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Pirate's Code

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Pirates of the Caribbean Online is now closed.


This page will now serve as an archive for the content that was in
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''First, your return to shore was not part of our negotiations nor our agreement,
so I must do nothing. And secondly, you must be a pirate for the Pirate's Code to
apply, and you're not. And thirdly, the Code is more what you'd call guidelines
than actual rules.

Captain Hector Barbossa


The Pirate's Code is a long list of rules on how a pirate should behave. This code was set down in the Pirata
Codex by the Brethren Court, authored by Morgan andBartholomew to promote limited cooperation
among pirates and to protect pirates in general. Although in real pirate times, the code was a series of articles.
Many pirates that sailed the seven seas each had their own set of rules and "guidelines" mainly called Articles
or Rules of the Sea.
The code is based on agreements made by historical pirates and their crews for the running of their business.
These guidelines were to ensure order and mutual benefit.
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Crew

The Pirate Code

Rule 1: Befriend others Wisely!

All adherents of the Code pledge to be bound together as a brotherhood of pirates, sharing alike in
one's fortunes and troubles. Every member shall have an equal vote in the affairs of the moment and
equal share of the provisions. Every pirate shall obey the Code. Anyone who fails shall be marooned on
a desert island, and left ashore with a loaf of bread or hardtack, a bottle of water, and a pistol with one
load.

The captain of a ship is to be elected by a majority vote of its crew. If any time a crew, with sufficient
evidence, finds their captain to be lacking in ability or offensive in nature, a new captain may be freely
elected amongst the ship's members. The captain shall be made aware of the situation and will
graciously step aside, assuming another position on the crew. Failure to follow this procedure will be
deemed mutiny.

Any pirate who has suffered an injury from pillaging, plundering, hijacking, swashbuckling, or other
pirate duties shall receive compensation for the wound from common stock.
Compensation shall be as follows, in pieces of eight:

Loss of right arm: 800

Loss of left arm: 750

Loss of right leg: 500

Loss of left leg: 400

Fight wound: 100

Loss of eye: 200 (Although Ragetti got 300)

Loss of ear: 30 Ducats

Loss of finger: 100

Trigger finger: 200

Pinky finger: Life be cruel, mate

Head: A dead man not be needin' his money.

In the event of the loss of a limb, the surgeon or carpenter may be able to restore lost appendages with what is
best suited. Spare planks or other miscellaneous items found onboard may be rigged as a makeshift prosthetic.
If injury is dehabilitating to the point of preventing a pirate from performing his duties as an able-bodied
seaman, the quartermaster will provide a new assignment. Replacement limbs lost on duty should be
compensated at no less than half-cost of natural limbs.

Every member shall have an equal share of fresh provisions, however they may be acquired, and may
take pleasure in such provisions at will, except in times of scarcity. Until said scarcity is voted over, it is
necessary for the common good of the crew to adhere to rations. Anyone who takes more than his equal
share of provisions at any time shall be marooned. Any Pirate susceptible of eating any foodstuff
rendered pernicious shall see the ship surgeon post haste.

Each man shall keep his weapon, whether it be a cutlass, sword, pistol, or other piece, clean at all
times and ready for action.

If a pirate is the first to locate a prize and should find among this plunder a weapon that is better than
his own, he may take it as his own. The rest of the items will be chosen in turn with the captain first,
master second, and so forth in seniority. Ship's musicians may lay claim to any instruments found
among the spoils.

No pirate shall strike another while onboard the ship. In the event of such an occurrence, the quarrel
shall be resolved on the shore by a pistol, sword, or in another agreed upon manner as deemed by the
captain. Limbs or other body parts lost in duel are not to be compensated as those lost in battle.

No man shall game for money in any form, whether it be with cards, dice, crab claws, barnacles, or
any other means. (Loophole - Note that in Davy Jones' crew, they were gambling with years of service
and not money, therefore this seems acceptable)

Lights and candles must be suffed out of eight o'clock. If any man desires to drink after such time, he
shall do so on the open deck without lights.

No man shall smoke tobacco in the hold without cap to his pipe or hold a candle without lantern
shield. If he is discovered doing so, he shall receive such punishment as the captain and company see
fit.

All musicians shall have their only day of rest on the Sabbath. Any other day, musical pirates shall be
granted leisure time only by favour of the captain or quartermaster.

Every member of the crew shall be allowed a shift of clothes. These may be obtained by plundering,
stealing, or borrowing.

If a pirate is captured by an enemy ship, he has the right to declare parlay, or temporary protection,
until he may have an audience with the enemy captain. At this point, he cannot be harmed. Parlay is not
considered concluded until said captives and captains have completed negotiations.

The captain shall have two shares of a prize. The quartermaster shall have one-and-three-quarter
shares. The surgeon shall have one-and-one-half shares. The master gunner, carpenter, sailmaker, and
boatswain shall receive one-and-one-quarter shares. All others shall have one share each. The company
may vote to temporarily withhold the cook's share should his food kill a shipmate.

If any Man shall steal anything in the the value of a piece of eight, he shall be marooned or shot.

Good quarters to be given when craved.

He who falls behind shall be left behind.

Take what you can, give nothing back.

Pirate Lord Codes

To become a pirate lord, one must be captain of a ship, must swear by the Code, and must have killed
a man.

A pirate lord shall hand down his piece of eight to his successor, who shall take his place as lord of
one of the nine seas.

The Brethren Court may not declare war upon an enemy without the election of the pirate king.

The pirate king is elected by popular vote among the pirate lords.

The pirate king is to serve as chief and fleet captain during war. They will command our combined
forces, make parlay, or make peace.

Against the Code Warning

In Pirates Online, one primary rule from the code is: NO GUNS when fighting other humans, be they Royal
Navy, EITC or other pirates. During the game, if a pirate tries to aim a firearm
(pistol, blunderbuss, musket orbayonet) at a human enemy (Royal Navy or EITC), a warning message will
appear and the weapon will not function.
Encountering any human enemy, the pirate must opt for another weapon.
This does NOT apply to other pirates in PvP or during the Curse, since the pirate will be techincally undead at
the time.
On Raven's Cove, the code does not apply to the ghosts, so feel free to use firearms against them.

No fighting on board ship.


No gambling with cards and dice on board ship.
No women on board ship.
All weapons and pirates to be ready for battle at all time.
Every pirate gets equal amounts of food and drink.
Every pirate gets equal amounts of all loot captured,

except for the Captain and the Quartermaster who get


twice as much, or any pirate who loses an arm or leg in a
fight, he gets an extra half.
Every pirate gets to vote on where the ship goes and what
the crew does.
Every pirate does what the Captain or Quartermaster
says.
Aha, this be the Code of Conduct for The Pirate Ship, it
maybe different on another ship, me Hearty.

Pirate Code of Honor


author unknown

ARTICLE 1: Every man shall obey civil command; the captain shall have one full share and a
half in all prizes. the Master, Carpenter, Boatswain, and Gunner shall have one share and
quarter.

ARTICLE 2: If any man shall offer to run away, or keep any secret from the Company, he
shall be marroon'd with one bottle of powder, one bottle of Water, one small Arm, and shot.
ARTICLE 3: If any Man shall steal any Thing in the Company, or game, to the value of a
piece of Eight, he shall be Marroon'd or shot.
ARTICLE 4: If at any Time we should meet at another Marrooner (that is, Pyrate) that man
shall sign his Articles without Consent of our Company, shall suffer such Punishment as the
Captain and Company shall think fit.
ARTICLE 5: That a man that shall strike another, whilst these Articles are in force, shall
receive Moses's Law (that is 40 Stripes lacking one) on the bare Back.
ARTICLE 6: That Man that shall snap his Arms, or smoak Tobacco in the Hold, without cap to
his Pipe, or carry a candle lighted without lanthorn, shall suffer the same Punishment as in the
former Article.
ARTICLE 7: That Man that shall not keep his Arms clean, fit for an Engagement, or neglect
his Business, shall be cut off from his Share, and suffer such other Punishment as the Captain
and Company shall think fit.
ARTICLE 8: If any man shall lose a joint in time of Engagement, shall have 400 Pieces of
Eight: if a limb, 800.
ARTICLE 9: If at any time you meet with a prudent Woman, that Man that offers to meddle
with her, without her Consent, shall suffer Death.

Popular Punishments
author unknown
MAN OVERBOARD

This form of punishment is fairly self-explanatory. The accused is simply tossed

off of the moving ship and left for dead. A common variation to this theme is for
the accused to be towed by a rope behind the ship until he dies from hypothermia
and exhaustion.
MAROONING
This punishment usually consisted of leaving the accused stranded on a small,
deserted island or a tiny raft to die. Many times the accused was left with a small
pistol in order to kill himself before he was eaten by sharks or perished from
sunstroke or starvation. (Suicide was considered a more honorable death to the
pirates.) Marooning was the popular choice of punishment for deserters.
CAT O' NINE TAILS
This flogging technique is frequently referred to as Moses's Law (40 stripes lacking
one). The name comes from the number of lashes that Jesus receives from Herod
in the Bible. The quartermaster is the only individual who administered floggings
with the cat o' nine tails, and it was frequently used as punishment for striking other
crewmembers, or other less heinous crimes. This was one of the few punishments
that did not lead to death, though it was quite barbaric. The cat o' nine tails was
usually an unwound rope whip of nine strands, the ends of which varied. Sometimes
the ends were tarred nots, and sometimes fish hooks or musketballs
were placed on the end to inflict more pain on the accused. After the beating, the raw
skin was sometimes covered with salt and vinegar for further punishment.
DUNKING
This punishment entailed being endlessly dunked in the ocean and alternately
suspended above the ocean for hours. It wasn't as popular as the other punishments.

The Pirate's Realm

The pirate code grew out of the experience of most pirates in previous naval or merchant
service under harsh conditions and even harsher men as commanders, which left an
indelible impression and desire to create a more secure and equitable environment
aboard ship....

Pirate Code of Conduct


In the second half of the 17th century, buccaneers began operating under
a set of rules called the Chasse-Partie, or Charter Party, which for a
season even held legal weight in the Jamaican court system. This pirate
code of conduct later grew into the Articles of Agreement (pirate's code),
which basically explained the standard operating procedures for all
pirates involved. To "go on the account" usually meant that a person
signed the articles and was declaring their membership with a group of
pirates.
Music to 'swear' by (Win Media- 21Kb)
"We'll Rant and We'll Roar" sequenced by Barry Taylor of contemplator.com (more info)

Elements of the Code of Pirates:

- who was voted CAPTAIN, if the ship's owner was not among them to be in charge...
- which AREA to sail in search of fortune...
- the TERMS and conditions of service clearly stated...
-

the DIVISION of plunder among crew members...


A pirate captain and possibly the quartermaster (whose powers equaled or surpassed
those of the captain) might receive as much as two (sometimes up to five!) shares of the
loot taken, while the master gunner, boatswain, and carpenter might receive 1
and3/4 shares. All others would receive 1 share or less.
- INTOLERABLE behaviors, such as fighting, gambling, open flame

- PUNISHMENT or disciplines for broken rules


- COMPENSATION for disabling injuries such as loss of eye, hand, arm, or leg (losses of
right hand or arm were compensated with more as more pirates were right-handed)

Each pirate would sign or make his mark and then swear an oath of
honor while his hand was on either a Bible, crossed pistols or a human
skull, or while sitting on a cannon.

Punishments for Breaking the Pirate CodePunishments for breaking the pirate's code were always swift and rarely
without exception, an attitude carried over from their previous time
aboard a sailing vessel.The quartermaster would deliver the punishment
determined by the captain or vote of the crew, which might be legs in
irons, flogging, or keel hauling. More serious crimes were answered with
marooning or death....
These were the articles used by Captain John Phillips' ship 'Revenge':

Article One
Every man shall obey civil command; the captain shall have on full share and a half in
all prizes. the Master, Carpenter, Boatswain, and Gunner shall have one share and
quarter.
Article Two
If any man shall offer to run away, or keep any secret from the Company, he shall be
marroon'd with one bottle of powder, one bottle of Water, one small Arm, and shot.

Article Three
If any Man shall steal any Thing in the Company, or game, to the value of a piece of
Eight, he shall be Marroon'd or shot.
Article Four
If at any Time we should meet at another Marooner (that is, Pyrate) that man shall sign
his Articles without Consent of our Company, shall suffer such Punishment as the
Captain and Company shall think fit.
Article Five
That man that shall strike another, whilst these Articles are in force, shall receive
Moses's Law (that is 40 Stripes lacking one) on the bare Back.
Article Six
That Man that shall snap his Arms, or smoak Tobacco in the Hold, without cap to his
Pipe, or carry a candle lighted without lanthorn, shall suffer the same Punishment as in
the former Article.
Article Seven
That Man that shall not keep his Arms clean, fit for an Engagement, or neglect his
Business, shall be cut off from his Share, and suffer such other Punishment as the
Captain and Company shall think fit.
Article Eight
If any man shall lose a joint in time of Engagement, shall have 400 Pieces of Eight: if a
limb, 800.
Article Nine
If at any time you meet with a prudent Woman, that Man that offers to meddle with her,
without her Consent, shall suffer Death.
Summary for the Pirate Code of Conduct-

In the years before the founding of democratic nations, pirates were


groups of violent men in rebellion against the restraints of harsh rule and
society. The pirate code helped them to live under their unique social
contracts. Although the goal was still to have the quickest route to riches
and leisure as the tyrants they fled from, the pirate code elements such
as: equality, rules and decisions by group vote, just punishments, and
division of power, contributed to the framework upon which
democracies would later be built.... Ain't that a pretty punch!

The Pirate Code of Conduct consisted of a number of agreements between the Captain and pirate crew which we
Conduct was necessary as pirates were not governed by any other rules such as Naval regulations. Pirate captains
position for abuse of their authority. The captain enjoyed few privileges:

"The Captain or any other Officer is allowed no more [food] than another man
the Captain cannot keep his Cabbin to himself."

The Pirate Code of Conduct


An example of the Pirate Code of Conduct dealt with the following subjects:

Pirate Code of Conduct 1 - Equal Voting Rights

Pirate Code of Conduct 2 - Fair share of the loot and pirates punishments for those who
cheated

Pirate Code of Conduct 3 - Gambling was banned

Pirate Code of Conduct 4 - No lights at night - a pirates sleep should not be disturbed

Pirate Code of Conduct 5 - Each pirate was responsible for the upkeep of their weapons

Pirate Code of Conduct 6 - No Boys or women allowed on board

Pirate Code of Conduct 7 - Penalty for Desertion

Pirate Code of Conduct 8 - No fighting between pirates on board the ship

Pirate Code of Conduct 9 - A Pension according to the severity of wounds

Pirate Code of Conduct 10 - Shares of the loot or booty

Pirate Code of Conduct 11 - Musicians available to play when required.

These Pirate codes of conduct ensured a well-run and harmonious ship.

The Pirate Code of Conduct - Bartholomew Roberts Shipboard Articles 1721

A specific Pirate Code of Conduct was agreed by Bartholomew Roberts' in the Shipboard Articles of 1721.
Bartholomew Roberts, also known as "Black Bart" or "Black Barty", was one of the most successful pirates, The
by Bartholomew Roberts and his Pirate Crew - an important element of the success of this particular Pirate

Pirate Code of Conduct Bartholomew Roberts Shipboard Articles 1721

ARTICLE I - Every man shall have an equal vote in affairs of moment. He shall have an equal title to the
any time seized, and shall use them at pleasure unless a scarcity may make it necessary for the common g

ARTICLE II - Every man shall be called fairly in turn by the list on board of prizes,
because over and above their proper share, they are allowed a shift of clothes. But if they defraud the com
plate, jewels or money, they shall be marooned. If any man rob another he shall have his nose and ears sl
sure to encounter hardships.

ARTICLE III - None shall game for money either with dice or cards.

ARTICLE IV - The lights and candles should be put out at eight at night, and if any of the
crew desire to drink after that hour they shall sit upon the open deck without lights.

ARTICLE V - Each man shall keep his piece, cutlass and pistols at all times clean and
ready for action.

ARTICLE VI - No boy or woman to be allowed amongst them. If any man shall be found
seducing any of the latter sex and carrying her to sea in disguise he shall suffer death.

ARTICLE VII - He that shall desert the ship or his quarters in time of battle shall be
punished by death or marooning.

ARTICLE VIII - None shall strike another on board the ship, but every man's quarrel
shall be ended on shore by sword or pistol in this manner. At the word of command from
the quartermaster, each man being previously placed back to back, shall turn and fire
immediately. If any man do not, the quartermaster shall knock the piece out of his hand.
If both miss their aim they shall take to their cutlasses, and he that draweth first blood

shall be declared the victor.

ARTICLE IX - No man shall talk of breaking up their way of living till each has a share of l,000. Every m
limb in the service shall have 800 pieces of eight from the common stock and for lesser hurts proportiona

ARTICLE X - The captain and the quartermaster shall each receive two shares of a prize, the master gunn
shares, all other officers one and one quarter, and private gentlemen of fortune one share each.

Interesting Facts and Information about the Pirate Code of Conduct


Some interesting facts and information about the Pirate Code of Conduct

Pirate Code of Conduct

Additional details, facts and information about Famous Pirate can be accessed via the Elizabethan Era Sitemap o
Famous Elizabethan Pirates
Famous Pirates
Famous Women Pirates
Famous Pirate Ships
Pirate Flags
The Pirate Song
Pirate Clothing
Blackbeard
Anne Bonney
Mary Read

THE PIRATE CODEX


Pirates are free

Pirates are freedom-loving, independent, autonomous, and disapprove of blind


obedience. They stand for informational self-determination and freedom of opinion.
Pirates bear the responsibility entailed by freedom.
Pirates respect privacy

Pirates protect privacy. They fight against the increasing surveillance mania of state
and economy because it prohibits the free development of the individual. A free and
democratic society is impossible without private and unobserved free space.
Pirates are critical

Pirates are creative, curious, and do not acquiesce in the status quo. They challenge
systems, search for weak spots and find ways to correct them. Pirates learn from their
mistakes.
Pirates are fair-minded

They keep their word. Solidarity is important when it comes to collective aims. Pirates
counteract the blind-eye-mentality of society and take action when moral courage is
necessary.
Pirates respect life

Pirates are peaceful. Therefore they reject the death penalty and the destruction of our
environment. Pirates stand for the sustainability of nature and its resources. We do not
accept patents on life.
Pirates are eager for knowledge

The access to information, education, knowledge and scientific findings has to be


unlimited. Pirates support free culture and free software.
Pirates are social

Pirates respect human dignity. They commit themselves to a society united in


solidarity where the strong defend the weak. Pirates stand for a political culture of
objectivity and fairness.
Pirates are international

Pirates are part of a global movement. They take advantage of the opportunities
offered by the internet and are therefore enabled to think and act without borders.

Even scallywags had their standards. Ranking among historys most successful pirates
isBartholomew Black Bart Roberts (1682-1722), a Welsh plunderer who worked with
one of his many crews to draft the following bylaws in 1722. Some might seem
remarkably progressive to modern readers, while others definitely wont. If youd been
onboard Roberts vessel (the Royal Fortune), would you agree to them anyway?

1. ROCK THE VOTE


Every man shall have an equal vote in affairs of moment. He shall have an
equal title to the fresh provisions or strong liquors at any time seized, and shall
use them at pleasure unless a scarcity makes it necessary for the common good
that a retrenchment may be voted.

2. BE SMART: DONT STEAL FROM PIRATES


Every man shall be called fairly in turn by the list on board of prizes, because
over and above their proper share, they are allowed a shift of clothes. But if
they defraud the company to the value of even one dollar in plate, jewels, or
money, they shall be marooned. If any man rob another, he shall have his nose
and ears slit, and be put ashore where he shall be sure to encounter hardships.

3. GAMBLINGS FOR LANDLUBBERS


None shall game for money, either with dice or cards.

4. MIND THE CURFEW

The lights and candles shall be put out at eight at night, and if any of the crew
desire to drink after that hour they shall sit upon the open deck without lights.

5. KEEP BATTLE-READY
Each man shall keep his piece, cutlass and pistols, at all times clean and ready
for action.

6. NEVER BRING YOUR DATE HOME


No boy or woman [shall] be allowed amongst them. If any man shall be found
seducing one of the latter sex and carrying her to sea in disguise, he shall suffer
death.

7. STAND BY YOUR HEARTIES


He that shall desert the ship or his quarters in the time of battle shall be
punished by death or marooning.

8. SETTLE DISPUTES ONSHORE (WITH PISTOLS & CUTLASSES, OF


COURSE)
None shall strike another on board the ship, but every man's quarrel shall be
ended onshore by sword or pistol in this manner: at the word of command from
the Quartermaster, each man being previously placed back to back, shall turn
and fire immediately. If any man do not, the Quartermaster shall knock the
piece out of his hand. If both miss their aim, they shall take to their cutlasses,
and he that draws first blood shall be declared the victor.

9. LOSE A LIMB, GET WORKERS COMP


Every man who shall become a cripple or lose a limb in the service shall have
eight hundred pieces of eight from the common stock, and for lesser hurts
proportionately.
NOTE: Pieces of eight werent just for pirates. These Spanish coins once enjoyed
widespread international use & were even accepted as legal tender in the U.S. until 1857.

10. REMEMBER: RANK HAS ITS PRIVILEGES


The Captain and the Quartermaster shall each receive two shares of a prize,
the Master Gunner and Boatswain, one and one half shares, all other officers
one and one quarter, and private gentlemen of fortune one share each.

11. GIVE THE BAND A BREAK


The musicians shall have rest on the Sabbath Day only, by right, on all other
days, by favor only.

Pirate code
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Treasure being divided among pirates in an illustration by Howard Pyle.

A pirate code, pirate articles or articles of agreement were a code of conduct for
governing pirates. A group of sailors, on turning pirate, would draw up their own code or articles,
which provided rules for discipline, division of stolen goods, and compensation for injured pirates.
Contents
[hide]

1Applications

2Example codes
o

2.1Captain John Phillips's articles

2.2Articles of Edward Low and George Lowther

2.3Articles of John Gow

2.4Articles of Henry Morgan and other buccaneers

3See also

4References

Applications[edit]
Buccaneers began operating under a set of rules variously called the Chasse-Partie, Charter Party,
Custom of the Coast, or Jamaica Discipline. These eventually became known as Articles of
Agreement, or the pirate's code. Pirate articles varied from one captain to another, and sometimes
even from one voyage to another, but they were generally alike in including provisions for discipline,
specifications for each crewmate's share of treasure, and compensation for the injured.
Each crew member was asked to sign or make his mark on the articles, then swear an oath of
allegiance or honor. The oath was sometimes taken on a Bible, but John Phillips' men, lacking a
Bible, swore on an axe.[1] Legend suggests that other pirates swore on crossed pistols, swords, or on
a human skull, or astride a cannon. This act formally inducted the signer into the pirate crew,
generally entitling him to vote for officers and on other "affairs of moment", to bear arms, and to his
share of the plunder. The articles having been signed, they were then posted in a prominent place,
often the door of the grand cabin.[2]
After a piratical cruise began, new recruits from captured ships would sometimes sign the articles, in
some cases voluntarily, in other cases under threat of torture or death. Valuable sea artisans, such
as carpenters and navigators, were especially likely to be forced to sign articles under duress, and
would rarely be released regardless of their decision to sign or not. In some cases, even willing
recruits would ask the pirates to pretend to force them to sign, so that they could plead they were
forced should they ever be captured by the law.[3] Generally, men who had not signed the articles had
a much better chance of acquittal at trial if captured by the law.
Pirate articles are closely related to, and in some cases derived from, privateering articles, which
similarly provided for discipline and regulated distribution of booty (though usually far less equally
than with pirate articles).[4] By the 19th century, ordinary merchant ships also had articles
specifying wages and rules, which crewmen had to sign upon shipping aboard. Merchant articles
and privateering articles can be traced back to Europe in the Middle Ages when there was a system
of "joint hands" agreements between merchants, owners and seamen to share profits. [5]

Example codes[edit]
Four complete or nearly complete sets of piratical articles have survived, chiefly from Charles
Johnson's A General History of the Pyrates, first published in 1724. A partial code from Henry
Morgan is preserved in Alexandre Exquemelin's 1678 book The Buccaneers of America. Many other
pirates are known to have had articles. Few pirate articles have survived, because pirates on the
verge of capture or surrender usually burned their articles or threw them overboard, to prevent the
papers being used against them at trial.[6]

I. Every man has a vote in affairs of moment; has equal title to the fresh provisions, or strong liquors,
at any time seized, and may use them at pleasure, unless a scarcity (not an uncommon thing among
them) makes it necessary, for the good of all, to vote a retrenchment.
II. Every man to be called fairly in turn, by list, on board of prizes because, (over and above their
proper share) they were on these occasions allowed a shift of clothes: but if they defrauded the
company to the value of a dollar in plate, jewels, or money, marooning was their punishment. If the
robbery was only betwixt one another, they contented themselves with slitting the ears and nose of
him that was guilty, and set him on shore, not in an uninhabited place, but somewhere, where he
was sure to encounter hardships.
III. No person to game at cards or dice for money.
IV. The lights and candles to be put out at eight o'clock at night: if any of the crew, after that hour still
remained inclined for drinking, they were to do it on the open deck.
V. To keep their piece, pistols, and cutlass clean and fit for service.
VI. No boy or woman to be allowed amongst them. If any man were to be found seducing any of the
latter sex, and carried her to sea, disguised, he was to suffer death; (so that when any fell into their
hands, as it chanced in the Onslow, they put a sentinel immediately over her to prevent ill
consequences from so dangerous an instrument of division and quarrel; but then here lies the
roguery; they contend who shall be sentinel, which happens generally to one of the greatest bullies,
who, to secure the lady's virtue, will let none lie with her but himself.)
VII. To desert the ship or their quarters in battle, was punished with death or marooning.
VIII. No striking one another on board, but every man's quarrels to be ended on shore, at sword and
pistol. (The quarter-master of the ship, when the parties will not come to any reconciliation,
accompanies them on shore with what assistance he thinks proper, and turns the disputant back to
back, at so many paces distance; at the word of command, they turn and fire immediately, (or else
the piece is knocked out of their hands). If both miss, they come to their cutlasses, and then he is
declared the victor who draws the first blood.)
IX. No man to talk of breaking up their way of living, till each had shared one thousand pounds. If in
order to this, any man should lose a limb, or become a cripple in their service, he was to have eight
hundred dollars, out of the public stock, and for lesser hurts, proportionately.
X. The Captain and Quartermaster to receive two shares of a prize: the master, boatswain,
and gunner, one share and a half, and other officers one and quarter.
XI. The musicians to have rest on the Sabbath Day, but the other six days and nights, none without
special favour.

Captain John Phillips's articles[edit]


Captain John Phillips, captain of the Revenge, also set a code for his men in 1724:
I. Every Man Shall obey civil Command; the Captain shall have one full Share and a half of all
Prizes; the Master, Carpenter, Boatswain and Gunner shall have one Share and quarter.
II. If any Man shall offer to run away, or keep any Secret from the Company, he shall
be marooned with one Bottle of Powder, one Bottle of Water, one small Arm, and Shot.
III. If any Man shall steal any Thing in the Company, or game, to the Value of a Piece of Eight, he
shall be marooned or shot.
IV. If any time we shall meet another Marooner that Man shall sign his Articles without the Consent of
our Company, shall suffer such Punishment as the Captain and Company shall think fit.

V. That Man that shall strike another whilst these Articles are in force, shall receive Moses Law (that
is, 40 Stripes lacking one) on the bare Back.
VI. That Man that shall snap his Arms, or smoke Tobacco in the Hold, without a Cap to his Pipe, or
carry a Candle lighted without a Lanthorn, shall suffer the same Punishment as in the former Article.
VII. That Man shall not keep his Arms clean, fit for an Engagement, or neglect his Business, shall be
cut off from his Share, and suffer such other Punishment as the Captain and the Company shall
think fit.
VIII. If any Man shall lose a Joint in time of an Engagement, shall have 400 Pieces of Eight ; if a
Limb, 800.
IX. If at any time you meet with a prudent Woman, that Man that offers to meddle with her, without
her Consent, shall suffer present Death.

Articles of Edward Low and George Lowther[edit]


The articles listed below are attributed by the Boston News-Letter to Captain Edward Low. The first
eight of these articles are essentially identical to those attributed to pirate captain George Lowther by
Charles Johnson. Since Lowther and Low are known to have sailed together from about New
Year's to May 28, 1722, it is probable that both reports are correct and that Low and Lowther shared
the same articles, with Low's two extra articles being an ordinance, or amendment, adopted after the
two crews separated.
I. The Captain is to have two full Shares; the Quartermaster is to have one Share and one Half; The
Doctor, Mate, Gunner and Boatswain, one Share and one Quarter.
II. He that shall be found guilty of taking up any Unlawful Weapon on Board the Privateer or any
other prize by us taken, so as to Strike or Abuse one another in any regard, shall suffer what
Punishment the Captain and the Majority of the Company shall see fit.
III. He that shall be found Guilty of Cowardice in the time of engagements, shall suffer what
Punishment the Captain and the Majority of the Company shall think fit.
IV. If any Gold, Jewels, Silver, &c. be found on Board of any Prize or Prizes to the value of a Piece of
Eight, & the finder do not deliver it to the Quarter Master in the space of 24 hours he shall suffer
what Punishment the Captain and the Majority of the Company shall think fit.
V. He that is found Guilty of Gaming, or Defrauding one another to the value of a Royal of Plate,
shall suffer what Punishment the Captain and the Majority of the Company shall think fit.
VI. He that shall have the Misfortune to lose a Limb in time of Engagement, shall have the Sum of
Six hundred pieces of Eight, and remain aboard as long as he shall think fit.
VII. Good Quarters to be given when Craved.
VIII. He that sees a Sail first, shall have the best Pistol or Small Arm aboard of her.
IX. He that shall be guilty of Drunkenness in time of Engagement shall suffer what Punishment the
Captain and Majority of the Company shall think fit.
X. No snapping of Guns in the Hold.

Articles of John Gow[edit]


A set of articles written in John Gow's own hand was found aboard his ship, the Revenge (exGeorge), in 1729.[7] Article IV's reference to no going ashore "till the ship is off the ground" suggests
that the Revenge was already grounded when the articles were written, only days before Gow and
his men were captured. The code states as follows:

I. That every man shall obey his commander in all respects, as if the ship was his own, and as if he
received monthly wages.
II. That no man shall give, or dispose of, the ship's provisions; but every one shall have an equal
share.
III. That no man shall open, or declare to any person or persons, who they are, or what designs they
are upon; and any persons so offending shall be punished with immediate death.
IV. That no man shall go on shore till the ship is off the ground, and in readiness to put to sea.
V. That every man shall keep his watch night and day; and at the hour of eight in the evening every
one shall retire from gaming and drinking, in order to attend his respective station.
VI. Every person who shall offend against any of these articles shall be punished with death, or in
such other manner as the ship's company shall think proper.

Articles of Henry Morgan and other buccaneers[edit]


Exquemelin writes in general terms about the articles of late 17th century Caribbean buccaneers.
Although he does not attribute these articles to any specific buccaneer captain, Exquemelin almost
certainly sailed with Henry Morgan as a physician, and thus his account likely reflects Morgan's
articles more accurately than any other privateer or buccaneer of the time.
Exquemelin writes that the buccaneers "agree on certain articles, which are put in writing, by way of
bond or obligation, which every one is bound to observe, and all of them, or the chief, set their hands
to it." Although Exquemelin does not number the articles, the following approximately reflects his
description of the buccaneers' laws:
I. The fund of all payments under the articles is the stock of what is gotten by the expedition,
following the same law as other pirates, that is, No prey, no pay.
II. Compensation is provided the Captain for the use of his ship, and the salary of the carpenter, or
shipwright, who mended, careened, and rigged the vessel (the latter usually about 150 pieces of
eight). A sum for provisions and victuals is specified, usually 200 pieces of eight. A salary and
compensation is specified for the surgeon and his medicine chest, usually 250 pieces of eight.
III. A standard compensation is provided for maimed and mutilated buccaneers. "Thus they order for
the loss of a right arm six hundred pieces of eight, or six slaves ; for the loss of a left arm five
hundred pieces of eight, or five slaves ; for a right leg five hundred pieces of eight, or five slaves ; for
the left leg four hundred pieces of eight, or four slaves ; for an eye one hundred pieces of eight, or
one slave ; for a finger of the hand the same reward as for the eye.
IV. Shares of booty are provided as follows: "the Captain, or chief Commander, is allotted five or six
portions to what the ordinary seamen have ; the Master's Mate only two ; and Officers proportionate
to their employment. After whom they draw equal parts from the highest even to the lowest mariner,
the boys not being omitted. For even these draw half a share, by reason that, when they happen to
take a better vessel than their own, it is the duty of the boys to set fire to the ship or boat wherein
they are, and then retire to the prize which they have taken."
V. "In the prizes they take, it is severely prohibited to every one to usurp anything, in particular to
themselves. ... Yea, they make a solemn oath to each other not to abscond, or conceal the least
thing they find amongst the prey. If afterwards any one is found unfaithful, who has contravened the
said oath, immediately he is separated and turned out of the society."

See also[edit]

Bartolomeu Portugus

Bartholomew Roberts

Blackbeard

Calico Jack

Stede Bonnet

Henry Morgan

Parley, part of the code according to the Pirates of the Caribbean (film series).

Piracy in the Caribbean

Pirates in popular culture

Distribution of justice

References[edit]

Really Bad Eggs: Pirates of the Caribbean

Pirate Articles of Capt. John Phillips 1724

Charles Johnson, A General History of the Robberies and Murders of the Most Notorious
Pyrates, London, 1724.

Benerson Little, The Sea Rover's Practice: Pirate Tactics and Techniques, 1630-1730.
Potomac Books, 2005.
1.

Jump up^ Charles Johnson (1724), A General History of the Pyrates, p. 398.

2.

Jump up^ Benerson Little (2005), The Sea Rover's Practice: Pirate Tactics and Techniques,
Potomac Books, Inc., ISBN 1-57488-910-9, p. 34.

3.

Jump up^ Douglas Botting, The Pirates, Time-Life Books Inc., p. 51. ("Sometimes seamen
who volunteered to join the pirates asked the quartermaster to go through the motions of forcing them
in the presence of their officers. The quartermaster was happy to oblige and do a blustery piratical turn
for them, with much waving of cutlasses and mouthing of oaths").

4.

Jump up^ See the Articles of the privateer ship Mars,


at http://pirates.hegewisch.net/articles_new.html#privateer

5.

Jump up^ Hayes, P. (2008), "Pirates, Privateers and the Contract Theories of Hobbes and
Locke", History of Political Thought 24, 3: 461-84.

6.

Jump up^ Fox, E.T. (Ed). "In the show 'Black Sails', the pirates have laws they quote every
now and then when there are disputes". redditt. Retrieved 18 March 2016.

7.

Jump up^ The Newgate Calendar - JOHN GOW Accessed 16 December 2009.