate of gross state domestic product at nominal
rates is about 7.16% and 6.46% in the year 2007-08 and 2008-09 respectively and
generally less than to the national average. On the whole, Uttar Pradesh is striving to
demonstrate better economic and fiscal management for the coming years.

26

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

Table 2-7: Comparision of State Fiscal Indicators


Parameter

Norms

Revenue
deficit/GSDP
fiscal deficit/
GSDP
Debt/GSDP

Interest
payment/
revenue
receipts
Tax Income/
GSDP

Haryana

Delhi

Rajasthan

Uttar Pradesh

Consolidation of 27
states
(w.r.t GDP)
FY08
FY09

National
(w.r.t GDP)

FY08

FY09

FY08

FY09

FY08

FY09

FY08

FY09

FY08

FY09

Zero
by
FY09
<3%

0.12%

2.04%

Surplus
by2.65%

Surplus
by3.69%

Surplus
by0.20%

Surplus
by0.89%

Surplus
by3.54%

Surplus
by4.05%

Surplus
by0.9%

Surplus
by0.1%

0.20%

4.40%

3.46%

5.39%

5.12%

4.33%

2.70%

4.20%

8.90%

28.61%

26.34%

23.24%

--

Surplus
by
0.68%
--

1.50%

27.50%

Surplus
by
0.14%
63.43%

0.83%

<75%
by
FY10
<15%

Surplus
by
0.15%
61.22%

27.80%

27.10%

60.10%

58.90%

11.88%

10.81%

16.49%

14.02%

19.65%

19.52%

18.31%

17.00%

2.10%

2.00%

24.60%

24.50%

>17.6%
by
FY10

12.72%

14.41%

12.14%

11.47%

10.19%

10.96%

10.89%

11.93%

9.20%

9.40%

18.50%

18.10%

9.35%

8.02%

15.06%

12.48%

7.11%

5.48%

7.16%

6.46%

--

--

9.01%

6.70%

GSDP
Growth at
nominal
rates

Source: Reserve Bank of India

2.

Cost Recovery and Profitability

105.

Where cost recovery and/or profitability are primary objectives, the financial
consequences of policies, strategies, and practices relating to the entitys (IA) operations
or trade should be set out, for instance: (i) policies on recovery of costs of its products
and/or services, (ii) tariffs and charges levied, (iii) systems of establishing costs of
products and/or services, (iv) inventory controls, and (v) possibility and extent of external
regulation (e.g., by government).

106.

Existing Scenario. UP PWD is responsible for the subproject including development,


operation and maintenance. Due to practical problems and other reasons, levying of user
charges is not visualized. Also UP PWD is being a state department, the subproject will be
implemented through state budget support. As there is no revenue collection through user
charges for the services they are providing, it is difficult to carryout sustainability analysis
for UP PWD.

3.

Cost Benefit Analysis

107.

The projects for the purpose of financial analysis have been categorized as Service, Cost
Recovery and Remunerative. The present project of flyover construction is a service
category one and accordingly no feasibility analysis is carried out.

108.

Weighted Average Cost of Capital. The financial viability of subprojects was assessed by
comparing the subprojects financial internal rate of return (FIRR) with the financial
opportunity cost of capital. As proxy for the financial opportunity cost of capital, the
weighted average cost of capital (WACC) of the subprojects in real terms is used. The
27

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_V-A5 (15 Jul 10)

FIRR is the discount rate that equalizes the present values of costs and revenues over the
subproject life, while the WACC represents the cost incurred by the GNN with the support
of the UP State government in raising the capital necessary to implement the subprojects.
The WACC was estimated based on the central governments on lending policy.
Table 2-8: Weighted Average Cost of Capital (%) - Uttar Pradesh & Haryana
Item
NCRPB Lending
Govt. of India
ULB
WACC
/b
Grant /a
Equity
Amount weighting
75%
0%
25%
Nominal cost
9.00%
8.50%
10.00%
Tax Rate
0
0
0
Tax-Adjustable Nominal Cost
9.00%
8.50%
10.00%
Inflation Rate
4.50%
4.50%
5.50%
Real Cost
4.50%
4.00%
4.50%
Minimum rate test [ 4.0%]d
4.00%
4.00%
4.50%
Weighted Component of WACC
3.38%
0.00%
1.13%
4.50%
WACC = weighted average cost of capital, UP = Uttar Pradesh,
a - Nominal cost of Government of India grant is estimated at 8.5%, based on the Governments longterm bond rate.
b - Indicative Lending Rates for Loans by NCRPB for urban infrastructure projects
c - Global Price escalation is based on - INTERNATIONAL COST ESCALATION FACTORS 2008
2012, World Bank, Table 1.1 The global outlook in summary. Global Development Finance 2008:
The Role of International Banking, page 8.
d - Preparing and Appraising Investment Projects, Guidelines for the Financial Governance and
Management of Investment Projects Financed by ADB (pp 26)

D.

Financial Analysis of Subprojects

109.

The projects for the purpose of financial analysis have been categorized as Service, Cost
Recovery and Remunerative. The present project of flyover construction is a service
category one and accordingly no feasibility analysis is carried out.

110.

Also, as there is no commitment from UP PWD to introduce project specific user charges
and / or tax, it is assumed that the proposed project will be supported from the existing
budget support to UP PWD. As the project is to be funded from the budget source of
revenue stream, subproject specific financial analysis was not carried out.

28

APPENDICES

Appendix 1-1
Economic Cost

1.
The economic costs of capital works and annual operation and maintenance are calculated from
the financial cost estimates on the following basis:
(i)

Price contingencies are excluded but physical contingencies are included because they
represent real consumption of resources;

(ii)

Import duties and taxes are excluded because they represent transfer payments. For this the
shadow exchange rate factor worked out below was used;

Table 1: Shadow exchange rate factor


Details
National export (free on board) = Ex *
National import (CIF) = Im*
Customs Duties =Ct*
AD-HOC STANDARD CONVERSION FACTOR
(CF = (Ex + Im)/( Ex + Im+Ct))

2008-09
RE

2007-08
Actual

2006-07
Actual

2005-06
Actual

766,934
1,305,503
84,710

655,864
1,012,312
72,029

571,779
840,506
62,819

456,418
660,409
46,645

0.961

0.959

0.957

0.960

1.04
Shadow exchange rate factor (Y):(Y=1/CF)
* - Source : Reserve Bank of India
RE - Revised Estimates
Note: Calculation Method based on the handout on Economic Analysis

1.04

1.04

1.04

(iii)

The existence of unemployment and under-employment for unskilled workers within the
Indian economy means that the opportunity cost of unskilled labour can be considered to
be lower than its wage rate a conversion factor of 0.5 of the market wage rate for
agriculture casual labour is used to estimate the shadow wage rate;

Table 2: Shadow Wage-rate Factor (Y)


Casual agriculture labor cost (Rs. per day)* ( L)
National minimum wage of unskilled worker (Rs. per day)** (M)
Shadow Wage-rate Factor (Y); Y = L/M

80
159

0.50
*- Minimum Agricultural Labor wage fixed by many sates incl. Tamil Nadu at Rs. 80 a day (for men working six
hours) and Rs. 70 (for women working five hours)
** Uttar Pradesh: Minimum Wages w.e.f. 01.04.2009 to 30.09.2009, Labor Department, Government of Uttar
Pradesh.

(iv)

The market wage rate for skilled labour and the acquisition cost of land are considered to
represent opportunity costs, as both factors are in demand;

(v)

All costs are valued using the domestic price numeraire, to enable an easier comparison
with the information used to measure benefits (e.g. a significant component of benefit is
the savings in resources, which would be used in the without project situation).

2. Estimated financial base cost without contingencies and allowances for the Ghaziabad Transport
project (widening of 4.8 km length of NH 91 section in Ghaziabad City) is estimated Rs 513.486
million (excluding utility shifting, R&R and environment management expenditure) as shown in
Table 3. Using the basis, the economic cost (resource cost) was estimated both for capital cost and
operation & maintenance costs and presented in Tables 4 to 5. For estimating the economic cost
from the financial cost, the following other assumptions were also considered:

A. Capital Cost
Contingences and other allowances considered to the base cost (12%):
o Design Supervision Consultancy (DSC)+ Third Party Inspection (TPI) - 3%,
o Information, Education & Communication (IEC) activities 1%,
o Incremental Administration (PIU) 2%,
o Physical contingency 3%,
o Environmental mitigation 1%,
o Social intervention 1%,
o Institutional development and capacity building activities1%
Share of foreign cost to total project cost
Share of foreign Cost (%)

Sector
Water Supply
Sewerage
Drainage
SWM
Urban Transport

Services
Materials
0.75%
0.75%
0.75%
0.75%
0.75%

Total
2%
0%
0%
0%
0%

2.75%
0.75%
0.75%
0.75%
0.75%

Tax and duties


o Local cost 12%
o Foreign Cost 4%
Share of unskilled labor in Local Cost 12%

B. Maintenance Cost
Share of foreign cost to total project cost
o Water supply 0%
o Sewer 0%
o Strom water Drainage 0%
o Solid Waste Management 0%
o Urban Transport 0%

Tax and duties


2

o Local cost 12%


o Foreign Cost 4%
Share of unskilled labor in Local Cost 15%

Table 3: Details of Base Financial Cost Ghaziabad (Flyover Construction)


2010-12
Rs. Million

Item
Construction of a Flyover at Patel Chowk in Ghaziabad city

513.486

Total

513.486
Source: Consultant

Table 4: Details of Resource Cost Estimation Capital Cost (Ghaziabad Transport Component - Flyover construction)

Details

Financial Cost (Capital)


Rs Million

Base Cost
Allowances

Resource Cost (Capital)


Rs Million
S P Factor

513.49
12%

61.62

- Base cost & allowance

1%

4.31

3.99

0.92

- Taxes & Duties

4%

0.17

4.48

3.99
-

Foreign Cost

Local Cost
- Unskilled labour

12%

68.49

34.25

0.50

- Skilled labour & Others

88%

502.30

502.30

1.00

- Taxes & Duties

12%

66.44

637.23

536.54

641.71

540.53

Total
Note:

1. Shadow Exchange Rate Factor was worked on the RBI data on national exports, imports and
exports and using the Method based on the ADB Handout on Economic Analysis

Table 5 Details of Resource Cost Estimation O&M Cost (Ghaziabad Transport Flyover
Construction)
Financial Cost

Details

Rs Million (coll.
& trans.)

Resource Cost (Capital)

Rs Million
(Dist.&
treat..)

Rs Million
(coll. &
trans.)

Rs Million
(Dist.&
treat..)

O&M Cost

6.42

Foreign Cost

0%

- Base cost

0.00

0.00

S P Factor

0.92

Local Cost

100%

- Unskilled labour (25%)


- Skilled labour & Others
(75%)

1.60

0.00

0.80

0.50

4.81

0.00

4.81

1.00

6.42

5.62

6.42

5.62

Total

Source: Consultant

3.
Considering 2009-10 as base year followed by three construction period and 20 years
implementation period considered for the analysis, the cash outflow for economic cost was
worked out and presented in Table 6.
Table 6: Details of Phasing and Expenditure Flow
Economic Cost Transport Flyover Construction (Ghaziabad City, Uttar Pradesh)
Phasing

40.00%
60.00%
0.00%

Year

all values in Rs. Million


Capital Cost

O & M Cost

2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18

216.21
324.32
-

5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62

2018-19
2019-20
2020-21

5.62
5.62
5.62

2021-22
2022-23
2023-24
2024-25
2025-26
2026-27
2027-28
2028-29
2029-30
2030-31
2031-32
2032-33

5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62

Source: Consultant

Appendix 1-2
1. Valuing Economic Benefits Flyover Construction Project under Transport Component

1.
The benefits arising from improved urban transport infrastructure results in improved
service level delivery in urban transport travel requirements in the Project city / town. Benefits
are achieved through more effective connectivity, better speed, less traffic related issues like
congestion, accidents etc.
2.
Project beneficiaries will be those travelers for whom accessibility to economic and
social activities will be improved through better road conditions and traffic flows brought about
by the sub-projects. This improvement is achieved by reducing the effort or inconvenience of
travel between the origin of the traveler and the destination offering these activities.
3.
The subproject in Ghaziabad the Old NH 24, is the spinal cord of Ghaziabad city
transport network and at present experiencing tremendous traffic congestion. Most of the roads
are connected to this road and provide main access to Delhi, NOIDA, Loni, Meerut and Hapur
and thereby has resulted in many junctions. As a result significant traffic merges, diverges and
crosses the road at frequent intervals. Patel Chowk is a four road junction where the roads from
Loni and Mohan Nagar join the Old NH 24 Road. At present the movement of traffic at the
junction is controlled by signals supported by manual operation resulting inordinate delay for the
vehicular traffic The sub proposal is to construct a grade separator so as to allow the heavy
through traffic with free flow and the remaining turning traffic at grade with less waiting time.
4.
Subproject proposals will benefit the vehicular traffic on this road with less traffic
congestion, less traffic conflict at junctions, increase the travel speed resulting in savings in
vehicle operating cost (VOC) and travel time, accommodate the fast growing vehicular traffic,
uninterrupted movement for the major through traffic through flyover, pedestrian safety
including reduced road crossing time etc.
5.
The economic benefits considered in the present analysis for the grade separator (flyover)
subproject in transport component in Ghaziabad city include:
(i)

Value of Passenger Travel Time Savings

6.
Value of Passenger Travel Time Savings: Construction of flyover will result in reduction
of the existing junction delay for all the vehicles and subsequently savings in travel time for the
road users crossing this junction.
7.
In the absence of detailed traffic modeling, assumptions were made regarding impact of
improvements on road network performance, in terms of likely Program benefit including
savings in travel time and related cost as well savings in vehicle operating cost (VOC). These
assumptions and methodology followed include:

(i)
Proposed improvement to selected Program roads in terms of surface quality will
help reduce the vehicle operating cost for the vehicular traffic plying on these roads.
Based on the reconnaissance survey made during field studies and proposed design
parameters, the change in surface quality and the related VOC savings are estimated,
considering the Indian Roads Congress (IRC) guidelines.
(ii)
Average travel speed in peak and off-peak conditions is assumed to increase from
the existing levels (this increase in speed/service level shall be achieved due to Project
components by widening, strengthening, and segregation of pedestrian traffic by
providing footpaths, etc, if any). Even though increased speed levels are expected more,
only 20 percent is assumed on conservative side. The improvement in travel speed is used
to estimate the savings in travel time and further costing the time saved.
(iii)
Similarly, provision of flyovers and junction improvements will eliminate the
existing frequent delay at junctions that will result in increase in travel speed and the
resultant time savings to the commuters.
8.
Travel time savings for the passengers held up at the junction, in terms of hours and its
monetary value using the time unit rates for different vehicle users using the proposed flyover at
Patel Chowk in Ghaziabad City, was estimated from the following data collected at field as well
guidelines stipulated by Indian Roads Congress (IRC), and relevant study reports:

Average vehicle occupancy the number of passengers by vehicle type, plus paid driver
and crew where applicable;
Traffic category traffic using the proposed flyover and the remaining traffic using the
improved at-grade facility;
Traffic composition the percentage of each vehicle type in the traffic stream;
Passenger composition the percentage of each socio-economic category using each
vehicle type and the percentage of passengers who are in the workforce;
Savings in travel time estimated based on the existing delay and the proposed delay at
the proposed project site;
Unit cost of travel time for different vehicle users Based on a relevant study report, unit
time cost at 2009 price level.

9.
Road user cost unit rates including VOC and travel time for different vehicles used for
the analysis is given in Table 1. Vehicle occupancy details and estimated vehicle hours time
costs for different using vehicle occupancy and time cost unit rates are presented in Tables 2 and
3.
Considering the project design, the average daily junction traffic was segregated into:
Traffic using the proposed flyover; and
Traffic using the at-grade development below flyover
This was mainly to account the different level of project benefit in terms of time savings. Thus
segregated base year peak hour traffic is presented in Table 4. Finally the estimated project
benefit of travel savings during the analysis period is given in Table 5.
10.

Table 1: Details of Road User Cost adopted for the Study


Vehicle Category

VOC (Rs. / Vehicle Km)


2008 1

2009 3

Travel Time (Rs. / Hour)


2008 2

2009 3

Car - New Technology (Maruti 800)


Bus
TW
Auto rickshaw

4.07
16.37
1.40
3.98

4.27
17.19
1.47
4.18

47.80
22.76
31.87
27.31

50.19
23.90
33.46
28.68

Share-Auto
Taxi
2-Axle Truck
LCV
Goods Tempo
Goods Auto
Source: Analysis

4.49
4.70
14.77
10.96
4.61
3.59

4.71
4.94
15.51
11.51
4.84
3.77

27.31
47.80
13.54
9.65
4.83
2.41

28.68
50.19
14.22
10.13
5.07
2.53

1. Approach for Economic and Operation Assessment for Identified Urban Roads and Transportation Sub-projects, Working
Paper No. : WP-05, Comprehensive Transportation Study for Chennai Metropolitan Area, May 2008
2. Estimated using the RUCS Study, 2001 results (Rs 25,000/Tonne) for the year 2001 and escalated to 2008 with 5% annual
growth.
3. Escalated to 2009 with 5% annual growth.

Table 2: Vehicle Occupancy (No. of passengers/vehicle)


Bus
Bus
Minibus
Private & IPT
Car/Jeep/Van
Two Wheelers
Autorickshaws
Goods Vehicles (crew)
Trucks
MAV
LCV

40
15
3.5
1.5
2
2
2
1

Source: Indian Roads Congress (IRC)

Table 3 : Value of Travel Time Savings

Bus

Rs./Vehicle Hour in 2009 prices

Bus

955.92

Minibus
Private & IPT

430.13

Car/Jeep/Van

175.67

Two Wheelers

50.20

Autorickshaws
Goods Vehicles
Trucks
MAV
LCV

57.35
14.22
37.33
10.13

Source: Analysis

Table 4: Distribution of Peak Hour Turning Traffic - Patel Chowk in Ghaziabad (2009) No.
Of vehicles
Vehicle Category
Standard Bus
Mini Bus
Van
Shared Auto
Cars
Two Wheeler
Auto Rikshaw
Trucks
MAV
LCV
Tractors
Cycles
Carts
Cycle Rickshaw
Total Vehicles
Source: Consultants Survey, 2009

Flyover Traffic
From
To
Ghaziabad
Ghaziabad
17
10
12
4
123
24
290
46
233
47
150
14
53
8
13
1
6
3
4
16
18
2
20
23
933
204

Total

Non-Flyover
Traffic

27
16
147
336
280
164
61
13
7
7
34
2
43
1,137

85
194
63
421
464
215
126
37
11
23
109
111
1,859

Total Traffic
112
210
210
757
744
379
187
50
18
30
143
2
154
2,996

Table 5: Estimated Annual Travel Time Savings due to Construction of Flyover (Rs. In Million)
Year
Bus
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019

112.89
120.23
128.04
136.36
145.23
154.67
164.72
175.43

Bus
Minibus
30.97
32.98
35.13
37.41
39.84
42.43
45.19
48.13

Car/Jeep/Van
18.94
20.17
21.48
22.87
24.36
25.94
27.63
29.43

Private & IPT


Two
Auto
Wheelers
rickshaws
1.64
1.32
1.74
1.41
1.86
1.50
1.98
1.60
2.11
1.70
2.24
1.81
2.39
1.93
2.54
2.06

Goods Vehicles
Trucks MAV LCV
0.15
0.16
0.17
0.18
0.19
0.21
0.22
0.23

0.10
0.11
0.11
0.12
0.13
0.14
0.15
0.16

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01

Total Fast
Vehicles
166.01
176.80
188.29
200.53
213.57
227.45
242.23
257.98

2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
2028
2029
2030
2031
2032

186.83
198.98
211.91
225.68
240.35
254.77
270.06
286.26
303.44
321.65
340.94
361.40
383.08

51.26
54.59
58.14
61.92
65.94
69.90
74.09
78.54
83.25
88.24
93.54
99.15
105.10

31.34
33.38
35.54
37.85
40.32
42.73
45.30
48.02
50.90
53.95
57.19
60.62
64.26

2.71
2.89
3.07
3.27
3.49
3.70
3.92
4.15
4.40
4.67
4.95
5.24
5.56

2.19
2.33
2.48
2.64
2.82
2.99
3.16
3.35
3.56
3.77
4.00
4.24
4.49

0.25
0.26
0.28
0.30
0.32
0.34
0.36
0.38
0.40
0.43
0.45
0.48
0.51

0.17
0.18
0.19
0.20
0.21
0.23
0.24
0.25
0.27
0.28
0.30
0.32
0.34

0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.01
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02

274.75
292.61
311.63
331.88
353.45
374.66
397.14
420.97
446.23
473.00
501.38
531.46
563.35

Source: Analysis

11.

Exclusions. The following benefits of transport component for flyover construction have not been
quantified for want of adequate data and quantification techniques. These qualitative benefits along with
the quantifiable benefits discusses above, the proposed flyover construction will tend to provide better
living condition in the project town.
(i)

improvement in the environment of the project site;

(ii)

savings in VOC due to the reduction in traffic congestion at the junction;

(iii)

savings in traffic accidents cost due to better traffic management; and

(iv)

Effects on tourism and tourist-related businesses.

Appendix 1-3
Economic Cost-Benefit Analysis (Construction of Flyover)
Year Ending March

2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
2019-20
2020-21
2021-22
2022-23
2023-24
2024-25
2025-26
2026-27
2027-28
2028-29
2029-30
2030-31
2031-32
Total
NPV at 12% Discount Rate
(Rs. Million)
EIRR

Roads - Capital
Cost
216.21
324.32
540.53

Economic Cost
Roads - O & M
Cost
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
112.33

403.21

29.86

Total Cost
216.21
324.32
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
5.62
652.85
433.06

Economic Benefits
Savings in Travel
Total
Time Cost
Benefits
166.01
166.01
176.80
176.80
188.29
188.29
200.53
200.53
213.57
213.57
227.45
227.45
242.23
242.23
257.98
257.98
274.75
274.75
292.61
292.61
311.63
311.63
331.88
331.88
353.45
353.45
374.66
374.66
397.14
397.14
420.97
420.97
446.23
446.23
473.00
473.00
501.38
501.38
531.46
531.46
6,382.04
6,382.04
1,357.78

1,357.78

Net Cash Flow

(216.21)
(324.32)
160.40
171.19
182.68
194.92
207.95
221.83
236.62
252.36
269.13
286.99
306.01
326.27
347.84
369.05
391.53
415.35
440.61
467.39
495.77
525.85
5,729.19
924.71

32.58%

Appendix I-3 : Sensitivity Analysis


Year

2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
2018-19
2019-20
2020-21
2021-22
2022-23
2023-24
2024-25
2025-26
2026-27
2027-28
2028-29
2029-30
2030-31
2031-32
Total
NPV
@12%
(Rs.

Total
Economi
c Capital
Cost
216.21
324.32
540.53

451.59

EIRR (%)
Source: Consultant

Construction of Flyover Ghaziabad


(Rs. Million)
Base Case
20% increase in Capital Cost Scenario
20% increase in O&M Cost Scenario
20% decrease in Project Benefits Scenario
One Year delay in implementation
Combined effect
Total
Total
Net
Total
Net
Total
Total
Total
Total
Net
Total
Total
Total
Net
Total
Total
Total
Net
Total
Total
Total
Net
Total
Economic Economic Economic Economi Economic Economic Economic Economi Economi Economic Economic Economic Economic Economic Economic Economic Economic Economic Economic Economic Economic Economic Economic
Capital
O&M
Benefits
Benefits
Benefits
Benefits
O&M
O&M
Benefits
Benefits c Capital O&M
Benefits
Benefits c Capital c O&M Benefits
Benefits
Capital O&M Cost Benefits
Benefits
Capital
Cost
Cost
Cost
Cost
Cost
Cost
Cost
Cost
Cost
Cost
(216.21) 259.45
(259.45) 216.21
(216.21)
216.21
(216.21)
(324.32) 389.18
(389.18) 324.32
(324.32)
324.32
(324.32)
216.21
(216.21)
259.45
(259.45)
5.62
166.01
160.40
5.62
166.01
160.40
6.74
166.01
159.27
5.62
132.81
127.19
324.32
(324.32)
389.18
(389.18)
5.62
176.80
171.19
5.62
176.80
171.19
6.74
176.80
170.06
5.62
141.44
135.83
5.62
166.01
160.40
6.74
132.81
126.07
5.62
188.29
182.68
5.62
188.29
182.68
6.74
188.29
181.55
5.62
150.64
145.02
5.62
176.80
171.19
6.74
141.44
134.70
5.62
200.53
194.92
5.62
200.53
194.92
6.74
200.53
193.79
5.62
160.43
154.81
5.62
188.29
182.68
6.74
150.64
143.90
5.62
213.57
207.95
5.62
213.57
207.95
6.74
213.57
206.83
5.62
170.85
165.24
5.62
200.53
194.92
6.74
160.43
153.69
5.62
227.45
221.83
5.62
227.45
221.83
6.74
227.45
220.71
5.62
181.96
176.34
5.62
213.57
207.95
6.74
170.85
164.12
5.62
242.23
236.62
5.62
242.23
236.62
6.74
242.23
235.49
5.62
193.79
188.17
5.62
227.45
221.83
6.74
181.96
175.22
5.62
257.98
252.36
5.62
257.98
252.36
6.74
257.98
251.24
5.62
206.38
200.77
5.62
242.23
236.62
6.74
193.79
187.05
5.62
274.75
269.13
5.62
274.75
269.13
6.74
274.75
268.01
5.62
219.80
214.18
5.62
257.98
252.36
6.74
206.38
199.64
5.62
292.61
286.99
5.62
292.61
286.99
6.74
292.61
285.87
5.62
234.09
228.47
5.62
274.75
269.13
6.74
219.80
213.06
6.74
234.09
227.35
5.62
311.63
306.01
5.62
311.63
306.01
6.74
311.63
304.89
5.62
249.30
243.68
5.62
292.61
286.99
5.62
331.88
326.27
5.62
331.88
326.27
6.74
331.88
325.14
5.62
265.51
259.89
5.62
311.63
306.01
6.74
249.30
242.56
5.62
353.45
347.84
5.62
353.45
347.84
6.74
353.45
346.71
5.62
282.76
277.15
5.62
331.88
326.27
6.74
265.51
258.77
5.62
374.66
369.05
5.62
374.66
369.05
6.74
374.66
367.92
5.62
299.73
294.11
5.62
353.45
347.84
6.74
282.76
276.02
5.62
397.14
391.53
5.62
397.14
391.53
6.74
397.14
390.40
5.62
317.71
312.10
5.62
374.66
369.05
6.74
299.73
292.99
5.62
420.97
415.35
5.62
420.97
415.35
6.74
420.97
414.23
5.62
336.78
331.16
5.62
397.14
391.53
6.74
317.71
310.97
5.62
446.23
440.61
5.62
446.23
440.61
6.74
446.23
439.49
5.62
356.98
351.37
5.62
420.97
415.35
6.74
336.78
330.04
5.62
473.00
467.39
5.62
473.00
467.39
6.74
473.00
466.26
5.62
378.40
372.79
5.62
446.23
440.61
6.74
356.98
350.24
5.62
501.38
495.77
5.62
501.38
495.77
6.74
501.38
494.64
5.62
401.11
395.49
5.62
473.00
467.39
6.74
378.40
371.66
5.62
531.46
525.85
5.62
531.46
525.85
6.74
531.46
524.73
5.62
425.17
419.56
5.62
501.38
495.77
6.74
401.11
394.37
112.33
6382.04
5729.19
648.63
112.33
6382.04
5621.08
540.53
134.79
6382.04
5706.72
540.53
112.33
5105.63
4452.78
540.53
106.71
5850.58
5203.34
648.63
128.05
4680.46
3903.78
33.44

1520.71

1035.68

32.58%

541.91

33.44

1520.71

945.36

28.32%

451.59

40.13

1520.71

1028.99

32.44%

451.59

33.44

1216.57

731.54

27.29%

403.21

29.44

1318.56

885.91

32.50%

483.85

35.33

1054.85

535.67

23.38%

Sensitivity Analysis - Construction of Flyover

Appendix 2-1

THE CONSTITUTION (SEVENTY-FOURTH AMENDMENT) ACT, 1992


AN ACT
Further to amend the Constitution of India
Be it enacted by Parliament in the Forty-third Year of the Republic of India as follows:1. (1) This Act may be called the Constitution (Seventy-fourth Amendment) Act, 1992
(2) It shall come into force on such date as the Central Government may, by notification in the
Official Gazette, appoint
2. After Part IX of the Constitution, the following Part shall be inserted, namely:I.

PART IXA

THE MUNICIPALITIES
A.243P. In this Part, unless the context otherwise requires,(a) Committee means a Committee constituted under article 243S;
(b) district means a district of a State;
(c) Metropolitan area means an area having a population of ten lakhs or more
comprised in one or more districts and consisting of two or more
Municipalities or Panchayats or other contiguous areas, specified by the
Governor by public notification to be a Metropolitan area for the purposes
of this Part;
(d) Municipal area means the territorial area of a Municipality as is notified
by the Governor;
(e) Municipality means an institution of self-government constituted under
article 243Q;
(f) Panchayat means a Panchayat constituted under article 243B;
(a) population means the population as ascertained at the last preceding census of which the
1

relevant figures have been published.

243Q. (1) There shall be constituted in every State,(a) a Nagar Panchayat (by whatever name called) for a transitional area, that is to say,
an area in transition from a rural area to an urban area;
(b) a Municipal Council for a smaller urban area; and
(c) a Municipal Corporation for a larger urban area,
in accordance with the provisions of this Part:
Provided that a Municipality under this clause may not be constituted in such urban area or part
thereof as the Governor may, having regard to the size of the area and the municipal services
being provided or proposed to be provided by an industrial establishment in that area and such
other factors as he may deem fit, by public notification, specify to be an industrial township.
(2) In this article, a transitional area a smaller urban area or a larger urban area means
such area as the Governor may, having regard to the population of the area, the density of the
population therein the revenue generated for local administration, the percentage of
employment in non-agricultural activities, the economic importance or such other factors as he
may deem fit, specify by public notification for the purposes of this Part.
243R. (1) Save as provided in clause (2), all the seats in a Municipality shall be filled by
persons chosen by direct election from the territorial constituencies in the Municipal area and
for this purpose each Municipal area shall be divided into territorial constituencies to be known
as wards.
(2) The Legislature of a State may, by law, provide,(a) for the representation in a Municipality of
(i) persons having special knowledge or experience in Municipal administration;
(ii) the members of the House of the People and the members of the Legislative Assembly of
the State representing constituencies which comprise wholly or partly the Municipal area;

(iii) the members of the Council of States and the members of the Legislative Council of
the State registered as electors within the Municipal area;
(iv) the Chairpersons of the Committees constituted under clause (5) of article 243S.
Provided that the persons referred to in paragraph (i) shall not have the right to vote in the
meetings of the Municipality;
2

(b) the manner of election of the Chairperson of a Municipality.


243S. (1) There shall be constituted Wards Committees, consisting of one or more wards,
within the territorial area of a Municipality having a population of three lakhs or more.
(2) The Legislature of a State may, by law, make provision with respect to(a) the composition and the territorial area of a Wards Committee;
(b) the manner in which the seats in a Wards Committee shall be filled
(3) A member of a Municipality representing a ward within the territorial area of the Wards
Committee shall be a member of that Committee.
(4) Where a Wards Committee consists of
(a) one ward, the member representing that ward in the Municipality; or
(b) two or more wards, one of the members representing such wards in the
Municipality elected by the Members of the Wards Committee,
shall be the Chairperson of that Committee.
(5) Nothing in this article shall be deemed to prevent the Legislature of a State from making
any provision for the constitution of Committees in addition to the Wards Committees.
243T. (1) Seats shall be reserved for the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes in every
Municipality and the number of seats so reserved shall bear, as nearly as may be, the same proportion to
the total number of seats to be filled by direct election in that Municipality as the population of the
Scheduled Castes in the Municipal area or of the Scheduled Tribes in the Municipal area bears to the
total population of that area and such seats may be allotted by rotation to different constituencies

in a Municipality.
(2) Not less than one-third of the total number of seats reserved under clause (1) shall be
reserved for women belonging to the Scheduled Castes or, as the case may be, the Scheduled
Tribes.
(3) Not less than one-third (including the number of seats reserved for women belonging to the
Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes) of the total number of seats to be filled by direct
election in every Municipality shall be reserved for women and such seats may be allotted by
rotation to different constituencies in a Municipality.
(4) The office of Chairpersons in the Municipalities shall be reserved for the Scheduled Castes,
the Scheduled Tribes and women in such manner as the Legislature of a State may, by law,
provide.
(5) The reservation of seats under clauses (1) and (2) and the reservation of office of

Chairpersons (other than the reservation for women) under clause (4) shall cease to have effect
on the expiration of the period specified in article 334.
(6) Nothing in this Part shall prevent the Legislature of a State from making any provision for
reservation of seats in any Municipality or office of Chairpersons in the Municipalities in
favour of backward class of citizens.
243U. (1) Every Municipality, unless sooner dissolved under any law for the time being in
force, shall continue for five years from the date appointed for its first meeting and no longer:
Provided that a Municipality shall be given a reasonable opportunity of being heard before its
dissolution.
(2) No amendment of any law for the time being in force shall have the effect of causing
dissolution of a Municipality at any level, which is functioning immediately before such
amendment, till the expiration of its duration specified in clause (1).
(3) An election to constitute a Municipality shall be completed,(a) before the expiry of its duration specified in clause (1);
(b) before the expiration of a period of six months from the date of its
dissolution:
Provided that where the remainder of the period for which the dissolved Municipality would
have continued is less than six months, it shall not be necessary to hold any election under this
clause for constituting the Municipality for such period.
(4) A Municipality constituted upon the dissolution of Municipality before the expiration of its
duration shall continue only for the remainder of the period for which the dissolved
Municipality would have continued under clause (1) had it not been so dissolved.
243V. (1) A person shall be disqualified for being chosen as, and for being, a member of a
Municipality(a) if he is so disqualified by or under any law for the time being in force for the
purposes of elections to the Legislature of the State concerned:
Provided that no person shall be disqualified on the ground that he is less than twenty-five years
of age, if he has attained the age of twenty-one years;
(b) if he is so disqualified by or under any law made by the Legislature of the
State.

(2) If any question arises as to whether a member of a Municipality has become subject to any
of the disqualifications mentioned in clause (1), the question shall be referred for the decision
of such authority and in such manner as the Legislature of a State may, by law, provide.
243W. Subject to the provisions of this Constitution, the Legislature of State may, by law,
endow(a) The Municipalities with such powers and authority as may be necessary to enable
them to function as institutions of self-government and such law may contain provision for the
devolution of powers and responsibilities upon Municipalities, subject to such conditions as
may be specified therein, with respect to(i) the preparation of plans for economic development and social justice;

(ii) the performance of functions and the implementation of schemes as may be entrusted to
them including those in relation to the matter listed in the Twelfth Schedule;
(b) the committees with such powers and authority as may be necessary to enable
them to carry out the responsibilities conferred upon them including those in relation to the
matters listed in the Twelfth Schedule.
B. 243X. The Legislature of a State may, by law(a) authorise a Municipality to levy, collect and appropriate such taxes, duties, tolls and
fees in accordance with such procedure and subject to such limits;
(b) assign to a Municipality such taxes, duties, tolls and fees levied and collected by the
State Government for such purposes and subject to such conditions and limits;
(c) provide for making such grants-in-aid to the Municipalities from the Consolidated
Fund of the State; and
(d) provide for constitution of such funds for crediting all moneys received,
respectively, by or on behalf of the Municipalities and also for the withdrawal of such
moneys therefrom,
as may be specified in the law.
243Y. (1) The Finance Commission constituted under article 243-I shall also review the
5

financial position of the Municipalities and make recommendations to the Governor as to(a) the principles which should govern(i) the distribution between the State and the Municipalities of the net proceeds of the taxes,
duties, tolls and fees leviable by the State, which may be divided between them under this Part
and the allocation between the Municipalities at all levels of their respective shares of such
proceeds;
(ii) the determination of the taxes duties, tolls and fees which may be assigned to, or
appropriated by, the Municipalities;
(iii) the grants-in-aid to the Municipalities from the Consolidated Fund of the State;
(b) the measures needed to improve the financial position of the Municipalities;
(c) any other matter referred to the Finance Commission by the Governor in the
interests of sound finance of the Municipalities.
(2) The Governor shall cause every recommendation made by the Commission under this
article together with an explanatory memorandum as to the action taken thereon to be laid
before the Legislature of the State.
243Z. The Legislature of a State may, by law, make provisions with respect to the maintenance
of accounts by the Municipalities and the audit of such accounts.
243ZA. (1) The superintendence, direction and control of the preparation of electoral rolls for,
and the conduct of, all elections to the Municipalities shall be vested in the State Election
Commission referred to in article 243K.
(2) Subject to the provisions of this Constitution, the Legislature of a State may, by law, make
provision with respect to all matters relating to or in connection with, elections to the
Municipalities.
243ZB. The provisions of this Part shall apply to the Union territories and shall, in their
application to a Union territory, have effect as if the references to the Governor of a State were
references to the Administrator of the Union Territory appointed under article 239 and
references to the Legislature or the Legislative Assembly of a State were references in relation
to a Union Territory having a Legislative Assembly, to that Legislative Assembly.

Provided that the President may, by public notification, direct that the provisions of this Part
shall apply to any Union territory or part thereof subject to such exceptions and modifications
as he may specify in the notification.
243ZC. (1) Nothing in this Part shall apply to the Scheduled Areas referred to in clause (1), and
the tribal areas referred to in clause (2), of article 244.
(2) Nothing in this Part shall be construed to affect the functions and powers of the Darjeeling
Gorkha Hill Council constituted under any law for the time being in force for the hill areas of
the distinct of Darjeeling in the State of West Bengal.

(3) Notwithstanding anything in this Constitution, Parliament may, by law, extend the
provisions of this Part to the Scheduled Areas and the tribal areas referred to in clause (1)
subject to such exceptions and modifications as may be specified in such law, and no such
law shall be deemed to be an amendment of this Constitution for the purposes of article 368.
243ZD. (1) There shall be constituted in every State at the district level a District Planning
Committee to consolidate the plans prepared by the Panchayats and the Municipalities in the
district and to prepare a draft development plan for the district as a whole.
(2) The Legislature of a State may by law, make provision with respect to(a) the composition of the District Planning Committees;
(b) the manner in which the seats in such Committees shall be filled:
Provided that not less than four-fifths of the total number of members of such Committee shall
be elected by, and from amongst, the elected members of the Panchayat at the diacritic level
and of the Municipalities in the district in proportion to the ratio between the population of the
rural areas and of the urban areas in the district;
(c) the functions relating to district planning which may be assigned to such
Committees;
(d) the manner in which the Chairpersons of such Committee shall be chosen.
(3) Every District Planning Committee shall, in preparing the draft development plan, (a) have regard to (i) matters of common interest between the Panchayats and the Municipalities including spatial
planning, sharing of water and other physical and natural resources, the integrated development
of infrastructure and environmental conservation;

(ii) the extent and type of available resources whether financial or otherwise;
(b) consult such institutions and organisations as the Governor may, by order, specify.
(4) The Chairpersons of every District Planning Committee shall forward the development
plan, as recommended by such Committee, to the Government of the State.
243ZE.(1) There shall be constituted in every metropolitan area a Metropolitan Planning
Committee to prepare a draft development plan for the Metropolitan area as a whole.
(2) The legislature of a State may, by law, make provision with respect to
(a) the composition of the Metropolitan Planning Committees;
(b) the manner in which the seats in such Committees shall be filled:
Provided that not less than two-thirds of the members of such Committee shall be elected by,
and from amongst the elected members of the municipalities and chairpersons of the
Panchayats in the Metropolitan area in proportion to the ratio between the population of the
Municipalities and of the Panchayats in that area;
(c) the representation in such Committees of the Government of India and the Government of
the State and of such organisation and institutions as may be deemed necessary for carrying out
of functions assigned to such Committees;
(d) the functions relating to planning and coordination for the metropolitan area which may be
assigned to such Committees;
(e) the manner in which the Chairpersons of such Committees shall be chosen.
(3) Every Metropolitan Planning Committee shall, in preparing the draft development
plan (a) have regard to
(i) the plans prepared by the Municipalities and the Panchayats in the Metropolitan area;
(ii) matter of common interest between the Municipalities and the Panchayats, including
coordinated spatial planning of the area, sharing of water and other physical and natural
resources, the integrated development of infrastructure and environmental conservation;

(iii) the overall objectives and priorities set by the Government of India and the Government of
the State;
(iv) the extent and nature of investments likely to be made in Metropolitan area by agencies of
the Government of India and of the Government of the State and other available resources
whether financial or otherwise;
(b) consult such institutions and organizations as the Governor may, by order, specify.
(4) The Chairperson of every Metropolitan Planning Committee shall forward the development
plan, as recommended by such Committee, to the Government of the State.
243ZF. Notwithstanding anything in this Part, any provision of any law relating to
Municipalities in force in a State immediately before the commencement of the Constitution
(Seventy-fourth Amendment) act, 1992, which is inconsistent with the provisions of this Part,
shall continue to be in force until amended or repealed by the competent Legislature or other
competent authority or until the expiration of one year from such commencement, whichever is
earlier:
Provided that all the Municipalities existing immediately before such commencement shall
continue till the expiration of their duration, unless sooner dissolved by a resolution passed to
that effect by the Legislative Assembly of that State or, in the case of a State having a
Legislative Council, by each House of the Legislature of the State.
243ZG. Notwithstanding anything in this Constitution (a) the validity of any law relating to the delimitation of constituencies or the allotment of seats
to such constituencies, made or purporting to be made under article 243ZA shall not be called
in question in any count;

(b) no election to any Municipality shall be called in question except by an election petition
presented to such authority and in such manner as is provided for by or under any law made
by the Legislature of a State;
(3). In clause (3) of article 280 of the Constitution, sub clause (c) shall be lettered as sub-clause
(d) and before sub-clause (d) as so relettered, the following sub-clause shall be inserted,
namely:(c) the measures needed to augment the Consolidated Fund of a State to supplement the
resources of the Municipalities in the State on the basis of the recommendations made by the
Finance Commission of the State;.
(4) After the Eleventh Schedule to the Constitution, the following Schedule shall be added,
namely:TWELFTH SCHEDULE

(Article 243W)
1. Urban Planning including town planning
2. Regulation of land-use and construction of buildings.
3. Planning for economic and social developments
4. Roads and bridges.
5. Water supply for domestic, industrial and commercial purposes.
6. Public health, sanitation conservancy and solid waste management.
7. Fire services.
8. Urban forestry, protection of the environment and promotion of ecological aspects.
9. Safeguarding the interests of weaker sections of society, including the handicapped and
mentally retarded.
10. Slum improvement and upgradation.
11. Urban poverty alleviation.
12. Provision of urban amenities and facilities such as parks, gardens, playgrounds.
13. Promotion of cultural, educational and aesthetic aspects.
14. Burials and burial grounds; cremations, cremation grounds and electric crematoriums.
15. Cattle pounds; prevention of cruelty to animals.
16. Vital statistics including registration of births and deaths.
17. Public amenities including street lighting, parking lots, bus stops and public conveniences.
18. Regulation of slaughter houses and tanneries.

10

EXTRACT OF ARTICLE 243-I & 243-K FROM CLAUSE 2 OF THE CONSTITUTION


RD

(73

AMENDMENT) ACT, 1992 WHICH ARE REFERRED TO IN THE CONSTITUTION


TH

(74

AMENDMENT ) ACT, 1992

243-I. (1) The Governor of a State shall, as soon as may be within one year from the
commencement of the Constitution (Seventy-third Amendment) Act, 1992, and thereafter at the
expiration of every fifth year, constitute a Finance Commission to review the financial position
of the Panchayats and to make recommendations to the Governor as to :(a) the principles which should govern(i) the distribution between the State and the Panchayats of the net proceeds of the taxes, duties,
tolls and fees leviable by the State, which may be divided between them under this Part and the
allocation between the Panchayats at all levels of their respective shares of such proceeds;
(ii) the determination of the taxes, duties, tolls and fees which may be assigned to, or
appropriated by, the Panchayats;
(iii) the grants-in-aid to the Panchayats from the Consolidated Fund of the State;
(b) the measures needed to improve the financial position of the Panchayats;
(c) any other matter referred to the Finance Commission by the Governor in the interests of
sound finance of the Panchayats.
(2) The Legislature of a State may, by law, provide for the composition of the
Commission, the qualifications which shall be requisite for appointment as members thereof
and the manner in which they shall be selected.
(3) The Commission shall determine their procedure and shall have such powers in the
performance of their functions as the Legislature of the State may, by law, confer on them.
(4) The Governor shall cause every recommendation made by the Commission under this
article together with an explanatory memorandum as to the action taken thereon to be laid
before the Legislature of the State.
243K(1) The Superintendence, direction and control of the preparation of electoral rolls for,
and the conduct of, all elections to the Panchayats shall be vested in a State Election
Commission consisting of a State Election Commissioner to be appointed by the Governor.

11

(2) Subject to the provisions of any law made by the Legislature of a State, the conditions of
service and tenure of office of the State Election Commissioner shall be such as the Governor
may by rule determine;
Provided that the State Election Commissioner shall not be removed from his office except in
like manner and on the like grounds as judge of High Court and the conditions of service of the
State Election Commissioner shall not be varied to his disadvantage after his appointment.
(3) The Governor of a State shall, when so requested by the State Election Commission, make
available to the State Election Commission such staff as may be necessary for the discharge of
the functions conferred on the State Election Commission by Clause (1).
(4) Subject to the provisions of this Constitution, the Legislature of a State may, by law, make
provision with respect to all matters relating to, or in connection with elections to the
Panchayats.
******

12

Appendix 2-2
National Capital Region Planning Board (NCRPB)
1.
The National Capital Region Planning Board (NCRPB), constituted in 1985 under the provisions of
NCRPB Act, 19851, is a statutory body functioning under the Ministry of Urban Development, Government of
India. NCRPB has a mandate to systematically develop the National Capital Region (NCR) of India which
comprises of (i) National Capital Territory Delhi (constitutes 4.4 percent of NCR area); (ii) Haryana Subregion (40.0 percent of NCR area); (iii) Rajasthan Sub-region (23.3 percent of NCR area);(iv) Uttar Pradesh
Sub-region (32.3 percent of NCR area) and (v) Five Counter Magnet Areas (CMA) The project town
Ghaziabad City also part of the NCR.

Rs. Million

2.
According to the NCRPB Act, 1985
NCRPB - Income & Expenditure Account (Plan)
2,000.00
major functions of the Board include:
Plan
1,800.00
(i)Preparation of the Regional Plan and
Expenditure
1,600.00
Functional Plans; (ii) Coordinate enforcement
1,400.00
and implementation of the Regional Plan,
1,200.00
Plan Income
1,000.00
Functional Plans, Sub-regional Plans, and
800.00
Project Plans through the participating states
600.00
and NCT; (iii) Ensure proper and systematic
Excess of
400.00
Plan Income
programming by the participating states and the
200.00
Over Plan
Expenditure
NCT in project formulation, determination of
31-3-2003 31-3-2004 31-3-2005 3/31/ 2006 3/ 31/2008 3/31/ 2009
priorities in NCR or Sub-regions and phasing of
Financial Year ending
the development of NCR in accordance with
the stages indicated in regional plan; and, (v)
Arrange and oversee the financing of selected development
project in the NCR through Central and State Plan funds and other sources of revenue.

3.
NCRPB has prepared regional plan for NCR area with the perspective year 2021. Further, the Board
also initiated preparation of functional plans to elaborate one or more elements of the Regional Plan.
Accordingly the functional plan for water supply and transport is under preparation but plans for other
infrastructure is yet to take off.

4.
NCRPB has been providing financial assistance to the participating state governments, ULBs, and
other IAs in the NCR and in counter magnet towns. Till March 2008, NCRPB has financed 212 infrastructure
projects involving total project outlays exceeding Rs. 139 billion. It has sanctioned loans amounting to Rs. 53
billion and disbursed Rs. 33.3 billion2. NCRPB gives significant emphasis for building water supply and
sanitation infrastructure.

5.

NCRPB Act 1985, Chapter VI discusses the provisions for finance, accounts and audit that regulate

THE NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION PLANNING BOARD ACT, 1985, No.2 OF 1985, 9th February, 1985,
published by The Gazette of India on FEBRUARY 11, 1985. This Act provide for the constitution of a Planning
Board for the preparation of a plan for the development of the National Capital Region and for co-ordinating and
monitoring the implementation of such plan and for evolving harmonized policies for the control of land-uses and
development of infrastructure in the National Capital Region so as to avoid any haphazard development of that
region and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto
2
Annual Report 2007-2008, NCRPB

NCRPB accounting policies. It discusses about the financial sources, constitution of NCRPB Fund,
requirement of annual budget, annual report etc, account and audit requirements, Annual auditors report and
report to be laid before Parliament.

6.
The accounts of the NCRPB will be maintained and audited in such manner as may be prescribed in
consultation with the Comptroller and Auditor-General of India and the Board will furnish, to the Central
Government, before such date as may be prescribed, a copy of its audited accounts together with the auditors
report thereon. Annual auditors report and report to be laid before Parliament.

7.
NCRPB maintains annual accounts in the form of Income & Expenditure Account (Plan & Non-Plan),
Balance Sheets and detailed Receipts & Payment Account with appropriate Schedules. Review of NCRPB
Annual Accounts during the period FY 2002-03 to FY 2008-09 indicate the following: (Table Error! No text
of specified style in document.-1)

Income, expenditure and net revenue under Plan head form the major revenue source
Plan income is observed with fluctuating trend over the analysis period.
Plan expenditure found drastically reduced from Rs 1055 million in FY 2002-03 to Rs 252 million
in FY 2008-09 which had resulted in increase trend of net plan income.
Under Non-Plan head, both income and expenditure found to be more or less equal resulting no
surplus during the analysis period.
Under non-plan, salaries and office expenses are the major expenditure items and grant in-aids
and interest receipts from provident fund are the major revenue item.

NCRPB - Income Expenditure Account (Non-Plan)


Non-Plan
Expenditure

80.00
60.00

Rs. Million

40.00
Non-Plan
Income

20.00
(20.00)

31-3-2003

31-3-2004

31-3-2005

3/31/2006

(40.00)
(60.00)

Financial Year Ending

3/31/2008

3/31/2009
Excess of
Non-Plan
Income Over
N Pl

NCRPB - Income & Expenditure Account (Plan & Non-Plan)

R s. M illion

2,000.00

Total
Expenditure

1,800.00
1,600.00
1,400.00
1,200.00

Total Income

1,000.00
800.00
600.00
400.00
200.00
31-3-2003

31-3-2004

31-3-2005

3/31/2006

3/31/2008

Excess of
Total Income
Over Total
Expenditure

3/31/2009

Financial Year Ending

Table Error! No text of specified style in document.-1: NCRPB Summary of Income & Expenditure
Account
Details
31/3/2003
1,055.55
1,796.15
740.60

31/3/2004
790.47
1,584.47
794.00

Plan Expenditure
Plan Income
Excess of Plan Income Over Plan
Expenditure
Non-Plan Expenditure
15.14
17.94
Non-Plan Income
15.92
18.03
Excess of Non-Plan Income Over
0.78
0.10
Non-Plan Expenditure
Total Expenditure
1,070.69
808.41
Total Income
1,812.07
1,602.50
Excess of Total Income Over
741.38
794.10
Total Expenditure
Source: NCRPB Annual Reports & Annual Accounts

Financial Year Ending


31/3/2005 3/31/2006 3/31/2008
432.30
403.89
63.83
1,190.45
1,136.77
1,141.03
758.14
732.88
1,077.20

3/31/2009
252.48
1,411.11
1,158.63

18.96
19.07
0.10

18.32
18.38
0.06

59.99
19.55
(40.44)

24.62
24.84
0.22

451.27
1,209.51
758.25

422.21
1,155.15
732.94

123.83
1,160.58
1,036.75

277.10
1,435.95
1,158.85

8.
NCR Planning Board continued to provide financial assistance to the constituent States / NCT of Delhi
and their implementing agencies in the form of loans upto a maximum of 75% of the estimated cost of
Projects. The constituent States of NCR/ NCT of Delhi or its implementing agency contributed a minimum of
25% of the project cost as its counter-part share. During the recent years, NCRPBs lending activity had
increased considerably and from the FY 2005-06 its annual loan dispersal had crossed Rs 300 crores. Rs 705
crores were distributed as loan to infrastructure development projects during the FY 2007-08 in which
transport, power and water supply were the major sectors constituting 81% of the loan dispersal.

9.
There recovery rate of interest and installment of principal amount from any State Government or its
implementing agencies was found to be good over the years. except one from the Patiala Urban Planning &
Development Authority (PDA), Govt. of Punjab in respect of sewerage scheme of Patiala Municipal
Corporation

10.
In order to meet the gap between budgetary support and actual fund requirement for providing
financial assistance for the infrastructure development, the Board raises from the capital market by issuing
unsecured redeemable non-convertible taxable bonds periodically. The bonds have also been listed at National
Stock Exchange (NSE)-WDM segment.

Appendix 2-3
Impact of 73rd & 74th Amendments on ULBs in Uttar Pradesh
1.
The two historic and much talked about 73rd and 74th amendments to the Constitution of
India, envisaged a total change in the process of self-governance and planning. The objectives of
the amendments were loud and clear: a better plan and its better implementation.
2.
Consequent to the enactment of the 73rd Constitution Amendment Act Uttar Pradesh
enacted appropriate legislations for setting up strong, viable local bodies. The Uttar Pradesh
Local Self Government Laws (Amendment) Act 1994 was passed by the legislature of Uttar
Pradesh to incorporate the mandatory provisions of the CAA 1992. The new laws came into force
from 31.5.1994. 3.
Various aspects of Self Governance, under the Urban Local Bodies systems have been
discussed below in greater detail.

Urban Local Bodies


4.
Following the 74th Constitutional Amendment Act, 1992, the Government of Uttar
Pradesh has taken steps to set up the democratic governance in urban local bodies have been
accorded Constitutional Status, they have also been made democratic by way of providing
representation of weaker sections of society and women. The functional domain of the ULBs has
also been enlarged.

Conformity Legislations in State


5.
The Uttar Pradesh Local Self Government Laws (Amendment ) Act, 1994 was passed by
the legislature of Uttar Pradesh to incorporate the mandatory provisions of the CCA 1992. The
new laws came into force from 31.05.1994, Some of the salient changes made in the municipal
laws through the Amendment Act, 1994 have been highlighted below.
6.
The U.P. Municipal Corporations Act, 1959 and U.P, Municipalities Act, 1966 have been
amended and renamed as U.P. Nagar Nigam Act, 1959 and U.P. Nagar Palika Act 1916, while the
United provinces Town Area Act, 1914 has been repeated.
7.
Through these amendments following three categories of Urban Local Bodies have been
created in the State:
Nagar Nigams (Municipal Corporations)
Nagar Palika Parishads (Municipal Boards)
Nagar Panchayats (Town Panchayats)

12
194
422

Total:

628

Expanding functional Domains of ULBs


8.
As provided under XII th Schedule of the Constitution, following 12 functions have
been added to the duties of the urban local bodies:
Providing water supply for domestic, industrial and commercial purpose,
Establishing maintaining and assisting maternity center and child welfare and birth
control clinics and promoting control family welfare and small family norm,
Regulating tanneries,
Construction and maintenance of parking lots, bus stops and public convenience:
promoting urban forestry and ecological aspects and protection of the environment.
Safeguarding the interests of weaker sections of society including the handicapped and
mentally retarded,
Promoting cultural educational and aesthetic aspects
Constructing and maintaining cattle ponds and preventing cruelty to animals,
Slum improvement and upgradation,
Urban poverty alleviation and facilities such as gardens, public parks and play grounds.

Delegation of Rule Making Powers:


9.
Powers regarding the framing and making the bye-laws has been delegated to the local
bodies subject to the only condition that the bye-laws will take effort only after the have been
confirmed by the State Government and published in the official gazette.
10.
Previously State Government was empowered by the Act to make rules for Nagar Palika
Parishads and Nagar Panchayats. These Powers have now been decentralized and delegated to the
Divisional Commissioners, who are the Prescribed Authority for this purpose.

Financial Autonomy
11.
Financial powers of Nagar Ayukt in case of Nagar Nigams and President in case of Nagar
Palika Parishads and Nagar Panchayats have been increased as under:
Type of ULBs
Financial Powers
Authority
Before 74th
After74th Amendment
Amendment
Nagar Nigams
Upto Rs.10,000
UptoRs. 1,00,000
Nagar Ayukt
Nagar Palika
UptoRs. 10,000
UptoRs.50,000
President
Parishads
Nagar Panchayats
Upto Rs. 3000
Upto Rs. 15,000
President

Devolution of State Revenues


12.
The First State Finance Commission of U.P. has recommended that 7 percent of net tax
receipts of the State Government should be transferred to ULBs. the respective shares of Nagar
Nigams, Nagar Palika Parishads and Nagar Panchayats were 3.12%,3.12% and 0.76%. Inter-se
distribution within each category was on the basis of population and area (1991) with respective
weight of 80% and 20%. The State Government accepted this recommendations. With this, the
flow of funds to ULBs has become regular and its distribution among ULBs has been
rationalized and limited to objective criteria. In this context,the Second State Finance
Commission of U.P.has recommended that 7.5 percent of net tax receipts of the State
Government should be transferred to ULBs.The flow of funds to ULBs has substantially
increased in recent years as shown in the table below.
Year
1997-98
1998-99
1999-2000
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05

Funds developed (Rs.in crore)


415.83
504.22
537.89
628.92
682.31
765.74
825.00
877.00

13.
To improve the financial position of ULBs and compel them to take more internal
resources imposition of all taxes enumerated in the Municipal Acts, has been made compulsory
since September 1998. Ten percent of devolution share has been linked to the financial
performance of ULBs. Previously, the State Government was empowered by the Act, to make
rules regarding taxation and other purpose for Nagar Palika Parishad and Nagar Panchayat. These
powers have been decentralized and delegated to the Divisional Commissioners, who are the
Prescribed Authority for this purpose.
14.
Property Tax constitutes the most important own source of revenue of ULBs. The First
Finance Commission made several suggestions to reform the property tax system in the state.
which were accepted by the State Government. An area based self-assessment system of property
tax has been introduced in 11 Municipal Corporation Towns of the State in the first place to
strengthen the financial position of the ULBs.
15.
Inspite of all these measures, the financial position of ULBs in the State contiunes to be
precarious and they are often unable to meet expenditure on salaries and other essential services
like power dues. As a result, the quality of urban services remains poor Urgent steps are
therefore, called to revamp the financial situation of ULBs. The fiscal domain of these bodies
needs to be expanded and they have to be persuaded to take steps to raise revenue from their own

resources. Assess of these bodies to institutional sources of funding and capital market has to be
improved.
16.
Thus the enactment of 73rd and 74th Constitutional Amendment Bills 1992 has paved the
way for the creation of institutional structures for realizing the goals of self governance under the
Panchayati Raj and Urban Local Bodies systems. It has accelerated the socio-economic
development through democratic decentralization of governance within a participatory
framework at the grassroot level.

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w +91.80. 3918.7500 f +91.80. 2363.4097

NCR Planning Board


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Capacity Development of the National


Capital Region Planning Board
(NCRPB) Component B
(TA No. 7055-IND)

FINAL REPORT
Volume V-A6: DPR for Flyover at Mohan Nagar Junction in
Ghaziabad
Initial Environmental Examination Report
July 2010

Abbreviations
ADB
BOD
CC
CGWA
CGWB
CMA
COD
DFR
DPR
EAC
EC
EIA
EMP
ESMC
ESMS
GDA
GNN
GoH
GoI
GoUP
IA
IEE
IPT
IRC
km
KMPH
LA
LCV
LPCD
MLD
MoRTH
MoEF
NCR
NCRPB
NCT
NGO
NH
O&M
PCU
PSC
R&R
RSPM

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Asian Development Bank


Biochemical Oxygen Demand
Construction Contractor
Central Ground Water Authority
Central Ground Water Board
Counter Magnet Areas
Chemical Oxygen Demand
Draft Final Report
Detailed Project Report
Environmental Appraisal Committee
Environmental Clearance
Environmental Impact Assessment
Environmental Management Plan
Environmental & Social Management Cell of NCRPB
Environmental & Social Management System of NCRPB
Ghaziabad Development Authority
Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam
Government of Haryana
Government of India
Government of Uttar Pradesh
Implementing Agencies
Initial Environmental Examination
Intermediate Public Transport
Indian Road Congress
Kilometer
Kilometer per Hour
Land Acquisition
Light Commercial Vehicle
Liters per capita per day
Million Liters per Day
Ministry of Road Transport and Highways
Ministry of Environment & Forests
National Capital Region
National Capital Region Planning Board
National Capital Territory
Non-governmental Organizations
National Highway
Operation and Maintenance
Passenger Car Unit
Pre-stressed Concrete
Resettlement and Rehabilitations
Respirable Suspected Particulate Matter

ROW
RCC
SH
SPM
TA
UP
UPJN
UPSIDC

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

Right of Way
Reinforced Cement Concrete
State Highway
Suspected Particulate Matter
Technical Assistance
Uttar Pradesh
Uttar Pradesh Jal Nigam
Uttar Pradesh State Industrial Development Corporation

ii

Contents
1.

INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................... 1
A. BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................................................... 1

2.

POLICY & LEGAL FRAMEWORK........................................................................................................... 3


A. EXTENT OF IEE STUDY ................................................................................................................................. 3
B. GOVERNMENT LAW AND POLICIES ............................................................................................................... 3
C. ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OF NCRPB ........................................................... 4
1. Environmental Policy ............................................................................................................................... 4
2. Environmental Assessment Requirements ............................................................................................... 5

3.

DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT .................................................................................................................... 6


A. PROJECT NEED............................................................................................................................................... 6
B. PROPOSED SUBPROJECT ................................................................................................................................ 6

4.

DESCRIPTION OF ENVIRONMENT ...................................................................................................... 14


A. PHYSICAL RESOURCES ................................................................................................................................ 14
1. Location .................................................................................................................................................. 14
2. Topography, Soil and Geology .............................................................................................................. 14
3. Climate ................................................................................................................................................... 16
4. Air Quality .............................................................................................................................................. 17
5. Surface Water ......................................................................................................................................... 18
6. Groundwater .......................................................................................................................................... 18
B. ECOLOGICAL RESOURCES ........................................................................................................................... 19
C. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.......................................................................................................................... 19
1. Land Use ................................................................................................................................................. 19
2. Industry & Agriculture ........................................................................................................................... 20
3. Infrastructure.......................................................................................................................................... 20
4. Transportation ........................................................................................................................................ 21
D. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RESOURCES .......................................................................................................... 21
1. Demography ........................................................................................................................................... 21
2. Health & Education Facilities ............................................................................................................... 23
3. History Culture and Tourism ................................................................................................................. 24
E. PROFILE OF PROPOSED FLYOVER SITE ........................................................................................................ 24

5.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS & MITIGATION MEASURES ......................................................... 26


A. OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................................................... 26
B. CONSTRUCTION IMPACTS ............................................................................................................................ 26
1. Impacts on Physical Resources .............................................................................................................. 27
2. Ecological Resources ............................................................................................................................. 29
3. Economic Development .......................................................................................................................... 29
4. Social and Cultural Resources............................................................................................................... 30
C. OPERATION STAGE IMPACTS ....................................................................................................................... 31
1. Physical Resources................................................................................................................................. 32
2. Ecological Resources ............................................................................................................................. 32
3. Economic Development .......................................................................................................................... 32
4. Social and Cultural Resources............................................................................................................... 33
D. LOCATION AND DESIGN IMPACTS ............................................................................................................... 33

6.

INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS..................................................................................................... 34
A. INSTITUTIONS INVOLVED ............................................................................................................................ 34

7.

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN ........................................................................................ 35


A. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN ..................................................................................................... 35
B. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN ........................................................................................................ 35

8.

PUBLIC CONSULTATION AND INFORMATION DISCLOSURE ................................................... 44

iii

A. PROJECT STAKEHOLDERS ............................................................................................................................ 44


B. CONSULTATION AND DISCLOSURE .............................................................................................................. 44
9.

RECOMMENDATION AND CONCLUSION.......................................................................................... 45


A. RECOMMENDATION ..................................................................................................................................... 45
B. CONCLUSION ............................................................................................................................................... 47

List of Tables
Table 2-1: Environmental Category ....................................................................................................... 5
Table 3-1: Projected Traffic at Mohan Nagar Junction .......................................................................... 6
Table 3-2: Details of existing utilities .................................................................................................. 13
Table 4-1: Rainfall Pattern in Ghaziabad (2004-2008) ........................................................................ 16
Table 4-2: Air Pollution Status in Ghaziabad (2008) ........................................................................... 17
Table 4-3: Air Pollution Classification based on Annual Mean Concentration Range (g/m3) .......... 17
Table 4-4: NAAQ Standard Annual Average Concentration in g/m3 ............................................ 18
Table 4-5: Population Growth of Ghaziabad City ................................................................................ 22
Table 5-1: Construction Method & Materials of Flyover .................................................................... 26
Table 7-1: Environmental Management Plan ....................................................................................... 36
Table 7-2: Environmental Monitoring Plan ......................................................................................... 42

List of Figures
Figure 1-1: Regional Setting of Ghaziabad ............................................................................................ 2
Figure 3-1: Location of Proposed Flyover at Mohan Nagar Chowk...................................................... 7
Figure 3-2: Orientation of Proposed Flyover at Mohan Nagar Chowk .................................................. 8
Figure 3-3: Typical cross section of flyover .......................................................................................... 9
Figure 3-4: Plan & Profile of Proposed Flyover .................................................................................. 10
Figure 4-1: Ghaziabad Base Map ......................................................................................................... 15
Figure 4-2: Long-term Annual Rainfall Pattern of Ghaziabad (in millimeter) .................................... 16
Figure 4-3: Average Monthly Temperature (in Degrees Centigrade) .................................................. 17
Figure 4-4: Existing Land Use ............................................................................................................. 20
Figure 4-5: Occupational Structure ...................................................................................................... 23

iv

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

1.

INTRODUCTION

A.

Background

1.

Ghaziabad City is located in the western part of Uttar Pradesh State sharing the borders
with the National Capital Territory Delhi. It is the district headquarters of Ghaziabad
District. Owing to its location close to Delhi, and with good connectivity, it is one of the
important and fast developing city in the State of Uttar Pradesh and as well as in the
National Capital Region. City is well connected with important cities of the state and the
country; three National Highways (NH 58, NH 91 and NH 24 - Delhi-LucknowMuradabad Road) pass through the City connecting it will Delhi, Meerut, Lucknow,
Sikandrabad, Kolkata etc. Besides, it is well connected with its hinterland and surrounding
towns by regional and local road network. It is also well connected with railways.
Location of Ghaziabad is depicted in Figure 1-1.

2.

The rapid development of city has also put its infrastructure on tremendous pressure. Due
to rapid increase in vehicles and traffic, the road infrastructure is severely affected. The
vehicle speed on various roads is decreased significantly, while junctions have become
bottle necks free traffic movement. Mohan Nagar Junction (Patel Chowk intersection) on
NH 24 is one of the critical locations that carry a high volume of traffic. Based on the
traffic analysis carried out, a flyover is proposed at this location.

3.

The subproject of construction of Flyover at Mohan Nagar Junction is selected for detailed
study and preparation of a model Detailed Project Report under this ADB TA Component
B. NCR Planning Board, a statutory body of Ministry of Urban Development,
Government of India, is a likely source of funding for the subproject in Ghaziabad.

4.

This Initial Environmental Examination (IEE) Report is prepared in accordance with


NCRPB Environmental and Social Management System (ESMS) and Policy for project
funding.

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

2.

POLICY & LEGAL FRAMEWORK

A.

Extent of IEE Study

5.

The subproject implementation shall comply with the policies of Government of India
(GoI), Government of Uttar Pradesh (GoUP) and procedures/policies of NCRPB.
Government regulations and the NCRPB policy require that impacts of the development
projects have to be identified at the beginning and mitigation measures be incorporated in
the project to reduce those impacts to acceptable levels. This is generally done through the
process of environmental impact assessment.

B.

Government Law and Policies

6.

The GoI EIA Notification of 2006 (replacing the EIA Notification of 1994), sets out the
requirement for Environmental Assessment in India. This states that Environmental
Clearance (EC) is required for specified activities/projects, and this must be obtained
before any construction work or land preparation (except land acquisition) may
commence. Projects are categorized as A or B depending on the scale of the project and
the nature of its impacts.

7.

Category A projects requires EC from the national Ministry of Environment and Forests
(MoEF). The proponent is required to provide preliminary details of the project in the
prescribed manner with all requisite details, after which an Expert Appraisal Committee
(EAC) of the MoEF prepares comprehensive Terms of Reference (ToR) for the EIA study.
On completion of the study and review of the report by the EAC, MoEF considers the
recommendation of the EAC and provides the EC if appropriate.

8.

Category B projects require environmental clearance from the State Environment Impact
Assessment Authority (SEIAA). The State level EAC categorizes the project as either B1
(requiring EIA study) or B2 (no EIA study), and prepares ToR for B1 projects within 60
days. On completion of the study and review of the report by the EAC, the SEIAA issues
the EC based on the EAC recommendation. The Notification also provides that any project
or activity classified as category B will be treated as category A if it is located in whole or
in part within 10 km from the boundary of protected areas, notified areas or inter-state or
international boundaries.

9.

This subproject of construction of flyover does not falls under the ambit of the EIA
Notification, and, therefore EC is, thus, not required.

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

C.

Environmental and Social Management System of NCRPB

10.

Recognizing the importance of environmental and social issues that can arise in
infrastructure projects, NCRPB has formulated an Environmental and Social Management
Systems (ESMS) in line with Government and other multilateral agencies like ADB
safeguard requirements for Financial Intermediaries (FIs). The ESMS provides an overall
management system to NCRPB to identify, assess, and mitigate environmental and social
issues that are likely to arise in projects funded by NCRPB. The ESMS outlines the
policies, methods of assessments and procedures that will enable NCRPB to ensure that a
project that it funds is developed in accordance with ESMS and is adequately protected
from associated risks. Implementing Agencies (IAs) will have to comply with the ESMS
and Policy.

1.

Environmental Policy

11.

Policy Statement. National Capital Regional Planning Board (NCRPB) will continually
strive to ensure and enhance effective environmental management practices in all its
operations. This is aimed to achieve through:

12.

Minimizing negative environmental (including health & safety) impacts in its


operations and risks to the environment (particularly eco-sensitive areas and culturally
important areas) and people who may be affected through formulating and
implementing commensurate plans
Ensuring that environmental safeguards - defined as requirements of applicable Indian
environmental legislation and multilateral / bilateral funding agencies - are being
adequately integrated by the project proponent / IA in the planning, design,
construction prior to its financing and in its implementation during the operational
phase.
Ensuring that compliance to all applicable national and local environmental
legislation.
Encouraging that public and stakeholder consultation be carried out by the project
proponent / IA and disclosing the required information in all stages of the project
cycle.
Integrating environmental risk into its overall internal risk management analysis.
Including environmental management considerations in all aspects of operations and
interactions with the project proponent / IAs in all stages of the project cycle.

This policy statement emphasizes NCRPB's sensitivity, concern and commitment to


environmental safeguards. NCRPB will strive to ensure that the projects that it supports
meets government policies and as well as of the bilateral/multilateral agencies such as
ADB.

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

2.

Environmental Assessment Requirements

13.

The nature of the assessment required for a project depends on the significance of its likely
environmental impacts, which are related to the type and location of the project, the
sensitivity, scale, nature and magnitude of its potential impacts, and the availability of
cost-effective mitigation measures. According to NCRPB ESMS, the projects are screened
for their expected environmental impacts and are assigned to one of the following
categories: E1, E2 or E3.

Table 2-1: Environmental Category


Environmental Scenario
NCRPBs
Categorization
Significant impacts or in ecoE1
sensitive area
Limited impacts
E2
No impacts

E3

MOEFs
Categorization
A

ADB
Categorization
A

B1 or B2 or No
Category
No Category

B
C

(i)

Significant impacts or in eco-sensitive areas (Category E1): If the project has


significant adverse environmental impacts that are irreversible, diverse, or
unprecedented, then it is regarded to have environmental scenario. These impacts
may affect an area larger than the sites or facilities subject to physical works. These
impacts will be considered significant if these are in eco-sensitive areas.

(ii)

Limited environmental impacts (Category E2): If the project has impacts that are
site-specific, few if any of them are irreversible, and in most cases mitigation
measures can be designed.

(iii)

No environmental impacts (Category E3): If the project is likely to have minimal or


no adverse environmental impacts, then it is regarded to have this environmental
scenario.

14.

The proposed subproject of construction of flyover at Mohan Nagar Junction in Ghaziabad


is unlikely to have significant impacts. The project site is also not located or near any ecosensitive area. The subproject is however likely to have typical impacts associated with the
construction activity in urban areas and therefore classified as Category E2.

15.

According to ESMS, E2 projects require carrying out Initial Environmental Examination


(IEE) and preparation of IEE Report. This IEE report is prepared accordingly.

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

3.

DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT

A.

Project Need

16.

Patel Chowk (Mohan Nagar Junction) on NH 24 is one of the critical locations that carry a
high volume of traffic in Ghaziabad. The speed survey conducted on this stretch of the
highway indicated a peak hour average speed of 19 KMPH. The study has mandated a
flyover to be built at this junction (intersection of roads from NH24/Madan Mohan
Malviya/Loni Road) by 2015. Location and proposed orientation of flyover is presented in
Figure 3-1 and Figure 3-2.

17.

From the traffic analysis carried out, it can be seen that a flyover is mandated at this
location in 2015 (Table 3-1). Based on this, an arrangement best suiting to the traffic
pattern is proposed for improving the situation. Proposal is evolved giving due
consideration to minimize the land acquisition. All the site constraints have been taken
care while formulating the improvement scheme. The main objective is to improve the
present condition and make the movement of traffic manageable to the possible extent.

Table 3-1: Projected Traffic at Mohan Nagar Junction


S. No
Year
1
2010
2
2015
3
2020
4
2025
5
2030

Projected PCU
6,867
9,299
11,893
13,816
14,632

Source: Traffic Prediction Analysis; PCU Passenger Car Unit

B.

Proposed Subproject

18.

Carriageway Width and Design Speed. Taking into consideration the volume of traffic and
pattern of movement, for decongesting the junction, it is proposed to provide a flyover
along NH 24 which carries major share of traffic. This also segregates the through traffic
from cross traffic. Based on the traffic requirement as per projections, a four lane
configuration is proposed for the flyover and a two lane width is proposed for the service
roads. Dual 2 lane carriageway separated by a central median is proposed for the flyover
structure. Each 2 lane carriageway, intended for each direction of traffic, has a width of
7.5m with crash barriers of 0.5m width on extreme outer ends. The central median has a
width of 1m. The existing alignment of NH 24 is followed for the flyover. Footpath cum
drain of 2m is proposed. The ruling design speed of 100 KMPH is adopted for the flyover
and at grade roads. Location and orientation of the flyover is shown in Figure 3-1 and
Figure 3-2.

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

Figure 3-2: Orientation of Proposed Flyover at Mohan Nagar Chowk

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

19.

The flyover is on structure except for a small length on either ends. Earthen ramps with
earth retaining structures on sides are proposed beyond the abutments on either side.
Minimum vertical clearance of 5.5m is proposed from the at grade road top to the bottom
of deck at the junction.

20.

The proposed flyover has a total length of 640 m with 16 numbers of spans of 40 m each,
5 numbers on Shahadara Border side and 9 numbers on Chandra Shekhar Chowk side
apart from the two obligatory spans at the centre. The length of earthen ramp shall be 350
m and 200 m on Shahadara Border side and Chandra Shekhar Chowk side respectively.
Thus the flyover and approaches including ramp portion shall have a total length of 1,190
m. The proposed flyover plan and profile is presented in (Figure 3-4).

21.

At grade road of 7.5m width is proposed on either side of the flyover as service road for
local and turning traffic. Footpath cum drains is also proposed at the outer edges of these
roads on both sides. The typical cross section of the proposed flyover is shown in the
following Figure 3-3.

Figure 3-3: Typical cross section of flyover


500

Foot path

2000

Service road

7500

500

7500

17000
1000

7500

500

500

Service road

Foot path

7500

2000

22.

Right of Way. The available ROW along NH 24 in the project site location varies from
36m to 39m. The Right of Way requirement for the proposed improvement is worked out
to be maximum at the at grade section, which is 36 m. So the works will be taken up
within the available ROW.

23.

Improvements to Existing Traffic Regulations. The proposed flyover requires improvement


and reorganization of the existing traffic arrangement at the junction. The traffic shall be
channelized ensuring proper turning radius. To avoid conflicts between right turning
traffic from Madan Mohan Malavya Marg and Loni Road, signal control is proposed at the
junction. Traffic regulation arrangements like islands, signals etc now available are
reorganized to facilitate smooth turning of vehicles.

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

24.

Salient Features of the Proposed Flyover. Various structural arrangement options were
studied for the proposed flyover based on: functional requirement; characteristics of
subsoil; facilities to be provided at grade; ease in construction, and economy etc.
Accordingly, the structural system was planned taking into account suitability of the same
at the proposed location, constructability, level of impact on traffic movement during
construction etc. A total of 16 spans of 40 m length are proposed for the elevated structure.
The remaining portion is on earthen ramps on either side.
(i)

Superstructure: As longer spans are proposed, pre-stressed concrete superstructure is


adopted. The four lane deck shall consists of 8 numbers of pre-cast post tensioned Igirders with in-situ RCC slab. The girders are spaced at 2.2 m. Cross diaphragms are
proposed at support locations. The superstructure is supported by POT-PTFE
bearings.

(ii)

Substructure: The substructure proposed is RCC hammer headed piers with shaft
flaring towards top portion and straight portion below is proposed. Single pier
arrangement is proposed for the four line superstructure. Pier cap is cantilevered out
to accommodate the girders. Height of pier is based on the clearance requirement.
Where vehicles are to cross below, the minimum vertical clearance requisite of 5.5
m is ensured. At other support locations, the pier height varies in line with the road
profile.

(iii)

Foundation: Based on the geotechnical investigations on site, it is found that deep


foundation is required at the location. Pile foundation is proposed to be taken to an
average depth of 25 m from the ground level. The piles shall be of 1.2m diameter.

25.

At Grade Roads. At grade roads with 7.5 m wide carriageway and 2.0 m wide footpath
cum drains at the outer ends are proposed on either side of the flyover to cater for the
turning traffic from cross roads. These roads are to be formed widening the existing
pavement of NH 24; the existing road level is kept for the widened portion also.

26.

The width of footpath has been derived from the volume of pedestrian traffic at the
location. The drain shall have a width of 1.5m and is placed at the extreme end of the road.

27.

Utility Relocation Plan. Proposal for shifting the utilities which fall within the project
alignment have been prepared. The details of utilities falling along the project alignment
are given in Table 3-2Error! Reference source not found.. There are 33 lampposts
present along the project alignment, which have to be removed, and lighting arrangement
have been proposed in the flyover portion for both flyover and at grade roads. The cost for
new lighting has been included in the cost estimates. There are 36 trees falling along the
proposed flyover alignment, which have to be felled during the construction phase. As a
compensatory measure, it is proposed to plant thrice the number of trees to be felled with
site specific indigenous species and also to transplant the small trees wherever possible.
For all the remaining utilities, shifting proposal is given.

12

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

Table 3-2: Details of existing utilities


S. No
Utilities
1
Lamp post
2
Transformer
3
Telephone pole
4
Trees
5
Man hole
6
Electric pole

Number
33
7
1
36
22
51

13

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

4.

DESCRIPTION OF ENVIRONMENT

A.

Physical Resources

1.

Location

28.

Ghaziabad City is located in the western part of Uttar Pradesh State sharing the borders
with the National Capital Territory Delhi. It is the district headquarters of Ghaziabad
District. Owing to its location close to Delhi, and with good connectivity, it is one of the
important and fast developing city in the State of Uttar Pradesh and as well as in the
National Capital Region. Geographically, Ghaziabad is situated at 280 40 N latitude and
770 25 E Longitude. Ghaziabad is situated at about 20 Km east of Delhi, and 432 km west
of the State Capital, Lucknow.

29.

It is well connected with important cities of the state and the country; three National
Highways (NH 58, NH 91 and NH 24 - Delhi-Lucknow-Muradabad Road) pass through
the City connecting it will Delhi, Meerut, Lucknow, Sikandrabad, Kolkata etc. Besides, it
is well connected with its hinterland and surrounding towns by regional and local road
network. The Main railway line and the two branches of northern railway (Meerut Branch
& Moradabad Branch) pass through the City. It is an important railway junction in the
Northern Railway. Base map of Ghaziabad is at Figure 4-1.

2.

Topography, Soil and Geology

30.

Originally established on the eastern side of River Hindon, present sprawling development
of Ghaziabad can be observed on both sides of the River. Hindon River is an important
tributary of Yamuna River of the Ganges River System. Flowing north-south, Hindon
River passes through middle of the City and meets Yamuna about 35 km south of
Ghaziabad. The topography of the City is almost plain and the general slope is from north
to south.

31.

Geologically, Ghaziabad forms a part of the Indo-Gangetic alluvium. Soil is characterized


mainly by silty sand and loamy soils. Geotechnical investigations conducted at the
proposed flyover site indicates that there is no hard rock till 25 m below ground level.

32.

As per the seismic zoning map of India, Ghaziabad falls in sever intensity zone (Zone IV).
However, there were no major earthquakes occurred in Ghaziabad till date.

14

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

3.

Climate

33.

Typical humid subtropical climate of north India prevails in Ghaziabad, with high
variation between summer and winter temperatures and precipitation. There are three
distinct seasons first of which is the monsoon season - hot and humid season from midJune to September. Second season, winter, is the cool and dry season from October to
March. The third phase, summer, is characterized by hot and dry weather which prevails
from April to mid-June.

34.

Rains in the region are concentrated in the monsoon season. The region receives rainfall
mainly under the influence of southwest monsoon from July to September. Over 75
percent of the total rainfall is received during the monsoon months and the remaining
rainfall is received during December to February. The annual average rainfall is 732 mm.
Dust and thunderstorms occur in summer season while fog occurs in the winter.

Table 4-1: Rainfall Pattern in Ghaziabad (2004-2008)


Month
Normal
20.5
20.6
17.4
5.8
12.8
43.8
216.5
234.5
129.2
34.1
4.3
6.1
745.6

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Total

Rainfall (mm)
2005
2006
0
0
23.9
0
19
NA
0
0
0
0
80.5
34.2
185.7
250.5
57.9
20.4
284.2
114
0
16
0
0
0
0
651.2

2004
7.8
0
0
30.4
75
20.6
36.8
520.6
50.4
12.6
0
0
754.2

2007

2008
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
16.4
124.4
58.1
8.7
0
2
NA
-

0
45
64
0
0
64.1
84.1
99.8
4.7
0
NA
0
-

Figure 4-2: Long-term Annual Rainfall Pattern of Ghaziabad (in millimeter)


1,200
1,000
800
600
400
Annual Rainfall

200

Average Rainfall
2005

2001

1997

1993

1989

1985

1981

1977

1973

1969

1965

1961

16

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

35.

Owing to its sub-tropical continental monsoon climate with hot summers and cold winters,
Ghaziabad experiences large variations in temperature across the year. May and June
experiences high temperatures and the lowest is recorded in the months of December and
January. Figure 4-3 depicts the monthly averages of minimum, mean and maximum
temperature. Winds predominantly blows from north, north-west and west direction,
followed by from east and south-east direction.

Figure 4-3: Average Monthly Temperature (in Degrees Centigrade)


45.00
40.00
35.00
30.00
25.00
20.00
15.00
10.00

Mean Minimum

Average

Mean Maximum

5.00
Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

4.

Air Quality

36.

Ambient Air Quality in Ghaziabad is monitored by Uttar Pradesh Pollution Control Board
(UPPCB). Due to dry weather coupled with dusty roads, particulate matter is high while
levels of oxides of sulphur and nitrogen are well within the National Ambient Air Quality
Standards (NAAQS). According to UPPCB, air pollution status in Ghaziabad has been
termed as low.

Table 4-2: Air Pollution Status in Ghaziabad (2008)


Land use
Sulphur Dioxide
Nitrogen Dioxide
(SO2)
(NOx)
L
Residential
L
L
Industrial
L

SPM

C
H

C Critical; L Low; H High (see below Table for values); NA: Data not available

Table 4-3: Air Pollution Classification based on Annual Mean Concentration Range (g/m3)
Air Pollution
Industrial Area
Residential Areas
Status
SO2 & NOX
SPM
SO2 & NOX
SPM
Low ( L )
0 40
0 - 180
0 30
0 70
Moderate (M)
40 80
180 - 360
30 60
70 - 140
60 90
140 - 210
High (H)
80 120
360 - 540
Critical (C)
>120
>540
>90
>210

17

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

Source: UPPCB
Table 4-4: NAAQ Standard Annual Average Concentration in g/m3
Land use
RSPM
SPM
SOx
Residential
60
140
60
Industrial
120
360
80

NOx
60
80

Source: CPCB

5.

Surface Water

37.

Hindon River is an important tributary of Yamuna River of the Ganges River System.
Hindon meets Yamuna about 35 km south of Ghaziabad. The confluence is located about
40 Km downstream of Okhla barrage. A short cut canal called the Hindon Cut joins River
Yamuna at Okhla barrage from where the Agra canal takes off. The Hindon Cut, thus,
serves to make the Hindon river water, including the supplemental discharge from the
upper Ganga Canal, available for diversion to the Agra canal for irrigational use. The
river stretch remains dry, except during rains. During winter and summer seasons, river
flow is mainly limited to industrial effluents discharged from various industries located in
Ghaziabad and as well as upstream areas.

38.

Due to illegal entry of industrial and domestic wastewater, Hindon River water is polluted.
As per the CPCB, the dissolved oxygen content in the river is low and BOD is presence in
notable quantities. Illegal disposal of untreated/partially treated effluent from textile dying
and printing industries located in Shahid Nagar and Janakpuri in the trans-Hindon area are
said to be one of the main reasons for pollution of Hindon River stretch in Ghaziabad.

6.

Groundwater

39.

Due to its location in Gangetic Plains, the underlain aquifers have good groundwater
potential. However, the rapid development and increase in demand for water has put
tremendous stress on groundwater reserves, both in terms of quantity and as well as
quality. The groundwater decline is at much rapid phase and considering this alarming
situation the Central Ground Water Authority (CGWA) has notified the area under GMC
limits for regulation and control of groundwater extraction. No groundwater extraction is
allowed without prior permission of Central Ground Water Board (CGWB).

40.

General groundwater quality in Ghaziabad is good except in certain industrial and


residential pockets where there is concentration of nitrates, fluorides and heavy metals
beyond permissible limits. Indiscriminate disposal of untreated industrial and domestic
wastewater is said to be the main reason for pollution of groundwater.

18

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

B.

Ecological Resources

41.

There are no forests or any other environmental sensitive locations in or near project site.
Ghaziabad City is an urban area surrounded by land that was converted for agricultural use
many years ago. There is no remaining natural habitat in the city, and the flora is limited to
artificially planted trees and shrubs, and the fauna comprises domesticated animals plus
other species able to live close to man. Tree cover along few main corridors is
considerable; main tree species include Keekar (Acacia karoo); Neem (Azadirachta
indica); Peepal (Ficus religiosa); Honge (Pongamia Pinnata); and eucalyptus.

C.

Economic Development

1.

Land Use

42.

Owing to its location, adjacent to the National Capital, Delhi, over the years, Ghaziabad
City has experienced a very rapid development and urbanization. Originally established on
the eastern side of River Hindon, present sprawling development of Ghaziabad can be
observed on both sides of the River. The City is almost merged with Delhi - Citys
development stretching towards Delhi on west side and vis--vis Delhi expanding to east
towards Ghaziabad.

43.

Ghaziabad Master Plan 2001 was formulated for an area of 100.4 sq. km, of which by
2001, about 84.8 sq. km was developed. As depicted in the following figure, the existing
land use of Ghaziabad development area (84.8 sq km) shows that 60 percent of the land is
under residential use followed by industrial areas. There are no agricultural areas within
this development area. The gross density of the population is 130 persons per hectare.
Anticipating a big growth in the near future, the Ghaziabad Master Plan 2021 has been
formulated to an area of 155.54 sq. km.

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Figure 4-4: Existing Land Use

2.

Industry & Agriculture

44.

The City of Ghaziabad is known for medium and large scale industries. During 1970-80
decade a number of prestigious and large scale industries are established along Meerut
Road, Bulandhshahar Road, Link Road, Sahibabad and Loni Road in Ghaziabad City. In
addition to UPSIDC developed industrial areas, there are a number of industries located in
Mohan Nagar and Mohan Industrial Area. Ghaziabad houses a variety of industries
including distilleries, chemical, engineering, steel, and textile and dying units etc.

45.

Industrial sector is a major employment generator in Ghaziabad. Industrial development in


Ghaziabad however declined in the decade of 1991-2001 and no new industries were
established during that decade.

46.

Within the city limits, there are no agricultural areas left. Almost all of the land is
converted for residential or for other development.

3.

Infrastructure

47.

Water Supply. Two agencies are involved in provision of water supply service in
Ghaziabad; while the state line agency Uttar Pradesh Jal Nigam (UPJN) is responsible for
development of new infrastructure and all capital works, the Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam
(GNN) is responsible for its day-to-day operation and maintenance. Water supply system
in Ghaziabad is groundwater based. Water is extracted from 186 bore wells and a total of
160 MLD of water is supplied everyday at a rate of 145 LPCD (gross supply). In industrial
areas, water is supplied by UPSIDC.

48.

Sewerage System. UPJN carries out all new and capital works while the GNN operates and
maintains the sewerage system in the City. Around 70-75 percent of the city population is
covered with underground sewerage system. At present an estimated 128 MLD of sewage
is generated in the City. There are 17 sewage pumping stations in the City to pump the

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sewage to two sewage treatment plant for treatment and further disposal. The total
treatment capacity available is 126 MLD however present usage is only about 71 percent.
Industrial waste water treatment and disposal is managed by individual industries and
UPSIDC.
49.

Solid Waste Management. Municipal solid waste management is the responsibility of


Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam. At present about 750 tons of solid waste is generated daily in
Ghaziabad at a rate of 550 gm per capita per day. City is divided into five zones for better
management of solid waste collection and disposal. There is no door-to-door collection
system in the City. The solid waste is collected through bins located at various places in
the neighborhood. Sanitary workers collect waste from bins and transport to disposal site
at Sai Upvan on the banks of Hindon River. There is no proper disposal facility; the waste
is disposed by crude open dumping method.

4.

Transportation

50.

Ghaziabad City is well connected with important cities of the state and the country; three
National Highways (NH 58, NH 91 and NH 24 - Delhi-Lucknow-Muradabad Road) pass
through the City connecting it with Delhi, Meerut, Lucknow, Sikandrabad, Kolkata etc.
Besides, it is well connected with its hinterland and surrounding towns by regional and
local road network. The main railway line and the two branches of northern railway
(Meerut Branch & Moradabad Branch) pass through the City. It is an important railway
junction in the Northern Railway.

51.

It is 20 km east of Delhi and 46 km southwest of Meerut. Other roads lead northwest to


Loni and Baghpat and east to Hapur and Garhmukteshwar. Buses run at frequent intervals
to Delhi, Meerut, Aligarh, Bulandshahar, Moradabad, Lucknow and other cities. The City
acts as the main entrance of Uttar Pradesh and is also called the Gateway of Uttar
Pradesh.

52.

Internal road network within the town is well developed. Most of the roads however are
congested with traffic, pedestrians and activities such as parking of trucks/other vehicles
and presence of informal business activities (squatters and vendors) within the ROW.

53.

According to available 2003 data, over 70 percent of the vehicles in the town are two
wheelers followed by cars. Internal travel in the city is mainly through public transport
(buses and mini buses) and intermediate public transport system consisting of Auto
Rickshaws.

D.

Social and Cultural Resources

1.

Demography

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54.

According to the national census the population of Ghaziabad was 968,521 in 2001,
increased from 511,759 in 1991, recording an unprecedented growth rate of 89.3 percent
over the decade. The population of overall GDA area in 2001 was 1,327,330, which was
increased from 732,957 in 1991, with a growth rate of 81 percent.

Table 4-5: Population Growth of Ghaziabad City


Year
1971
1981
1991
2001

Population

Decadal Growth Rate (%)


128,036
287,170
511,759
968,521

124.3%
78.2%
89.3%

Source: Census of India

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55.

Overall literacy is 80 percent, reported at 87 percent for males and 72 percent for females,
which is considerably better than literacy in the state, which is 60.4 percent overall, and
75.7 percent for males and 44.0 percent for females. Sex ratio is however significantly
below the natural 1:1 ratio, being 858 females per 1000 males, lower than both the state
and national averages (879 and 929 respectively).

56.

According to the Census 2001, workforce participation rate (WPR) in Ghaziabad was 28
percent. As shown in the following figure, nearly 95 percent of the total workforce was
engaged in service sector (formal, informal, trade, commerce and industrial and other
service sectors). Contribution of other sectors is very minimal about 3.1 percent are
engaged in household industries the remaining 2.3 percent of population are engaged in
primary sector activities.
Figure 4-5: Occupational Structure

Cultivators
1.7%

Agri.
Labourers
0.6%
HHIndustry
3.1%

Others
(service)
94.7%

57.

Majority of people in Ghaziabad are Hindus and the remainder are mainly Muslims, Sikhs,
Jains, Christians and Bhudhists. Hindi is the main language of the area. Around 16% of the
population belongs to scheduled castes (SC) category. Population belonging to Scheduled
Tribe (ST) category in Ghaziabad are negligible and are part of the mainstream population.

2.

Health & Education Facilities

58.

Ghaziabad is a main centre for educational and health facilities in the region. There are a
number of schools, colleges, professional education institutions, general and special health
care facilities in the City, serving a large number of population from the City and the other
near and far areas.

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3.

History Culture and Tourism

59.

The City was founded in 1740 by the Emperor, Ghazi-ud-din, who called it Ghaziuddin
Nagar after himself and built a spacious structure consisting of 120 rooms of masonry with
pointed arches. Only the gate, a few portions of the boundary wall and a massive pillar
about fourteen feet high remain now, the precincts now being inhabited. His mausoleum
still stands in the city but is in a bad state. Ghaziabad played active role in the Indian
freedom struggle, the revolt of 1857. An encounter took place between the freedom
fighters and British force in Ghaziabad during that time. This was regarded as the first war
of independence and it brought Ghaziabad much of its glory. On 14th November 1976,
Ghaziabad became a separate district. Then on, Ghaziabad has developed in all fronts and
it is now one of the biggest and fast developing centers in NCR.

60.

There are no notified or protected monuments or sites of archeological and historical


importance in the City. The tourism potential of is minimal.

E.

Profile of Proposed Flyover Site

61.

The proposed flyover will be constructed at Mohan Nagar Junction in Ghaziabad. This is a
busy junction and carries heavy traffic throughout day and night. Traffic at this junction
consists of traffic to and from Ghaziabad, Delhi, Loni and Shahadara and has considerable
truck traffic owing to industries in the area.

62.

Located in the northwestern part of the City, Mohan Nagar is predominantly an industrial
area. Mohan Nagar Industrial Area houses a number of small, medium and large scale
industries. Mainly industrial establishments abut the road stretch at this location;
commercial and residential premises are very limited.

63.

The total length of proposed flyover is 1,100 m. The existing right of way at the site
ranges from 36 m to 39 m. A Police Station building and a Public Toilet are located within
the ROW and therefore needs to be relocated for the proposed development.

64.

The topography of the site is plain. There are no water bodies/streams traversing the road.
During the geotechnical investigations conducted at the site, the groundwater had
encountered at a depth of 21 m below the ground level. Four test bore holes of 25 m depth
were drilled, and at all four locations the groundwater is encountered at the same depth.
The geology and soil is characterized by silty sand and clay.

65.

There are trees along the road on earthen shoulder and in traffic island, some of which
needs to be removed for the subproject. All the trees are of domestic species and there are
no endangered or protected species. The trees observed at the site include: Keekar (Acacia
karoo); Neem (Azadirachta indica); Peepal (Ficus religiosa); Honge (Pongamia Pinnata);
and Eucalyptus. Some of these young growing trees with girth size of not more than 300
mm. Some are old and degraded trees.

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Photo 1: View of Flyover Site/Mohan Nagar Chowk

Photo 2: View of Proposed Site

Photo 3: Trees in the Traffic Island

Photo 4: Trees along the Service Road

Photo 5: Public Toilet in the RoW

Photo 6: View of the Road

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5.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS & MITIGATION MEASURES

A.

Overview

66.

As a general practice, an IEE should evaluate impacts due to the location, design,
construction and operation of the project. Construction and operation are the two activities
in which the project interacts physically with the environment, so they are the two
activities during which the environmental impacts occur. In assessing the effects of these
processes therefore, all potential impacts of the project should be identified, and mitigation
is devised for any negative impacts. Following sections evaluate the impacts of the
proposed Flyover Subproject in Ghaziabad.

B.

Construction Impacts

67.

This subproject will involve construction of the following elements at Mohan Nagar
Junction in Ghaziabad:

Flyover, 17 m wide and 5.5 m and 640 m length with 16 spans of 40 m each,
supported on 17 centrally located RCC piers
Two earthen ramps (one 200 m and other 350 m) to form approaches to the flyover.
At grade service roads of 7.5 m wide on either side of flyover with 2 m wide footpath.
These roads will be formed widening the existing pavement

Table 5-1: Construction Method & Materials of Flyover


Element

Construction Details

Flyover
Foundation: Pile foundation
Structure 17 pile foundations for 17 piers to
support the flyover structure;
RCC cast in-situ piles of dia 1.2
m and depth 25 m. Number of
piles for each foundation varies
from 6 to 8 and will placed at a
centre to centre distance of 3.6 m
Substructure: RCC Piers with
cantilever pier cap to get the
required span to accommodate
girders

Construction Activities
Excavation and construction will be done
simultaneously a void is formed by boring or
excavation and piles are produced by casting
concrete in the void. Construction will be
conducted in mechanized way. Heavy-duty
machinery such as drilling machines, cranes,
concrete mixers, vibrators etc will be used.

The reinforcing rods will extend out of the


foundations to create the structure of each pier,
and these will then be encased in shuttering,
into which more concrete will be poured to
form each pillar. Ready mixed concrete will
used. Construction equipment used will be
cranes to lift shuttering and ready mix concrete
trucks and concrete vibrators/compactors.

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Element

Construction Details

Construction Activities

Superstructure: Pre-cast I-girders


with in-situ RCC slab

Pre-cast girders, casted at a manufacturing unit,


will be brought to the site and placed over piers
using heavy-duty cranes. Post-tensioning will
be carried out using heavy-duty hydraulic jacks
mounted on piers.
The RCC slab will be casted in situ.
Reinforcing bars will be fixed over a steel
platform and the ready mixed concrete will be
poured and compacted using vibrators to form
the slab.

Ramps
approach
to
flyover

Earthen ramps with earth


retaining structures; length of
ramps will 200 m on one-side and
350 m on other side.

Earth retaining structure will be of interlocking


concrete blocks placed on either side to form
wall like structure of required height. Earth
brought from quarries and excavated soil at the
soil be used to fill the ramp. Soil will be
compacted and over which a bituminous road
will be formed.
Construction equipment used will be: Cranes,
earth moving equipment, rollers and
compactors bitumen pavers.

At grade
roads

7.5 m bituminous road with 2 m


wide foot path over 1.5 m drain

The existing pavement will be widened to


accommodate service roads. Sub grade and
base course will be formed. Equipments used
will be earth moving equipments, rollers and
compactors and bitumen pavers.

68.

Total quantity of earthwork excavation has been estimated as 18,694. Most of this will be
utilized in construction of earthen ramps, which requires an estimated 17,845 sq. m.
Construction materials like gravel, stone aggregate and sand will be sourced from quarries
approved by the respective Mines & Geology Departments. Yamuna Nagar in Haryana
about 200 km away is a known source for stone aggregates, Ghaghar, 180 km away and
Haridwar, 160 km away are sources for sand and Noida, 30 km away for soil. Bitumen
will be procured from refineries.

1.

Impacts on Physical Resources

69.

Although all work will be conducted at a single, relatively small site, construction will
involve a great deal of excavation and earth moving over a period of approximately nine
months, so physical impacts could be quite considerable.

70.

As detailed above, the work involves significant quantities of earthwork excavation as


well as filling works. In earthwork most of the impacts are related to mining/borrow pits
and disposal of surplus soil. However, this is avoided by proposing to use the excavated
soil for formation of earthen ramps. Thus, the net quantity of soil that needs to be disposed

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is about 850 m3, which can be disposed off without any problems. This can also be
utilized for filling up of low-lying areas.
71.

Overall, the quantity of earthwork conducted at the site will be over 36,000 m3 (including
both excavation and filling). Moving such a large quantity of soil could cause physical
impacts, including the creation of dust during dry weather and silt-laden runoff during
rainfall, both of which would affect people who live and work near the site and reduce the
quality of adjacent land. Earthwork will not mostly be conducted in rainy season, so this
will avoid any problems from runoff. In Ghaziabad, dry weather prevails in most part of
the year, and therefore generation of dust may be significant. It will therefore be necessary
to prevent dust, which could be generated in quite large quantities. The Contractor should
therefore:

Cover or damp down by water spray on the excavated mounds of soil to control dust
generation
Damp down soil while moving from excavation area to earthen ramp portion
Bring the material (aggregate) as and when required;
Use tarpaulins to cover loose material/soil that is transported to and from the site by
truck
Damp down soil sufficiently while using for leveling the ground
Control dust generation while unloading the material (particularly aggregate) at the
site by sprinkling water and unloading an a barricaded area
Sprinkle water in truck after downloading material; or cover it with tarpaulin to avoid
dust raging from the truck while it is moving

72.

The excavation to create the foundations for the piers and abutments could affect local
drainage patterns as rainfall will collect in the voids instead of running onto surrounding
land or into storm water drains, but this impact will also be avoided by conducting the
work in the dry season. The work should be conducted at the same time as construction of
the ramps so that excavated material is utilized immediately, avoiding the need to
stockpile large quantities of excavated soil, which could create dust. Any soil that is
stockpiled should be damped down during dry weather as noted above.

73.

As the deep excavations will be made for foundations, it is possible that the groundwater
may be collected in voids, which need to be pumped out. This silt-laden runoff may
accumulate on the ground or choke the local drains, creating nuisance and unhealthy
environment. However, considering that groundwater table depth of 21 m below ground
level, and the proposed excavation depth of 25 m for pile foundations, the water gushes
out of pit will be very minimal. Nevertheless the contractor should implement the
following measures:

Do not divert/dispose silt laden water into drains directly


Provide temporary ponds in the site for temporary storage; dispose clarified water into
nearest drains
Ensure that disposal into drains do not lead to water accumulation in the nearby areas

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74.

Creation of ramps will gradually alter the topography and appearance of the site. Drainage
of the site needs to be modified with suitable drains to suit the changed topography to
avoid flooding and accumulation of water. These are included in the project design. One
possible impact on drainage is that existing drains have to be relocated to the edge of the
expanded roadway and therefore needs to be stopped during the construction work. During
this transitional phase, the following measures shall be implemented to avoid water
accumulation due to disruption of drains:

Divert existing drains in the working section (ROW) temporarily; construct a


temporary drain if required
Complete construction of new drain as soon as possible and restore the flow

2.

Ecological Resources

75.

There are no protected areas in or around the site and no known areas of ecological
interest. However, construction of flyover requires cutting of 36 trees of domesticated
species including Keekar (Acacia karoo); Neem (Azadirachta indica); Peepal (Ficus
religiosa); Honge (Pongamia Pinnata); and Eucalyptus. Some of these young growing
trees with girth size of not more than 300 mm. Some are old and degraded trees.

76.

Cutting of trees could not be avoided as the trees are located within the ROW. Necessary
approvals from competent authority (Forest Department/Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam) shall be
obtained and the guidelines for compensatory measures, if any of the competent authority,
must be adhered to. In any case, as a compensatory measure, three trees will be planted
and maintained for each tree felled.

3.
77.

Economic Development
The work will be conducted within the available ROW and therefore no land acquisition is
envisaged. However, there are some encroachments in the form of squatters which needs
to be cleared off for the project. All 19 squatters are commercial squatters squatting upon
the ROW and they run their small business like tea stalls, vehicle repairing shop etc and
earn their livelihood. NCRPB Environmental and Social Management System (ESMS) and
Policy provides that the owners and tenants of these businesses do not suffer economically
as a result of the project, and a Resettlement Plan have been prepared to assess the nature
and extent of the losses and the compensation that is needed. This indicates that owners
and tenants of businesses that will lose property, other assets and/or income as a result of
the project will be provided with:

Compensation equivalent to the amount of business income lost as a result of the


construction process;
Compensation at replacement cost for lost income-generating assets (shop premises,
etc);
Additional financial assistance to enable them to re-establish their business at an

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alternative location.
78.

Some shops and other premises along the road may lose business income because the
presence of the construction site will deter customers, and at some locations access will be
impeded by road closures, and by the presence of heavy vehicles and machinery, etc.
These impacts will be avoided by confining the construction area to the actual area in the
middle of the road and allowing the traffic to move on the service roads on either side. The
construction area will be confined and barricaded. Moreover, there are almost no
commercial establishments such as shops, markets in this stretch of road which is mostly
occupied by industries.

79.

Transportation is the principal activity that will be impeded by this work. Although the
traffic can move on the service roads, there will be disturbance and overcrowding of
vehicles. Following measures are therefore required to be implemented:

Maintain the service roads in good condition to allow smooth traffic movement;
provide necessary personnel to guide and control the traffic
Provide alternative traffic arrangement/detours so that traffic can be distributed and
move on different roads; and, ensure that public is informed about such traffic
diversions
Provide information to the public through media daily news papers and local cable
television (TV) services about the need and schedule of work, and alternative routes
At the work site, public information/caution boards shall be provided - information
shall inter-alia include: project name, cost and schedule; executing agency and
contractor details; nature and schedule of work; traffic diversion details, if any; entry
restriction information; competent officials name and contact information for public
complaints.

4.

Social and Cultural Resources

80.

There are no historical or cultural heritage sites in Ghaziabad in general or at the project
site in particular. Therefore there are no likely impacts.

81.

There are no modern-day social and cultural resources (such as schools and hospitals)
near the site, and no areas that are used for religious or other purposes, so there is no risk
of other impacts on such community assets.

82.

In the ROW there is a Police Station, two Bus Bays and a public toilet, which needs to be
removed and relocated from the ROW as part of the project. These will suitably be
accommodated within the vicinity.

83.

Although residential and commercial establishments along the road and in the vicinity are
minimal, action should be taken to minimize disturbance as far as possible. This will
require:

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84.

Consultation with the local community to inform them of the nature, duration and
likely effects of the construction work, and the mitigation measures in place
Proper planning of work programme so that any particularly noisy or otherwise
invasive activities can be scheduled to avoid sensitive times;
Avoiding noise-generating activities at night;
Implementing the measures to reduce dust;
Utilising modern vehicles and machinery with the requisite adaptations to limit noise
and exhaust emissions, and ensuring that these are maintained to manufacturers
specifications at all times.

There is invariably a safety risk when substantial construction such as this is conducted in
an urban area, and precautions will thus be needed to ensure the safety of both workers
and citizens. The Contractor will be required to produce and implement a Site Health and
Safety Plan. This should include such measures as:

Following standard and safe construction practices;


Excluding the public from the site enclosing/barricading the construction area;
providing warning boards and sign boards and posting of security guards throughout
the day and night
Ensuring that all workers are provided with and use appropriate Personal Protective
Equipment (helmet, hand gloves, boots, masks, safety hoists when working at height,
etc);
Barricade the entire area that may come under influence in case of accidents this
may particularly critical during fixing of pre-cast girders using heavy duty cranes; this
may be conducted during lean traffic periods and if required the traffic may also be
stopped for that short duration
Follow standard practices of safety checks as prescribed before use of equipments
such as cranes, hoists, etc.
Employ an Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Expert on site;
Provide on -site Health and Safety Training for all site personnel;
Report accidents to the authorities promptly, and maintain records

85.

There could be some short-term socio-economic benefits from the construction work if
local people gain employment in the workforce. To ensure that these benefits are directed
to local people, the Contractor should be required to employ as much of his labour force as
possible from the local communities in the vicinity of construction sites. Drawing of
majority of workforce from local communities will avoid problems that can occur if
workers are imported, including social conflicts and issues of health and sanitation due to
labour camps. If temporary labour camps are to be provided; Contractor should ensure that
they are maintained well with proper water supply and sanitation facilities.

C.

Operation Stage Impacts

86.

The roads and bridges generally operate without the need for major maintenance or repair,

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therefore there are no major impacts envisaged. During its design life, the flyover should
require no major repair or refurbishment, beyond routine maintenance like small scale ad
hoc repairs of surface damage caused by traffic use or accidents; repairs and replacement
of damaged safety barriers and signs, etc.
87.

The stability and integrity of the bridge should also be monitored periodically to detect any
problems and allow remedial action if required.

1.

Physical Resources

88.

Once the flyover is completed and operating it will improve the physical environment by
removing the severe traffic congestion that is a feature of this location at present, with the
resulting concentration of vehicle noise and pollution. This will be replaced by a modern
elevated roadway, which allows the maintenance of a smooth flow of traffic at different
grades/levels.

89.

The Flyover will however elevate the traffic significantly above ground level, making the
traffic and the structure significantly more visible than at present. However considering
the land use around the road with industrial areas and no aesthetically beautiful areas,
visual impacts of flyover will be negligible. Planting of large growing native trees, which
would mask the structure to give a more pleasing appearance, may be considered where
land is available within the ROW. This may however be considered with due consideration
to safety of traffic, pedestrians.

90.

Although the flyover is located in an area of high seismic risk, it will be designed
according to standard Indian Engineering Design Codes, which include measures to allow
the structure to withstand tremors of the expected magnitude and above. There should
therefore be little risk of the structure failing, even if the area is subject to seismic events
of greater magnitude than those that have occurred over recent years.

2.
91.

3.
92.

Ecological Resources
As there are no significant ecological resources in or around the town, the operation of the
flyover and the routine maintenance and repair of the road and surroundings will have no
ecological impacts. There would be some small ecological gain from the planting of trees
to mask the visual impact of the structure.

Economic Development
The flyover will improve the infrastructure of the city by providing a more efficient and
effective transportation route, and this should have positive impacts on the overall
economy by reducing time spent idle in stationary traffic by delivery vehicles, employees
and customers.

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4.

Social and Cultural Resources

93.

There are unlikely to have any negative impacts on these resources. The citizens of the city
will benefit from a more effective transportation route as they will spend less time in
stationary traffic exposed to noise, pollution and the associated physical and psychological
stresses. Social and cultural resources may also benefit in a small way as it will be easier
for people to reach their destinations. People may also benefit from an improvement in the
economy of the city, although it would require much larger improvements in
transportation and other infrastructure for this to be recordable.

D.

Location and Design Impacts

94.

In many environmental assessments there are certain effects that, although they will occur
during either the construction or operation stage, should be considered as impacts
primarily of the location or design of the project, as they would not occur if an alternative
location or design was chosen.

95.

However in case of this subproject it is not considered that there are any impacts that are a
result of the design or location. This is because:

The project will be built at a single relatively small location and involves
straightforward construction and low-maintenance operation, in an environment that
is not especially sensitive, so it is unlikely that there will be major impacts;
Most of the predicted impacts are associated with the construction process, and are
produced because that process involves quite extensive groundwork. However the
routine nature of the impacts means that most can be easily mitigated.

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6.

INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS

A.

Institutions Involved

96.

Following agencies will be involved in implementing this Flyover construction subproject


at Mohan Nagar Junction in Ghaziabad:
(i)

NCRPB: National Capital Region Planning Board is the funding agency for the
project.

(ii)

Implementing Agency (IA): Implementing Agency of the Project will be Ghaziabad


Development Authority. IA will be responsible for the project implementation.
Operation & maintenance will also be the responsibility of the IA.

(iii)

Design and Supervision Consultants: Implementing Agency will be assisted by


Design and Supervision Consultants (DSC) in tendering, and reviewing and revising
designs during the construction, if required, and supervising the construction to
ensure quality.

(iv)

Construction Contractors: IA will appoint Construction Contractors (CC) to build


the infrastructure elements.

97.

Implementing the project according to and incompliance with the policies the funding
agency, NCRPB, will be the responsibility of the Implementing Agency (IA). The
Environmental and Social Management Cell (ESMC) of NCRPB will deal with
environmental and social safeguard issues. ESMC would guide and monitor IA in
complying with its ESMS and Policy.

98.

ESMC. The ESMC will be housed inside the appraisal function of NCRPB and will have
two distinct sub-functions, i.e. managing environmental safeguards and social safeguards.
ESMC will be provided with one full-time staff - safeguards officer, who will look after
the day-to-day activities related to the safeguard compliance. Safeguard Officer will be
responsible for both environmental and social safeguard functions. Based on the necessity,
the Safeguards Officer will source expertise from outside/external consultants on a caseto-case basis.

99.

ESMC will review and approve IEE, oversee disclosure and consultations, and will
monitor the implementation of environmental monitoring plan and environmental
management plan where required. The Construction Contractor (CC) will implement
mitigation measures in construction. IA or DSC will monitor the implementation of
mitigation measures by the CC. ESMC will oversee the implementation of EMP.
Implementation of mitigation and monitoring measures during the operation and
maintenance (O&M) stage will be the responsibility of the implementing agency.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

7.

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

A.

Environmental Management Plan

100.

The proposed subproject and its components, the baseline environmental profile of the
subproject area, the anticipated environmental impacts and appropriate mitigation
measures to avoid/ reduce/ mitigate/compensate for the identified impacts have been
discussed in detailed in earlier sections.

101.

This Environmental Management Plan is developed for implementation listing the


impacts, appropriate mitigation measures, delegating the responsibility of implementation
to concerned agencies. This is shown in the following Table 7-1.

B.

Environmental Monitoring Plan

102.

A program of monitoring will be conducted to ensure that all the parties take the specified
action to provide the required mitigation, to assess whether the action has adequately
protected the environment, and to determine whether any additional measures may be
necessary. Regular monitoring of implementation of mitigations measures by Construction
Contractor will be conducted by the Implementing Agency. Periodic monitoring and
overseeing of implementation of mitigation measures will be conducted by the ESMC of
NCRPB. Monitoring during operation stage will be conducted by the Operating Agency.

103.

Most of the mitigation measures are fairly standard methods of minimizing disturbance
from building in urban areas (public inconvenience and traffic disruptions). Monitoring of
such measures normally involves making observations in the course of site visits, although
some require more formal checking of records and other aspects.

106.

Table 7-2 shows the proposed Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for this Project,
which specifies the various monitoring activities to be conducted during different phases
of the project. The EMP describes: (i) mitigation measures, (ii) location, (iii) measurement
method, (iv) frequency of monitoring and (v) responsibility (for both mitigation and
monitoring).

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

Table 7-1: Environmental Management Plan


Potential Negative Impacts
Sig Dur Mitigation measures
Preconstruction
Involuntary resettlement
L
P
Implement compensatory measures as recommended
by the Resettlement Plan prepared in accordance with
Description: Displacement of 19
NCRPB ESMS
squatters encroached on the ROW
Suggested measures must be implemented before the
signing of contract for civil works including:
o Compensation equivalent to the amount
of business income lost as a result of the
construction process;
o Compensation at replacement cost for
lost income-generating assets (shop
premises, etc);
o Additional financial assistance to enable
them to re-establish their business at an
alternative location.
Obtain necessary approvals from Forest
Department/Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam for tree cutting
Plant and maintain three trees for each tree felled as a
compensatory measure

Construction
Tree Cutting
Description: The proposed work
requires cutting of 36 trees of
domesticated and local species
Excavation will produce large
quantity of waste soil, which needs
proper disposal.

Utilize surplus soil for beneficial purposes such as in


construction activities elsewhere and filling up lowlying areas

Responsibility

Location

Cost

GDA

Flyover site

Part of
RP Cost

CC

Flyover site

Part of
project
cost

CC

Flyover site

Part of
standard
contract

Description. Excavation for bridge


construction will produce an
estimated 18,694 m3 of waste soil.
This however will be utilized in
construction earthen ramps, which
require an estimated 17,845 m3 of

36

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)


Potential Negative Impacts
soil. So the surplus soil that requires
proper disposal will be minimal.
Dust nuisance due to construction
Description. Earthwork excavation,
refilling, handling and transportation
of construction materials (like sand
and aggregate), and handling,
transportation and construction of
earthen ramps will produce large
volumes of dust if it is not done
properly. Total quantity of earthwork
involved in laying/replacing of
distribution and rising main is about
260 thousand cubic meter, including
9,500 m3 of surplus soil for disposal.

Impacts on drainage
Description. During deep excavation
for pile foundation, there is a
possibility of water collecting in the
void, needing disposal.
Indiscriminate disposal of this silt
laden water may choke drains, lead to
water accumulation etc. Also,
existing drains in the ROW will be
disturbed.

Sig Dur Mitigation measures

Cover or damp down by water spray on the excavated


mounds of soil to control dust generation
Damp down soil while moving from excavation area to
earthen ramp portion
Damp down the surface of the developing ramps and
any soil stockpiled on site by spraying with water
when necessary during dry weather;
Use tarpaulins to cover soil/materials when transported
by truck
Bring the material (aggregate) as and when required;
Use tarpaulins to cover loose material/soil that is
transported to and from the site by truck
Damp down soil sufficiently while using for leveling
the ground
Control dust generation while unloading the material
(particularly aggregate) at the site by sprinkling water
and unloading an a barricaded area
Sprinkle water in truck after downloading material; or
cover it with tarpaulin to avoid dust raging from the
truck while it is moving
Do not divert/dispose silt laden water into drains
directly
Provide temporary ponds in the site for temporary
storage; dispose of clarified water into nearest drains
Ensure that disposal into drains do not lead to water
accumulation in the nearby areas
Divert existing drains in the working section (ROW)
temporarily; construct a temporary drain if required
Complete construction of new drain as soon as
possible and restore the flow

Responsibility

Location

Cost

CC

Flyover site
& material
and waste
construction
routes

Part of
standard
contract

CC

Flyover site

Part of
standard
contract

37

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)


Potential Negative Impacts
Generation of noise and vibrations
from excavation
Description. High noise and vibration
generating activities like rock
blasting are not involved in the
project. Construction activities in
general like operation of heavy
equipment, excavation for casting
piles, braking up of road surface,
may creates noise & vibration

Impacts due to improper mining for


construction materials
Description. Large quantities of
construction material like sand,
gravel and aggregate will be required
for construction work. Yamuna
Nagar in Haryana about 200 km
away is a known source for stone
aggregates, Ghaghar, 180 km away
and Haridwar, 160 km away are
sources for sand and Noida, 30 km
away for gravel.

Sig Dur Mitigation measures


L
T
Consultation with the local community to inform them
of the nature, duration and likely effects of the
construction work, and the mitigation measures in
place
Do not conduct noise generating activities in the night
Employ manual methods, where required
Proper planning of work programme so that any
particularly noisy activities can be scheduled to avoid
sensitive times;
Utilize modern vehicles and machinery with the
requisite adaptations to limit noise and exhaust
emissions, and ensuring that these are maintained to
manufacturers specifications at all times.
L
P
Ensure that construction materials (sand, aggregate and
gravel) are obtained from quarries licensed by Geology
and Mining Departments of respective state
governments (Haryana/ Uttar Pradesh /Uttarakhand)

Responsibility
CC

Location
Flyover Site

Cost
Part of
standard
contract

CC

NA

Part of
standard
contract

38

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)


Potential Negative Impacts
Shops and other business may loose
income if costumers access is
impeded
Description. There are no major
commercial areas along the roads
except few road side vendors. The
disturbance however will be minimal
as the road will not be closed
completely and the traffic is allowed
on service roads.
Excavation could damage existing
infrastructure/utilities
Description. There are various
utilities (electric poles, transformers
and manholes) within the ROW,
which needs to be relocated. No
major impact envisaged as these
utilities will be relocated suitably
before the start of work. However, it
needs to be confirmed during
construction about the underground
utilities.

Sig Dur Mitigation measures


L
T
Inform the public in general and business
establishments in particular about the work in advance
Maintain service roads and pedestrian walks in good
condition
Control dust generation

Confirm location of underground


infrastructure/utilities before start of work
Provide prior public information about the likely
disruption of services
Ensure that alternate arrangements are provided during
the relocation

Responsibility
CC

Location
Flyover site

Cost
Part of
standard
contract

CC and
respective
agency (BSNL,
UJS, GNN)

Flyover site

Part of
standard
contract

39

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)


Potential Negative Impacts
Hindrance to traffic due to
construction work
Description. As this is a major
transport corridor carrying
considerable traffic, the construction
work will create large scale
disturbance

Increase in traffic due to trucks


carrying construction material and
heavy equipment
Workers and public at risk from
accidents on site
Description. Deep excavations,
operating heavy-duty construction
equipment

Sig Dur Mitigation measures


M
T
Maintain the service roads in good condition to allow
smooth traffic movement; provide necessary personnel
to guide and control the traffic
Provide alternative traffic arrangement/detours so that
traffic can be distributed and move on different roads
and ensure that public is informed about such traffic
diversions
Barricade the site properly; avoid accidental entry of
traffic (pedestrian / vehicular) into site.
Provide information to the public through media
daily news papers and local cable television (TV)
services, about the need and schedule of work, and
alternative routes
At the work site, public information/caution boards
shall be provided - information shall inter-alia include:
project name, cost and schedule; executing agency and
contractor details; nature and schedule of work; traffic
diversion details, if any; entry restriction information;
competent officials name and contact information for
public complaints.
L
T
Plan routes to avoid narrow streets, congested roads,
and places of religious importance
Plan work to avoid peak traffic hours
M

Follow standard and safe construction practices


Exclude the public from the site enclose/barricade
the construction area, provide warning boards/ sign
boards and post security guards throughout the day and
night
Ensure that all workers are provided with and use
appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (helmet,
hand gloves, boots, masks, safety hoists when working

Responsibility
CC

Location
Flyover site

Cost
Part of
standard
contract

CC

NA

Part of
standard
contract

CC

Flyover Site

Part of
standard
contract

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)


Potential Negative Impacts

Economic benefits for people


employed in workforce

Sig Dur Mitigation measures


at height, etc);
Barricade the entire area that may come under
influence in case of accidents this may particularly
be critical during fixing of pre-cast girders using heavy
duty cranes; this may be conducted during lean traffic
periods and if required traffic may also be stopped
Follow standard practices of safety checks as
prescribed before use of equipments such as cranes,
hoists, etc.
Employ an Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS)
Expert on site;
Provide on -site Health and Safety Training for all site
personnel;
Report accidents to the authorities promptly, and
maintain records
L
T
Ensure that most of the unskilled workforce is from
local communities

Responsibility

Location

Cost

CC

All sites

NA

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

Table 7-2: Environmental Monitoring Plan


Mitigation measures

Pre-Construction
Implement measures as recommended by RP

Obtain necessary approvals for tree cutting


Plant and maintain three tree for each tree felled
Confirm location of underground infrastructure
Inform public about the likely disruption of services
Ensure alternate arrangements during the relocation

Construction
Utilize surplus soil for beneficial purposes

Damp down soil to arrest dust


Use tarpaulins to cover soil in transport
Do not divert/dispose silt laden water into drains
Provide temporary ponds in the site
Ensure that no water accumulated due to disposal
Divert existing drains in the work area (ROW)
Construct temporary drains if required
Complete construction of new drain early
Inform local community about the work
Identify old and sensitive buildings and safe practices
Do not conduct noise generating activities in the night
Employ manual methods, where required
Avoid noisy or invasive activities in sensitive times;

Responsible
for
Mitigation

Monitoring
Method &
Parameters

Monitoring
Frequency

Responsible for
monitoring

Cost

GDA

Records review;
interview with APs
Records review; on
site-observation

As needed

ESMC

As needed

GDA

Part of project
management cost
Part of construction
supervision cost

CC
CC &
respective
agency
(BSNL, UJS,
GNN)

Observations on- site; CC records;


consult respective
agencies; informal
public interviews

Weekly

GDA

Part of construction
supervision cost

CC

Observations onsite/off-site; CC
records

Weekly

GDA

Part of construction
supervision cost

42

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)


Mitigation measures

Responsible
for
Mitigation

Monitoring
Method &
Parameters

Monitoring
Frequency

Responsible for
monitoring

Cost

Weekly

GDA

Part of construction
supervision cost

Utilize modern machinery and in good condition


Obtained construction material from licensed quarries
Inform public and business about the work in advance
Maintain service roads/pedestrian walks in good condition
Provide necessary personnel to guide & control traffic
Provide bypasses/ traffic detours & inform public
Barricade the site properly; avoid accidental entry
Provide information to the public through media
Provide public information/caution boards at site
Avoid congested/sensitive roads for material transport
Avoid peak traffic hours

CC

Observations on- site; CC records;


informal public
interviews

Follow standard and safe construction practices


Exclude the public from the site and post security guards
Provide Personal Protective Equipment to workers
Barricade the entire area that may come under influence
in case of accidents
Follow standard safety checks as prescribed for
equipment
Employ EHS Expert on site
Provide on-site Health and Safety Training for personnel
Report accidents and maintain records
Engage unskilled workforce from local communities

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

8.

PUBLIC CONSULTATION AND INFORMATION DISCLOSURE

A.

Project Stakeholders

104.

Most of the main stakeholders have already been identified and consulted during
preparation of this IEE, and any others that are identified during project implementation
will be brought into the process in the future. Primary stakeholders are:

People near the flyover site at Mohan Nagar Junction in Ghaziabad;


Public representatives and prominent citizens;
Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam;
Ghaziabad Development Authority

105.

Secondary stakeholders are:


Other concerned government institutions (utilities, regulators, etc)
NGOs and CBOs working in the local area;
Other community representatives (prominent citizens, religious leaders, elders,
womens groups);
The beneficiary community in general
NCRPB as the Funding Agency

B.

Consultation and Disclosure

106.

A series of public consultation meetings were conducted during project preparation.


Various forms of public consultations (consultation through household surveys, ad hoc
discussions on site) have been used to discuss the project and involve the community in
planning the project and mitigation measures.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

9.

RECOMMENDATION AND CONCLUSION

A.

Recommendation

107.

The process described in this document has assessed the environmental impacts of the
proposed flyover sub-project in Ghaziabad. Potential negative impacts were identified in
relation to design, location, construction and operation of the proposed flyover. Mitigation
measures have been developed to reduce all negative impacts to acceptable levels. These
were discussed with specialists responsible for the engineering aspects, and measures have
been included in the designs for the infrastructure. This means that the number of impacts
and their significance has already been reduced by amending the design. These include:

108.

Regardless of these and various other actions taken during the IEE process and in
developing the project, there will still be impacts on the environment when the
infrastructure is built. This is mainly because clearance of encroachments on ROW;
because of the large-scale construction located in a busy urban area. Because of these
factors there are impacts on the physical, social and human environment. Following are
some of the important mitigation measures suggested:

109.

Construction of flyover within the ROW of existing road to avoid the need to
acquire land or relocate people
Design of flyover as per seismic zone to eliminate risk
Utilizing excavated soil for construction of earthen ramps of the flyover to avoid
the need to disposal of surplus soil and as well as creating new borrow areas for
filling up soil
Design of drainage system considering the change in topography
Compensatory tree plantation 3 trees for each tree felled
Avoiding complete closure of road by limiting the construction area to actual
flyover site and allowing the traffic on service roads

Implementation of compensatory measures for clearance of encroachments as


recommended by the Resettlement Plan prepared in compliance with NCRPB
policies
Condition that the all compensatory/resettlement measures must be implemented
before the signing of contract for civil works

During the construction phase, impacts mainly arise from generation of dust from soil
excavation and refilling; and from the disturbance of residents, businesses, traffic and
important buildings by the construction work. These are common impacts of construction
in urban areas, and there are well developed methods for their mitigation. Among these,
public and worker safety due to large scale construction using heavy-duty construction
equipment, traffic disturbance during construction is considered to be significant.
Important measures suggested include:

45

WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

Dust control measures such as water sprinkling and covering the loose material
during transport
Proper planning and scheduling of noise generating activities
Maintaining service roads and pedestrian walks in good condition and provision of
personnel to guide traffic
Providing alternative traffic routes/detours and informing public about the same
Providing public information boards at site (project details, traffic arrangements,
executing agency and contractor details; safety and contact information)
Following standard and safe construction practices (barricading the site properly;
avoiding accidental traffic entry including pedestrians; deployment of safety and
security staff; providing warning/sign boards; provision of protection equipment;
special precautions during risky works like arranging the pre-cast elements and
equipment safety checks, etc)

110.

Once the construction is over, the flyover will function without any major maintenance so
no major impacts envisaged.

111.

The main beneficiaries of the flyover project will be will be the citizens of Ghaziabad and
road users in general.

112.

Mitigation will be assured by a program of environmental monitoring conducted to ensure


that all measures are provided as intended, and to determine whether the environment is
protected as envisaged. This will include observations on and off site, document checks,
and interviews with workers and beneficiaries, and any requirements for remedial action
will be reported to the NCRPB.

113.

Stakeholders were involved in developing the IEE through both face-to-face discussions
on site and a large public meeting will be held in the town, after which views expressed
will be incorporated into the IEE and the planning and development of the project.

114.

There are two essential recommendations that need to be followed to ensure that the
environmental impacts of the project are successfully mitigated. The IA shall ensure that:

All mitigation, compensation and enhancement measures proposed in this IEE


report and in the Resettlement Plan (RP) of the subproject are implemented in full,
as described in these two documents;
The Environmental Monitoring Plan proposed in this report and the internal and
external monitoring proposed in the Resettlement Plan are also implemented in
full.

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WSA_NCRPB_FR FOGZB_Vol V-A6 (15 Jul 10)

B.

Conclusion

115.

The environmental impacts of the proposed flyover subproject in Ghaziabad have been
assessed by the Initial Environmental Examination reported in this document, conducted
according to the NCRPB ESMS. Issues related to Involuntary Resettlement were assessed
by a parallel process of resettlement planning and will be compensated by measures set out
in detail in the Resettlement Framework for the subproject.

116.

The overall conclusion of both processes is that providing the mitigation, compensation
and enhancement measures are implemented in full, there should be no significant
negative environmental impacts as a result of location, design, construction or operation of
the subproject.

117.

There are no uncertainties in the analysis, and no additional work is required to comply
with NCRPB procedure or national law. There is thus no need for further study or
Environmental Assessment.

47

www.WilburSmith.com

#8, Second Floor, 80 Feet Road,


RT Nagar Bangalore Karnataka - 560 032. India
w +91.80. 3918.7500 f +91.80. 2363.4097

NCR Planning Board


Asian Development Bank

Capacity Development of the National


Capital Region Planning Board
(NCRPB) Component B
(TA No. 7055-IND)

FINAL REPORT
Volume V-A7: DPR for Flyover at Mohan Nagar Junction in
Ghaziabad
Short Resettlment Plan
July 2010

Abbreviations
ADB
AF
AP
BPL
BSR
CPR
DPR
EA
FGD
GoI
GRC
GDA
GNN
HH
HOH
INR
IP
IO
IA
IPSA
LA
LTH
NCRPB
NGO
NPRR
PMU
PRA
R&R
ROW
RO
RP
SC
ST
TORs
WHH

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

Asian Development Bank


Affected Family
Affected Person
Below Poverty Line
Basic Schedule of Rates
Common Property Resource
Detailed Project Report
Executing Agency
Focus Group Discussions
Government of India
Grievance Redressal Committee
Ghaziabad Development Authority
Ghaziabad Nagar Nigam
Household
Head of Household
Indian National Rupee
Indigenous Peoples
Implementing Organisations
Implementing Agency
Initial Poverty & Social Assessment
Land Acquisition
Legal Title Holder
National Capital Region Planning Board
Non-Government Organizations
National Policy on Resettlement & Rehabilitation
Project Management Unit
Participatory Rural Appraisal
Resettlement & Rehabilitation
Right of Way
Resettlement Officer
Resettlement Plan
Schedule Caste
Schedule Tribe
Terms of Reference
Women Headed Household

Contents
1.

SHORT RESETTLEMENT PLAN ............................................................................................................ 1


A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
K.
L.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT ................................................................................................................... 1


OBJECTIVES OF SHORT RESETTLEMENT PLAN ............................................................................................ 3
SCOPE OF LAND ACQUISITION & RESETTLEMENT ...................................................................................... 3
SOCIOECONOMIC INFORMATION AND PROFILE ........................................................................................... 5
IMPACT ON COMMUNITY RESOURCES ........................................................................................................ 9
GENDER IMPACTS AND MITIGATION MEASURES ........................................................................................ 9
INFORMATION DISCLOSURE, AND CONSULTATION ................................................................................... 10
RESETTLEMENT PRINCIPLES AND POLICY FRAMEWORK........................................................................... 11
GRIEVANCE REDRESS MECHANISM .......................................................................................................... 14
INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS, AND IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE ..................................................... 14
RESETTLEMENT BUDGET.......................................................................................................................... 16
TRAINING, MONITORING & EVALUATION ................................................................................................ 17

List of Tables
Table 1-1: Status of Census & Socio-economic Survey ........................................................................ 4
Table 1-2: Size of Squatter and Encroacher Structures.......................................................................... 6
Table 1-3: Affected Assets in the Subproject ......................................................................................... 6
Table 1-4: Summary Profile of the Affected Households ...................................................................... 6
Table 1-5: Social Stratification Details of APs ...................................................................................... 7
Table 1-6: Educational Structure (Age more than 6) ............................................................................. 8
Table 1-7: Occupation Structure (Age more than 18 yrs.) ..................................................................... 8
Table 1-8: Annual Income Pattern of Affected Households .................................................................. 8
Table 1-9: Household Asset Holding pattern ......................................................................................... 9
Table 1-10: Impact on Community Structure......................................................................................... 9
Table 1-11: Entitlement Matrix ............................................................................................................ 13
Table 1-12: Tentative Implementation Schedule ................................................................................. 15
Table 1-13: Tentative Budget ............................................................................................................... 16

List of Figures
Figure 1: Proposed fly over near Patel Chowk (Mohan Nagar) ............................................................ 1
Figure 2: Partial Encroachment in RoW by Shops ................................................................................ 4

List of Appendices
Appendix 1: Longitudinal Strip Plans of Flyover Stretch
Appendix 2: List of Affected Persons
Appendix 3: Stakeholders Participatory Consultation Abstracts
Appendix 4: Public Consultation and Disclosure Plan
Appendix 5: Terms of Reference for RP Implementing Agency / NGO
Appendix 6: TOR for Independent External Monitor for Monitoring & Evaluation of RP
implementation
Appendix 7: Census and SES Questionnaire Format
Appendix 8: Involuntary Resettlement Categorization Form
Appendix 9: Summary Poverty Reduction and Social Strategy

ii

Glossary
Affected Person (or
Household)

People (households) affected by project-related changes in use of land, water,


forest, grazing land, or other natural resources

Compensation

Payment in cash or kind to which the people affected are entitled in order to
replace the lost asset, resource or income

Entitlement

Range of measures comprising compensation, income restoration, transfer


assistance, income substitution, and relocation which are due to the affected
persons, depending on the nature of their losses, to restore their economic and
social base to pre-project situation

Grievance Redress
Committee

The committee formed to resolve grievances of the project affected


persons/families/communities.

Involuntary
Resettlement

Development project results in unavoidable resettlement losses that people


affected have no option but to rebuild their lives, incomes, and asset bases
elsewhere.

Land Acquisition

It is the process whereby land and properties of individuals/community are


acquired for the purpose of project construction

Relocation

Rebuilding housing, assets, including productive land, and public


infrastructure in another location

Rehabilitation

Re-establishing incomes, livelihoods, living and social system

Replacement rate

Cost of replacing lost assets and incomes, including cost of transactions

Resettlement effects

Loss of physical and non-physical assets, including homes, communities,


productive land, income-earning assets and sources, subsistence, resources,
cultural sites, social structures, networks and ties, cultural identity and mutual
help mechanisms

Resettlement Plan

A time-bound action plan with budget setting out resettlement strategy,


objectives, entitlement, actions, responsibilities, monitoring and evaluation

Vulnerable groups

Distinct groups of people who might suffer disproportionately from


resettlement effects.
In the context of involuntary resettlement, displaced persons are those who are
physically displaced (relocation ,loss of residential land, or loss of shelter)
and/or economically displaced (loss of land, assets, access to assets, income
sources, or means of livelihoods) as a result of (i) involuntary acquisition of
land, or (ii) involuntary restrictions on land use or on access to legally
designated parks and protected areas
Loss of land, assets, access to assets, income sources, or means of livelihoods
as a result of (i) involuntary acquisition of land, or (ii) involuntary restrictions
on land use or on access to legally designated parks and protected areas.

Displaced Persons*

Economic
Displacement*

Source: 1.ADBs Handbook on Resettlement: A Guide to Good Practice, 1998


2.*Safeguard Policy Statement, June 2009, ADB

iii

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1.

Description of Project. The intersection on NH 24 is one of the critical locations that carry
a high volume of traffic. The speed survey conducted on this stretch of the highway also
indicated a peak hour average speed of 19 kmph. The study has mandated a flyover to be
built at this junction (NH24/Madan Mohan Malviya/Loni Road) by 2015. The objective of
subproject is to construct a fly over from Km 0.00 (Shadra/Delhi side) to Km 2.213
(Ghaziabad side). The improvement of this grade separator through proposed fly over is
one of the proposed sub-projects. The width of the flyover at the junction will be 17 m in
each side, including the crash barriers. The width required on ground at the beginning and
end of the ramps is about 35 m.

2.

Objectives of Short Resettlement Plan. In keeping with ADBs Policy on Involuntary


Resettlement, a Short Resettlement Plan (SRP) has been prepared for the subproject. The
survey and assessment undertaken during preparation of the subproject indicates that the
subproject will entail some degree of resettlement impact and this SRP has been prepared
in accordance with ADBs Policy on Involuntary Resettlement to address those impacts.
This short RP identifies the broad scope of the subproject and outlines the policy,
procedures for compensation and other assistance measures for affected persons and
institutional requirements for implementation, budget etc. of RP under NCRPB project.

3.

Scope of Land Acquisition & Resettlement. A census and socio-economic survey was
undertaken in the chainage between Km. Km 0.00(Shadra/Delhi side) to Km
2.213(Ghaziabad side). An estimated 57APs will be affected and there are 5 Common
Property Resource (CPR) will be affected by the subproject. Of the total 57 APs 19
households/APs are commercial squatters squatting upon the ROW. They run their small
business like tea stall, vehicle repairing shop etc and earn their livelihood. During
consultations, the squatter APs expressed their willingness to shift their business to make
the ROW encumbrance free as required by the sub project. Rest of the 38 APs are located
in shopping complex which has been encroached the RoW partially. As per the design, the
required width of the ramp of the flyover is 35 m, however, the available RoW is 37 mts.
Beyond 35mts to 37 mts the RoW is being encroached by permanent commercial
buildings. Through consultation it was learnt that most of the business activities are
highway related like vehicle repairing shop, tyre retreading shop, etc. They suggested that
a vendor market near the highway needs to be provided to them to mitigate their economic
displacement and livelihood loss.

4.

They run their small business like tea stall, vehicle repairing shop, etc and earn their
livelihood. During consultations, the APs expressed their willingness to shift their business
to make the ROW encumbrance free as required by the sub project. All the 57
structures/shops are commercial in nature and small business activities were observed
within the structures. Relocation assistance and income loss assistance has been
considered for the squatters. Since, all the small business have been considered as
productive and support livelihood, assistance for loss of income has also been considered
in the entitlement matrix prepared for the subproject. The identified project affected
1

shops/structures are falling in to three categories: 1) Temporary; 2) Semi-permanent


and;3) permanent. No private land acquisition is envisaged for this sub project.
5.

Socioeconomic Information and Profile. The socio-economic survey was carried out for 19
squatter and 38 encroacher shop owner/APs respectively . The number of total affected
population as derived from the 57 surveyed households is 317, thereby making the average
family size as 5.56. The Resettlement Framework prepared for NCRPB classifies several
groups of population as socially vulnerable and has provided special assistance for them.
The Vulnerable groups are: (a) those who are below the poverty line (BPL); (b) those who
belong to scheduled castes (SC), scheduled tribes (ST); (c) female-headed households
(FHH); (d) elderly and (e) disabled persons. There are twelve vulnerable persons among
the affected households have been found from the census and socio economic survey.
There are twelve vulnerable households, and all of them belong to Schedule Caste
(SC).Main occupation of the surveyed households is small trade & business. The average
household income is Rs. 182,696. There are five common property resources located with
in the ROW. These common property resources need relocation by the project authority
before the civil work construction begun.

6.

Information Disclosure and Consultation. The social team carried out preliminary
consultations, through Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and meetings with the APs as
well as the general public. FGDs were conducted primarily in the area with problems of
traffic congestion, dense informal squatter settlements, road junctions ,major junctions,
cycle traffic, common property resources like religious structure, cycle traffic, accident
hotspots and effect on seasonal traffic, weekly market places, seasonal whole sale market
etc. FGDs were also conducted with the APs wherein policy related issues, i.e.,
displacements and other issues like compensation and assistance, input to alternative
design were discussed. The short RP will be translated in Hindi language and will be made
available to the affected people by the Executing Agency (EA) for review and comments
on the policy and mitigation measures, particularly the compensation package, by means
of subproject-level Disclosure workshops prior to loan negotiation. Copies of the short RP
will also be made available at the local level public offices such as revenue offices, to the
stakeholders for local inputs prior to award of civil work contract. The proceedings of the
disclosure workshop and the feedback received will be sent to ADB for review. The final
RP will also be disclosed on the ADB Website and NCRPB website.

7.

Gender Impacts and Mitigation Measures. The proposed fly over under this sub project is
expected to open up new economic opportunities for women to upgrade their skills and
also better accessibility to educational and health facilities. The improved road was
perceived to help reduce travel time, as an immediate benefit. Women as a segregated
class are not involved in any economic activity, which demands attention for their special
needs. To ensure that women are secure in receiving payments all benefits will be
provided in joint account where the woman will be the first beneficiary accounts. Where
ever title is provided, it should be provided with joint title with women as the first
beneficiary.

8.

Resettlement Principles and Policy Framework. The resettlement principles adopted for
NCRPB and this subproject recognize the State Land Acquisition (LA) Act 1894 and the
entitlement benefits as listed in the National Policy on R&R,2007 (Government of India)
2

and the relevant Asian Development Banks (ADB) policies and operations manuals, in
particular the policy on Involuntary Resettlement (Safe Guard Requirements 2009), and
Operations Manual F2 on Involuntary Resettlement (2006) and Hand Book of
Resettlement-A Guide to Good Practices, 1998. Compensation and resettlement assistance
for various types of loss have been determined following the provision made in the
resettlement framework of NCRPB. As the census survey was carried out between 15 - 21
June, 2010 this may be considered as Cut-off date for the Non-titleholder APs (Squatters
and encroachers). The entitlement matrix has been prepared in accordance with the
Resettlement Framework of the NCRPB, for the people and the community affected by the
project and provisions will be kept in the budget for those who were not present at the time
of census survey, after verifying their claim for legal ownership. However, people moving
in the project area after the cut-off date will not be entitled to any assistance. In general,
the people affected by the Sub-Project will be entitled to the following types of
compensation and assistance -(i) Compensation for loss of structure at replacement
cost,(ii) Transfer grant for temporary shift of residence,(iii) Rental Assistance for 3 months
and (iv) assistance for vulnerability. Since the potiential impact is on commercial
structures, chances of loss of income or potential impact on the livelihood of any of the
APs is prominent; and the resettlement assistance for this purposes has been proposed
accordingly. All 38 encroachers need to rehabilitated in a vendor market to be developed
by the project authority. The vendor market needs to be located adjacent to the same
highway. Adequate care needs to be taken while selecting the land. A detailed livelihood
support plan and relocation of the encroachers in vendor market needs to be prepared by
the project authority and subsequently to be approved by the authority before sanctioning
of the loan by ADB. NCRPB/EA and IA will use the RP as a planning tool, verify and
update the inventory prior to implementation of the project, and provide ID cards to the
entitled affected persons for compensation and resettlement purposes. The principles
applicable in defining the entitlements and compensation packages for the affected
households shall remain unchanged.
9.

Grievance Redress Mechanism.A Grievance Redressal Committee (GRC) will be


established in Ghaziabad for timely and satisfactory completion of RP related activities
and other requirements of the Resettlement Plan (RP) to facilitate satisfactory
implementation of all ADB funded projects. The primary objective of creating GRC is to
provide a mechanism in order to address and sort out all disputes related to
implementation of resettlement plan, most importantly, to mediate conflict and disputes
concerning compensation payments and cut down on lengthy litigation.

10.

Institutional Arrangements and Implementation Schedule. National Capital Planning


Board (NCRPB) will be the Executing Agency (EA) for the Project. Ghaziabad
Development Authority (GDA) would act as implementing agency(IA). A separate
independent unit in IAs office will constitute for the purpose of over all coordination and
management of the project and it will be called as The Project Management Unit (PMU)
will also implement the RP with assistance of Design & Supervision Consultants (DSC) &
an experienced NGO/agency/institution, acting as Implementing Organisation (IO) who
will shoulder the primary responsibility of the RP implementation. The PMU would
ensure monitoring any changes to subproject design which may require re-evaluation of
the need for and adequacy of the RP. If necessary, RP will be updated keeping changed
design in view while entitlement principle remaining unchanged. The PMU will ensure

resettlement budgets are delivered on time for timely RP implementation, prior to


commencement of construction work. The total time period for completion of the RP
implementation has been proposed as 12 months.
11.

Resettlement Budget. The total estimated budget for implementation of Resettlement Plan
(RP) including payment of compensation and assistance to the entitled AP, preparation of
identity card, cost of resettlement operation and management for the Project through
Implementing Agency and engaging Independent Monitor is INR Rs 5.80 Million.

1.

SHORT RESETTLEMENT PLAN

A.

Description of the Project

12.

On Government of Indias request, Asian Development Bank (ADB) has formulated the
technical assistance (TA) to enhance the capacities of National Capital Region Planning
Board and its associated implementing agencies. The TA has been designed in three
components: Component A relates to improving the business processes in NCRPB;
Component B relates to improving the capacity of the implementing agencies in project
identification, feasibility studies and preparing detailed engineering design; and
Component C relates to urban planning and other activities. As part of the Component B,
several DPRs of different subprojects have been prepared for NCR towns. As part of
traffic and transportation improvement Plan of Ghaziabad city, four sub projects have been
selected for the preparation of DPR. From the junction volume counts analysis and from
its projections it is observed that some junctions have got saturated and some are about to
get saturated in near future. With reference to IRC regarding the capacity of junctions 12
Junctions are recommended to have Grade separator in the horizon years. This report is
the Resettlement Plan of one of the sub project: - Grade Separator at Patel Chowk
(Mohan nagar). The improvement of this grade separator through proposed fly over is one
of the proposed sub-projects under ADB TA No.7055.

Figure 1: Proposed fly over near Patel Chowk (Mohan Nagar)

13.

The objective of subproject is to construct a fly over from Km 0.00(Shadra/Delhi side) to


Km 2.213(Ghaziabad side). The width of the flyover at the junction will be 17 m in each
side, including the crash barriers. The width required on ground at the beginning and end
of the ramps is about 35 meters. In keeping with ADBs Policy on Involuntary
Resettlement, this Short Resettlement Plan (SRP) has been prepared for the subproject.
1

The strip plan of the sub project has been placed in Appendix 1.It can be seen from
Figure 1 and the strip plan that there is a major intersection with major traffic from Delhi
and Haryana Sub-region and Punjab is passing through. The corridors approaching this
intersection is a busy corridor carrying a high volume of traffic. The intersection on NH 24
is one of the critical locations that carry a high volume of traffic. The speed survey
conducted on this stretch of the highway also indicated a peak hour average speed of 19
kmph. The study has mandated a flyover to be built at this junction (NH24/Madan Mohan
Malviya/Loni Road) by 2015.
14.

The project is expected to bring quite a few benefits, viz,

Result in lower transport costs for freight and passengers of motorised and nonmotorised vehicles;
Improved road transport corridors ;
Road network connectivity;
Improved management of road sector institutions, and
Basic amenities to the town along the proposed highways

Project benefits in terms of economic analysis also include:


Savings in vehicle operating costs; and
Time savings for passengers and goods in transit.
15.

The project is also expected to help alleviate development constraints in trade and
commerce, education, health, social welfare, and public safety and contribute to general
expansion and diversification of development activities.

16.

As per the requirement of Asian Development Bank Safe guard policy, 2009 require social
impact assessment during the design stage to avoid, reduce or mitigate potential negative
impacts of project action and enhance positive impacts, sustainability and development
benefits has been carried out. The assessments also contribute to engineering design and
result in the preparation of social action plans governing project implementation and the
resettlement and rehabilitation of those who may be displaced by road improvements.

17.

The survey and assessment undertaken during preparation of the subproject indicates that
the subproject will entail some degree of resettlement impact and this SRP has been
prepared in accordance with ADBs Policy on Involuntary Resettlement to address those
impacts. This short RP identifies the broad scope of the subproject and outlines the policy,
procedures for compensation and other assistance measures for affected persons and
institutional requirements for implementation, budget etc. of RP under NCRPB project.

B.

Objectives of Short Resettlement Plan

18.

This Short Resettlement Plan (SRP) has been prepared to mitigate land acquisition and
resettlement impact considering outcome of the preliminary engineering and technical
design and topographic survey. Social screening was undertaken in conjunction with
project feasibility studies. It provides important inputs and guidance to engineering
designs.

19.

The RP has been prepared based on census and socio-economic survey that was carried
out register and document the status of the potentially affected population within the
project impact area, their loss of assets, and sources of livelihood. The Census data
provided the basis for establishing a cut-off date for non-title holders in order to determine
who may be entitled to relocation assistance or other benefits from the project.

20.

Socio-economic survey has also been carried out in order to establish the mitigation
measures and that includes comprehensive examination of peoples loss of assets,
incomes, important cultural or religious networks or sites, and other sources of support
such as common property resources. Analyses of survey results cover the needs and
resources of different groups and individuals.

21.

Preparation of the Resettlement Plan (RP) was undertaken within the projects social
assessment component. A key prerequisite of the RP is a policy framework for
resettlement containing categories of impacts and their corresponding entitlements. The
RP provide detailed guidance on how to implement provisions in the policy framework,
including institutional arrangements and budgets based on enumeration of project-affected
people with entitlements under the framework.

C.

Scope of Land Acquisition & Resettlement

22.

Despite all the efforts taken for modifying the design of the project roads, a section of the
communities along the corridor are going to be negatively impacted, mainly due to
clearing of encroachment and squatters from the public ROW. The Row has also been
encroached partially in some places by commercial structure. Negative impacts include
loss of economic opportunities/livelihood, sources of earning, etc. Moreover, a significant
number of community/cultural properties are also going to be negatively impacted.

23.

A census and socio-economic survey was undertaken in the chainage between Km 0.00
(Shadra/Delhi side) to Km 2.213 (Ghaziabad side). An estimated 57 APs will be affected
and there are 5 Common Property Resource (CPR) will be affected by the subproject. Of
the total 57 APs 19 households/APs are commercial squatters squatting upon the ROW.
They run their small business like tea stall, vehicle repairing shop etc and earn their
livelihood. During consultations, the APs expressed their willingness to shift their business
to make the ROW encumbrance free as required by the sub project. Rest of the 38 APs are
located in shopping complex which has been encroached the RoW partially. As per the
design, the required width of the ramp of the flyover is 35 mts, however, the available
RoW is 37 mts. Beyond 35mts to 37 mts the RoW is being encroached by permanent
3

commercial buildings. It can be seen from the photographs in fig 2 that proposed fly over
construction will impact upon the commercial business. Through consultation it was learnt
that most of the business activities are highway related like vehicle repairing shop, tyre
retreading shop, etc. They suggested that a vendor market near the highway needs to be
provided to them to mitigate their economic displacement and livelihood loss. No private
land acquisition is envisaged for this sub project.
Figure 2: Partial Encroachment in RoW by Shops

24.

The socio-economic survey was carried out on 19 shops of the commercial squatters and
38 shops of the encroachers on ROW. The number of total affected population as derived
from the 57 surveyed shop owners is 317, thereby making the average family size as 5.56.
A list of Affected House holds/families is annexed as Appendix 2.

Table 1-1: Status of Census & Socio-economic Survey


S. No
Details
1.
Total Affected APs/Household
2.
Common Property Resource (CPR)
3.
Total household / Shops surveyed
4.
Household / Shops responded
5.
Total Affected Population (As per Survey of 57 Shops)

No.
57
05
57
57
317

Source: Census & Socio-economic Survey, June 2010

D.

Socioeconomic Information and Profile

25.

All the 17 squatter structures/shops are commercial in nature and small business activities
were observed within the structures. 38 encroachers in commercial building are found to
be carrying out any productive occupation in the ROW.All 57 APs/DPs will be
economically displaced. Relocation assistance and income loss assistance has been
considered for the squatters. Since, all the small business have been considered as
productive and support livelihood, assistance for loss of income has also been considered
in the entitlement matrix prepared for the subproject. All 38 encroachers needs to
rehabilated in a vendor market to be developed by the project authority. The vendor
market needs to be located adjacent to the same highway. Adequate care needs to be taken
while selecting the land. A detailed livelihood support plan and relocation of the
encroachers in vendor market needs to be prepared by the project authority. Table 1-3
provides a summary of affected households and type of loss.

26.

The identified project affected shops/structures of squatters and encroachers are falling in
to three categories: 1) Temporary; 2) Semi-permanent and 3) permanent. The material
specifications were also collected and accordingly the structures are classified.

27.

Following types of structural combinations were found:

Temporary
o wooden walls
o roof
o floor
o wooden walls
o corrugated sheet/tile roof
o thatched wall
o floor mud
o tiled roof
o mud wall and floor
o thatched roof
Semi-Permanento brick wall
o concrete floor roof
o stone masonry wall
o floor stone/concrete
o asbestos/tiles roof
Permanent
o brick wall
o concrete floor roof
o floor concrete
o RCC Structure
5

28.

For the squatters, most of the structures are of temporary and semi-permanent natures. The
structures of the encroachers are RCC concrete. The materials of most of the squatter
structures seemed easily transferable to other locations. Most of these are small and used
for commercial purposes.

Table 1-2: Size of Squatter and Encroacher Structures


Description
Squatter Structure
Wooden cabins
Thatched structures
Semi permanent structures
Encroacher Structures
RCC Concrete/Permanent Structure
Table 1-3: Affected Assets in the Subproject
Type of Loss
Location on ROW

Semi Permanent

Permanent
Structure

4 sq. m.
5 sq. m.
8 sq. m.
12 sq. m.

RHS
LHS
Total
RHS
LHS
Total
RHS

06
00
06
08
03
11
28

Details Affected Assets


Loss of Area of the structure(Sq. M)
10.00
00.00
10.00
11.75
04.50
16.25
336

LHS
Total

0
28

0
336

(No.)
Temporary

Approx. Floor Area

Note: R.H.S. (from Shahadra towards Ghaziabad)


L.H.S. (from Shahadra towards Ghaziabad)
Source: Census & Socio-economic survey, June 2010
29.

A detailed socio-economic survey was carried out during the census operation in June
2010. Table 1-1 shows briefly the status of census and socio-economic survey. Table 1-4
provides a brief socio-economic profile of the affected persons.

Table 1-4: Summary Profile of the Affected Households


Characteristics
Total APs Surveyed
Total Affected Population
Average Family Size of Affected HH
Total No. of Scheduled Caste HH
Total No. of Woman Headed Households
Total No. of Below Poverty Line Households
Main Occupation of the Affected Persons
Average Annual Household /Shop Income

Units
57
317
5.56
12
00
00
Small Trade & Business (Shops)
Rs. 1,82,696

Source: Census & Socio-economic survey, June 2010


6

30.

The Resettlement Framework prepared for NCRPB classifies several groups of population
as socially vulnerable and has provided special assistance for them. The Vulnerable
groups are: (a) those who are below the poverty line (BPL); (b) those who belong to
scheduled castes (SC), scheduled tribes (ST); (c) female-headed households (FHH); (d)
elderly and (e) disabled persons. There are five vulnerable persons among the affected
households have been found from the census and socio economic survey. There are twelve
vulnerable households, and all of them belong to Schedule Caste (SC). Main occupation of
the surveyed households is small trade & business. The average household income is Rs.
182,696.

31.

Based on the data of the 57 surveyed households, social stratification of the affected
households can be ascertained (Table 1-5). Of the total APs, 91 and 9 percent are belongs
to Hindu and Muslim communities. The majority of the APs, 42 in number, are of joint
family type while 15 are nuclear families. The predominant family size is large with
more than 5 persons, accounting for 50 %. The average family size is 5.56, as stated
earlier.

Table 1-5: Social Stratification Details of APs


S. No
Criteria
Classification
1.
Community
Hindu
Muslim
SC
2.
Family Type
Joint
Nuclear
3.
Family Size
Upto 3
4-5
More than 5

No. of AFs
52
05
12
42
15
10
18
29

Source: Census & Socio-economic Survey, June 2010


32.

Literacy status among the affected families is not much encouraging as per information
collected during census and socio economic survey (Table 1-6). The APs, comprising
about 22 %, are having the education level upto primary, which may be fallout of disquiet
economic situation of the APs. Nearly 34 % achieved the education level upto middle.
Nearly 29 % achieved the education level upto secondary.

Table 1-6: Educational Structure (Age more than 6)


S. No
Occupation
1.
Illiterate
2.
Informally Literate
3.
Primary (Class IV)
4.
Middle (Class VIII)
5.
Secondary (Class X)
6.
Intermediate (Class XII)
7.
Graduate and above
Total

No. of Person
18
19
42
92
78
25
1
275

%
6.55
6.91
15.27
33.45
28.36
9.09
0.36
100.00

Source: Census & Socio-economic survey, June 2010


33.

The proportion of the working population among the APs is 62 %. The unemployed retired
population accounts for about 11 %. About 27 % surveyed working population are daily
wage labor, nearly 3 % population is employed in private service, another 57 % engaged
in trade and business. The occupational pursuit of the affected economically active
population shows a major dependence on the secondary sector of the employment source.

Table 1-7: Occupation Structure (Age more than 18 yrs.)


S. No
Occupation
1.
Government Service
2.
Private Service
3.
Cultivation + Allied Agriculture
4.
Professional
5.
Trade & Business
6.
Daily Labour
7.
Retired / Unemployed
Total

No. of Person
0
6
3
0
112
54
22
197

%
0.00
3.05
1.52
0.00
56.85
27.41
11.17
100

Source: Census & Socio-economic survey, June 2010


34.

It is evident from the data on annual household income of 57 APs, that there are no APs
belong to Below Poverty Line (Table 1-8). The proportion of household with annual
income between Rs. 90,000 and above is the highest, about 41 %. While nearly 25 % of
the APs earn an income varying from Rs. 50,000 to Rs. 70,000. There are 12 (21%), APs
have an annual income varying from Rs. 50,000 to Rs. 70,000 respectively. The average
annual household income of the affected families has been calculated as Rs. 182,696.

Table 1-8: Annual Income Pattern of Affected Households


S. No
Total Household Income (per annum)
1.
2.
3.
4.

Below Rs. 50,000


Rs. 50,000 - 70,000
Rs. 70,000 90,000
Rs. 90,000 and above
Total

Affected Household
No.
% to total
8
14.04
14
24.56
12
21.05
23
40.35
57
100.00

Source: Census & Socio-economic survey, June 2010

35.

It can be seen from household asset holding pattern (Table 1-9) that all the APs are having
mobile phone. Twleve AP is having a motor cycle/scooter and 19 APs are having bi-cycle.

Table 1-9: Household Asset Holding pattern


S. No
Type of Assets
1.
Durable Assets
A.
Gold and Silver Jewelery
B.
Motor Cycle/ Scooter
C.
Mobile Phone
D.
Others (Cycle)

No. of Units
52
56
12
57
19

Source: Census & Socio-economic Survey, June 2010

E.

Impact on Community Resources

36.

Some of the infrastructures built to facilitate the basic needs of the communities in these
areas are affected by the project. The common property resources are listed below in
Table 1-10. There are five common property resources located within the ROW. These
common property resources need relocation by the project authority before the civil work
construction begun.

Table 1-10: Impact on Community Structure


Community Properties
Police Station
Public Toilet
Bus Shelter
Total

Numbers
01
02
02
05

Source: Census & Socio-economic Survey, June 2010

F.

Gender Impacts and Mitigation Measures

37.

The proposed fly over under this sub project is expected to open up new economic
opportunities for women to upgrade their skills and also better accessibility to educational
and health facilities. The improved road was perceived to help reduce travel time, as an
immediate benefit. Women as a segregated class are not involved in any economic
activity, which demands attention for their special needs. To ensure that women are secure
in receiving payments all benefits will be provided in joint account where the woman will
be the first beneficiary accounts. Where ever title is provided, it should be provided with
joint title with women as the first beneficiary.

G.

Information Disclosure, and Consultation

38.

The detailed design was primarily aimed at providing a congenial environment for
implementation with less negative impact on land and people accordingly public
consultations were carried out in all critical locations to evolve a consensus. The social
team carried out preliminary consultations, through Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and
meetings with the APs as well as the general public. FGDs were conducted primarily in
the area with problems of traffic congestion, informal squatter settlements, road junctions
,major junctions, cycle traffic, common property resources like bus shelter, cycle traffic,
accident hotspots and effect on seasonal traffic, weekly market places, seasonal whole sale
market etc. FGDs were also conducted with the APs wherein policy related issues, i.e.,
displacements and other issues like compensation and assistance, input to alternative
design were discussed.

39.

Suggestions and comments by APs were kept for detailed investigation in order to
incorporate in technical design the endeavour was to evolve technical design feasibility
endorsing the view of people first. Public discussions were conducted in important
strategic points, where people could assemble in large numbers.

40.

The basic objectives of public consultation at project planning stage are as follows:

To familiarise the local people regarding the development of the road; and
To provide to the design team the micro social issues concerning corridor
management (road safety , local traffic movement, intersection improvement,
provision of via duct, provision of underpass, provision of junction improvement
,provision of service road , provision of parking place ) etc.

41.

The other concern of public consultations and focus group discussions are listed as below:
Familiarise the R & R policy of ADB and Government of India;
Likely impact of proposed road development for future socio -economic
development;
Likely impact of proposed road development for regional connectivity and regional
development perspective;

42.

As part of the preparation for the project, state level workshop was conducted with
participation from key stakeholders, line agencies/institutions, government officials, and
others. The purpose of the stakeholder workshop was to present and discuss the different
aspects of project and approach to social impacts and resettlement.

43.

The main objectives of the local level consultation at the field level program were to
minimise negative impact in the project corridors and to make people aware of the road
rehabilitation project. During the process efforts were made to ascertain the views and
preferences of the people. The aims of community consultation were:

10

To understand views of the people affected w.r.t to the impacts of the road; and
To resolve the issues relating to affect on community property

44.

A summary report on Stakeholder consultation is annexed (Appendix 3).

45.

The short RP will be translated in Hindi l